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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  April 7, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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three people have been killed and many others injured after a lorry drove into pedestrians in the swedish capital, stockholm. the lorry drove into shoppers outside a department store, sending people fleeing in panic. the lorry had been stolen earlier in the day. sweden's prime minister says the country has been attacked. the capital is in lockdown. there was blood everywhere, there were bodies on the ground everywhere, and the sense of panic, people standing by their loved ones, but also people running away. police have just released an image ofa police have just released an image of a suspect whom they think is connected to the attack. we'll have the latest developments and reaction from the swedish capital. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: the us launches a missile strike on the syrian government airbase believed to have mounted the chemical attack earlier this week. tonight i call on all civilised nations to join us in seeking
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to end the slaughter and bloodshed in syria. as syrian television shows the aftermath, moscow strongly condemns the action, vowing to strengthen assad's air defences. the romanian tourist injured in the westminster attacks two weeks ago has died — andrea christea fell into the thames during the incident. hello and welcome to bbc news. i'm jane hill. a lorry has driven into a crowd of pedestrians
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in the swedish capital, stockholm. police say at least three people have been killed and many others injured. the vehicle is reported to have rammed into a busy department store on drottninggatan, one of the city's major shopping streets. the swedish prime minister stefan lofven has said that the country has been attacked and everything indicates that it was police have released this image of a man they want to question in relation to the attack. suddenly this afternoon, panic on the streets of central stockholm. people running for their lives. around the corner, a lorry has smashed across a pedestrian area, into a department store, leaving at least three people dead. into a department store, leaving at least three people deadlj
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into a department store, leaving at least three people dead. i heard the noise, i heard the screams, i saw the people as i walked out immediately. just outside the store, there was a dead dog, its owner screaming. there was a lady laying with a 7k, there was blood on the ground, bodies on the ground everywhere, and the sense of panic, people standing by their loved ones, but also people running away, mainly to the minor streets around. the general sense of sheer panic. after the police and ambulances arrived at the police and ambulances arrived at the scene, it became clear, this was not an accident. translation: sweden has been attacked. everything indicates that this is a terrorist act. the government is doing everything to support the authorities, who are working now, and we urge the public to be alert and we urge the public to be alert and to listen, not least to the
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information from the police. the police have told people to stay away from the city centre will stop the metro has been closed down, and goverment offices shut. security has been stepped up in key locations here and in neighbouring norway. in the last few minutes, the police have released this picture of a man they are looking for in connection with the incident. with me is frank gardner, our security correspondent. so far, what does this look like tu? the fact that it was a pedestrian precinct, and this truck was driven deliberately into that, shows that this was not an accident. it does not mean it is definitely a terrorist attack. i know the prime minister is saying it has the indications are that, but it may be someone indications are that, but it may be someone who is mentally disturbed, who had a row with his wife that
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morning, who knows? everyonejumped to the conclusion that the westminster attack a few weeks ago was jihadists, westminster attack a few weeks ago wasjihadists, and westminster attack a few weeks ago was jihadists, and even westminster attack a few weeks ago wasjihadists, and even though isis claimed it, there is no evidence to link it. so we don't know what is behind this. it could be someone who has been fired from his job and was severely depressed, suicidally. sweden is in absolute shock right now. i just got sweden is in absolute shock right now. ijust got back from there yesterday, and i was on that street two days ago. sweden are totally unprepared for this. they have not had a terrorist attack in seven yea rs. had a terrorist attack in seven years. the last thing was in 2010, when a failed suicide bomber who himself up in the centre of stockholm. that shock people, but then they got back on with their normal lives. there is not the sense of security that there is in, say, whitehall. sweden, like germany, is very averse to surveillance. they are very much a liberal, open society, although the pendulum is
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starting to swing in the other direction. rightly or wrongly, perhaps a lot of us following the last few hours, we don't think of sweden as a country that might be particularly vulnerable. now, maybe we are wrong to think in that way, but what sort of security operations do they have? what sort of alert has sweden been on? i have been on a security conference for two days, and they are vulnerable, no doubt about it. there are areas of the suburbs in places like gartenberg where police don't even go. there are known terrorists, that people who are financing al-anda, isis, gathering money for overseas operations, and i'm told that swedish legislation just does not have the law in place to crack down on them. so far, the sort of terrorism efforts are directed outwards, but the fear is, it is only a matter of time before it becomes directed inwards. i think
