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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 11, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11: the france foreign minister said there has been no agreement on sanctions against russia and syria, as us secretary of state prepares to fly to moscow. the main suspect in the lorry attack in sweden appears in court, admitting to carrying out a terrorist act. more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit their job in england last year. as revealed by new figures. a housing 1500 migrants in northern france has been destroyed by fire. also, united airlines defends itself after this passenger was dragged off one of its aircraft because of overbooking. 0h, my aircraft because of overbooking. 0h, d! aircraft because of overbooking. 0h, my god! he was violently dragged from his seat and pulled down the aisle. technical trouble, or are
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more actors beginning to mumble? we investigate complaints about the sound quality on some tv programmes. it is either too quickly spoken or they don't speak clear enough. good morning. it's tuesday 11th april. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. in the last half an hour it has been announced foreign ministers meeting at the g—7 summit have not been able to agree on imposing sanctions on russia. they have discussed what options to take after a chemical attack killed 89 syrians last week. us secretary of state rex deveson
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will be in moscow later to face the russians over their continued support for president bashar al—assad. they call it the ‘family photo' and it's a family that used to include russia before it was expelled in 2014 when the g8 became the g7. the kremlin may not be represented at this summit, but its continued support for the syrian regime dominates conversation. these foreign ministers have been working out the precise message us secretary of state rex tillerson should deliver when he heads to moscow later today. if i think about the position of vladimir putin now, you know, he's toxifying the reputation of russia, by his continual association with a guy who has flagrantly poisoned his own people. secretary tillerson‘s visit comes after russia threatened to retaliate with force if the us repeats last week's tomahawk strikes on a syrian airbase. in a phone call last night, theresa may and donald trump discussed breaking up the syrian—russia alliance.
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a downing street spokesman revealed: one of the options g7 ministers are discussing is hitting russia with targeted sanctions if it refuses to buckle, but president putin is used to standing up to international pressure and the chances of him abandoning his ally seem remote. greg dawson, bbc news. as we were hearing there — the uk has suggested threatening tightly—focused sanctions on russian and syrian military officers. the foreign secretary, boris johnson said sanctions could target high—ranking syrians and russians who had been involved in coordinating syrian military operations, but pj crowley, who was assistant us secretary of state under president 0bama, explains why he thinks sanctions may not be effective.
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iam not i am not sure sanctions will make a difference. we saw this in the context of ukraine. roger has paid a significant price but it sees its national interests exceed that price. —— russia has paid. the ministers are trying to arrive at a common position for secretary rex tillotson to discuss with russian officials later this week, the challenge is not the lack of common position, the west has been unified in wanting to seek the departure of president assad for a number of yea rs. president assad for a number of years. it is the means of accomplishing the objective without resorting to military force. sadly in syria you do not yet have a path forward towards a viable political negotiation which will end the civil warand negotiation which will end the civil war and resolve the stasis of bashar al—assad. —— status of bashar al—assad. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james robbins is in lucca in italy for the final day of that g7 foreign ministers meeting.
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they have not reached an agreement but he said that all the nations agreed president assad cannot be pa rt agreed president assad cannot be part of syria's future. and telling russia, it must not be hypocritical and must accept its responsibilities in syria. let's go to moscow. barbara platt asher is here for us. does this lack of agreement about broadening sanctions at this point mina russia feels at the window of opportunity to encourage it to change its position on president assad 7 change its position on president assad? —— means russia feels. do they feel that opportunity is closing and that russia is off the hook at the moment? it is happening
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quickly as we speak. i think the russians have not responded to the state m e nts russians have not responded to the statements so far, but they will be watching, the fact that the g—7 statements so far, but they will be watching, the fact that the 6—7 is hardening its position on the role of bashar al—assad, putting on pressure to russia to say that it can no longer shield him without taking responsibility for its behaviour. i think that is a message the us secretary of state is going to be bringing and they do have agreement from all the members. as well as middle east leaders who participated. they cannot agree that sanctions had been fermented on both syrian and russian officers who might be involved in military activities in syria probably makes the kremlin feel the pressure will ease quite a bit. —— sanctions had been implemented. we are not sure what he is going to say. the russians have issued a statement in
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which they say relations between moscow and washington are the lowest since the cold war. they want to hear all kinds of things from the us secretary of state about what the united states has in mind for the relationship. the general tone happy end is they do not want confrontation, they want constructive cooperation. that is how they are presenting themselves ahead of his visit, no matter what message he brings. and dropping in on the news agencies since you sat down, barbara, the russian foreign minister saying he hopes the usa will agree to an international investigation on the syrian chemical attack. the foreign ministry also saying it is worried about the possibility the usa might take unilateral military action against north korea, another topic for discussion, as well. the scene is set for what is going to be a very difficult meeting when the us secretary of state get there. yes,
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quite different from his previous meetings. because as head of exxon mobil he did quite a bit of business here and had good relations with the kremlin and mr putin. he has a different sort of message and roll coming as secretary of state. we are observing with interest. it is going to bea observing with interest. it is going to be a difficult meeting. not only regarding syria and here again, he is going to carry that message from western and middle eastern countries, who are hoping this chemical weapons attack will create the opportunity to press the kremlin on its ties with bashar al—assad. they will be other issues as well that the russians want to speak to us secretary of state about. remember, they hoped it would improve, the relationship, under president trump, and the latest signs are that does not look very optimistic. i should say mr putin and the kremlin so far in their response to the chemical weapons attack, as well as pressure from the
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united states, has been digging in and showing more solidarity for bashar al—assad, insisting the chemical weapons attack was not carried out by the syrian army and to insist there be an investigation into it. that is something they will repeat here. i guess the question is will this tactic worked, to press mr putin directly? if that's the best way to get cooperation from him? -- is that the best way. let's get more with norman smith, who is in westminster. do you think the government, borisjohnson, westminster. do you think the government, boris johnson, has misjudged the willingness of other members of the g—7 misjudged the willingness of other members of the 6—7 to go ahead with more targeted sanctions against russia and syria? i think there will be disappointment in the foreign office and more broadly in government. 0nly yesterday downing street said they wanted to look at ways of exerting pressure on president putin and president assad.
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borisjohnson had president putin and president assad. boris johnson had been president putin and president assad. borisjohnson had been at the front of trying to argue the case for sanctions. his political aides were clear his favourite strategy was a carrot and stick approach, where russia would be offered a return to the international table, but if they did not, there would be the threat of sanctions. already the sanctions being talked about had been scaled back. we were talking about potentially sanctions on named military figures in the russian and syrian army rather than any broader economic sanctions. but even that it appears has been taken into the long grass. we're now told, government sources are saying these sanctions, although not of the table, will not be considered unless there is hard and irrefutable evidence of the chemical attack. that will involve not only establishing that chemical attack has taken place, but who was
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responsible and whether russia was in any way complicit. to establish all that and provide hard irrefutable evidence would seem to me to be quite a long and contested process , me to be quite a long and contested process, meaning the prospect of sanctions must have been moved quite considerably down the line, precisely at the moment the british government are saying there is an opportunity now with the us secretary of state going to moscow, to try and prize president putin away from president assad. the danger of this being delayed is that it loses momentum, that window of opportunity. norman, thank you very much for that fast moving the releva nt much for that fast moving the relevant in this story. we are expecting a closing news conference from the g—7 meeting in italy and we will bring you any key moments from the speeches that are made there. the main suspect in last week's stockholm lorry attack has admitted committing "a terrorist crime".
