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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 10, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith fowler, who was murdered in last month's westminster attack. his name has been added to the national police memorial on the mall in central london. iam here in central london. i am here at southwark cathedral, where the funeral service will be held at 2pm. a service that will be both a public memorial and a private family funeral. russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syrian‘s president assad, as foreign ministers from the g7 nations meet for two days of talks. the bbc uncovers evidence implicating the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. also this hour. the great barrier reef is at a "terminal stage". scientists say unprecedented
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leeching has damaged two thirds of the reef. the nearly man no more, sergio garcia wins his first major title on his 74th time of asking, with victory overjustin rose in a sudden—death play—off at the masters. it is something amazing. i feel the economist i have ever felt. i am so happy. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. thousands of police officers will line the streets of central london for the funeral procession of keith palmer, murdered in the attack in
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westminster. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death by khalid masood as he stood guard outside the palace of westminster. his coffin will be taken to southwark cathedral for a full police service funeral. also, his name was added to the roll of honour at the national police memorial in a ceremony that has just taken place. yesterday, the coffin of pc keith palmer was brought to the palace of westminster, the place where he worked, the place he had been protecting when he was killed last month. overnight, an honour guard made up of members of the parliamentary and diplomatic protection command has been watching over his coffin in the chapel of st mary undercroft inside the palace. pc palmer's funeral is to be held at southwark cathedral this afternoon. some of his colleagues who worked alongside him have been paying tribute, describing him as hard—working, selfless, a dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed working with the public.
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one of the kindest people you'll ever find. very giving, very loyal, a true friend. a fantastic policeman. he was so down—to—earth and so normal. he came to work because he had a family to support. that was all he ever wanted to do, be there for his family. officers from across the uk are expected to travel to london to line the route of the funeral cortege from westminster to southwark cathedral. police forces will be holding two minutes‘ silence to remember their fallen colleague, while flags on force headquarters will be lowered to half—mast. we can now cross to our correspondent daniela relph, who is at southwark cathedral in london. the roads around the cathedral have been closed for more than an hour, we have seen bus—loads of police officers arriving, they have come
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from across the country to pay their respects and honour the sacrifice of keith palmer. the service here this afternoon will be conducted by the dean of southwark. can i ask about what the service will be like? the essential thing to remember is it is a funeral service, so everything else that is happening around london and the procession is wonderful, and it isa and the procession is wonderful, and it is a way that the metropolitan police force can honour one of their colleagues, but at the heart of the service, it is a funeral, for his widow and his daughter to come along, and we can pay our respects to keith and led him to rest. along, and we can pay our respects to keith and led him to restm along, and we can pay our respects to keith and led him to rest. it is slightly unusual, keith palmer died a public death, and there is a sense that this is a public memorial as well as a private family service. absolutely, and it needs to have both aspects. i hope for the family that they receive the comfort that
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they need through the service, because they are having to grieve publicly. that must be a difficult thing, i cannot imagine what it must be like. the rest of the nation needs to pay its respects and say thank you for what he actually did in defending democracy. for the police service, a very important day and moment, we are already seeing hundreds of police officers here, it is an important day for the police service. absolutely, they work together so much as a team, defending one another. to lose one of your colleagues must be tragic, a shock, but also make you realise what it is that you are doing. this kind of act of remembering and thanking is really important for the police, but for all of us in the nation. have the family played a big
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pa rt nation. have the family played a big part in contributing to the service? they have been supported by the chaplains of the metropolitan police. they have had their full pa rt police. they have had their full part in helping to choose the hymns and the readings. the funeral is the funeral they would want for their husband and father. it turns a view of the dean, it is a poignant moment, the start of holy week, this service comes at moment, the start of holy week, this service comes at a moment, the start of holy week, this service comes at a poignant moment. we are leading up to remembering the death ofjesus, we are leading up to remembering the death of jesus, what looked hopeless, and on easter day a sign of great hope, as god raised him from the dead. that sense of the ultimate sacrifice that one person can make for another in laying down their life for people they know, and for people they do not know, that is what has touched the hearts of so many people about keith palmer's death, doing it on behalf of people he will never know. you had already mentioned there will be a moving passage from the gospel ofjohn that will be read. jesus said, no greater
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love has a person than this, to lay down one's life for one's friends. that is a very moving passage, but it will be moving for everybody here today, remembering what keith palmer has done. it will be a very busy day for you. the service here will begin at 2pm. we can speak now to steve lloyd. keith palmer's name is being added to the roll of honour, along with that of another police officer. talk us that of another police officer. talk us through the significant. the significance of the name of the officers being added to the national police roll of honour and book of remembrance is that we know that this will give some small comfort to
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the families in the future, knowing that their names are going to be remembered in perpetuity here at the national police memorial. those games were added a few moments ago. what ceremony took place? we had a contingent of uniformed police officers who were here at the memorial, they formed a guard of honour. members of the public came and watched. we are in the centre of london, at horse guards. the chairman of the police roll of honour trust, himself the father of a murdered police officer, was fear. he put the two new pages into the book, and the book now is on public display, and will be forever more. the focus today is very much on
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keith palmer, with his funeral later, but the other name added to the role is that of gareth brown inc, who was hit by a stolen car as he tried to stop it from getting away. that is the point of the least real, to remind people of the police officers who have given their lives in the line of duty? exactly. we have a role here, to remember police officers, that was never fulfilled before the foundation of our charity, which was set up following the tragic drowning of three police officers in lancashire, when they went to help a man who was in trouble in the sea off blackpool. it was recognised at that point there was recognised at that point there was no roll of honourfor the uk. we have built on that since, and we now have built on that since, and we now have the roll of honour, which has gone worldwide, we have had contact from all over the world come people
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saying how pleased and proud they of their loved ones who names of remembered at this national memorial, which was founded by the late michael winner. he set this memorial up in are following the tragic murder of yvonne fletcher all those years ago. we work closely together. we know that there are other police charities for the wider police family who will be there, working quietly in the background, to help today and into the future to bring comfort and sucker to the loved ones of fallen officers. foreign ministers from the g7 leading nations are meeting in italy today. they'll discuss how to persuade russia to end its military support for syria's president assad, following last week's chemical attack.
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the next two days in the tuscan walled city of lucca will be dominated by a collective search for arguments to persuade vladimir putin that he must now end russia's military support for syria's president assad and help to accelerate a negotiated political transition. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to press the case for new sanctions against russia if they don't give ground. president trump's secretary of state rex tillerson wants to go on from here to moscow, able to confront the russians with a strong set of demands, backed by america's key allies. our priority is, first, the defeat of isis. remove them from access to their caliphate, because that's where the threat to the homeland and to so many homelands of our coalition partners is emanating from. once we can eliminate the battle against isis, conclude that, and it is going quite well, then we hope to turn our attention to achieving ceasefire agreements between the regime and opposition forces. russia and iran, president assad's key military backers,
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are threatening retaliation if there are any further american strikes. it's far from clear that moscow's attitude has shifted significantly since either the gas attack or america's retaliatory but limited missile strike. years of effort trying to find a negotiated settlement have failed, and so the task here in italy of trying to find a new way to break the deadlocks still looks enormous. as foreign ministers gather, we can speak to our rome correspondent. what can they achieve in this meeting? a single voice. table one to try to speak with one voice to an out wrecks to listen to go to moscow later this week to say, this is what the g7 believes. the g7 believes that there should be a transition away from asad in syria. the trouble
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is, diplomacy has failed time and time again in the last few years, and it might be that in this meeting and it might be that in this meeting a lot of attention will be paid to what the american strategy is, because there is still confusion about what america's priority is. is it to defeat isis, or is it to defeat and carry out regime change? there will be a lot of focus on the fa ct there will be a lot of focus on the fact that boris johnson is there will be a lot of focus on the fact that borisjohnson is attending this meeting but refused to go to moscow. he cancelled the trip, he has a chance to talk to rex tillerson later today. it will be during that meeting that he will press for further sanctions, he during that meeting that he will press forfurther sanctions, he has already called assad toxic in every possible saints, but that is just one voice among seven. they'd
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distributed talk to russia directly, because the g7 is the remnant of the gs, because the g7 is the remnant of the g8, when russia was the table, but that ended with the conflict in crimea and eastern ukraine. the fact that russia is not the table is a reminder of the fractured allegiance between the west and russia. what can we expect out of this meeting, a line? a communiqu about sylvia, possibly about north korea and libya. at the very least, an idea of ag7 libya. at the very least, an idea of a g7 view, that rex tillerson could then take to moscow. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. thousands of police officers are to attend the funeral of keith palmer, murdered in last month's westminster attack. russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its
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support of syria's president assad, as foreign ministers meet for two days of talks. the bbc uncovers evidence implicating the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. sergio garcia has won the 2017 masters, his first major in 7a appearances. the 37—year—old secured the green jacket after beating englishman justin rose in an entertaining play—off. manchester united keep sunderland rooted to the bottom of the premier league after a 3—0 win at the stadium of light. united move up to fifth. everton ended leicester's winning run with a 4—2 victory at goodison park. romelu lu ka ku scored twice for the toffees and is the premier league's top goal scorer, with 23 goals. i'll be back with more on those stories. iam back i am back just i am backjust after 11:30am. the bbc has uncovered evidence that appears to implicate the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. a secret recording from 2008 obtained by panorama suggests it repeatedly pressured commercial
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banks to push down the rates at which they charged each other interest. the libor scandal first blew up in 2012, when barclays boss bob diamond was forced to resign. until recently, libor used to be set by a member of staff of the biggest banks, called a submitter, saying what interest rate they thought they'd have to pay to borrow money. an average was taken, called the london inter—bank offered rate, or liborfor short. the submitters were meant to base it only on their own genuine view of the market for borrowing and lending cash. panorama has uncovered a phone call on october 29th 2008, during the financial crisis, when a senior barclays banker, mark dearlove, tells the man putting in libor rates, peterjohnson, to push down his libor rates below the true cost of borrowing cash because of pressure from above. we played the recording
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to chris phelps mp, a member of the treasury select committee. if what dearlove is saying is true, that is shocking. this tape suggests that in fact the bank of england knew about it, and indeed were encouraging or even instructing it. so we need an immediate inquiry to find out exactly what is going on, given what we have just heard on this tape. the bank of england told panorama that libor and other global benchmarks were not regulated in the uk or elsewhere during the period in question. in egypt, funerals have begun for the more than a0 people killed in two attacks on coptic christian churches. the president has announced a three—month state of emergency
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after the bombings in alexandria and the city of tanta, near cairo. this is the moment a suicide bomber approaches the cathedral in alexandria. a security guard turned him away at the gate and directs him to a metal detector. seconds later, he detonates his explosive device. a day for christian celebration transformed into a scene of horror. the head of egypt's coptic church had been inside, but was unharmed. this was a coordinated attack. the first target was the church of st george in the city of tanta, also filled with worshippers. translation: the situation is painful, it is not fair. the authorities have received warnings before that the church has been targeted. why weren't measures being taken to protect people?