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they are sitting on a time bomb, and it isa they are sitting on a time bomb, and it is a worry. they have swedish equivalent of m15 or the fbi, and they have pretty good tabs on who is doing what, but they do not have legislation to go in and arrest them. ina legislation to go in and arrest them. in a way, they are the way that london was in 2009, a place for funding overseas terrorist actions but where there was not the law to crackdown on those activities. very interesting. thank you very much, frank gardner, our security correspondent. let's go to stockholm itself. joining us now via web—cam from her hotel in stockholm is annevi petersson, a photographer who ran out onto the street while the attack was happening. thank you for talking to us on the bbc. as i understand it, you are in a hotel, but you ran outside to see what was happening during this attack. explain what you saw. what was happening during this attack. explain what you sawlj what was happening during this attack. explain what you saw. i had stepped into a store, and i was in the fitting room. i heard a terrible
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noise from the street, i heard people screaming, and i realised that something was seriously wrong, so that something was seriously wrong, soi that something was seriously wrong, so i got out of there. there are no proper doors, so you could see insta ntly proper doors, so you could see instantly people on the ground. i am a photographer, so i took a couple of snapshots, but then decided to get out of there and walked into a smaller street and got out of there. iam smaller street and got out of there. i am sensing from your voice, correct me if i'm wrong, that it was very frightening. it was. i have not seen a very frightening. it was. i have not seen a situation like that before, and yes, a lot of emotion and just really the sense of getting out of there. this was seconds after. i did not see the lorry myself, but he had just passed, so the were no emergency staff on the ground yet. you and presumably lots of other people were trying to get out? yes,
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and straight after the store started to lockdown, closing the doors, so people couldn't get in to safety either. mostly, people tried to run away. other people were then inside the stores, on lockdown. the hotel i'm staying at now, it's on complete lockdown. as in, you and the other guests are not allowed to leave? no, we are not. and they have security all around the hotel. do you feel well—informed and safe? all around the hotel. do you feel well—informed and safe ?|j all around the hotel. do you feel well-informed and safe? i do, in a way. completely unexpected, of course. i was in londonjust a couple of weeks ago. i live in london. so, yeah... you don't expect to be so close. no... what are your thoughts when you hear the prime minister say that he believes it was
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an act of terrorism? that was my first thought. we've seen lloris before, so that was my immediate reaction, and then getting out of the scene. —— we've seen lorries before. a difficult afternoon for you, so before. a difficult afternoon for you , so we before. a difficult afternoon for you, so we are very before. a difficult afternoon for you, so we are very grateful that you, so we are very grateful that you could speak to us on the bbc. we wish you the best there. currently, like all guest in that central stockholm hotel, everyone being held inside, no one allowed to leave that building, as is common with an awful lot of goldings in the centre of stockholm. that is the situation as we understand it. let's speak now to anneka bromberg on the phone. where are you and what have you experienced in the last few hours? i left my workjust a couple of minutes before it happened. it
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was a lovely friday afternoon, warm and with a lot of tourists in town. yeah, lots of people. it's a big shopping street, so i was there just a couple of minutes earlier, before it happened, and then i went to a hotel where i was going to meet a friend. i must havejust hotel where i was going to meet a friend. i must have just passed hotel where i was going to meet a friend. i must havejust passed it hotel where i was going to meet a friend. i must have just passed it a few minutes before it happened. i didn't hearan few minutes before it happened. i didn't hear an explosion, i didn't hear anything of that. other people at the restaurant where i was waiting for my friend, they started to talk about social media and what had happened, then i looked down on the street, because i was on the eighth floor, and i looked down, and there were just hundreds of people running really fast, and then i started to realise that something
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big had happened. and i asked the other guests, what has happened? i mean, we did not no more than that a truck had driven into a big department store. so, had you walked down that street just a couple department store. so, had you walked down that streetjust a couple of minutes later, you would have seen what had happened, and i suppose you realise you might have been, god forbid, caught up in what had happened? yeah, that's correct. i don't really want to think about that. i still have a daughter who is on the other side of town, and they we re on the other side of town, and they were held in school, not allowed to leave, so we are still waiting for her to come home, but she has to cross the city, and the subway is closed. after 20 minutes, when it