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four people died in the attack, and 15 were injured, when a lorry ploughed into a crowded shopping street. the lawyer for rakhmat akilov, a 39—year—old uzbek, told a court hearing in stockholm that his client "confesses to a terrorist crime and accepts his detention." 0ur correspondent dan johnson is in stockholm. give us more detail about what was said in that hearing. the hearing lasted quite a while but most of it did not take place in public. we saw him being brought into court from this building, from the police station across the road, where he has been held since he was arrested on friday afternoon. he was wearing a green shirt and trousers and had a green blanket over his head, with heavy thickset and cups, unlocked as heavy thickset and cups, unlocked as he sat down. the judge told him to remove his blanket from his head so she could address. we could not see
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his face from the public gallery. he was facing thejudge. his face from the public gallery. he was facing the judge. we could see he had short shaved grey hair. his lawyer told the judge straightaway his client confessed to committing the terror attack in stockholm on friday, essentially hijacking a delivery truck and driving it through a crowded shopping street into a department store, killing four people. thejudge into a department store, killing four people. the judge said the hearing needed to carry on in private and reporters were allowed back insidejust at private and reporters were allowed back inside just at the end with the judge announced what was discussed would not be made public but the conclusion was he should be detained for a further month. his defence lawyer has just spoken to reporters, saying it is not likely to be challenged. the questioning will continue and lawyers say he could be in prison for ever. thank you, dan johnson, in stockholm. there's a warning this morning that the social care system in england has already started to collapse — that's according to the uk care home association. figures obtained by the bbc show
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that more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit theirjob in england last year. care providers say that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care. the government says an extra £2 billion is being invested in social care over the next three years. this report from carla fowler. good morning. the start of the morning shift at the cecilia nursing home in scarborough. it is a 42 bed home in scarborough. it is a 42 bed home and it is full. call bells ring co nsta ntly home and it is full. call bells ring constantly here. the conditions of residence range from dementia suffering, surviving strokes and needing end of life care. it is a co nsta nt needing end of life care. it is a constant battle for health care assista nts constant battle for health care assistants to meet everybody‘s needs quickly. there should be two nurses on the ship today but sue gregory is alone. what is the matter? what is the matter? let me put your head up.
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i think the hardest thing is keeping the consistency because it does have a knock—on effect if you are having a knock—on effect if you are having a great turnover of staff. it does not make for a happy home. 1.3 million people work in adult social ca re million people work in adult social care in england but last year more than 900 per day left theirjobs and of those, 60% less social care completely. i'm falling! i'm falling! it is high-pressure demanding and stressful work. most ca re demanding and stressful work. most care workers demanding and stressful work. most ca re workers are demanding and stressful work. most care workers are paid just above the minimum wage. you always get eve ryo ne minimum wage. you always get everyone on time and it is quite upsetting and disheartening when you find people earn more stacking shelves and you are looking after people and making this per day. only two carers are on the ship tonight and agency nurses had to be drafted in. the government recently committed to spending next £2 billion on social care and allowing local authorities to raise council tax bills in order to fund social
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ca re tax bills in order to fund social care services. with a number of 75—year—olds set to double in 25 yea rs 75—year—olds set to double in 25 years will there be enough members of staff to care for those most in need? bbc data journalist david rhodes put together the figures on those care workerjobs. he's in leeds for us now. how did you come to this figure of more than 900 adult social care workers are leaving theirjob per day last year in england? it is related to data gathered by the charity skills for care, analysing data from local authorities and independent providers. they suggest 1.3 million are employed in the sector as of last year and of them, there were 300,000 who left in the aduu there were 300,000 who left in the adult care sector. simply divide 300,000 by 365 and you come to the figure of more than 900 adult social ca re
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figure of more than 900 adult social care workers leaving theirjob every day last year. this industry has a turnover of over 27%, effectively meaning care providers in england are ina meaning care providers in england are in a situation where every year they have to replace one in every four workers. of those over 900 a day, a significant percentage returns to the profession but there are returns to the profession but there a re clearly returns to the profession but there are clearly massive implications for the level of care and quality. yes, it is estimated 60% of those who left a role last year in adult social care stopped working in that sector altogether. it shows there is a high volume of turnover in the industry and as you mentioned, providers are warning it is having an impact on the level of care they can provide. at the end of the day they are trying to employ people to look after people who are among the most vulnerable in society. talking to those on the front line, who look after people, they say the adult social care sector is all about building relationships with the people you look after. if people are
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coming into the industry on a regular basis, care providers say it affects the level and quality of ca re affects the level and quality of care they can provide. david, thank you very much. david rhodes in leeds. it is 80 minutes past 11. the headlines on bbc news, the friend from minister says a g—7 meeting of industrialised nations has failed to reach an agreement on sanctions on russia and syria. —— the french foreign minister. the main suspect on the attack in stockholm appears in courtand on the attack in stockholm appears in court and he has admitted to carrying out a terrorist act. we have just been hearing, carrying out a terrorist act. we havejust been hearing, more carrying out a terrorist act. we have just been hearing, more than 900 adult social care workers per day quit theirjob in england last year, new figures reveal. former arsenal striker ian wright says arsenal—macro has now lost the dressing room. they slumped to their biggest defeat last night, 3—0 against crystal palace and remain
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seven points from the top four. claudio ranieri said he never lost the dressing room at leicester, speaking publicly about his dismissal for the first time. he said there was not a player revolt but somebody behind the scenes might have worked against him. andy murray was back on court in zurich last night after an elbow injury, playing ina night after an elbow injury, playing in a charity match against roger federer. he said he might be fit for the start of the clay—court season in monte carlo next week. a full update for you in the next 15 minutes. united airlines has been heavily criticised after one of its passengers was dragged off a flight in chicago. shocking images, which have been shared across the world, show the man being violently dragged out of his chair and forcibly pulled down the aisle to the dismay of fellow travellers. the airline had overbooked the plane and selected the man and his companion at random when nobody volunteered to leave. 0ur correspondent neda tawfik reports. the company said it will conduct a
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review into what is happening. you mightfind review into what is happening. you might find some of this footage distressing. screaming. .. every screaming... every thought... screaming. .. 0h, screaming... every thought... screaming. .. oh, my screaming... every thought... screaming... oh, my god! oh, my god. no! every movement... my god. what are you doing? no... carefully planned, coordinated and synchronised. oh, my god! look at what you did to him. 0h, synchronised. oh, my god! look at what you did to him. oh, my god. performing together with a single united purpose. busted his rib. oh, my god. look at what he did to him.
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0h, my god. look at what he did to him. oh, my god. oh, my god. good work. way to go. that is what makes the world's leading airline flyer friendly. i have to go home. i have to go home. i have to go home. 0ne passenger on the flight spoke to the bbc on condition that they were kept anonymous. the guy that came, i do not know who he was, from some airport authority of some sort, was very calm, was not rude or even forceful. it was almost he was kind of there to intimidate and say, you need to come off. but he did not use force. another officer came on and then another man, who you see in the video, the one with the hat and jeans. he had a badge, but you know, it is probably helpful to say who you are, an
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authority figure, before you start yanking people out of seats. let's discuss this further. simon calder is the travel editor of the independent and has been following this story. hejoins me via webcam from stromboli off the north coast of sicily. tim jeans timjeans in tim jeans in gloucestershire is a former managing director of monica airlines. —— monarch airlines. how common is it to overbook flights, first of all? oh... unfortunately as you can hear the sound quality is terrible. hopefully no such problems talking to you, tim. was it common practice for monarch flights to be overbooked? overbooking is part and parcel of every airline with their commercial activities. parcel of every airline with their commercialactivities. monica parcel of every airline with their commercial activities. monica did overbook but only under carefully controlled circumstances. —— monarch. he would never overbook on
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the easter weekend because most if not all passengers are likely to show up for their flights and likely christmas eve and other busy dates. it is part of the airlines commercial activity. sometimes things go wrong and badly wrong in the circumstances we have seen. normally things like this should be sorted out before the passengers set foot on a plane. absolutely. the worst case is the passenger gets on board and has to be asked to leave. there are numerous opportunities to make sure that does not happen. back in the days when we all checked in in the days when we all checked in in the airport terminal, people could be advised that there was a problem at that stage. now people checkin problem at that stage. now people check in online. the problem moves forward to the boarding gate. but never should reach a point where a passenger is on the aircraft and has to be asked to leave or persuaded to leave either by financial inducement