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hours later, this response from egypt's president. translation: several steps are to be taken. the first of which will be the declaration of a state of emergency for three months after the necessary legal procedures are complete. we are announcing the state of emergency only to protect our country and secure it. the measure means the army will be deployed to help police guard important buildings, and security forces will be able to make arrests without warrants. it is a significant announcement. egypt had been ruled for nearly two decades under a state of emergency. its unpopularity was a contributing factor in 2011's revolution. it comes after the islamic state group warned it would intensify its targeting of christians in egypt. on sunday evening, the first funerals were held for victims. egypt's copts have endured decades of discrimination, but after another day of grieving, a community known for its resilience is demanding greater
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protection in its own country. the swedish prime minister stefan lofven has declared today a national day of mourning, following friday's deadly lorry attack in the centre of stockholm. a minute of silence was observed outside the city hall. the prime minister, most of the royal family and the mayor took part, as flags we re and the mayor took part, as flags were held at half—mast. many swedes are back in the city centre for the first time since friday's attack, as they return to work, and the tributes keep coming. hundreds of thousands of flowers have been placed at the scene of the attack over the past few days. we now have more details about the victimes. four people killed in friday's attack, including a briton, a 41—year—old known as chris bevington. he built a life here in sweden, he worked for spotify. he had a swedish wife and two young children. an 11—year—old girl from sweden also
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caught up in the violence, along with another swede, and a belgian who was here as a tourist. there will be a minute's silence across sweden for the victims in the coming hours, as police continue to hold their main suspect, a 39—year—old from uzbekistan, understood to be driving the truck that crashed into the building just behind me. he had applied for residency here in sweden. that had been rejected, and he was due to be deported at the time of the attack. some vocational subjects in england's schools are being scrapped because of budget pressures, according to teaching unions. they claim teachers of subjects outside maths, english, science and the human teeth are at risk. one way of measuring performance at 16 is the english baccalaureate. to pass, teenagers need at least a gcse
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c grade pass, teenagers need at least a gcse cgrade in pass, teenagers need at least a gcse c grade in english, maths, the sciences, a language and either history or geography. it is a key measure of how a school is doing. but according to a poll carried out by two of england's biggest teaching unions, subjects not included are the ones being hit hardest by budget cuts. the 1200 school staff who responded to the poll, half were from secondary schools, three quarters of those said there had been cut to teaching posts in their schools in the last year, with non—baccalaureate subjects bearing the brunt. unions say the government must find more money fast. the children are missing out, because they are losing that broad and rich and deep educational experience. education cuts, whatjordan do not get as children, they will never make up. the government says school
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funding is at record levels, but critics say it is not keeping up with costs, and one of a £3 billion funding gap in the end of the decade. executives at shell knew that money paid as part of a business deal would end up in the hands of a money—laundering. they paid money to the nigerian government, which passed on more than $1 billion to a company controlled by a former oil minister, who have previously been convicted of money—laundering. shell does not believe any comment or former employees acted illegally. police in manchester who launched extra patrols in the city centre after receiving calls about people passing out from taking the and drug spice. the police that they had dealt with 31 calls related to the drug in 2a hours after it launched a two—day banning order in the city centre. it has been reported the
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substance centre. it has been reported the su bsta nce left centre. it has been reported the substance left some users looking like zombies. australian scientists say two thirds of the great barrier reef has now been devastated by severe coral bleaching. it's caused by rising water temperatures, and researchers say surveys show an accelerated rate of damage along the coast of queensland. mass bleaching makes the coral fragile and can kill it. the reef is home to more than 130 species of shark and 1,600 varieties of fish. with me is our science editor david shukman. coral bleaching, it it exactly that, but it loses its colour? it turns white, because cole has an interesting relationship with an algae, they live together, the algae provides the food, the col provides nutrients, but if the water temperature gets above a certain level for a particular length of time, that relationship cannot survive, and the algae leave the coral. the algae provide the colour
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as well as the food, so once they have left, you end up with a white skeleton have left, you end up with a white s keleto n of have left, you end up with a white skeleton of a coral brief, and you get some eerie shots, it is like a graveyard , get some eerie shots, it is like a graveyard, from going from a teeming ecosystem to this awful wasteland. many of the scientists who study this problem are quite shocked by what has happened. this can happen perfectly naturally. the great barrier reef has suffered for bleaching events in 20 years. in two yea rs bleaching events in 20 years. in two years running, last year and this year, giving the coral no chance to recover. scientists are using the word terminal, which makes it sound like it is irreversible? there are many different species, some are tougher than others, some can cope with warmer water for longer than others. the scientist i was just talking to was talking about it being patchy, you can have a bit of a brief where some may be damaged,
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and others will not be, so they need to know how many will come back. typically the fastest—growing take about a decade to recover, if all is well, if the water is cool enough. if you get to accrue bleaching events in consecutive years, you wipe out the chance for them to recover, so it is likely the mortality rate will be higher than for a normal previous reaching event. the scientists are worried. they say some will look over, it is not the end of the reef, but they are warning that it is under a great deal of threat, not only from global warming, but from pollution and cyclone damage. if it is weakened by all of these things together, that will threaten its long—term survival. can anything be done in a localised sense? quite apart from the big questions about climate change? the immediate thing that some scientists have wanted to see happen for years is to stop farmers
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in lands spraying their fields with pesticides, that then run off into the rivers, make their way into the ocean and killed the reef. that is a major source of disruption. and construction along the shoreline generates a huge amount of sediment, which gets into the water, and it can smother the reef. there is also localised destruction, dishing on the reef, dynamite, so there is all sorts of things that can be done to minimise the immediate damage, but the long—term problem is on how do you reverse the rising temperatures? harry potter and the cursed child has won a record—breaking nine olivier awards, which celebrate the best in theatre. they include best actor forjamie parker, who plays the wizard, and noma dumezweni, who plays hermione grainger, won best supporting actress. the stage show has now become the most—decorated production in the history of the olivier awards. just talking about the problem of
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rising temperatures in some parts of the world, but here we are going the other way. if you saw 25 yesterday, you will not see its like again this week. temperatures must closer to the senior —— seasonal bohm. the cloud filling in in cambridge. in cheshire, there always was more cloud. the cool breeze. the cloud continues to develop and fill in across many parts through the afternoon. it pops of some showers, most concentrated across the eastern side of the pennines, and plenty of showers there. a much cooler atmosphere across the northern isles. more cloud and rain into the northern and north—western parts of scotland. if the sky is clearer
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further south for any length of time, there could be some frost to start your day on tuesday. the cloud and rain there to be had. noticeable wind across the north and north west of scotland. further south, a half decent date. it feels like spring. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: thousands of police officers are expected to line the streets of london for the funeral of pc keith palmer at southwark cathedral. the 48—year—old was murdered in the westminster attack last month. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, has said washington will hold to account any and all who attack innocents anywhere in the world, as last week's suspected chemical attack in syria looks set to dominate the g7 summit in italy. do it for seve — sergio garcia claims the masters for the first
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time on the day his mentor and hero would have turned 60. let's go over to the sports centre. sergio garcia has said his masters win was a dream come true. at 37—years—old, he has finally won has first major championship and had to do it via a tense play—off because he and england'sjustin rose were tied at nine under par after the day's play. garcia is the third spaniard to win at augusta, on what was a particularly poignant day. watch out for some flash photography, as tim hague reports. some things are just written. and sergio garcia winning a first major on the day that his hero turned 60 was one of them. to do it on his 60th birthday and tojoin him