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happened, i started to realise that i should really start to walk home, because there were no buses and no subway. i had to walk to the south side of the city, and there were hundreds of people walking. they we re hundreds of people walking. they were calm, but also very afraid, because we could hear helicopters and we could see fast police cars. we didn't really know if something else was going to happen. people we re else was going to happen. people were calm, and everybody was moving and wanted to get home. so, people we re and wanted to get home. so, people were calm, but you don't know, then, when you will be really united with your daughter? —— reunited with your daughter? that's the situation right now. the rest of the family is home, and she has her mobile, and there head teacher is walking them to a
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bus which will take them through the city, to the south side, so we hope to hear from city, to the south side, so we hope to hearfrom her very soon, i hope. then we can pick her up. of course. well, we hope that you will be back together as a family very soon. we really appreciate you talking to us. thank you very much for speaking to us on thank you very much for speaking to us on the bbc. and we will have more about that story and any breaking news around that a little later in this hour. for now, we will turn our attentions to the other major story here today. the united nations security council is meeting now to discuss the military action in syria overnight. the united states carried out a missile strike on a syrian air base, in response to the suspected chemical weapons attack earlier this week. it's the first direct us military action against forces commanded by syria's president. russia says syria's air defences will be strengthened following the strikes. our washington correspondent,
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jane o'brien, reports. a one—off strike or the start of us action against the syrian regime? 59 tomahawk missiles fired from two warships in the mediterranean that destroyed an airstrip near idlib. for now, president trump seems satisfied that a forceful message has been sent — the us will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons. on tuesday, syrian dictator bashar al—assad launched a horrible chemical weapons attack on innocent civilians. using a deadly nerve agent, assad choked out the lives of helpless men, women and children. images of the gas victims, many of them children, appear to have prompted the sudden call to action. just a few days before, the white house wasn't that bothered
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about president assad. now, the administration says he must go, and russia needs to think twice about its support for the regime. assad's role in the future is uncertain, clearly, and with the acts he has taken, it would seem there would be no role for him to govern the syrian people. this is the airfield that was attacked and many countries have welcomed such a limited and targeted response, but russia said the strike was an act of aggression, that has damaged bilateral relations, and syria said it will only help terrorists. it is an attack against our sovereignty and it plays into the hands of the terrorist, and it came only after the syrian army was able to defeat terrorists in that area, and the airport that was attacked by the americans is an airport that had been standing against the terrorists for the last six years.
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china also expressed concern, as president xi jinping arrived in florida for talks with mr trump, just hours before the missiles launched. on the agenda, the growing threat from north korea. the us has not discounted the use of military force there, in spite of china's support for the nuclear—armed state. but striking syria, the trump administration has shown its allies and its adversaries that it is prepared to act. jane o'brien, bbc news, washington. in the last few minutes, brisson lorries britain's ambassador said that the assad regime has been put on notice by the air strike. alexander vershbow is a former deputy secretary general of nato and a former us
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ambassador to russia. he is in our washington studio for us now. thank you for your time tonight. there are a lot of people who have supported this decision by the trump administration, some who said it would have been preferable if he had got international support before doing its an what is your take on what this will achieve? -- if he had got international support before doing it — what is your take on this? as the british ambassador said, ithink this? as the british ambassador said, i think it was important to put assad on notice that the international community will not accept this. at the same time, i think the president chose a limited strike against one target, the base from which the chemical attacks were launched, signalling that he is not looking for a prolonged confrontation with the regime itself. i think the us objective in syria will be to fight isis and try
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to eliminate the isis stronghold of the city of rocker. a lot depends on what the russians do next. —— city of raqqa. and this will surely hugely damage us — russian relations. what is the impact of that? well, clearly, the expectations in moscow for some kind of warming of relations, which have been declining since the president came into office, i think have taken a further notch downward. at the same time, it is interesting that the russian foreign minister said that he hoped the damage to us— russian relations will not be irreversible. it is noteworthy that they have suspended rather than terminated this arrangement between the ministry of defence and the us
