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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 8, 2017 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm sophie long. the headlines at six: swedish police say a man arrested in stockholm after yesterday's fatal lorry attack is almost certainly the driver. a man with links to the incident was arrested this morning, quarter past one in the morning. the man arrested is suspected of being the one who drove the car. foreign secretary borisjohnson calls off a visit to moscow, saying the chemical weapons attack in syria has changed the situation "fundamentally". two people have died and 33 others were rescued after a fire at a care home at cheshunt in hertfordshire. also in the next hour, spain says the decision of the basque separatist group eta, to surrender its arms marks its definitive defeat. the group effectively ended its armed campaign after handing over details and locations of the last of its weapon dumps to the french authorities. and as ‘0ne for arthur‘ wins
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the grand national we'll bring you full details of the race and the rest of today's sporting action at half past six. hello, good evening, welcome to bbc news. swedish police say a man arrested in stockholm after yesterday's fatal lorry attack is almost certainly the driver — a 39—year—old man from uzbekistan. four people were killed and 15 injured when the lorry crashed into the front of a department store. police have also confirmed that a "suspicious device" was found inside the truck. our correpondent dan johnson reports. after yesterday's horror there is calm, stillness and sadness in stockholm. people have come together.
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time to reflect, a moment to remember. we were walking in the shop yesterday when it happened. patrick and francesca are tourists who were in the basement of the department store when the truck hit. we went up the escalator and saw panic and police with guns and stuff like that. how did people react? everybody was screaming and running to the other side of the building, and we took the side entrance and went out, and we just kept running to the other side of the city. this is the moment terror spread suddenly through the streets of sweden's capital. a hijacked lorry driven deliberately at shoppers. late last night the wreckage was towed away as police questioned the man they think was at the wheel. we have confirmed that he is a subject, a man from uzbekistan, 39 years old, that is what we know.
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in addition to that we would not like to say anything further about his whereabouts and his background. there is a quiet, contemplative mood here today. people are considering what happened yesterday. they know it will take time to sink in, but there's also concern about the deeper impact this may have. it is important now that we just show we are not afraid, that sweden will not change and that we will keep strong and work together for a better sweden. it's going to be a different stockholm from now on. you see the same thing in brussels and paris, and i hope not, but i think people will be more cautious. this morning, politicians and the crown princess paid their respects. everyone here wants to understand more about who attacked the heart of this nation and why. danjohnson, bbc news, stockholm. plenty of people have been here,
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several thousand would be my guess since early this morning. people turned up early with just a couple of candles and cards. this wall stretches about a hundred metres behind me and a number of high—profile figures have been to visit. we heard about the crown princess and her husband, also the swedish prime minister has been here with a message telling people that events like this, events like what happened on friday cannot completely be out ruled that he is doing everything he can, he says, to keep his country safe. it is important to point out that this attack took place on friday has come in the aftermath of ongoing political situations, about how prepared the country was for a terror attack or military attack or threat and so there is starting to be some debate emerging about that. politicians from both
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sides have come out and said today is not the day to debate that. today is the day to remember the victims. the four people who lost their lives on friday. an update on those injured, 15 were taken to hospital on friday. we understand that six of those have been released, including one child. one other key development today, we heard earlierfrom the press conference police confirming some kind of device had been found in the lorry. they have yet to confirm whether it was explosives. what is being questioned a lot here in the swedish media is the timing of that, whether that device was still in the truck at the time of the swedish prime minster was here at the scene last night, along with many other people still being in the area. questions being asked about security as police investigations continue. maddy savage and reporting.