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and my other idol in golf, my whole life, it is absolutely amazing. i felt calmness. i am so happy. and no wonder, the battle he had withjustin rose was among the finest in masters history. no one else could close to them. it was simply a two horse race for the title. they were both on eight under par going to the final nine holes. the spaniard seemed to collapse, finding the trees, the rough, and even a spot in there. he needed something special on the 15, and he found it. oh, that was great. sergio garcia will have that for an eagle. and with the tree still shaking, he would get that eagle, only forjustin rose to get a birdie himself. the olympic champion never giving up. with three holes to play, they were both nine under. yet these ryder cup teammates
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and good friends kept going at it. down the 18. still level. shot into the final green. equally impressive. neither man deserved to lose, in truth. they both missed their putts, meaning a sudden death play—off. the light was fading. but sergio garcia was still shining. this putt for a first major. you have done it at last. at the 74th attempt, sergio garcia has mastered the majors, and he leaves with the green jacket. garcia pointing to the sky in honour of seve there, and he certainly had the support of seve's sons. miguel ballesteros tweeted, "happy 60th dad, best of luck sergio garcia. it would be amazing if you win the masters on such a special date." he later went on to congratulate
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garcia with another picture of his father with garcia — you deserve it more than anyone. rory mcilroy added: "2 unbelievable players and 2 great friends, but i couldn't be happierfor sergio garcia. you deserve it all amigo. so garcia is the nearly man no more. prior to this year at augusta, he'd finished in the top 10 of a major 22 times. it's taken garcia 7a attempts to finally win one. that's the most for any champion, beating tom kite who won the us open after 72 attempts. prize money — he's £1.6 million richer today. a consolation forjustin rose, who just missed out on the green jacket, he pockets £960,000. we will both get up tomorrow morning
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and our careers will go on. there are many more goals this year, many more objectives i look forward to. us open, the open championship at birkdale for me will be a big one. it is disappointing to come so close, but the year is only getting going now. some breaking news for rugby league. st helens have sacked their head coach keiron cunningham after 2a yea rs of coach keiron cunningham after 2a years of the club. they are seventh in the super league table. that is all the sport for now. more now on our top story and thousands of police officers from around the uk will line the streets of london this afternoon for the funeral of pc keith palmer. in the past hour, pc palmer's name has been added to the national police memorial in central london. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death outside parliament last month. a service is due to take place at southwark cathedral. let's go back to daniela relph
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at southwark cathedral. that funeral service will be held here this afternoon. it will be at full police service funeral with all of the pomp and ceremony that brings. it will have to be a public memorial. keith palmer died of early public death. there is the bringing the people want to honour his sacrifice, but we must remember it will also be a private family funeral. what is noticeable being on the streets of southwark in the last couple of hours, is the number of police officers beginning to arrive here. it is notjust metropolitan police officers, but officers from around the country who have come here today to pay their respects. to show support for a colleague
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stone here. like my colleague said, we are a big family so it made sense to come down and do our bit. moments like this, how important is put the peace community to come together question extremely. there is no word for it other than that, really. they have estimated 5,000 bees coming down. you can't say there than that. it is important. the horrific terrorist incident that we have had it will try to drive everyone apart, it will try to drive everyone apart, it has done the opposite, brought everyone together. with had free transport for police officers. people are putting food on. for great britain as a whole it has brought us closer together sol think it is really important at times like this that we come together as a nation and become stronger. days like this, does it make you feel more supported as a
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police officer? i do, yeah. i have noticed this support as a police service as a whole by members of the public, they have appreciated that we are willing to put our lives and harm's way. we will put her own safety in the back of our minds to do that. it means a lot to have the community behind this as a whole. the funeral cortege is due to leave westminster at 1:30pm this afternoon, where keith palmer has been buying unrest for the last day. it will be led by mounted police through westminster, across lambeth bridge, to southwark cathedral for the funeral service at two o'clock this afternoon. as we've been hearing, foreign ministers from the g7 group of industrialised nations are meeting in italy over the next two days with the conflict in syria high on the agenda. western nations want russia to distance itself from president assad after the recent chemical weapons attack. so do the current tensions between washington and moscow over syria mean that cordial relations
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between donald trump and vladimir putin are finally over? our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg has been looking at the russian morning papers. it wasn't so long ago that the russian media, particularly the programme then press was so full of praise of donald trump, but that has all changed. here we see trump, the us strike on syria, and the headline, aggression. seven reasons for alarm after the us strike on syria. this one is, you can't believe what donald trump says. inside, trump leads at victorious war. from pleased the hawks puppetry is the voters. trump doesn't care about facts and balls. trump acts on about facts and balls. trump acts on a hunch not a strategy. and trump is mademoiselle strikes left so—called islamic state the winner. this is a
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very creative front page. the missile launcher with the jam bottle of champagne instead of missiles and the headline, we believed the new, comrades donald, more than we believed in ourselves. the champions represents hope the russians celebrated donald trump's election win. inside, the paper talks about how the russian media are quickly changing the way they portray donald trump. it says here that after the strike on syria, for internal consumption, only image of donald trump is being slapped together, which allows a return to the cosy matrix of the cold war. here, the paper talks about a possible deal between moscow and washington. the paper says that when rex taylor saint comes to moscow on tuesday, but could be an agreement. the two teams act in the same public relations field, the paper says, but
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similar methods. there is a basic foundation for mutual understanding and actions. there is the basis for deals. similar cautious option in another paper. it says that russia reacted more power only to the us missile strike on syria than a could of done and the paper concludes that in moscow, moscow is still hoping that there will be a radical shift in us policy toward syria. it is 200 years since parkinson's was discovered and still there is no cure. some drugs can control the symptoms, but campaigners say progress in developing new treatments is too slow. one of the reasons, they say, is because it's less common than diseases like alzheimers, which has six times as many people living with the condition. today, the charity parkinson's uk is launching a new drive to raise money for more research. jayne mccubbin has been to meet 22—year—old jordan webb who is living with parkinson's and takes up to 15 tablets every day. this is not the kind of face usually associated with parkinson's.
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the average age of onset is 60. jordan's diagnosis came when he was 16. when you first heard the diagnosis... shattered. shattered you, yes. absolutely shattered, because he went from this... he was outgoing, loved the girls, and thinking, is he going to be the same? felt like my heart had been ripped out. in 1817, james parkinson called this the shaking palsy. 200 years on, there is still no cure. it is so much to deal with. it has been really challenging, because i have to go to university with it. i am actually applying myself more. he still managed to graduate. he is still managing to sit a masters degree. i am so proud of him. but the drugs only help so much.
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some drugs mask the symptoms of parkinson's, others deal with the side—effects of the drugs to mask the symptoms of parkinson's. but they don't slow its progression, and eventually they will stop working. they only work for so long, forfive or ten years. parkinson's uk say it is time to change that. today they launched the we won't wait campaign. we broughtjordan to london, to come to parkinson's hq, to meet the man at the helm. have you got some good news? unfortunately, there is no good news. they only really treat the symptoms of the disease, so we are only papering over the cracks. why so little progress with this neurological condition, when medical science elsewhere has made great strides? the professor tells us the reason is simple. lack of investment.