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pentagon to the conflict error operations. —— to take the conflict out ofair operations. —— to take the conflict out of air operations. it is possible that russia will try to draw a line under this incident, agree to disagree file denouncing the us harshly in its rhetoric, but hope to go back to the status quo, where we are fighting loosely co—ordinated wars against isis while leaving the assad regime to one side. and of course, you made the point that what happens next depends entirely on what moved president assad makes. god forbid, were there to be another chemical attack, where does that leave us? what option really does the us, the un and others have? another chemical attack would be pretty foolish on his part, after what has just happened. but he has done crazy things before. that would inevitably invite further action. i think his reaction is more
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likely to be less direct. he may threaten us interests in other parts of the world — in lebanon, for example, where he has a close relationship with the shi'ite radical group. he could sponsor acts of terrorism in other parts of the world, but he may not be looking for rape prolonged and escalating confrontation with the united states now that he sees that president trump, unlike president obama, is ready to use force if this red line on chemical weapons is cross. very good of you to speak to us tonight. thank you so much for your time. let's also put some of those points to sir malcolm rifkind, the conservative former defence secretary. thank you to you as well for joining secretary. thank you to you as well forjoining us. will this us strike have a deterrent effect? that is one of the reasons behind it, according to the trump administration. of the reasons behind it, according to the trump administrationlj of the reasons behind it, according to the trump administration. i think it will have two consequences. i would predict that there will be no
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more use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. until now, they thought they could get away with it, because the word two previous incidents apart from the one this week. now that the americans have shown clearly that they will respond militarily, it would be incredibly stupid of assad to do it again, because the mayor —— the americans would make a bigger strike. the russians will be telling them privately they must not do that again. there is a second consequence. i think, again. there is a second consequence. ithink, despite again. there is a second consequence. i think, despite all the harsh russian rhetoric, the russians now have to change their assumption, and this could lead to better prospects for the beginning of some proper negotiated outcome. my of some proper negotiated outcome. my reason for saying that is because until now, the russians and president assad have said, we might as well keep this war going, because every week, every month, we control more territory, so that when negotiations do eventually begin, assad will already control most of the country. he now cannot make that
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assumption. putin does not want a military confrontation with the americans. up till now, that has not been possible. now it is possible. so, ultimately, you mean, could there be regime change? could it be that fundamental? russia has been hugely resistant to that. i'm not talking about regime change. the issueis talking about regime change. the issue is getting the syrian government and opposition factions round the table to agree an accord, such as happened in bosnia. getting them round the table is incredibly difficult, and i am saying that, until now, because assad felt he was winning, with russian help, then he had no particular incentive to start negotiations this month rather than in six months' time, because he would, it can be assumed, be in an
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advantageous position. the russians are probably not willing to risk a military confrontation with the united states. trump does not want to expand the military involvement, but once you have used your error power once unsuccessfully, if circumstances point in that direction, it will be easier for trump to consider using it again, and that is the one thing that putin would be very anxious to avoid. he is an opportunist and does not want confrontation of a military kind with the americans. that now could happen if he doesn't actually look for a diplomatic solution. is your assertion that there will be pressure put, then, by russia on assad to sit down? for you, you think that will be the next logical stage? i am not saying it is happening today or tomorrow, but i think over the next two or three weeks, the russians have to think up what will be their new strategy. till now, they have had it to themselves. the americans weren't involved, except for around raqqa,
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the british want involved, so the russians were the only external player from the wider international community, along with iran, who were able to influence events. that's no longer true. our foreign secretary, borisjohnson, will longer true. our foreign secretary, boris johnson, will be longer true. our foreign secretary, borisjohnson, will be in moscow, meeting the russian foreign secretary on monday, and rex tillerson will be there soon after. sergei lavrov said today that he hoped the problem with the americans would not be irreversible. there will be ways explored to get a more diplomatic solution, without which peace will not come to syria after six long years. very good to talk to you. thank you so much for your time, as ever, sir malcolm rippon, the former foreign secretary. let's go to moscow itself and get an assessment from our correspondent.