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or... it would never in my experience cause a passenger to have to be removed by force as we have seen. i think we can go back to simon calder shortly. let me first ask you, tim, how would an airline decide, if it asked for volunteers to leave a flight and there are not any, or not enough, how would it decide which passengers it was going to say, we want you to get off this plane? that is very difficult. there would almost always be volunteers. as the money is ratcheted up, it might be £250, go as high as £600, even, but almost always there would be volunteers. never in my experience did i have to say to somebody or a cabin crew member had to say, it is you, you are the unlucky one. because people have many different reasons for travelling. some more urgent than others. you would hope the
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passengers whose journeys were not absolutely vital would take the financial inducement. let's hope we can talk to somebody. simon, clearly something went badly wrong here. what have you worked out from looking at this story? it was an absolute disaster from beginning to end. basically you had the matter being handled with the people that had already got onto the plane which is the last time when you would want to do something like this. it should be sorted out at the gate. they said they has to make room for staff to fly. they would have known that weeks ago. the fact they has to go on board and have a brutal persuasion to get this guy off shows it was operationally a complete catastrophe. actually the guy was breaking the law. he was disobeying the legal command of the captain, he or she on the plane, their word goes“ or she on the plane, their word goes... surely anybody that has
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booked a plane ticket has the right to expect that they can travel if they have got onto the plane and has sat down, paid for that ticket, or is there something in small print that says the airline is allowed to do this? an airline ticket isjust a promise to get you from a to b. they have got every right up until the moment the plane pushes back from the gate to say, sorry, you're not the gate to say, sorry, you're not the plane. somebody else needs to ta ke the plane. somebody else needs to take your seat. but they have not got the right to drag somebody off a plane, surely. the moment he said i am not getting off the plane, i have to get to work, i patients to attend to, he became a disruptive passenger. and the law says if you are disruptive, we see things like this but generally when suddenly gets onto the plane, if they are drunk, taking drugs, behaving obnoxiously, they get dragged off. simon, i think we are having sound
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of problems with you again. i do not know if you can hear me. let's go back to you, tim. in terms of how it was handled, what would the process have been? were these security officials who came on the plane, we re officials who came on the plane, were they told just handle it in the best way that you see fit? would they have been in communication with somebody about how to deal with the removal of a passenger?” somebody about how to deal with the removal of a passenger? i think it is fairto removal of a passenger? i think it is fair to say that there is some context to this incident. they must‘ve been something going at the airport terminal or earlier on board the plight meaning this passenger behaved in the way that he did. —— the flight. that does not excuse the fa ct the flight. that does not excuse the fact he was dragged off the plane in the way that he was. but clearly there is something else to this story in terms of the preamble to the incident we have seen on facebook. but this is a disaster, plain and simple, for united, isn't
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it? oh, completely. no airline would want... however difficult a passenger was being from being able to dispatch the aircraft on time, nobody would want to see that, no airline. united's toes must be curling up. not least when you have juxtaposed their advertising with the reality of how this passenger was treated. there is no good coming out of this for anybody. 0ne was treated. there is no good coming out of this for anybody. one can only feel for the passenger involved. i'm sure he did not start his journey expecting to be treated like that. ok, tim and simon, thank you both very much. let's go straight to lucca in italy where the italian foreign minister is holding a closing news conference at the g—7 meeting of foreign ministers. translation: which is more than 30 pages long and covers the many subjects for which we were able to
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come up with a common solution among the g-7 come up with a common solution among the g—7 countries and two additional state m e nts the g—7 countries and two additional statements on disarmament and nonproliferation. and on cyberspace. 0ur idea is this political success was possible thanks to everybody participating, with an exceptional spirit on everybody‘s part. in addition, and this was unexpected, yesterday morning, i think we achieved a wonderful result and that is this morning's meeting. i decided to seize the window of opportunity. that came after the american military attack as a response to the use of chemical weapons, in order to
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revitalise the political process. and to pursue a political solution for the syrian conflict. therefore, it was very important for our appeal to dissipate and again in a very short period of time, our appeal to the ministers of turkey, jordan, saudi arabia and the united arab whereabouts and qatar we asked them to participate and they accepted our appeal immediately. we began at 730 this morning. we had a very effective and fruitful meeting. considering also the fact that it took place right before the departure of the us secretary of state, rex taylor seven, to moscow. iam state, rex taylor seven, to moscow. i am delighted to be able to say
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that the position was very similar to the italian one. we must have a dialogue with russia and must not push russia into a corner. we must also ask vladimir putin to demand the credit that now has been granted to president assad and we think that the russians have the strength that is needed to put pressure on him and to get him to observe the commitments with regard to the ceasefire. as i said, we covered more than 20 subjects and they are covered in the final declaration and i don't think that you want to sit here for many more hours often to this evening to cover all those items, so i have decided to select the number of those and i will begin with syria. we then spoke about libya and be reached full on the need to convey a message, one single
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message to all the parties that we can't have a military solution, we need to be more active in libya to make sure that the vacuum of the international community is filled... isn't filled by others. the g—7 partners have acknowledged that's the time commitment, the great effort and italian leadership with regard is to this dossier. we also talked about terrorism and we underscored the fact that our response cannot simply be militarily. we need to work on prevention, on information exchange and focus especially on the threats coming from the internet in particular with regard to recruitment, which we know happens over the web, on the ukraine crisis
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to g-7 over the web, on the ukraine crisis to g—7 countries have acknowledged the complexity of this matter and u nfortu nately the complexity of this matter and unfortunately that the minsk agreements are at a stalemate. there isa agreements are at a stalemate. there is a deadlock and at the same time there has been significant cohesion among g—7 countries with regards to our shared values. the territorial integrity of ukraine being first. i wish to thank all those who have contributed to this common effort. and i repeat reflect this in our final declaration and in the two additional declarations so this is the result of our work not only from a political perspective, but also organisationally i would say that the result has been exceptional and much of this is due to the wonderful work carried out by our law enforcement operatives, our fire
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department and last night i had the opportunity to thank the prefect franco gabrielli, the director of the public safety in parliament, and the public safety in parliament, and the prefect of luca, who is here, and they also thanked the police commissioner of liquor and all the representatives of law enforcement and we know that yesterday there was some disorder outside the city and there were six injured and clearly this was due to our events, but we must also point out that it has been successful thanks to the wonderful work carried out by law—enforcement. this is not simply been a protocol event. i would say it has been very proactive and an in—depth discussion
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which, at a very delicate moment in time has been able to confirm that italian foreign policy has so much to say and our foreign policy is listened to and respected and i think that the preparatory work that has gone into this event has been quite good. in fact, next month we will have the summit of the heads of state in government and there is a lwa ys state in government and there is always something when you are preparing for the final g—7 of heads and government, there was also something that you must complete. this is the work of the heads of state and government and we as foreign affairs ministers of the g—7 countries, believe that we have provided a wonderful contribution for a hopefully robust declaration following the summit with a clear—cut and concrete proposals. i thank you all. i thank the members of the national and international
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press who are all here. you have the pleasure of being accredited, and therefore following meetings and i'm ready to your questions. —— to take your questions. i was wondering, what is the position that was taken within the g-7 position that was taken within the g—7 of the us secretary of state, rex tennyson, in connection with the future of president assad? in other words, the us administration has provided some conflicting positions, maybe not conflicting but different positions, so i'm wondering if you might say something about this. and,
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since we have different nuances, is there a g—7 position in connection with the future of president assad that rex tennyson will illustrate in his travels the moscow. thank you for your question. you have been a journalist for quite some time so you know that that position will be reflected in the final statement and i cannot say in advance of the us secretary of state will be staying in moscow. but there is something in the final declaration which she was our philosophy, the philosophy underlying our political and organisational effort. we have invited our turkish colleagues, and our colleagues from the gulf states and arab states, as well. what is our philosophy? there is not a purely military solution for the syrian conflict. we are all engaged in order to have a political solution that will have two pillars,
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and you syrian constitution and the political process that will result in elections in syria which will enable the syrian people to decide on the fate of our great country. this is all within a framework. that is the framework that we, as g—7 countries and those like—minded countries, because we are the ones who met this morning, this is the framework that we recognise and we think russia can play an important role they are in. it is a role that can be played as a result of the negotiating dynamic. i am convinced that the us secretary of state will be able to go to moscow and he will be able to go to moscow and he will be able to convey the voice and the words of a very broad spectrum of countries. there is the fear that when you say