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well, parkinson's is on the borderline of profitability for drug companies. you know, if there were more people affected by the disease, you would get more profit back from the science. we have got all the tools, we have got all the knowledge, we just need the cash to drive the process forward. until a cure, alljordan can do is manage symptoms. complementary therapies help. for some, it is dance, others swim. jordan is trying something new. very good. how does that feel? yeah, feels good. it is fine. challenging, but it is rewarding when i get it right. 200 years after the condition was identified, parkinson's uk say those living with the condition shouldn't have to wait any more. a cure is within reach, with the right funding. it could and should happen, they say, in jordan's lifetime. it does feel close, but we're not
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getting any investment. so we are there, but we are not there yet. i have a lot ahead of me, i want to look forward to. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer who was murdered in last month's westminster attack. russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syrian's president assad, as foreign ministers from the g7 nations meet for two days of talks. scientists say unprecedented coral bleaching has damaged two—thirds of australia's great barrier reef. now the business news: jes staley, the chief
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executive of barclays, is to be investigated by regulators for trying to identify a whistleblower in 2016. mr staley has said he thought he was allowed to identify the person despite the need for anonymity. the bank says it will cut mr staley‘s bonus substantially ? that is understood to be by up to £1.3 million. a secret recording implicating the bank of england in the libor rigging scandal has been uncovered by the bbc‘s panorama programme. the recording, from 2008, adds to evidence that the bank of england repeatedly pressured commercial banks to push their libor rates down during the financial crisis. libor is the rate at which banks lend money to each other and sets the rate for mortgages and loans. the bbc has seen evidence that top bosses at shell knew money paid to the nigerian government for a vast oil field would be passed to a convicted money—launderer and be used to pay political bribes. shell says it did not believe its employees acted illegally. shell has been active in nigeria for nearly 60 years and was keen to acquire the field.
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jes staley, the chief executive of barclays, is to be investigated by the financial conduct authority and the prudential regulation authority. they say mr staley tried to identify a whistleblower in 2016. mr staley has said he thought he was allowed to identify the person. the bank says it will make a very significant compensation adjustment" as our business editor, simon jack, told me a little earlier. very unusual story, this. he is accused of sticking his nose in where as ceo couldn't. he hired someone from his old employerjp morgan chase. this person had had some personal issues in the past. someone wrote to the members of the board of someone wrote to the members of the boa rd of ba rclays someone wrote to the members of the board of barclays bank questioning whether this new person was a suitable hirer and saying that maybe
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the fact thatjes staley was an old friend of his meant that the normal hiring procedures had been ignored. jes staley took this as a personal knifing somebody who had problems in the past but was not ok and that didn't sit well with him. he wanted to know who sent the letter. he was told to back off, it was none of his business. he then thoughts he was cleared to start the hunt again, and he tried to get us agencies to find out who sent the letter. whistle—blowing only works if the system is anonymous and that is why regulators get so upset that chief executives are allowed to hunt on whistle—blowers the system just doesn't work. he admits he has messed up, it will cost them dearly, potentially up to £1.3 million from his bonus last year. regulators love whistle—blowers, they help them do their job, whistle—blowers, they help them do theirjob, they whistle—blowers, they help them do their job, they want whistle—blowers, they help them do theirjob, they want to get to the bottom of this. theirjob, they want to get to the bottom of this. the uk economy is already adjusting to a life outside the european union
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and could grow even faster this year and next. that's according to a report from an influential economic forecasting group. the ey item club is closely watched and their spring forecast says that our economy will grow at 1.8% this year — that's up from 1.3%, which it previously predicted. it put the upturn down to a couple of things — the weak value of the pound which is making british goods a lot cheaper overseas. and also lots of countries, particularly the rich ones, are seeing their economies improve so they are buying more. let's speak to the chief economic advisor of the ey item club, peter spencer, who joins us from the newsroom. good morning. let's talk about this back—up and recovery because you're pretty optimistic about our fortunes but this year and next. we are optimistic about this year certainly compared to six months ago, due to the combination of the devaluation of the pound, we have known that
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ever since the referendum result, but that is coming against a background in which the world economy is stronger now than at any time since the initial bounce back from recession in 2010. it is that combination which is making this the valuation work. compared to the last big devaluation in 2008, then the world economy was very weak, so our exports hardly grew at all. this time they are really motoring. given all the instability that surrounds the brexit votes and what happens next, people would say you are either brave or stupid to try to predict what happens next. i'm not suggesting either! but you see my point. it is hard for anyone to figure out what will happen. days. we really need to see investment in
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new export capacity. unfortunately, until producers and managers see the shape of brexit, they are very unlikely to be confident enough to make that investment. that is the real threat to this export recovery. in the meantime, we are seeing consumer spending fall as a result of the higher inflation that came from the devaluation. that means that the economy, don't get the wrong impression, 1.8% is similar to last yea r‘s wrong impression, 1.8% is similar to last year's growth, but it will slow through the year and next year we arejust through the year and next year we are just looking at through the year and next year we arejust looking at 1.2% through the year and next year we are just looking at 1.2% growth. those figures are slightly perceptive. the make-up of that growth is different, isn't that? absolutely. the first time in many yea rs we a re absolutely. the first time in many years we are seeing growth is not from the consumer that has been a real powerhouse of this economy
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since the recession, we are seeing growth from higher exports. that so—called rebalancing is a very nice development indeed. it is the quality of growth as well as the quantity of growth that we need to look at. peter spencer, good to talk to you. peter spencer, good to talk to you. in other business news, the budget hotel chain travelodge is now attracting more custom from business than leisure visitors for the first time. the firm, which has undergone a £100 million modernisation programme, says it will open 60 hotels over the next three years, including one in central london. in 2012, the chain was bought by two us hedge funds after its debts nearly dragged the company under. operating profits for 2016 are up £5 million to £110 million. brewdog, the aberdeenshire—based craft brewer, is now worth more than £1 billion after selling a stake to a us private equity firm. the brewer has raised £213 million from tsg
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consumer partners, for a 22% stake. the deal will see about £100 million paid out to the brewer's co—founders, a further £100m go into the business and the rest used to buy shares from early investors. brewdog grew its business by raising money through crowdfunding and has 55,000 small investors. the boss of southern rail was paid just under half a million pounds during a year in which the service was disrupted by strikes and tumbling profits. charles horton, the chief executive of govia thameslink railway, pocketed £478,000 in the last financial year according to the latest accounts just released. the dispute between southern and the unions over driver—only operated trains is ongoing. a train carrying british goods left essex earlier today for a seven and a half thousand mile journey through seven countries to china. it will take just over two weeks to reach its destination — by sea it would take up to six weeks to get there and its thought this route will make it more affordable for exporters
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to sell their goods to china. steph mcgovern was there for us earlier. good morning from london gateway. as you can see, the port behind me word lasts of containers are coming in off the ships. the reason we are here is because of this train. it will be the first train to travel from the uk to china carrying lots of different products that have been made here in the uk. it is everything from pharmaceuticals, soft drinks, baby products, all the things that people in china like to buy from us. it is interesting when you look at the statistics, we have something like £16 billion worth of products that we sell to china each year, and about £40 billion that we import from china, so a big difference there. the government and businesses here are hoping they can dojust businesses here are hoping they can do just that deficit and get more of our stuff to china. that train has
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now left derek nsx. it can take substantially longer if these things went by see. this will take a drought across the continent. it is not actually the same train because it has two account for all the different narrowness it has two account for all the different na rrowness of it has two account for all the different narrowness of the railways through the countries that. the goods will be lifted on and off that as it makes its journey. goods will be lifted on and off that as it makes itsjourney. it will ta ke as it makes itsjourney. it will take just over two weeks to go 7500 miles. interestingly, it is about selling uk goods overseas. traditionally, lots of stuff would come from china in containers. now we are selling stuff back to china as the growing middle class there gets more and more wealthy, they are becoming consumers for our goods. that is all from me. more later. the headlines are coming up
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on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. good morning. still pretty decent through my front door here at central london. it is increasingly not the case elsewhere. after a bright enough staff for many, this was yesterday in cambridgeshire. this is more typical of the scene thatis this is more typical of the scene that is developing as we speak across these two inside of the british isles. they got to 25 degrees in kent over the course of yesterday. overnight, a cold front has worked its way in over the british isles introducing a career, fresh appeal. after the bright start, the cloud is filling in quite markedly, fairweather klaipeda most part, but that is not to say i am promising you all a dry afternoon.
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isolated showers for the most part, but there are 12 areas that will see more than their fair share of showers. there probably will be the case the case then southwest wilson south—west england. anywhere from the south midlands await towards the north of england, particularly the north—east, you could see one of two sharp showers here. one in northern ireland that many of you dry here. plenty of showers in the north of scotland, cold day here particularly in orkney and shetland. they on in the day you will lose your sunshine in the north—western quarter because we have weather fronts coming in adding room to the mix. ice bar is quite noticeable there, quite breezy across the northern parts of scotland. further south, in across the northern parts of scotland. furthersouth, in the countryside, if your skies are clear you might end up of a touch of frost, but that converts into a decent enough staff of the day. further north, close to the weather
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fronts, i'm afraid it is one of those days for northern and north—western scotland, cloudy, wet and windy. in the wednesday, another weakening weather front across the british isles and behind that the isobars go british isles and behind that the isoba rs go round british isles and behind that the isobars go round towards the north westerly, so again i could feel to the day behind a weather front, but you will notice that you come for the site the rain tends to die away. if you were looking for a bit of rainforyour if you were looking for a bit of rain for your garden if you were looking for a bit of rainforyourgarden in if you were looking for a bit of rain for your garden in the south, it might not be the future for you. essentially, it stays dry and southern parts towards the easter weekend. easter weekend itself as driver of the most part. there will be some showers around and there will still be a cool order —— cold northerly breeze. this is bbc news. i'm sophie long live in westminster. the headlines at midday. thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in last month's westminster attack.