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very interesting to hear someone with experience in us — russia relations... the response from russian officials was really harsh. mr putin called it aggression against a sovereign state, but in a statement published by the russian prime minister nearly an hour ago, the language was even more harsh. he said that the fog has diminished and now we see the real face of the american establishment. this is quite a warning sign because it seems that before that, since the election of donald trump, mr putin was actually waiting for some signs from trump's administration in order to make up his mind about the future of russian — us relations, and he was hoping for a relaunch of those relations, but now, russia shows that they are really angry, and they
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may pursue their line, because the response was really harsh. in an official statement by the russian foreign ministry, they even said they believe that acts were prepared in advance, and that the us were just waiting for an excuse to launch the strikes. really harsh language. that is interesting, they thought they were looking for an excuse, and yet the russian foreign minister, as has been reflected this hour, said he hoped that ultimately, some sort of relations can be restored. do you ta ke of relations can be restored. do you take that, then, as a fairly thin comment? russia is, of course, interested in cooperation with the us in syria, and they don't make the conflict has cost them quite a lot, not only to support assad but also in order to re—establish themselves in the international arena, and to solve some other geopolitical
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problems. they are interested in the dialogue, but now they show that they are not going to step back. of course, russia is quite furious concerning what has happened during these 2a hours. concerning what has happened during these 24 hours. thank you very much indeed. let's assess the mood back in westminster. there was initially support from the government for the strike. ian watson can tell us more about that. there was a fairly swift, positive response, i think it's fair to say, ian? that is true. the british government was at the forefront of support for american action. the current defence secretary, sir michael fallon, voiced his support. it was interesting listening to sir malcolm rifkind there was up he felt these military air strikes could get these military air strikes could get the assad regime run the table again. sir michael fallon actually felt that the value of these air strikes was a deterrent effect, to
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prevent further attacks by the assad regime on his opponents. well, they didn't ask us to get involved. they didn't ask us to choose a particular option. they decided to take this action — a very limited, appropriate action, attacking the air field, the aeroplanes and the equipment that they believe were involved in the gas attack — with the very specific purpose of trying to do to the regime from future gas attacks on their own people, including civilians. interesting that sir michael fallon was pointing out that britain was not asked to participate in the error strikes. if there was going to be future buddhism vacate —— future participation, . .. be future buddhism vacate —— future participation,... tim farron, the leader of the lib dems, who opposed the iraq intervention, said he has backed these air strikes as
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proportion, as michael fallon did. nonetheless, he criticised america for acting alone. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, went one further and said that unilateral action by america could intensify the conflict, but he said he was also opposed to the air strikes themselves. there should have been consultation with the un before anything happened. let us have rapid ceasefire and a return to the negotiating table in geneva. millions have been forced into exile, tens of thousands have died in this conflict, weapons are pouring into the region and it is getting worse, there has to be a political solution. political solution is what jeremy corbyn is going for but there are difficulties inside his own party. no consensus as westminster, no consensus inside labour, his own deputy tom watson described the attacks on syria on the assad regime as proportionate and direct and many former front benches tweeted their
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support, spoke out in support of tom watson's position. as i understand it there is a letter circulating among labour mps. calling for the imposition of a no—fly zone in syria led by nato, signed by round 20 labourmp, so that led by nato, signed by round 20 labour mp, so that will put pressure onjeremy corbyn labour mp, so that will put pressure on jeremy corbyn to take a tougher sta nce on jeremy corbyn to take a tougher stance on the regime in syria, rather than simply calling for diplomatic solutions and new negotiations. thank you for now ian. let us return and talk more about the trump administration, and its stance. let us head to mar—a—lago in florida, to president trump's resort there, because our correspondent barbara plett usher is there for us. and presumably, barbara, the trump admin straight satisfied that it has had afair admin straight satisfied that it has had a fair degree of support from various western nations and the un as we have been reflecting? yes, i
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think that kind of support is what could be expected and they are all saying the same thing, they are saying the same thing, they are saying it was a limited strike with a clear objective in response to an atrocity, and that is also what he is hearing from a large number of congress people from across the isles, so many people feel it was justified, and i think of course, the background is there, is the history of their disappointment that president obama didn't take similar militariry action when there was a chemical weapon attack in 2013. but again, they emphasise the limited nature of it and it was aimed as a deterrent, so it was not a broader entry into the civil war, it was not a confrontation of the syrian regime, you know, a policy towards decided to try to topple bashar al—assad, the secretary of state here has said, that the policy in syria itself hasn't changed, it is