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we won't isolate russia that can't really be upheld by rex tennyson. do you think this might be the ultimate position? you were saying earlier that he would simply say to russia, tried to get the ceasefire respected, but that is all. because we know that sergei lavrov might have to deal with president assad, as well. will this be conveyed to moscow? i certainly can't say anything to that effect before he even leaves. we do have a consolidated desertion on what was already said. this is the support
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thatis already said. this is the support that is reiterated in the final statement to the work of the special on boy for syria. within this effort, there has to be a ceasefire. that has to be the starting point for a political process. as the european constituency within g—7, because some european countries are in the g—7 format of course, we reiterated our willingness and our will to participate in the rebuilding, not only of syrian institutions, but in concrete terms and specifically of syria over all. this cannot be while massacres are ongoing and well dated —— and while they continued to destroy syria. we need a genuine and long lasting ceasefire. my
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my italian is not very good but i will give it a try. the french minister said there was no concessions about new sanctions. i wonder whether the g—7 ministers think that it is a good idea to put a stop to the russian support to president assad. your question was very clear and well done per year italian. 0ur very clear and well done per year italian. our approach has been very clear. as matters currently stand there is no consensus on additional new sanctions as an efficient instrument to obtain the goal that
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we are aiming for. which, as i said earlier, is a very clear objective for syria. we have heard from boris johnson on this topic. he raised the issue,in johnson on this topic. he raised the issue, in fact. johnson on this topic. he raised the issue, infact. i johnson on this topic. he raised the issue, in fact. i would like to reiterate not what everyone in the group thinks, but rather what i think. sanctions are not an end in in themselves. they are an instrument to get a specific goal. for example, in the case of ukraine, it was important for us not to have automatic renewal of sanctions because the ultimate ian is to ensure peace and stability in that
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country, not to have sanctions for the sake of it. the g—7 position is clear, supporting the existing sanctions. i was going to ask the question that my colleague did, so i will ask something different. the new administration in the knighted states has said that it wants to try to restart relations with russia and the secretary of state's trip will be the first test of if there can be an effective dialogue. he does not have a diplomatic background at all, yet some people were positive about him, thinking his fresh or transactional approach could be effective in a place like russia. what is your take on how this might all go? thank you. i think that your
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question is very pertinent. we stressed the fact that it would be wrong at this point in time to create conditions of isolation of russia. in other words we think it would be wrong and this is the approach of the g—7, to consider russia as a country that we need to try to put into a corner. from the political point of view, from the point of view of the peace perspective, and also from the point of view of negotiations, from our point of view, it is more efficient to have negotiated a double relations that will allow an involvement of russia more actively in the ceasefire, in the peace
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process , in the ceasefire, in the peace process, in the construction of peace and serenity for a new syria. all of this cannot take place in just one g—7 in two days because we don't live in a world where g—7 decides all alone. we live in the system of relations that are geopolitical and cover the whole world. what i want to stress from the negotiation point of view is that the trip of the secretary of state rex teller sung in moscow can be nourished by two great points of force. the first is a strong supporter of the g—7 countries who have found on this subject, and i would stress this because it is a point of political success, they have found a common position. the other element which makes the secretary of state even stronger is the fact that following the meeting which we had this morning with
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like—minded countries who were all around the table together with us, it was stressed once again that they are an like—minded, they think in the same perspective as us. this is fundamental on the eve of such an important mission for the secretary of state of america. it is due to how quick we were in setting up this format, which as is obvious, was not originally included with the g—7 and we decided to days ago and it was very fruitful and it was carried out very fruitful and it was carried out very well this morning. thank you. i wish to thank you and may i before i leave this podium, i want to particularly thank the city of lucca and the whole of the community of lu cca and the whole of the community of lucca that is represented here by the mayor. we were welcomed in a
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fantastic fashion. i think that lu cca was fantastic fashion. i think that lucca was the spot for our country, soi lucca was the spot for our country, so i hope the g—7 was a promotional element for lucca, but most certainly lucca was a great promotional element for our country. thank you. so, the italian foreign minister repeating that line from the g-7 minister repeating that line from the g—7 meeting. minister repeating that line from the g-7 meeting. boris johnson's colver targeted sanctions against senior russian and syrian figures has been rejected by fellow g—7 foreign ministers. angelino alfano is saying that instead there was an agreement that the g—7 must have dialogue with russia and not push russia into a corner and not create conditions of isolation for russia as the countries work to try to solve the conflict in syria. we are
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just getting some lines from the us secretary of state, who of course has been at that meeting and is travelling to moscow for talks there. he has said that the us will look for options to de—escalate violence in syria. i hope that what the russian governments concludes is that they have aligned themselves with an unreliable partner in bashar al assad. they signed the chemical weapons are caught themselves. now president assad has made the russians look not so good under the circumstances. i think it is also worth thinking about russia has aligned itself with the president assad machine, the iranians and has black. is that a long—term alliance
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that serves russia's interests? 0r would russia prefer to realign with the united states, with other western countries and middle east countries who are seeking to resolve the syrian crisis? we want to relieve the suffering of the syrian people. we want to create a future for syria that is stable and secure. so, russia can be a part of that future and play an important role, or russia can maintain its alliance with this group, which we believe is not going to serve russia's interests long term. 0nly russia can ensure that question. the russian foreign ministry saying ahead of his visit that russia and us relations are at their most difficult now since the end of the cold war. now it is time for the business news.
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troubled japanese tech firm toshiba reports massive loss of $4.8 billion. the firm has already missed two deadlines to publish the results after seeing a massive slump in its nuclear business. it now faces being broken up and sold off in parts. in the statement, toshiba has warned that its future is now in doubt. uk inflation remains at 2.3% in march — that's the highest level since september 2013, but unchanged on the month before. the measure of the rising cost of living show that prices are still rising above the bank of england's target of 2%. jd sports has reported a 55% rise in pre—tax profits, its biggest increase in eight years. like—for—like sales were up 10%. the firm says the results come despite rising inflation, linked to the fall in the value of the pound. it also warns of uncertainties ahead as britain prepares to leave the eu.
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the rate of inflation, as measured by the consumer price index, has remained unchanged in march at 2.3%. the office for national statistics says the rising prices for food, alcohol and tobacco were largely offset by cheaper air travel flights and cheaper fuel. economist victoria clarke is from investec. victoria, nice to see you. so, unchanged, 2.3%. but above the bank of england target of 2%. why should we ca re of england target of 2%. why should we care about it being above target? 0ne we care about it being above target? one reason consumers need to focus on is that we think this is part of a step in what is going to be a trend inflammation —— in inflammation upwards over the next few years up to 3%, while wages
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remain steady. portland timbers this matters, people will feel less well off, their spending power will be squeezed. at the end of the day, thatis squeezed. at the end of the day, that is bad news for the uk economy. it is all about trying to keep the subject, isn't it? when inflation rises the bank of england will start to do things with interest rates, for example. our interest rates were to change any time soon? there have been a few noises in that direction. that is not the mood of the uk's monetary policy committee overall, soi monetary policy committee overall, so i don't think so. this move and inflation is being driven by the sharp fall in sterling after the referendum. that pushed up import prices quite substantially, by about 20% year—on—year. that is what is driving inflation. the bank of england says this is temporary and we can look through it and as long as this doesn't set in, can sit tight and hope that inflation drops
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back next year. is it likely that will get worse before it gets better? everybody has a close eye on what will happen with the weak pound. a love —— will it get worse before it starts to fall back again? yes, i think it is. this is a temporary respite at 2.3%. it is likely to pick up unable because this error fares likely to pick up unable because this errorfares in likely to pick up unable because this error fares in effect, likely to pick up unable because this errorfares in effect, which is related to the timing of easter, will push up on inflation round. the fa ct will push up on inflation round. the fact that sterling is still well down on its pre—referendum levels means that there was more import price pressures to come through. it tracks up from 2.3% to around 3% by the middle of this year. yes, more to come. victoria, good to talk to you. the japanese company toshiba has just posted financial results and they make pretty grim reading. the company lost £3.9 billion. we've been waiting for these numbers — they've been postponed twice. the firm has lost huge amounts of money from its business interests in the us.