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to show support for our colleagues. we area to show support for our colleagues. we are a big family. it made sense to come down and do our bit. earlier, pc palmer's name was added to the national police memorial on the mall in central london. hundreds of police officers are beginning to gather to honour the sacrifice of pc keith palmer. his funeral service will be healthier 2pm. i'm reeta chakrabarti with the rest of the day's headlines. russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syrian's president assad, as foreign ministers from the g7 nations meet for two days of talks. the bbc uncovers evidence implicating the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. scientists say "unprecedented" coral bleaching has damaged two thirds
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of australia's famous reef. the nearly man no more. sergio garcia wins his first major title on his 74th time of asking, with victory over england's justin rose in a sudden—death play—off at the masters. it is something amazing. i felt the calmest i have ever felt on major sunday. i am so happy. good afternoon from westminster, where in the next few hours thousands of police officers will line the streets of central london for the funeral procession of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in the attack at westminster last month. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death by khalid masood as he stood guard outside the palace of westminster.
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his coffin will be taken from a chapel beneath the houses of parliament to southwark cathedral for a full police—service funeral. it is normally an honour reserved for great statesmen and women, but the queen agreed that the same privilege should be granted to keith palmer. he was 48, a father to a five—year—old girl, and a husband. he was killed while protecting parliament. earlier, a small service was held in the mall in london, where his name was added to the roll of honour. there were members from the west mercia police force, who came to pay their respects. the service was led by the chairman of the police roll of honour trust. policemen and women from all over the country from more than 40 forces
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have made their way to london to pay their respects to pc keith palmer. they have been telling us why they have come. support for our colleagues down here. like my colleague said, we are a big family, so it made sense to come down and do our bit. at moments like this, how important is it for the community to come together? extremely. there is no other word for it. everyone coming together like this, an estimated 5,000 bobbies coming down, cannot say fairer than that. i think it is important. an horrific terrorist incident, trying to drive everyone apart, it has done the opposite, it has brought everyone together. you could see thousands here today, people putting food on. for great britain, it has brought people closer together. it is important that we come together as a nation
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and become stronger. does it make you feel more supported as a police officer? yes. when you are on the front line, i have noticed the support for the police service as a whole by members of the public, they appreciate we are willing to put ourselves in harm's way, we are there to protect the public. we put our own safety to the back of our mind. it is good, it means a lot to have the community behind us as a whole. the thought of a view officers who have come to london to pay their respects. at 1:30pm his coffin will be brought out of the chapel, where it has been lying in rest, onto the streets of westminster, past the place where he lost his life less than three weeks ago. it will make its way across the river to southwark cathedral for a full
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police funeral. yesterday, the coffin of pc keith palmer was brought to the palace of westminster, the place where he worked, the place he had been protecting when he was killed last month. overnight, an honour guard made up of members of the parliamentary and diplomatic protection command has been watching over his coffin in the chapel of st mary undercroft inside the palace. pc palmer's funeral is to be held at southwark cathedral this afternoon. some of his colleagues who worked alongside him have been paying tribute, describing him as hard—working, selfless, a dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed working with the public. one of the kindest people you'll ever find. very giving, very loyal, a true friend. a fantastic policeman. he was so down—to—earth and so normal. he came to work because he had a family to support. that was all he ever wanted to do, be there for his family. officers from across the uk are expected to travel to london to line the route of the funeral cortege from westminster
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to southwark cathedral. police forces will be holding two minutes' silence to remember their fallen colleague, while flags on force headquarters will be lowered to half—mast. people have already started to gather here to watch as pc keith palmer's funeral procession goes past. it will make its way to southwark cathedral, where people will be gathering now from all over the country. this will be a full police service funeral, with all the pomp and ceremony that that brings. i have beenin ceremony that that brings. i have been in southwark for two or three hours, it is interesting, seeing how many police officers are on the ground. we have watched bus—loads of officers arriving from across the country. officers from across the country. officers from across the country have come to london today to honour the sacrifice of their fallen
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colleague. there will be a large number of metropolitan police officers here in the precinct of the cathedral, they are wearing their number—1 dress, their formal cathedral, they are wearing their number—1 dress, theirformal police uniform will stop their helmets, their caps, white gloves. it is a sombre day here. it is a service thatis sombre day here. it is a service that is going to have to do two things. on one hand, it is going to bea things. on one hand, it is going to be a public tribute, pc keith palmer died a very public death. there is a sense that people want to publicly remember him and pay tribute to him today. we also have to remember that for the family of keith palmer, for his wife and daughter and parents and brothers and sisters, this will bea and brothers and sisters, this will be a private family funeral. earlier, the dean of southwark cathedral spoke to us of the difficulty of trying to combine those two things, but he said at the heart of today's event, the family
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of keith palmer. despite the pomp and ceremony, it is about his family and ceremony, it is about his family and giving them time to grieve and to say goodbye. iamjoined by i am joined by the former commander of specialist operations at scotland yard. this is a public event, it has -- it is yard. this is a public event, it has —— it isa yard. this is a public event, it has —— it is a time for the public to honour the sacrifice, but also, a deeply personal time. for his wife and family and friends. as somebody who has attended full police services, talk us through how those two things are combined. it is a balance. it depends on what the family want for the officer. this is a unique occasion, when the service wa nts to a unique occasion, when the service wants to do right by its fallen colleague, when officers want to express themselves and show their respect for what he has achieved and given tom but also it is important
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that that balance maintains this deeper personal thing for his family, for them to be able to say how they want their husband and father and family member to be remembered. it will be a moving occasion for both the force, for the greater police family, and for his own family. in terms of the number of people, particularly police officers, that are arriving in london, it is a deeply sad occasion when anybody loses a colleague, no matter how, talk to us about the sense of being a police officer and when you lose one of your own. there area number of when you lose one of your own. there are a number of things that go on. you think about what would have happened if it had been me there. a lot of officers when they go home, theirfamilies say, lot of officers when they go home, their families say, that could have been you. how are you protecting yourself? the emotion runs deep and wide. there will be a lot of
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conversation in canteens and across kitchen tables about the role of a police officer, and unarmed police officer defending the palace of westminster, downing street, buckingham palace, these very iconic locations. people will say, are you happy to carry on? i am certain that 99% of them will say, this is what i joined four, this is part of the job i love, what i want to do. they face this kind of threat everyday. in terms of a day like this, it is a deeply personal occasion, a time when they can remember their colleague, but we should remember that we are expecting thousands of people to come here, many police officers will be working. as the cortege passes, the officers will briefly turn and face the cortege, but they also have a very important role in protecting the public and ensuring that this terrible tragic
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event that has taken place, there are no other incidents to mark it. there is a huge security operation in central london, anybody trying to get around westminster will see that. it is a complex situation. great and have responsibility for any police officer working on a day like this. the sense of responsibility runs right from the very top of the force. cressida dick ta kes very top of the force. cressida dick takes up her role as commissioner today, right down to the pcs who will stand here outside the palace of westminster. there is a huge sense of responsibility, respect and compassion. give us a sense of what we can expect from a full police funeral. it is a dignified affair, we have already seen the coughing being taken into the palace of westminster, draped with the false flag. that cannot happen without the family agreeing to it. we will see
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the coughing, out, it will be carried by close friends and associates, colleagues who have worked with him, and then we will see a slow procession along here, past the palace of westminster, where the officer served, and there will be lots of members of parliament and members of the lord out to pay their respects as well, thousands of members of the public. it will possess very slowly and in a very dignified way, allowing the officers on the route to show their respect by turning to face it until it meets southwark cathedral. the service will be a deeply personal, family affair, but with the input from people who have worked with the officer in an operational role. it will be the balance all the time. as we speak, the coffin is lying in the chapel behind us, in the palace of
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westminster. it is an honour that is normally reserved to great statesmen and women. the last person was tony benn, three years ago. before him, margaret thatcher. how important do you think it is to police officers across the country that that privilege has been granted to keith palmer? it is incredibly symbolic. the palace of westminster is a royal palace, nothing can happen within a royal palace without her majesty's consent. the fact that his body has been allowed to rest in a royal palace is immensely significant for the police service. it sends a message to the police service that, we are behind you. and i'll have much more here from westminster and from southwark over the rest of the afternoon. back to you, reeta. foreign ministers from the g7 leading nations are meeting in italy today. they'll discuss how to persuade russia to end its military support for syria's president assad, following last week's chemical attack.