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borisjohnson has cancelled his visit to moscow next week in response to the chemical attack on syria. in a statement, mrjohnson said, we deplore rusher‘s continued defence of the assad regime. the united states has expressed disappointment at russian criticism of its attack on a syrian government airbase. the cruise missile strikes on the syrian air base were a sharp departure from a president whose policy on the campaign trail to the white house was one of avoiding overseas conflicts. administration officials are saying the strikes were intended as a one off, not a change in direction, and at an emergency meeting of the un security council, the us insisted its actions were fully justified. it was time to say, enough. but not only say it, it was time to act. bashar al—assad must never use chemical weapons again, ever. syria denies using nerve gas in the attack on the rebel—held town but the us says it has
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crossed a line. it fired almost 60 cruise missiles at the air base outside homs which it says the syrian air force used to launch the chemical weapons attack. but russia, syria's ally, accuses the us of an unprovoked show of force. russia's prime minister, dmitry medvedev, has said the strikes have brought moscow and washington to the verge of a military clash. britain's un ambassador criticised russia's continuing support for bashar al—assad. russia needs to listen to this council, listen to the arab world, listen to the rest of the international community. above all, listen to the syrian people. and the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has pulled out of a visit to moscow next week, saying development in syria had changed the situation fundamentally. he said he would instead focus on building coordinated international support to secure a ceasefire and an intensified political process.
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but moscow has said it will strengthen syria's anti—aircraft defences. it has also suspended a deal which is designed to prevent incidents between us and russian warplanes over the country, while washington says it is preparing further economic sanctions against syria. more now on the foreign secretary's decision not to go to moscow next week, with me is our political correspondent chris mason. this made in close consultation. he was due to go as well, the us secretary, he still well. iris johnson will not. he has built out a statement this afternoon saying we deplore rusher‘s continued defence of the assad regime. he says because of the assad regime. he says because of what he described as a
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fundamental changing of the situation, he does not want to go to moscow on monday. instead, he will go to moscow on monday. instead, he will gotoa moscow on monday. instead, he will go to a meeting of 6—7 foreign ministers who are meeting in italy to talk about syria amongst other things. the us secretary will go on his own after that meeting. my understanding from speaking to those around boris johnson is understanding from speaking to those around borisjohnson is that they did not feel that strategically use was worthwhile, that the two men pretty much going one after another because of fears that russia might try and find a way of praising them apart politically, even though on this issue and the us intervention in the other day, that the uk and the us are at one. borisjohnson deciding not to go, secretary of the us, deciding not to go. —— he will go. at what point, if ever, is this meeting rescheduled. in the meantime, what has been the reaction to the decision not to go? a couple
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of lines coming out of russia, from the russian foreign ministry and the embassy here in london. the russian foreign ministry said it is absurd that boris johnson foreign ministry said it is absurd that borisjohnson is not going. stability and consistency of long stop i've been the hallmark of western foreign policy. rather more critically or cryptically to me, was it wheat from the russian embassy in london a couple of hours ago offering a link to a piece of classical music. think this was soft power response. that was a piece of music was the 1812 overture. tchaikovsky ate hugely famous rusher composer. it is a russian triumph over napoleon's invasion of russia if you like, russia and managing to repel the western aggression at the time back in 1812. rather cryptic to me, cultural and musical response
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from the embassy. more directly and easily translatable, saying that it was absurd. i'm yet to hear back from the foreign secretary in terms of what they make of that reaction from moscow. there has been a bit of back and forth going on. it gives you some sense of politically the statement that boris johnson you some sense of politically the statement that borisjohnson is able to make by not going. thank you very much. two people have died in a fire at a care home in hertfordshire. firefighters were called to the newgrange care home in cheshunt early this morning. a number of people were taken to hospital. our correspondent andy moore is at the scene for us. we can speak to him. what can you tell us about what has happened there? firefighters were called here at ten to six this morning and they were confronted with a very fierce fire, leaving from end to end of this care home. you may be able to seat in the alleyway behind me. that fire within the roof space, it was spreading to