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over the years, japan has produced some of the world's best known brands, but some of the country's corporate giants have found themselves in troubled waters in recent years. so what went wrong? the bbc‘s rupert—wingfield hayes has been to investigate. these were the greatest brands in consumer goods for decades. toshiba, panasonic, sony, hitachi, so how did bmw? first of all, the chinese and korean along and they could make these things just as well but much cheaper. perhaps more importantly, these japanese countries companies lost their mojo. they forgot how to innovate. the country that invented the walkman did not go on to invent smartphone. inside out vast
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exhibition hall, more than 3,000 new recruits are being inducted into one of japan's big corporations. recruits are being inducted into one ofjapan's big corporations. a lot ofjapan's big corporations. a lot of these young people can expect to spend the whole of their career in this one company. it will become their second home and expect to work hard, long hours and wait their turn for promotion. it is a model that has worked well for japan for promotion. it is a model that has worked well forjapan in the past but it has real problems. in this rigid corporate hierarchy, promotion is based on age, not talent. it is a culture that is resista nt to talent. it is a culture that is resistant to change and bad at producing the ideas. toshiba is not alone. 0therfamous producing the ideas. toshiba is not alone. other famous japanese producing the ideas. toshiba is not alone. 0therfamous japanese names have been through deep crisis. last year, sharp was sold to a taiwanese
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company. year, sharp was sold to a taiwanese . my year, sharp was sold to a taiwanese company. my toshiba will be broken up, it's best bits sold off to the highest bidder. in other business news, drivers saw their car insurance premiums rise by an average of £110 in the last year, according to the comparison site confused.com. more expensive repairs and recent government changes to injury payouts pushed up annual costs by 16%. newer vehicles have seen some of the biggest rises, because they have complex electronics which are more expensive to repair. average house prices in the uk increased by 5.8% in the year to february, according to official figures from the office for national statistics. london continues to be the region with the highest average house price at £105,000. the lowest average price continues to be in the north—east. the charity citizens advice says broadband customers are paying a penalty for their loyalty, with providers putting up prices as soon as the initial cheap deals end. they have looked at the deals from five of the largest suppliers and found that bills went up by more than 40% on average at the end
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of the fixed contract period. they want to see the same level of scrutiny applied as that for energy providers. that is all the business. let's have a look at the weather. good morning. it is glorious in the centre of london and we are not alone. widely across the site that is the sort of scene that our weather watchers have been sending us. further north, you get perilously —— perilously close to your frontal system. cloud, perilously —— perilously close to yourfrontal system. cloud, wind and rain, that is the way it has been and that is the way it will stay through the rest of the afternoon, particularly to the north of the great glen. i'm hoping the western isles will improve with time. in the
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south, glorious. not unbroken sunshine, but respectable for this time of yearand sunshine, but respectable for this time of year and that best temperatures will reach 17. more cloud as the group are way towards the weather front, so the north of england, parts of northern ireland, southern subsequent, more cloud here. dry on the eastern side of scotland. that frontal system is not 1 million miles away from the east of scotland. in the first part of wednesday, the frontal system will move. still windy in the northern half of the british isles. if you are looking for a bit of rain in your garden in the southern part of the country, this is not the weather system for you. at last, bit of sunshine for the northern part of scotland. this is the temperature profile we expect to see in towns and cities on weather the night and that there is big, so you could imaginea
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that there is big, so you could imagine a bitterfrost that there is big, so you could imagine a bitter frost in that there is big, so you could imagine a bitterfrost in rural spots. thursday, not a bad day, but plenty of showers to be had in northern and western parts of scotland. for good friday, here is the prospect of something a bit more in the way of rain perhaps, down towards the north of england and into wales. the top until of the country still essentially dry. into the holiday weekend, quite a lot of isobars trapped the holiday weekend, quite a lot of isoba rs trapped around the holiday weekend, quite a lot of isobars trapped around a low pressure so the wind a real feature again across a good part of scotland and it will be showery on saturday. we are trying to give you a bit of comfort for the holiday weekend coming. saturday unsettled, but as we get in on the sunday and hope and that central and eastern parts will have a much improved sort of day. can we keep into monday? chris fawkes will be here with that later.
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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday: g7 leaders reject britain's call for targeted sanctions against russia and syria after the suspected chemical attack. the main suspect of the lorry attack in sweden appears in court and admits to carrying out a terrorist act. the japanese company, toshiba, warns its survival is at risk after it reported losses ofjust under £4 billion. a camp housing 1,500 migrants in northern france has been destroyed by a fire. also... united airlines defends itself after this passenger was dragged off one of its planes because of overbooking. screaming. .. the ceo of united airlines said the passenger who was violently ejected had been "belligerent". and technical trouble or are more actors beginning to mumble? we investigate complaints
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about the sound quality on some tv programmes. they mumble it is either spoken too quickly or they don't speak clear enough. hello, good afternoon. it is tuesday the 11th of april, welcome to bbc newsroom live. the foreign ministers meeting at the g7 summit have been unable to agree on imposing sanctions on russia. they had been discussing what measures to take after a chemical attack killed 89 syrians last week.
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the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, will be in moscow later to face the russians over their continuing support for president assad. he has described the syrian president as an unreliable partner for russia. it is clear to all of us the reign of the sad family is at an end but the transition could be very important, in our view, the transition could be very important, in ourview, to the transition could be very important, in our view, to the durability of a unified syria and its sustainability and durability the outcome going forward. that is why we are not presupposing how that occurs. but i think it is clear that we see no further role for the president assad regime long term given that they have effectively given that they have effectively given up their legitimacy with these types of attacks. the italian
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foreign minister gave the closing news co nfe re nce foreign minister gave the closing news conference of the g7 foreign minister meeting in lucca. he said foreign ministers believe russia have the strength to put pressure on the syrian president. translation: we had a very effective and fruitful meeting. considering also the fact that it took place right before the departure of the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, for moscow. it was a prevalent position, very similarto was a prevalent position, very similar to the italian one and i'm delighted to say that. we must have a dialogue with russia. and we must not push russia into a corner. we must also ask president putin to demand the credit that up to now has been granted to president bashar al—assad. and in fact we think the russians have the strength needed to put pressure on bashar al—assad. and to get him to observe the commitments with regard to the
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ceasefire. the italian foreign minister. we can talk to james reynolds, who joins us from the g7 meeting in lucca. they were talking about targeted sanctions against russia and syria. why did the g7 countries decide that was not the way ahead? because in the words of the italian foreign minister, we should talk to russia, not corner it. i am in rome and the summit is in lucca. borisjohnson, the foreign secretary, found he was outnumbered. his suggestion there should be sanctions against syrian military figures and russian military figures and russian military figures and russian military figures was not taken up. there was a suggestion if there are to be sanctions in future because of the chemical weapons attack, there needs to be a proper investigation
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of who carried out the attack. that investigation, even if it does happen, the results would not be known for some time. in other words, when a rex tillerson, us secretary of state, travel to moscow as he is doing now, his suitcase is a little more empty and lighter than britain would have wanted. it is not go with the threat of new sanctions. that window of opportunity theresa may and donald trump talked about in applying pressure on russia, that window seems to be narrowing. as rex tillerson heads to moscow. window seems to be narrowing. as rex tillerson heads to moscowm window seems to be narrowing. as rex tillerson heads to moscow. it does seem like it. downing street made a lot of the window of opportunity, borisjohnson mentioned lot of the window of opportunity, boris johnson mentioned it, lot of the window of opportunity, borisjohnson mentioned it, the spokespeople of theresa may, but it is hard to see where that window is and if no agreement is made by the western powers, some the most influential countries on the planet have decided not to go forward with sanctions as britain wanted. there still remains questions for the united states. you played an excerpt
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from a rex tillerson. a lot of people will ask the usa what is its policy towards syria. he said in the last hour the use of chemical weapons cannot be normalised. if it cannot be, what is the penalty and will anybody go along with such a penalty decided by the united states ? penalty decided by the united states? james reynolds, thank you. let's get reaction from norman smith in westminster. talk to us about how awkward this is for the uk, for borisjohnson, who suggested this further tightening of sanctions. government sources are trying to put the best gloss on the outcome of the summit, suggesting there is now an agreed position, an agreement bashar al—assad cannot be part of any final solution and america is now actively engaged, whereas it was feared under president trump america might take a back—seat. but there is no getting