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the next two days in the tuscan walled city of lucca will be dominated by a collective search for arguments to persuade vladimir putin that he must now end russia's military support for syria's president assad and help to accelerate a negotiated political transition. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is expected to press the case for new sanctions against russia if they don't give ground. president trump's secretary of state rex tillerson wants to go on from here to moscow, able to confront the russians with a strong set of demands, backed by america's key allies. our priority is, first, the defeat of isis. remove them from access to their caliphate, because that's where the threat to the homeland and to so many homelands of our coalition partners is emanating from. once we can eliminate the battle against isis, conclude that, and it is going quite well, then we hope to turn our attention to achieving ceasefire agreements between the regime
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and opposition forces. russia and iran, president assad's key military backers, are threatening retaliation if there are any further american strikes. it's far from clear that moscow's attitude has shifted significantly since either the gas attack or america's retaliatory but limited missile strike. years of effort trying to find a negotiated settlement have failed, and so the task here in italy of trying to find a new way to break the deadlocks still looks enormous. earlier, i spoke to our rome correspondent james reynolds, and i asked him what exactly foreign ministers will be hoping to achieve in this meeting. they will want to try to speak with one voice to allow rex tillerson to go to moscow later this week to say, this is what the g7 believes. the g7 believes that there should be a transition away from assad. but
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diplomacy has failed time and time again in the last few years, and it might be that in this meeting a lot of attention will be paid to what the american strategy is. because there are still a lot of confusion is about what america's priority is. is it to defeat isis, or is it to defeat and carry out regime change? there will be a lot of focus on the fa ct there will be a lot of focus on the fact that boris johnson is there will be a lot of focus on the fact that borisjohnson is attending this meeting but refused to go to moscow. he cancelled the trip, he has a chance to talk to rex tillerson for a one—on—one meeting later today. it will be during that meeting that he will press for further sanctions, he has already called assad toxic in every possible sense. that is just one voice among seven. a larger point is that they
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usedit seven. a larger point is that they used it be able to talk to russia directly, because the g7 is the remnant of what used to be g8. that ended with the conflict in the crimea and eastern ukraine. the fact that russia is not a big table is already a reminder of the fractured relations between the west and russia in the last few years. what can we expect out of this meeting eventually come a line? a communiqu , possibly about syria, possibly about north korea and libya. at the very least, an idea of ag7 libya. at the very least, an idea of a g7 view that rex tillerson could then take to moscow. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer, murdered in last month's westminster attack. russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syria's president assad,
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as foreign ministers of the g7 meet for two days of talks. we uncover evidence indicating the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. that catch up with the sport. sergio garcia said his masters when win was a dream come true. after 73 failed attempts, it is his first triumph ina failed attempts, it is his first triumph in a major. there is some flash photography coming up. justin rose pushed him all the way. they finished on nine under par, forcing a play—off at the 18th. justin rose's drive was wayward, and garcia sank this for victory. he has become the third spaniard to win at augusta. as well as a cheque for £1.6 million, his victory earned him the green jacket, resented
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£1.6 million, his victory earned him the greenjacket, resented by £1.6 million, his victory earned him the green jacket, resented by danny willett. -- the green jacket, resented by danny willett. —— presented. i felt the calmest i have ever felt ona i felt the calmest i have ever felt on a major sunday. even after making a couple of bogeys, i was still very positive. i still believed that there were a lot of holes i could get to. i had some really good shots coming in. i am so happy! lots of support coming in for him. seve ballesteros's sun tweeted. garcia is the nearly man no more. prior to this year, he had finished
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in the top ten of a major 22 times. it has taken him 74 attempts to win this one. that is the most for any champion, beating the player who would the us open after 72 attempts. the consolation forjustin rose, he just missed out, that he pockets £960,000. we have been friends for a long time, we have played against each other since we were 14. we will both get up tomorrow morning and our careers will go on, he will be happy for a month and go full takeover. i will be disappointed for a month and golf will take over, and we carry on. there are many more goals this year. i look forward to the us open, the open at birkdale. this was the highlight of the spring, and one target, disappointing to come so close, but the year is only getting
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going now. that is all for now, i will see you in the next hour. the bbc has uncovered evidence that appears to implicate the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. a secret recording from 2008 obtained by panorama suggests it repeatedly pressured commercial banks to push down the rates at which they charged each other interest. the libor scandal first blew up in 2012, when barclays boss bob diamond was forced to resign. until recently, libor used to be set by a member of staff of the biggest banks, called a submitter, saying what interest rate they thought they'd have to pay to borrow money. an average was taken, called the london inter—bank offered rate, or liborfor short. the submitters were meant to base it only on their own genuine view of the market for borrowing and lending cash. panorama has uncovered a phone call on october 29th 2008, during the financial crisis, when a senior barclays banker, mark dearlove, tells the man putting in libor rates, peterjohnson, to push down his libor rates below the true
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cost of borrowing cash because of pressure from above. we played the recording to chris phelps mp, a member of the treasury select committee. if what dearlove is saying is true, that is shocking. this tape suggests that in fact the bank of england knew about it, and indeed were encouraging or even instructing it. so we need an immediate inquiry to find out exactly what is going on, given what we have just heard on this tape. the bank of england told panorama that libor and other global benchmarks were not regulated in the uk or elsewhere during the period in question.
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the swedish prime minister stefan lofven has declared today a national day of mourning, following friday's deadly lorry attack in the centre of stockholm. earlier, a minute of silence was observed in a ceremony outside stockholm's city hall. the prime minister, most of the royal family and the mayor of stockholm took part as flags were flown at half—mast. many swedes are back in the city centre for the first time since friday's attack, as they return to work, and the tributes keep coming. hundreds of thousands of flowers have been placed at the scene of the attack over the past few days. we now have more details about the victimes. four people killed in friday's attack, including a briton, a 41—year—old known as chris bevington. he built a life here in sweden, he worked for spotify. he had a swedish wife and two young children. an 11—year—old girl from sweden also caught up in the violence, along with another swede,
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and a belgian who was here as a tourist. there will be a minute's silence across sweden for the victims in the coming hours, as police continue to hold their main suspect, a 39—year—old from uzbekistan, understood to be driving the truck that crashed into the building just behind me. he had applied for residency here in sweden. that had been rejected, and he was due to be deported at the time of the attack. the head of the swedish police have said that they are very confident that they have the man who was driving the truck in that attack. emma has been under arrest for a few days —— a man. they are very confident they have the man who was driving the truck. funerals are being held for the
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victims of the bombings of coptic christians in egypt. the egyptian government has declared a three—month state of emergency after blast outside to churches where palm sunday was being celebrated left at least 44 people dead. some vocational subjects in england's schools are being scrapped because of budget pressures, according to teaching unions. the nut and atl unions claim teachers of subjects outside of maths, english, science and the humanities are most at risk. one way of measuring performance at 16 is the english baccalaureate. to pass, teenagers need at least a gcse c grade in english, maths, the sciences, a language and either history or geography. it is a key measure of how a school is doing. but according to a poll carried out by two of england's biggest teaching unions, subjects not included are the ones being hit hardest by budget cuts. of the 1,200 school staff who responded to the poll, half were from secondary schools.
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three quarters of those said there had been cuts to teaching posts in their schools in the last year, with non—baccalaureate subjects bearing the brunt. unions say the government must find more money fast. the children are missing out, because they are losing that broad and rich and deep educational experience. with education cuts, what children do not get as children, they will never make up. the government says school funding is at record levels, but critics say it is not keeping up with costs, and warn of a £3 billion funding gap by the end of the decade. bbc news has seen evidence which shows executives at the oil—and—gas company shell knew that money paid as part of a business deal would end up in the hands of a convicted money launderer. the company paid money to the nigerian government for an oilfield in 2011,
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which then passed on more than $1 billion to a company controlled by a former oil minister, who'd previously been convicted of money laundering. shell maintains it doesn't believe any current or former employees acted illegally. police in manchester have launched extra patrols in the city centre, after receiving a surge in calls about people passing out from taking the banned drug spice. greater manchester police said they dealt with 31 calls relating to the drug in 24 hours after it launched a two—day banning order in the city centre. it's been reported that the substance left some users looking like "zombies". the big cooldown is under way. yesterday was the warmest day of the year so far. but our early taste of summer has left us just as quickly as it arrived. we have more clout this afternoon.
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if you showers dotted around, a number of them affecting northern ireland for the next few hours. north—east england and northern areas of scotland are prone to showers. southern scotland has the best of the sunshine. it is not feel too bad in the sunshine. overnight, it is dry for england, wales and northern ireland. it is called, though. it could be cold enough for ground frost in isolated places. gardeners, take note. across northern scotland, rain through the night will be there for much of the day on tuesday. away from it, plenty of sunshine. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: thousands of police officers are expected to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer at southwark cathedral.