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the roof space, it was spreading to the first floor. 35 residents there, elderly and infirm. many of them will take users and all those residents had to be helped out of the burning building. we heard from the burning building. we heard from the firefighters that some of them had to be carried on the shoulders of firefighters down ladders and they were brought up to the street heard and helped by the local people. darryl keane is the chief fire officerfor people. darryl keane is the chief fire officer for hertfordshire and this is what he told us. the first grey sweater right when faced with a very severe fire that was contained in the research base but spreading rapidly. this being a residential ca re rapidly. this being a residential care home, there were over 30 people, some of which were unable to escape themselves. we ended up carrying out the number of rescues, over 30, to remove people both with crews wearing breathing apparatus and others. as you know, 33 were successfully rescued and 42—mac residents have died as a result of the fire. —— two residents. we
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pulled together a team to start the investigation. fire investigation officers from the servers are working very closely with the co nsta bula ry working very closely with the constabulary and over the wii will be here until we identified the cause of the fire. two of those residents appear to have died. what happened to the 33 that we rescued? they have been moved somewhere else? that is right. 33, most of the 33 have been taken to other evacuation centres. they are being looked after, they are shocked but safe and well. three residents were taken to hospital suffering from minor burns and the effects of breathing in smoke. we understand one of them has been moved to a community hospital. the other two are still being treated in hospital. we do not know their condition at the moment. thank you for that update. workers at three rail companies are taking part in a 24—hour strike on
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the day at the grand national race near liverpool. the action is part ofa near liverpool. the action is part of a dispute over staffing and the role of conductors. merseyrail the big decision to strike on the day of the race meeting with damage liverpool's reputation. we have a strong relationship with the rmt and we have engaged in previous discussions and we would welcome further discussions. we made it quite clear that should a dispute take place on grand national day it would not change our stance. however we are willing to negotiate because we need to resolve this for the benefit of customers. new trains is a fantastic opportunity for the city region and is something we should all grasp with both hands and make it happen. survey after survey indicates massive support from the public to retain guards on services. we had no issues with racegoers today. they're supportive of the trade union stance. passengers are paying for this level of safety in their ticket prices, so why, as a passenger, would you want to pay even more on your ticket price for less safety solely to benefit the profits of the private train operators? we think, as a trade union, it is unacceptable and passengers deserve
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a safe railway and a second safety critical conductor on every service. it is quarter past six. the headlines on bbc news: swedish police say a man arrested in stockholm after yesterday's fatal lorry attack is almost certainly the driver. foreign secretary borisjohnson calls off a visit to moscow, saying the chemical weapons attack in syria has changed the situation "fundamentally". two people have died and 33 others were rescued after a fire at a care home in hertfordshire. a teenage boy has appeared in court in northern ireland charged with attempting to obtain a machine gun and a hundred rounds of ammunition. the fourteen—year—old was arrested at a shopping centre in coleraine in country londonderry on thursday. 0ur correspondentjohn campbell was in court for the hearing. well, the boy was arrested at riverside retail park in coleraine on thursday. a police officer gave some details about what led up to that arrest.
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she said there had been a proactive police investigation for a number of weeks involving the dark web. she alleged the boy had reached out across the dark web in an attempt to buy a russian—made submachine gun and 100 rounds of ammunition. she said that as part of that he came to the retail park and when he attempted to buy the ammunition, he was arrested by what she referred to as an operative. he has been released on bail. there are strict bail conditions, which include the fact that he's not able to possess a computer or mobile phone and he will appear in court again later this month. the dalai lama has addressed thousands of his followers at a monastery in northeastern india where he took shelter as he fled tibet in 1959. the monastery is located in a disputed area near the border with china. ashleigh neem reports. this has been an emotionaljourney
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for the dalai lama who was on his seventh visit to the 300 euros monastery. it is a place that has special significance for the tibetan spiritual leader there. he first came here nearly 60 years ago after fleeing tibet and escaping chinese guards to cross the border into india. the month offered him shelter while india gave him political asylum. but it was this man who helped secure his safety. the indian border guard escorted the dalai lama into the country in 1959. this was their first meeting since then. for india and china, there is much more at stake. it has immense strategic value. they have plans for new roads and railway. china has never recognised the region as a part of india. it sees it as an extension of
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tibet. beijing this week launched the first unofficial investigation of giving the dalai lama a platform. india insist that the visit is purely religious and a dalai lama says his week—long trip is to promote harmony. china is not convinced so the crowd is expected to gather for his teachings over the next few days will only cause more concern across the border. french police have found arms of eta. they held a rally this afternoon when the police were told the location of the weapons and sarah made. the spanish governor has described the event as a decisive defeat for the separatist. eta killed more than 850 people in its attempt to create