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still very much focussed on fighting the islamic state group, this was a one off act meant to send a message, it isa one off act meant to send a message, it is a fluid situation, so it could open, it depends how the syrians respond, it depends how the war evolves but this is what the americans are hoping it will achieve, that is also what the international ally, western countries an they sunni arab allies have said this is something they welcome. thank you very much for now. we will keep you up—to—date with that storyer of course and any developments following that us missile strike there this syria. but for now, we will return and talk more about the news that has developed in the last few hour, really, the attack in sweden, in stockholm where a lorry drove into a crowd of pedestrian, reports say at least three were killed and many others injured. the truck is reported to have
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crashed into a department store on drottninggatan — one of the city's major shopping streets. police are treating the incident as a possible terror attack, and have advised people to avoid the city centre. as we video been reflecting and people we have been talking to here tonight on bbc news, a lot of buildings are shut down, people are not able to leave certain buildings, and that is the situation at the moment, in the swedish capital. let us moment, in the swedish capital. let us try to assess everything we have learned so far in the last few hours, learned so far in the last few hours, with me is now is our correspondent, andy moore. that is the element of what we think we understand, what are the latest details you can bring us, in terms of casualties perhaps? we have had a press co nfe re nce of casualties perhaps? we have had a press conference with the police in the last half hour, they haven't given precise casualty figure, they talk about several fatality, several people injured. with have heard from other sources three people have died and at least eight injured. the most
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important thing that came out the press co nfe re nce was important thing that came out the press conference was the fact they have not arrested the driver of the truck, there were reports from the prime minister in fact that somebody had been arrested but the police denied that. they said nobody has been arrested but they have released imams of somebody they want to trace, they haven't said this is the driver of the truck, but i think you can suspect that probably is the case, these images of the man were apparent taken on cctv, just shortly afterwards, and they show a nan a hoodie ina afterwards, and they show a nan a hoodie in a dark green jacket. afterwards, and they show a nan a hoodie in a dark greenjacket. there are one or two images of him. there is an escalator in the background. we don't know if this was taken in a nearby department store or whether it was taken on the underground, but on the face of it, this was a terror attack. this looks as if this may have been the man who carried it out, and it appears he is still at large in stockholm this evening. all. andy, i know you will be back
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later if there are further details. thank you very much. that is the latest in terms of that police news conference that has been taking place. let us talk to the swedish security expert who joins me from copenhagen. we don't know of course it is terrorism for sure, as we keep repeating, the prime minister is acting on that basis for now. what is your assessment, given what we have learned in the last few hours? think not only the prime minister but the police and security service are sort of treating it as a terror incident. the modus operandi subjects such, but also the perpetrator is still at larne, they have shut down all of central stockholm, all the underground trains and trains have been cancelled. so it is quite sort of a
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difficult situation at this moment, when they are trying to get a handle on the entire situation, interviewing witnesses, but also trying to find the perpetrator who may still be at large. the police is advising people to go home, to stay at home, and not to travel into central stockholm at the moment. and, i mean you have studied in this field for many years, how vulnerable do you believe sweden is and has been to terrorism? well, sweden has been to terrorism? well, sweden has been sort of, has, we had a failed suicide attack in 2010, byjoy dis not so very far away from the police that we saw. the authorities, the security service, the police were
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practising last week on a scenario just like this, we have had lots of people going out to syria, we have had 300 confirmed cases of people joining is. we have had 150 of them coming back, so there is sort of a lot of focus on violent extremism, in all its kind, and ijust wanted to stress and say we don't, of course know, what, who the perpetrator is or what the motortives of, —— motives are even though the modus operandi looks like what happened in london and other places with someone hijacking a truck and driving over individuals. is yes, i must explain to viewers that the still images that we are looking at at the moment are the images that swedish police have released within the last hour, now crucially to behind them, they are not saying necessarily this is the driver of the lorry, they are simply