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the 48—year—old was murdered in the westminster attack last month. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, has said washington will hold to account any and all who attack innocent people, as last week's suspected chemical attack in syria looks set to dominate the g7 summit in italy. the bbc has uncovered a secret recording that implicates the bank of england in rigging the so—called libor interest rate. the material provides fresh evidence that it pressured banks to push rates down. sergio garcia wins his first major title on his 74th time of asking, with victory over england'sjustin rose in a sudden death play—off at the masters. well, let's return to our top story, the funeral of pc keith palmer, which takes place later this afternoon. let's go back to westminster and rejoin sophie long. we are in westminster. in the next
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hour we are expecting thousands of police officers and members of the public to line the streets as the funeral cortege of pc keith palmer makes its way from the palace of westminster where he has been lying in rest throughout the night, guarded at all times by two of his colleagues. the procession will make its way along millbank and make its way across the river to southwark cathedral. you can see the pictures of southwark cathedral now, you can see police officers already lining the street. we are expecting many thousands of police officers to make their way to southwark cathedral from all over the country. more than 14 police forces, many of them have been tweeting to say they have been making their way to london to pay their respects to pc keith palmer.
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he was 48 years old, a husband, a father to a five—year—old little girl. he was murdered less than three weeks ago during the terror attack on westminster. he was unarmed, protecting parliaments. today, thousands of his colleagues from across the country will come to london to honour his sacrifice. a full police funeral will take place at southwark cathedral. the roads around southwark cathedral have been closed off for over an hour and we have seen bus—loads of police officers coming from all over the country to pay their respects. the funeral service this afternoon will be conducted by the dean of southwark, the very reverend andrew nunn. thank you forjoining us. what will the service be like this
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afternoon? the essential thing to remember is that this is a funeral service, so everything else happening around it is wonderful and aware that the metropolitan police force can honour one of their colleagues, but at the heart of the service it is a funeral, where his widow and his daughter can come along and we can pay our respects to keith and lay him to rest. it is unusual in that pc keith palmer died a public death and there is a sense that this is a public memorial as well as a private family service. yes, and it needs to have both of those aspects to it, but they hope that the family will receive the comfort that they need through the service because they are having to grieve publicly, and that must be a very difficult thing. i can't imagine what that would be like. the rest of the nation also leads to pay at respects and say thank you for what he did in defending in the
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place where he was serving, doing his duty, defending democracy. place where he was serving, doing his duty, defending democracylj very his duty, defending democracy.” very important moment for the police service. we are seeing hundreds of police officers. it is a very important day for the police service. absolutely. they worked together so much as a team, defending one another as they defend us. to lose one of your colleagues must be tragic, a shock, but also make you realise just what it is that you are doing. this kind of act of remembering, banking, is really important for the police, but for all of us in the nation. has the family played a big part in contributing to the service? they have had their full part, contributing to the service? they have had theirfull part, as contributing to the service? they have had their full part, as any family would be expecting to do in helping to choose the heavens and the readings. the funeral is the funeral that they would want for their husband and father. in terms
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of view as the dean here, it is a poignant moment, the start of holy week, the service come at a poignant moment. it does because we are leading up night to remembering the death ofjesus leading up night to remembering the death of jesus on leading up night to remembering the death ofjesus on good friday, what looked hopeless, then on easter day the sign of great hope is god raised him from the dead. that sense of the ultimate sacrifice that one person can make for another in laying down their life, not just the can make for another in laying down their life, notjust the people they know but what they don't know, that is what has touched the hearts of so many people about the death of keith palmer, doing a bumper have the people he would never know. there is going to be a particularly moving passage from the gospel ofjohn? jesus said no greater love has a person than this than to lay down 1's life for 1's friends. it is a very moving passage would you read it but i think it will be particularly moving today, remembering what keith palmer has done. thank you very much for joining us. that funeral service for
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pc keith palmer here at southwark cathedral will begin at two o'clock this afternoon. cathedral will begin at two o'clock this afternoon. well, with me now is roy ramm, who's a former commander of specialist operations at scotland yard. thanks for being with us. we were just talking to the dean of southwark there to say that it is a chance for the public to say thank you, but it is a very personal time for his family. that is absolutely right. that is the way the service has been structured and balanced. it is therefore the family. it will be an extraordinary experience for the family to see the respect that pc keith palmer was held in by his colleagues, the value placed on his lost by the whole country. one hopes in the sense that offers the family support and they can feel the love
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thatis support and they can feel the love that is being expressed for him by his former colleagues from across the country and the metropolitan police. we saw a number of police officers already lining the streets around southwark cathedral. give us around southwark cathedral. give us a sense of how they will be feeling today. it is a very emotional day for them. they are in full dress uniform, wearing the white gloves. it is something they don't normally do unless it is a state occasion. they will field the significance of the day and many of them will be thinking, what if it was me? it easily could have been made. throughout the year thousands of police officers suffered injuries and assaults, thankfully not with the same consequences that keith palmer suffered. they will be thinking, that could be me. in the last ten years 11 police officers have lost their lives, most of them to includes constables doing an ordinary job.
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to includes constables doing an ordinaryjob. that will be going through their minds and their families. sadly, over the years, you lost officers in your command. this funeral in a way is unprecedented. not at all. there is no comparison. whenever a police officer dies and service there is always a degree of respect shown by colleagues from the local station, the local unit whatever, and they are dignified and symbolic occasions, but this is convivial unprecedented. for pc keith palmer to have lain in the palace of westminster with her magister‘s alliance, this is com pletely magister‘s alliance, this is completely unprecedented. less than three weeks on and we are just yards away from where he lost his life. he is now, as we speak, lying in rest
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in the palace of westminster, and honour normally afforded to tony benn was the last person a few years ago, before that margaret thatcher, ago, before that margaret thatcher, a former prime minister. what will it mean not just a former prime minister. what will it mean notjust to his family doctor police officers across the land that the queen has agreed that that privilege should be granted to him? it is an extraordinary honour. he was a palace of westminster police officer so there is that added significance. for her majesty's to allow this to happen, former prime minister is not a humble police officer defending democracy who has been allowed to stay there overnight guard by two police officers is massively significant. it says that the government, the royal family, significant. it says that the government, the royalfamily, are behind the service in what they are
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trying to achieve in protecting the public. thank you very much indeed. we are expecting the funeral cortege to pass as here in westminster at about1:30pm to pass as here in westminster at about 1:30pm this afternoon. back to you, reeta. well, earlier pc palmer's name was added to the national police memorial in central london. i've been speaking about the significance of that with steve lloyd from the police roll of honour trust. this significance of the name of the officers being added to the police roll of honour trust book of remembrance is that we know that this will give some small comfort to the families in the future knowing that there are names are going to be remembered in perpetuity here at the national police memorial. those namesjust added national police memorial. those names just added a few moments ago, what sort of ceremony took place? yes, we had act contingent of
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uniformed police officers who were here at the memorial, they form the guard of honour. members of the public came and watched as we are here right in the centre of london at horse guards. the chairman of the police roll of honour trust trust, sidney mackay, himself the father of a murdered police officer, nina mackay, was here. he put two new pages into the book and the book is now on public display and will be forever more. we should say that the focus today is very much on pc keith palmer with this funeral later this afternoon, but the other name added to that rule is that of pc gareth browning who was hit by a stolen car. that is the point of the police memorial, to remind people of police officers who have given their lives
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in the line of duty. exactly. we have a role here to remember police officers that was never fulfilled before, before the foundation of our charity, which was set up following the tragic drowning of two police officers in lancashire when they went in to help a man who was in trouble in this sea of black hole. it was recognised at that point that there was no rule of honour for the united kingdom. we have built on that since and we now have the roll of honour which has gone worldwide. we have had contact from all over the world with people saying how pleased and proud they are that their loved ones name is remembered here, it was founded by the late michael winner. he said this memorial up following the tragic murder of yvonne fletcher all those yea rs murder of yvonne fletcher all those years ago. we work closely together
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and we know that there are other police charities for the wider please family who will be there working quietly in the background to help today and into the future to bring comfort and soccer to the loved ones of fallen officers. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has warned of a possible "proxy war" developing between the united states and russia over the on—going conflict in syria. let's cross now to our assistant political editor, norman smith, who is in westminster. perhaps no surprise thatjeremy corbyn is opposed to any military intervention in the middle east. he has long been opposed to the west getting involved in wars and other countries. today he painted up bleak picture of the possible consequences over the tangent and syria, warning it could end in a confrontation
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between the two superpowers of the united states and russia, who he fears as one launches missile strikes, the other will retaliate in a tit—for—tat exchange which could develop into what he called a proxy war between the two sides. he is suggesting that there is not only a small window of opportunity to avoid this and four the g—7 to reach out and reconvened the geneva peace talks which stalled without any outcome earlier this year. he has also gone out of his way to attack the foreign secretary, boris johnson. he has criticised him for cancelling a trip to moscow, but also suggested he is encouraging the bombing by suggesting that russia sorry, america, could launch further strikes. well, it seems he is encouraging further bombing. i don't believe that will bring a solution anywhere near. surely, we need to get russia