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an independent state in northern spain and south—west france. it declared a ceasefire in 2011, but until now had not give up its arms. earlier i spoke to our chief international correspondent lyse doucet was watching. a tranquil setting. the flags of this city hall behind me as the day began. very simple ceremony with huge ‘s historic significance unfolded and because it is a ceremony unlike what happened in northern ireland or in colombia, the spanish and french governments are not involved, it was left to a french basque environmentalist to hand over the bulky file containing the details of what is left of eta's arsenal. including the reverend harold good to played a role in the northern ireland process, that was handed to international monitors and then on to the french authorities who are now searching for the arms
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caches. they are all on french soil. not farfrom when caches. they are all on french soil. not far from when i caches. they are all on french soil. not farfrom when i am speaking now, there has been a rally for peace to celebrate the end of this final chapter. although across the border in spain, the governing party has called on eta to do much more, saying they should not be doing these kind of events. they are simply disappear and compensate their victims. what happens next? we are joined their victims. what happens next? we arejoined here of their victims. what happens next? we are joined here of the their victims. what happens next? we arejoined here of the party, a far life probus independence party. what do you say to the primary so who says it is a bit of a show and eta should disband and issue an apology to its victims? six years ago, eta put an end to the campaign. today, six years later, it has settled to disarm it. the spanish government instead of acting with the responsibility and facilitating the process, they have tried to prevent
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it from happening. at that point, the basque society including people from every political constituency have engaged in this process, together with the help of the international committee as you have mentioned. what we have witnessed here today in the basque country is a major step to lasting peace here. there are still important issues that need to be addressed. they need a solution. today is a day on which we can say that the basque country is moving in the right direction. your party is headed by the gerry adams, they call him, of eta. it is 110w adams, they call him, of eta. it is now banned, the political wing, and he isa now banned, the political wing, and he is a prominent basque politician. you are still fighting for independence. do you think you can achieve it through political means? it has played a major role in this process. you could imagine that jeremy adams would've been sent to britain after bringing the republican movement to the friday
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agreement? ido republican movement to the friday agreement? i do not think so. that is what happened. we are people considers that the right to be knowledge. we want and do the relationship we are to have with friends bogey france and spain. we do not understand is that the spanish government is doing all they can to prevent the people from having a say. if you compare it not only to ireland but to scotland, where they have had the chance to decide whether they wanted in or not, it is something that we do not understand. do you understand the deep wound in france and spanish society, more than 800 victims, so many injured? the sense of injustice and angerand many injured? the sense of injustice and anger and loss is still very raw. this has been a dramatic conflict with a lot of consequences. it has been going on for more than
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50 years. obviously there are many things on the way towards that need to be addressed, we still have more than 300 prisoners in spanish and french jails. every victim of the public needs to be acknowledged. we obviously think this is a path we need to walk. but in our opinion, we need to walk. but in our opinion, we need to walk. but in our opinion, we need to do it together. every party of the conflict needs to be part of the solution. including the spanish government. what we do not understand is why for the spanish government, the disarmament and why they are not willing to engage in they are not willing to engage in the process that we will bring peace to the basque country. i do not think that is in the interest of the basque people that neither in the interest of the spanish people. can you say today that the period of silence is deafening over? i understand there's about a hundred members of eta is still reject this process and asked some explosives that cannot be accounted for. there
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are still danger in this process. eta and at the end six years ago in 2011. i think if something has been prove n 2011. i think if something has been prove 11 over 2011. i think if something has been proven over the last six years that the commitment of eta is clear and that there is no way back to it. eta of most use to fill its full disarmament with the help of the basque society and the international committee, without the spanish or the french government facilitating it. thank you very much forjoining us it. thank you very much forjoining us here. on this historic day, no matter what side you are on in spain 01’ matter what side you are on in spain or france, it is acknowledged this isa or france, it is acknowledged this is a historic day. it brings to an end the last insurgency in the heart of europe. this chapter is ending but as you have been hearing, another chapter is yet to begin in terms of reconciliation between all members of spanish society had from one would from the many basket, they wa nt to one would from the many basket, they want to see this as a new start. ina