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away from it, this is a setback for what boris johnson away from it, this is a setback for what borisjohnson sought away from it, this is a setback for what boris johnson sought to achieve. namely to get the west to agree a new range of sanctions on president putin as a stick to encourage him to distance himself from president bashar al—assad. the level of sanctions, it seems at already been reduced to quite a low level, we understand they were just going to focus on certain military individuals in the russian and syrian army who might be indicated in the chemical attack, or indeed in other attacks on civilians in syria. not broader economic sanctions. the fa ct not broader economic sanctions. the fact mrjohnson has had to concede they will have to first have an investigation means really that option has been taken off into the very long grass, because first they will have to be a united nations resolution, britain will put that to the un, the syrians will have to agree to allow the weapons
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inspectors in, then they would to establish a chemical attack has taken place, establish a chemical attack has ta ken place, having establish a chemical attack has taken place, having done that they would have to establish who was responsible, was it president bashar al—assad? finally they will have to work out if there was any russian involvement or complicity. that could take a very long time, if ever. this is a particularly long and dark piece of diplomatic cross, and dark piece of diplomatic cross, and on top of that mrjohnson yesterday said it was conclusive, the evidence was overwhelming that they had being a chemical attack. now he seems to have accepted that there needs to be an investigation to establish if there was a chemical weapons attack. —— that there had been a chemical attack. mrjohnson has been speaking in lucca giving his version of events with the outcome of the talks. what we have agreed is that we are going to put forward a resolution in the security council on the chemical weapons attack. we also want to see the
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results of the investigation, the organisation whose job it is to establish exactly what happened... but syria would have two allow the inspectors into the country. and then what we hope and what we got a very wide endorsement of last night in the meeting of the g7, we hope it may be possible... if we get evidence, those responsible for unleashing those chemical weapons should be sanctioned. it may be new names come forward. the americans have done some more sanctions, the canadians have been talking about doing unilateral sanctions of their own. we are going to go down this route with our european friends and partners. let's see where we get to. ican partners. let's see where we get to. i can assure you there was a wide measure of agreement last night that notjust the
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measure of agreement last night that not just the syria measure of agreement last night that notjust the syria generals, but if we could show complicity by those russian officers who are helping the syrian military operation, then they should also be sanctioned as well. the syrians are never going to allow a proper investigation into what they regard as their sovereign territory. there are countless resolutions, not least to 254, making it absolutely clear such inspections had to take place. —— 2254. the bigger picture is we are now moving into an environment where i think the russians have to make a choice. they basically changed the game in syria a couple of years ago when they came in and save bashar al—assad. it turns out the guy they have saved has absolutely no compunction about poisoning and
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murdering his own people with weapons that should have been banned 100 years ago. can ijust quickly finish this point... ? they have a choice because he has been exposed asa choice because he has been exposed as a user choice because he has been exposed asa userof choice because he has been exposed as a user of gas and chemical weapons. they have the choice of sticking with my glue, or deciding to work with the rest of the world towards a new political solution. i think it has been a fascinating and extraordinary meeting in the sense you have had the g7 come together with like—minded countries from around the region absolutely united in wanting to send that message to the russians. now is the time for them to reach out and engage and make the difference. you have given no stick for the american secretary of state to take to moscow, rex tillerson. surely you are sending him naked into the moscow conference chamber? i do not think that is true at all. they face the reality that
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for better or worse they bought it and have no option but to continue to support the president assad regime, unless they are willing to reach out, they are fated, they are doomed to continue with this albatross around their neck. let me tell you, there is absolutely no way, i think, tell you, there is absolutely no way, ithink, russia in the long—term can continue to support the president assad regime and pay for continued rebuilding. they will wa nt for continued rebuilding. they will want a way out. what we are offering them is the chance to have a new approach. it is for them to make the choice. they can decide to hunker down and stay with hezbollah and president assad and the iranians, or they could say, well, do we want to
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make an alliance with the americans? do we want to work with the rest of the world infighting terrorism? i think it is a great opportunity. that is what we are holding out. think it is a great opportunity. that is what we are holding outm this further evidence of western failure in syria and the triumph of russian might? on the contrary, what we have had i think in the last week,...l we have had i think in the last week,... ithink we have had i think in the last week,... i think it was the saudi foreign minister who said and spoke foreign minister who said and spoke for many people around the table, he said america is back. thank goodness we have got american leadership again. what he meant by that is the united states had finally shown, after five years of doing nothing, after five years of doing nothing, after the tragedy where we ignored what happens, the united states responded to the use of chemical weapons with force. i think that totally rocked the syrian regime. i
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think it has unsettled people. there isa think it has unsettled people. there is a window. james, i'm not going to sit here and returned to you, because we have both followed this for too long to be naive, i'm not going to pretend to you that this is going to pretend to you that this is going to pretend to you that this is going to be easy. there are very few or better routes forward that i can see for the russians. this is a way forward for russia and syria and in going to make this offer, i think rex tillerson as as you can see overwhelming support. boris johnson talking to james robbins, and still listing to that, norman smith. jeremy corbyn has been reacting to all of these developments, as well. yes, he has done. he is vehemently opposed to the prospect of any further military action. he has a lwa ys further military action. he has always opposed military intervention in the middle east. but when asked
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about sanctions he did not specifically comments directly on his view of whether there should not or should not be sanctions but he gave his backing to some kind of un investigation into the chemical attack. let's have a listen. i think borisjohnson made a bit of a mistake, no, a big mistake, in not going to moscow as arranged. everything we do has got to be measured against bringing peace to syria. measured against winning a political solution to syria. not going to moscow was not a good idea. i hope whatever comes out of the g7 todayis i hope whatever comes out of the g7 today is an agreement they will engage rapidly with russia, rapidly with all the neighbouring countries who clearly are not in the g7 and reconvene as a matter of urgency the geneva process and have a meaningful ceasefire and have a un led investigation into the chemical weapons attack, who did it, what was used, who was it targeted against and of course who authorised it? mr
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johnson's people are suggesting that farfrom being johnson's people are suggesting that far from being defeated johnson's people are suggesting that farfrom being defeated on the issue of sanctions, they remain on the table pending the outcome of that investigation. as i say there must be questions about if that investigation will take place, how long it might take and if at the end of the day it might provide a triggerfor sanctions, when of the day it might provide a trigger for sanctions, when clearly listening to the italian foreign minister, there is no consensus behind the idea of additional sanctions on russia, that must raise questions about whether there is the political appetite to go down this road. 0ne political appetite to go down this road. one other thing i thought was interesting in mrjohnson's interview was he appeared to be leaving the door open to perhaps russia not being involved in these chemical attacks. he says there is no evidence, no proof of russian involvement. that contrasts with what the americans have been saying when they stressed they do believe
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there is russian involvement. i think a difficult day certainly for the foreign secretary. norman, thank you very much. norman smith in westminster. the headlines on bbc newsroom live it is 17 past 12, a g7 meeting of industrialised nations failed to reach an agreement on sanctions against russia and syria. the main suspect in the lorry attack in sweden denied residency in the country, appears in court and admitted carrying out a terrorist attack. the japanese company toshiba is warning its survival is at risk after it reported losses ofjust under £4 billion. 0llie foster has the latest sports news. the calls for arsene wenger to leave arsenal are growing louder after their biggest league defeat of the season, going down 3—0 against crystal palace last night, still seven
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points from the top four. the gunners have never failed points from the top four. the gunners have neverfailed to finish outside the champions league under arsene wenger in 21 seasons there is commitment was questioned and there was also a question of whether or not arsene wenger had lost the dressing room. the manager would not reveal his plans for the future but anotherformer reveal his plans for the future but another former players at the french man's time is surely up.|j another former players at the french man's time is surely up. i worked under arsene wenger and man's time is surely up. i worked underarsene wengerandl man's time is surely up. i worked under arsene wenger and i have always been in the of yes, arsene wenger is great, he has done fantastic, with the champions league qualification and the money he brings to the club. but now ijust think it is time for him to go. i really do. it does hurt me to say that because i like arsene wenger. when i see him we have conversations andl when i see him we have conversations and i played under arsene wenger. last night he would call that performs an inept performance. british cycling has given an update