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and america around the table together to put pressure on respective parties to this war because it is in danger of becoming a proxy war in order to have a meaningful and effective ceasefire. the mood music from number ten seems to be trying to play down the prospect of further military action was at number ten saying that their focus is on trying to get the international community to forge a political settlement. that said, we do know that the foreign office had prepared a paper on further sanctions to be levied against russia for consideration at the g—7 meeting. russia already faces sanctions following its actions in crime in the —— in crimea and ukraine. the g—7 food agreed to more sanctions on russia and leicester backs is waived for its support on president assad and the military assistance they have given to his
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regime. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer who was murdered in last month's westminster attack. russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syrian's president assad, as foreign ministers from the g7 nations meet for two days of talks. the bbc uncovers evidence implicating the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. the first freight train is leaving britain for china this morning. it has 30 cargo containers onboard containing british produced goods. the 7,500 milejourney through europe and russia will take until thursday, 27th april. steph mcgovern sent this a short time ago, as the train was preparing to leave. good morning from london gateway. obviously you can see the port behind me where lots of containers are coming in off the ships, but the reason we're
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here is because of this. this train will be the first train to travel from the uk to china carrying lots of different products that have been made in the uk. it's everything from pharmaceuticals, soft drinks, baby products, all those things people in china like to buy from the uk. it wasn't that long ago that this train came over to the uk from china bringing stuff in. we do a lot of trade with the chinese, importing something like £40 billion worth of products and we explored about £16 billion worth every year to the chinese. what they are hoping here is that they can increase this trade with china using this real network. of course, lots of products travel by sea and air but they are saying the reason why they are doing this
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is they think it is cheaper to move the products by real compared to air and it is faster than sailing. it'll be interesting to see what kind of difference it to global trade. the dignitaries here this morning celebrating the fact that it will be making his first trip towards china. it's one of the great challenges of an ageing population — how to help people continue living in their own homes for as long as possible. with funding for social care in crisis, innovative solutions are needed. so perhaps the humble postie can help? the postal service onjersey in the channel islands is offering elderly residents a call and check service, and they hope the idea will spread to the uk mainland as well. andrew bomford reports. ricky has been opposed postman on jersey for 38 years, but lately he has been delivering a different sort of doorstep service, at temp one on the growing number of elderly people living alone to make sure they are
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0k. morning. morning, ricky. how are you doing come right? not too bad. the doorsteps is it only lasts a couple of minutes but it seems to be enough to offer reassurance. couple of minutes but it seems to be enough to offer reassurancem couple of minutes but it seems to be enough to offer reassurance. it is just the confidence of knowing i am not going to be left alone and forgotten. it is really amazing, just that there is somebody there, somebody cares and that is brilliant. it is only those couple of minutes but the difference that makes to somebody who doesn't see anybody at all is quite remarkable. posties have made more than 20,000 visits to elderly people on the island, all built into the normal post—round. the low—cost visitor free but will soon be paid for by the jersey free but will soon be paid for by thejersey government because they think it reduces demand on social ca re think it reduces demand on social care and health services. sometimes a quick visit can even prevent a tragedy. ricky find angela collapsed when she did not answer the door.”
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have always had a tremendous fear of living on my own and something happening, which at one stage. ricky came to my rescue. it could've been life or death for me. it is this simplicity of the scheme that seems to me could affect them. what can be nor natural than the postman having a friendly chat? but could this be expanded on a much wider scale? that would be the real challenge. despite the morning rush to sort the post, meal is in serious decline. so postal services need to find new ways to stay relevant, but they are still the only people to visit every home six days a week. that led to a light bulb moment forjersey post. why not combine their unique reach with simple social care delivered to the door? it wasjust a logical thing to happen. as to the stupid things together, everybody goes, why did we not think about before?m was just the thing to do. jersey
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post believable make a profit from call and check and reckons many people would also be willing to pay a small fee to have posted: elderly relatives. several countries are offering their own versions, including finland, iceland and some american cities, but on the uk mainland royal mail says it is open to new ideas but it is yet to anything similar, despite keen demand from councils and voluntary organisations. australian scientists say two—thirds of the great barrier reef has now been devastated by severe coral bleaching. it is caused by rising water temperatures and researchers say surveys show an accelerated rate of damage along the coast of queensland. mass bleaching makes the coral fragile and can kill it. the reef is home to more than 130 species of shark and 16 hundred varieties of fish. our science editor has been giving me more details. the algae provides food for the
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coral. if the water temperature gets above a certain level for a particular length of time, that relationship can't survive and the algae leave the coral. the algae provide the colour to the coral as well as the food, so once they have left you are left with a white skeleton left you are left with a white s keleto n of left you are left with a white skeleton of a coral reef. you get very eerie shots, it is like a graveyard , very eerie shots, it is like a graveyard, going from a teeming, brightly covered ecosystem to this wasteland. many scientists who studied this problem are shocked by what has happened. the key here, because this can happen perfectly naturally, the key is that the great barrier reef has suffered for bleaching events in 20 years. in two yea rs bleaching events in 20 years. in two years running, last year and again this year, giving the coral to recover. can they recover? scientist use the word terminal. it is possibly terminalfor use the word terminal. it is possibly terminal for some types of coral. some are at more resilient
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than other, some can cope with warmer water for longer than others. the scientist i was talking to just now said the reef is quite patchy. you can have a particular bit of grief or some corals will be damaged and others will be. they need to know how many will come back. the fastest growing corals take about a decade to recover, if all is well, if the waters are cool enough. the trouble is, if you get a couple of bleaching events two years running, you wipe at the chance for the corals to recover, so it is unlikely -- it is corals to recover, so it is unlikely —— it is likely that the death rate will be higher than in previous coral bleaching events. this is some of the corals will recover, but they are warning that it is under a great deal of threat, not just from are warning that it is under a great deal of threat, notjust from global warming and rising water temperatures, but also pollution, cyclone damage, and if the coral is weakened by all of these things
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together, it will threaten its long—term survival. together, it will threaten its long-term survival. can anything be donein long-term survival. can anything be done ina long-term survival. can anything be done in a localised sense, quite apart the big questions of climate change? the obvious immediate thing that some scientists have want to see happening for years is to stop farmers inland spraying their fields with pesticides that then run off into the rivers, make their way into the ocean and then kill the reef. also, construction along the shoreline generates a huge amount of sediment and silt beckoned the reef. also localised destruction for many yea rs. also localised destruction for many years. there has been fishing on the on the reef, the use of dynamite on some reef around the world. things can be done to minimise the damage in the short term, but the long question is how can you work against climate change in the long—term? british vogue has announced its new
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editor in chief of the a man. in a moment, the news at one with simon mccoy. first, the weather. spring is a gingerbread season were sometimes we see cold weather and snow, other times warm weather and sun chang. the warmth of site yesterday. it was the warmest day of the year so far with central and eastern england bid then the warmth thanks to south—easterly winds. compared to that, today will be much cooler. temperatures are some about 12 degrees lower than yesterday, thanks to these north—westerly winds that are pushing the cooler air across the country. if we look at the satellite picture, as the cool air moves over the ground that is warmed by the april sunshine, clouds
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will bubble up. those clouds will bring one or two isolated showers today afternoon. the most likely places to get showers, northern ireland will have frequently for the first part of the afternoon. the north—east england, quite a few showers here. also in the north—east of scotland. temperatures just 6 degrees in shetland. in london, but it is still not too bad. overnight tonight, it'll be a largely dry night for england and wales. it will be chilly with a patch of ground frost in the coldest areas. in the far north, clive betts into the far of scotla nd far north, clive betts into the far of scotland and it will bring wet weather but the end of the night. that rain will be therefore much of the day on tuesday in the highlands and islands. further south, sunshine in southern parts of england and wales, temperatures reaching 16 degrees. for the middle part of the
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week, this weather front continues to push its way slowly southwards, but it will bring some rain, if you are to that east of any high ground or in the south would be a great deal of rain. probably largely dry as well for east of scotland. towards the end of the week, this quiet spell of weather is set to continue. it will be cloudy and thirsty, perhaps a few more breaks in the cloud by friday. for easter, sunshine and showers. the showers are set to get heavier in northern and eastern areas, with the risk of some hail and thunder as well. the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in last month's westminster attack, gets under way this lunchtime. colleagues pay tribute to a man they call a hero and describe a tremendous sense of sadness and of loss. thousands of officers line the route for a full police funeral service which will begin shortly at southwark cathedral.
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iam here i am here at southwark cathedral where hundreds of officers have now gathered to honour the sacrifice of pc keith palmer in a service that will be both a public memorial and a family funeral. we'll be live in southwark and at the palace of westminster, where pc palmer's body has been lying in rest, by special permission of the queen. also this lunchtime: foreign ministers of the g7 countries meet in italy looking for a unified approach to the war in syria and towards russia. the bbc uncovers evidence implicating the bank of england
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