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in a moment we will have a full weather forecast. extraordinary acts by young people have been celebrated at the rotary young citizen awards in manchester today. there are seven winners, chosen from hundreds of people nominated across the uk and the republic of ireland. the awards are now in their tenth year — and previous winners also travelled to manchester for this year's celebrations. we have been surrounded by some very talented young people here at the young citizen awards, when past and present over the last ten years. joining me now is aiding jackson, he isa joining me now is aiding jackson, he is a winner from this year. we have got magic, he's a winner from 2010 and also gender. ——jenna and jenna's mum. how does it feel to be back? it is really exciting to be
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back, to see familiar faces and also to welcome new people into the club of winners, i suppose. it was really amazing to see all the work that people have done in the past ten years. you won an award in 2008. tell us a bit more about your story on what inspired you to start fundraising. we set up callum's cabin in memory of my twin brother who died from a brain tumour in february 2000 seven. it is a anniversary for a charity as well this year. just continuing the great work to make sure that children with cancer can get work to make sure that children with cancercan geta week work to make sure that children with cancer can get a week away and make memories. you have been incredibly inspirational, you have been a jenna's side every step of the way. how does it feel looking back ten yea rs how does it feel looking back ten years on? it does not feel like ten years on? it does not feel like ten years at all. i do not know where the time has gone. i watched everybody on stage today and it is wonderful to see the progression of
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everybody and how they have all grown up and how they have carried oi'i grown up and how they have carried on everything that they were doing ten, nine, eight years ago. it is amazing and very inspirational group of people. your twin brother callum sadly died, as you mention, tell me a bit about callum's cabin which is very special thing to you guys. callum's cabin now has two holiday hands on the isle of bute in scotland for children with cancer to come from a three—week's holiday, to make memories and have special time away so they can enjoy it as a family. callum's cabin was callum's idea. he wanted it happens out of the way of keeping his name alive and history in going. magic, you wonder a few years ago they doing some very, very hard work around billing. tell us your story.|j billing. tell us your story. i came to the uk in 2005 and being bullied by my fellow colleagues. i decided to make a step forward, to reduce
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it. i've idly managed to run a numberof it. i've idly managed to run a number of clubs in the school as well as get involved in sport and get all the kids involved in what was happening in the area to try and actually bring the projects together. instead of shying away and allowing the belief to win, you have been very instrumental, you have been very instrumental, you have been proactive you now. how does it feel when you look back at at your jenny? winning the award is back in 2010, opened my doorand jenny? winning the award is back in 2010, opened my door and allow me to the edge and 60 degrees. i've managed to turn my volunteering into a business venture and it is allow me tojoin the rotary a business venture and it is allow me to join the rotary and a business venture and it is allow me tojoin the rotary and now me to join the rotary and now help more and more people in the committee, not only as a volunteer but work wise. i think all attention 110w but work wise. i think all attention now on to aden. you are this year's winner. how do you feel? it isjust brilliant. you see all these things in the newspaper about all the bad young people are doing and then you just, you come here and all the
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other stories and it is like shining a light in the darkness. showing people what you can do when you put your mind to it. you have been recognised for raising a lot of money for charities, tell us a bit about your story and what inspired you to start fundraising. what inspired me to start fundraising was trying to keep my, one of my friends who sadly passed away in 2014, olivia, she had very mental and physical disabilities that stopped her from walking, speaking, physical disabilities that stopped herfrom walking, speaking, but whenever you got near her, she had a smile on her face and you knew that she was happy that you were there and she wanted you to be there with her. but when she died, her family wanted to keep her memory alive by making a charity to help other people like by buying medical equipment, buying holidays and just general days out, helping people but they did, they were not able to get a registered charity because they did not have enough funds which is
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when i got involved. sol did not have enough funds which is when i got involved. so i started with a mile of pennies which raised over £1000 from the start and that was the first one kind of set it in motion, then it wentjust small things then it went to the distance of the english channel in a swimming pool which raised about £4000. and my latest one which was filling in the stadium with over 11,000 teddy bears which took my total up to £16,000 raised for the foundation. absolute amazement. very quickly, how much of the race so far? £16,000. any advice to aidan is moving forward, what should he do to keep the momentum going in to keep inspiring? keep doing what you are doing. the work you are doing is amazing. never give up. never give up. it is about going forward and

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