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on the work it is doing to improve the culture in the organisation after responding to an independent investigation into bullying and discrimination. it is developing a new code of conduct as well as changing management structures. this saga has gone on for about one year now. we had an action plan recently in how to move forward and make improvements in relation to staff welfare, especially. those points we re welfare, especially. those points were good to make. it is good for an organisation to look to improve procedures as they go along. as soon as implemented i think we can draw a line under it. probably sergio garcia ‘s favourite colour now is green. he got that much coveted green. he got that much coveted green jacket green. he got that much coveted greenjacket on green. he got that much coveted green jacket on sunday after winning the masters, his first major title and in honourof the masters, his first major title and in honour of his augusta triumph the empire state building was bathed in green last night, as he spent the evening on top of it with his fiancee, angela. it is a wiki will never forget. i wasjust being
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positive. telling myself how well i was playing. that ijust need to keep doing the same thing, keep believing in myself and that is what i was doing. and if i did that i was going to have my shot at it. and i did andi going to have my shot at it. and i did and i took it which was great. it was. that is all the sport for now. i have back after the one o'clock news, about half past one. studio: thank you. toshiba has reported a loss of $4.8 billion and has warned its survival is in doubt. the company already missed two deadlines to publish the results and now faces being broken up and sold off in parts. more on this with rupert wingfield—hayes is in tokyo. what is the story behind these massive losses? it really goes back to the mid—naughties, 2005—6, when
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toshiba decided to gamble on the future of nuclear power had bought a big company, westinghouse electric, believing there would be a renaissance of nuclear power plant building worldwide and that has turned out not to be true. and westinghouse electric is in billions of dollars in debt, maybe as much as $10 billion, building new power pla nts $10 billion, building new power plants in the united states. toshiba a p pa re ntly plants in the united states. toshiba apparently did not know about it to begin with and it came to light last year. it is such a large debt that westinghouse is gone into protective ba n kru ptcy westinghouse is gone into protective bankruptcy and toshiba had to write down a large amount of money to cover the debt in the united states, so much so that toshiba itself, its future is in jeopardy so much so that toshiba itself, its future is injeopardy and it will have to sell large chunks of the company to raise money to cover these losses. is there a scenario
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where toshiba can survive? 0r these losses. is there a scenario where toshiba can survive? or as we suggested, will it end up being broken up and sold off? it is touch and go now. it has reported these big losses, their own auditors, pricewaterhousecoopers, refused to sign off on the accounts. toshiba could be delisted from the tokyo stock market in the next few weeks, which would be a big blow for the company. in order to survive it will have to sell off its best bits, the family silver, if you like, in order to pay the bills. such are the men arena —— memory chip division. it might raise £20 billion in doing that. it is a sought after technology. but it is effectively selling the best bits. what will be left after all this to carry on? we do not know. but it will be a shell of the former giant it was. ribot, thank you. rupert wingfield—hayes in tokyo. united airlines has been heavily
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criticised after one of its passengers was dragged off a flight in chicago. shocking images, which have been shared across the world, show the man being violently dragged out of his chair and forcibly pulled down the aisle to the dismay of fellow travellers. the airline had overbooked the plane and selected the man —— the airline has now apologised and said the company will conduct its own "detailed review" into what happened. a warning: you may find these images distressing. the world's leading airline. flyer friendly. screaming. .. every thought... screaming. .. oh, my god! oh, my god. no! every movement... my god. what are you doing? no... ..carefully planned, coordinated and synchronised. oh, my god!
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look at what you did to him. oh, my god. performing together with a single united purpose. busted his rib. oh, my god. look at what you did to him. oh, my god. good work. way to go. that is what makes the world's leading airline flyer friendly. i have to go home. 0ne passenger on the flight spoke to the bbc on condition that they were kept anonymous. the guy that came, i do not know who he was, from some airport authority of some sort, was very calm, was not rude or even forceful. it was almost he was kind of there to intimidate
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and say, you need to come off. but he did not use force. another officer came on and then another man, who you see in the video, the one with the hat and jeans. he had a badge, but you know, it is probably helpful to say who you are, as an authority figure, before you start yanking people out of seats. this incident is yet another public relations disaster for united airlines, which has now apologised for what it said was an upsetting event. we can discuss this withj alexander, a pr and marketing consultant. at the risk of the obvious, how do you think they handled it? absolutely horrendously. they seem to ignore the fact that these days we are living in... everybody has got a camera phone. everybody has got a camera phone. everybody is a witness. their
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reputation is at the lowest ebb ever. even after the leggings which i know we will come to an a minute, from a couple of weeks ago. reputation is a touchy—feely thing. it is about experience, or word of mouth. social media works as the eyes of the word —— world. millions of people see what the airline is capable of. we know that if airlines have overbooked, a common policy among airlines, they look for volu nteers among airlines, they look for volunteers to leave a flight and there aren't enough volunteers, they are within their rights to say to a passenger or passengers that you must get off this plane, ideally saying that before they get on in the first place. clearly that did not happen here. why do you think they handled it in this way? do you think the security guys dragging this man from the aircraft were in communication with somebody about how they should handle it? imagine
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if you or i were on the aircraft and you saw somebody in dark clothing without any badge saying who they were, they did not say, we are from chicago aviation, the police, or whatever, they just drag chicago aviation, the police, or whatever, theyjust drag someone off an aircraft, we would be in shock, we would want to know what was happening. the fact that this happened, although united had not said it was their fault and that the man was belligerent, to be honest, how can anybody not be upset if they we re how can anybody not be upset if they were being dragged off an aircraft like that? so they are apologising but being defensive, as well. interestingly the security people have in fact said they have suspended one of the officers involved in that incident and said that person went beyond what was expected of them. they are accepting that was unacceptable. do you think it will have a tangible impact on business for united ? it will have a tangible impact on business for united? if you were advising them, what would you say to them to do now? last night i was
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with two american friends who had flown over on a visit and we watched this exact footage on social media and they said they would never fly united airways again. number one, i would say to them and make sure your policy is absolutely clear to everybody understands it, not only your personnel, but also your customers. we are customers, not just passengers. make sure any on booking is done in the terminal. it happened to me with british airways yea rs happened to me with british airways years ago. i was offered £400 or a return trip anywhere in the world and put up in a hotel, offered brea kfast and put up in a hotel, offered breakfast and lunch —— lunch. we had nowhere else to go, so we accepted very happily! that should be done in a terminal, not when somebody is seated on an aircraft and dragged off like that. it is not acceptable. but the horse has bolted. how can they undo this damage? they have got an uphill battle. they had to make
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clear to the world what their policy is and it is not clear. the other thing they have to do is make sure they put in place, i'm not sure how they put in place, i'm not sure how they do it, whether it is adverts or putting money behind it, but there has to be some clarity. this man was offered 400 us dollars. it could have gone up. then it went up to 800 us dollars. the maximum is 1300. and he was offered vouchers. the customer should decide if they want vouchers or cash. they have got quite a lot of work to do to restore their image after this, i imagine. thank you very much for that. there is a warning that the social ca re there is a warning that the social care network in england is starting to collapse. more female care workers take their own life than any other occupation. let's talk to colin angel, policy
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director at the uk home care association. why were so many people leaving theirjobs? association. why were so many people leaving their jobs? we association. why were so many people leaving theirjobs? we know a significant percentage of them continued to work in adult social care, but why do so many leave each day? it is a sector that has always had a high turnover. it is getting worse. the figures that the bbc has clicked that demonstrates that. care has been underfunded. the terms and conditions of employment are not a lwa ys conditions of employment are not always right for people. until we sort out the funding of care and the status of care work, this problem will not go away. how would you do that? the government says it is putting more money in. a lot of
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people would argue it's not enough. we would argue it's not enough. it isa we would argue it's not enough. it is a good start, but we need to make sure that councils, who will be getting this money, make sure it reaches the front line. there will bea reaches the front line. there will be a temptation for councils to buy more care for the price that it does currently, which is unsustainable, rather than to think about how to stabilise the current care market, which is a number of commentators has said today, it is a different point. a lot of the money is going into paying higher agency peas for —— higher agency fees for temporary workers, rather than trying to pay regular staff? we need to make sure that the money reaches front—line ca re that the money reaches front—line care staff who are currently employed in care services. that means paying the right price for ca re means paying the right price for care services that are being bought at the moment so they can address