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saying this is someone they want to speak to saying this is someone they want to speakto in saying this is someone they want to speak to in connection with this attack, so these two still. imagines, ithink attack, so these two still. imagines, i think taken from cctv cameras, have been released by swedish police in the last hour, and just picking up on your point there, that the modus on ran di, if is terrorism, that is worrying because it is the the brutal. the grim simplicity of it, acquiring a vehicle, stealing a vehicle and simply choosing to drive it into a crowd. there is only so much that any security service can do, to guard against something like that. well, that's right. i think the street that that, where this took place would have been sort of the equivalent of oxford street. this is an area, it is a pedestrian street, a p pa re ntly an area, it is a pedestrian street, apparently the lorry according to eyewitnesses were driving slowly at
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first, then he picked up speed. he then crashed, the truck he hijacked, into a department store, and right at the, where he crashed in this lorry, there is an escalator that goes down into the busiest subway station in central stockholm, so it will be difficult, of course, to try to find the individual, given the fa ct to find the individual, given the fact they are not cctv cameras everywhere like in the uk, but you know, they are looking for this individual, whether he is a witness or whether he is the perpetrator, we don't know. thank you very much for your time tonight. let us talk to someone who was through at the time i believe. let us talk to someone who was through at the time i believe. jp hanson is ceo of a pr firm and in a locked—down conference building in stockholm. i think you run a pr firm and you we re i think you run a pr firm and you were close to the scene. explain if you can where you were and what you
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witnessed? so, we were at the seminar about five minutes from the actual incident, and we were wrapping up about the time where the perpetrator hit the building, and what we saw was mayhem. a lot of police cars, a lot of ambulances, a lot of fire truck, i think the response was very lot of fire truck, i think the response was very swift. and very impressive. burr it was a lot of uncertainty, and information process. i mean, uncertainty, and information process. | mean, were uncertainty, and information process. i mean, were people frightened were people panicking, how would you assess the mood and people's reactions? i think the reaction overall were quite impressive. people were quiet strong. the biggest fright we had was when the swat teem entering the station which was an two minutes from where we w at that time a couple of people were frightened and we we re couple of people were frightened and we were told not to stay close to
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window, it was dealt with impressively by everything else there. a lot of people talking to them down and reassures them they would be safe, and overall i thought it was an impressive show of solidarity of everyone involved. thank you very much indeed for joining us on a very difficult afternoon there in sweden. and we of course will keep you up—to—date with that that again a flavour of the latest situation there, in the swedish capital following that attack, as we say sweden's prime minister saying they are working on the basis, as are the police, that this was an act of terrorism, but not yet confirmed of course. a number of people killed and others injured. more now on last night's us missile attack on a syrian air base. the united nations security council is due to meet shortly to discuss the strikes — the meeting was demanded by russia after it denounced the strikes on its ally as aggression against a sovereign state.
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matthew rycroft told the security council says it has sent a strong message to the assad regime. the uk supports the us air strike, on the airfield. because war crimes have consequences. and the greatest warcriminal of have consequences. and the greatest war criminal of all, bashar al—assad, has now been put on notice. the us strike was a proportionate response to unspeakable acts, that gave rise to overwhelming humanitarian distress. it was also a strong effort to save lives by ensuring that such acts never happen again. the resolution that we adopted
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three—and—a—half years ago, provided a framework for the destruction of chemical weapons in syria. it had a clear author and a clear guarantor. at the time, russia, assured us that assad would fully declare his chemical arsenal and continue to co—operate with international inspectors. perhaps that was the assurance that russia received from assad. and perhaps russia has now learned the hard lesson that backing a warcriminal learned the hard lesson that backing a war criminal comes with its own consequence. humiliation. that was matthew rycroft britain's ambassador to the un. let us head to the un andjoin ambassador to the un. let us head to the un and join our correspondent there. let's cross to the un in new york and our correspondent nada tawfik. a strong message there, would you say that those sentiments, that that tone is reflected ? say that those sentiments, that that tone is reflected? yes, absolutely. we heard similar talk from the
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french ambassador, who said he hoped that the us air strikes would be almost a game—changer, really, in this, but i have to say on the opposite side, to give you the viewpoint of members such as bolivia who called for this meeting and the russian viewpoint, they say this was a flagrant violation of international law, that the us shouldn't have acted unilaterally, russia, the russian deputy ambassador warned in the council, that this action could have consequences for international stability and for the political talksjune stability and for the political talks june way. stability and for the political talksjune way. so we saw a big divide in council between those who we re divide in council between those who were support thetive of the us actions who say the only person to blame is president assad, they believe he carried out the attacks and they believe russia has been shielding him.

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