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the terms and conditions of the workforce. it is a fantasticjob to workforce. it is a fantasticjob to work in and those who do it enjoy it, but the terms and conditions don't match the enjoyment of the job. so, make it pay better to make the attractive proposition? pay is the attractive proposition? pay is the major factor the attractive proposition? pay is the majorfactor in the attractive proposition? pay is the major factor in the turnover. we need to buy care in the way so people are given realjob satisfaction. that is not the way councils do it at the moment. this is bbc newsroom live. let's have a look at the weather. good morning to you. we are looking at some decent sunshine for the rest of the day today. it was a cold start, but temperatures starting at
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zero ina start, but temperatures starting at zero in a few spots. you can see the sunshine in england and wales. the further north and west to go, the thicker the cloud gets. it is also quite windy. a weather front will be bringing wet weather into the highlands, the western isles and shetland and 0rkney. things will improve in shetland later in the day. as we go through the night, the weather front is very slow moving. you can see spring rain across western scotland. by the end of the night, that front will gradually be moving into northern ireland. 0n wednesday, this continues its journey southwards by the pool we can all do well so little if any range left in it by the time it reaches the midlands. breezy around the pump itself. 16 degrees in london, but to the north—west, are fresher feel to the weather. sunshine and a few showers in the north—west. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines: g7 leaders meeting in italy reject a uk plan for sanctions against russian and syria, as the us secretary of state flies to moscow. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has renewed calls for russia to change its stance on syria. they have the choice now because he has been exposed as a user of gas and chemical weapons. they have the choice of sticking with him like glue or deciding to work with the rest of the world towards a new political solution. the main suspect in the sweden lorry attack has confessed to a "terrorist crime", his lawyer says. rakhmat akilov, a failed uzbek asylum seeker, admitted responsibility for the attack in court. the japanese company toshiba warns its survival is at risk after it reported losses ofjust under £4 billion. the latest financial results raise the possibility that toshiba's shares could be taken off
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the tokyo stock exchange. a camp housing 1,500 migrants in northern france has been destroyed by a fire. officials say the fire began during a fight between afghans and kurds. the main suspect in last week's stockholm lorry attack has admitted committing "a terrorist crime". four people died in the attack, and 15 were injured, when a lorry ploughed into a crowded shopping street. the lawyer for rakhmat akilov, a 39—year—old uzbek, told a court hearing in stockholm that his client ‘confesses to a terrorist crime and accepts his detention'. earlier on i spoke to our correspondent dan johnson who attended the hearing. the hearing lasted for quite awhile, but most of it did not happen in
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public. we saw temp one being brought into court from the police station just across the road. he was wearing a green polo shirt, trousers and had a green blanket over his head. he had a heavy, fixed set of ha ndcuffs head. he had a heavy, fixed set of handcuffs on that for unlock when he sat down. thejudge handcuffs on that for unlock when he sat down. the judge told him to remove the blanket from his head so she could address them. we could see that he had short, she had grey hair. his lawyer told the judge straightaway that his cloud confessed to committing the terror attack in stockholm on friday, essentially hijacking that delivery truck and driving through a crowded shopping street killing four people. that is the point where the judge said the hearing needed to carry on in private. reporters were allowed backin in private. reporters were allowed back in at the end when the judge and at what had been discussed would not be made public, but the conclusion of the hearing was that rakhmat akilov should be detained
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for a further month. his defence lawyer has just said that is unlikely to be challenged. his lawyer said he could be imprisoned forever. a family friend of chris bevington, the british man killed in last week's lorry attack in stockholm, has been talking to the bbc. two swedes and one belgian also died in the attack on friday. the 41—year—old's family said they were devastated by the "untimely and tragic death" of the "wonderful husband, son, father, brother and close friend to many". maddy savage reports. chris bevington move to stockholm for love after meeting his swedish wife, anna, in london. they raised two young boys here in sweden but remained close to their british family and friends. as you can imagine, we are all struggling to come to terms with this horrendous loss. and to make sense of a world without a lovely, fannie mae the net. he was the most amazing father, son, husband, brother and
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net. he was the most amazing father, son, husband, brotherand friend net. he was the most amazing father, son, husband, brother and friend to eve ryo ne son, husband, brother and friend to everyone who knew him. we will miss him terribly. he loved his family, he loved his friends and he also loved his music. this is where chris spent the last five years of his career, the swedish headquarters of the music streaming company spotify where he held a senior role. everyone here spoken to who work with him described as a wonderful quy with him described as a wonderful guy with a lovely family. he would run through a wall for you, he is just that type of guy. i wanted to ta ke just that type of guy. i wanted to take the opportunity to say that every ounce of energy and love that we all have goes to put his family, but also the families of those are the people who were affected by this terrible tragedy. a tragedy that wages —— raises challenges for sweden, has changed the lives of chris's loved ones forever. the uk inflation rate... remained
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the same at 2.8%. this is largely thanks to the ball in the pound after the brexit boat. food prices we re after the brexit boat. food prices were 1.2% higher than last year, the biggest rise in three years. paul nuttall is setting out his pa rty‘s paul nuttall is setting out his party's —— big ukip leader, paul nuttall, is that unlike his parties campaigned for local elections and in england, scotland and wales later today. the party is campaigning in
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kent later after a local council election on the 4th of may. an 8—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire in his estranged wife's classroom, before killing himself. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. iam i am told that they were estranged. this is preliminary information to this could change. i'm told that their marriage was relatively short, they have only been married for a few months and they have been suffering for the last month and a half. nobody in this investigation has come forward to say that this was potentially going to happen. doctors in the us are warning that a new commission being put forward by president trump to investigate claims that vaccines can injure children's health could lead
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to a fall in their take—up. vaccines save millions of lives around the world every year and vaccination rates in the us remain high overall. but there are concerns that an increasing number of parents are deciding not to immunise their children, putting communities at greater risk of outbreaks of disease. 0ur global health correspondent tulip mazumdar reports from vashon island in washington state, which has some of the lowest vaccination rates in the country. your attention please. welcome to fashion island, a few miles off the seattle coast, it is a small affluent community that embraces natural, clean living. today, eisa dora has decided to be a lion. these children's parents want the absolute best for them, like any medication, vaccines has —— can cause mild and
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in rare cases serious side effects. but the scientific consensus on them is clear, they are safe, effective and save lives. these mums are still unconvinced. i think it is a very difficult decision for all parents because we live in a society that values that of public health, so we really have to do our own research to find how safe they are. there was a huge amount of evidence that it was a huge amount of evidence that it was harmful. if there weren't waiter could scientifically proven, it was talking from one mother to another. here on the island, like many other parts of the us, parents can opt out of vaccinating their children for personal reasons, but the issue has caused deep divides in this tight—knit community. caused deep divides in this tight-knit community. he is going to go first? me. four-year-old twins lanny and scarlett are getting right up lanny and scarlett are getting right up to date with their vaccinations today. there has never been any
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doubt that that is the right thing to do for everybody‘s kids, notjust for our room. it may be painful, but these shots protect against deadly diseases, including measles, which before vaccines used to kill hundreds of children every year in the us. the biggest concern that we are talking about is if we don't immunise enough of the children in the school, then on a fairly regular basis academics can come through and grew in the school, then the most dangerous parts is those infestations can be taken home and a little baby can be infected and that can be infected with a little babies. this is the mild who wants to chair a committee for the trump administration looking into vaccine safety. long—time vaccines pick robert f kennedyjunior met with donald trump after the election. the
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environmentalist completely dismissed this scientific consensus on vaccines. i'm saying, let's look at real science then i will believe it. i don't believe an official, i have to be sceptical. we all ought to be sceptical. the president was by: scientifically unfounded comments in the past have also caused alarm. a beautiful child went to have the vaccine and came back and a week later got a tremendous fever, got very, very sick, neither is artistic. he appealed to emotion. he appealed to clear. we know that vaccines and cause autism and we are concerned that statements like this could deter families from getting vaccines that we know their children deserve and need. back at the clinic, the lanny and scarlett are getting over their injections, but for their parents, the greater good for their parents, the greater good for their parents, the greater good
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for the health of the islands is worth their tears. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: a g7 meeting of industrialised nations has failed to reach an agreement on sanctions against russia and syria. the main suspect of the lorry attack in sweden, an uzbek national denied residency in the country, appears in court and admits to carrying out a terrorist act. the japanese company toshiba warns its survival is at risk after it reported losses ofjust under £4 billion. the number of care worker suicides in england is on the rise. that's according to figures which show the rate has been steadily increasing for the last 15 years. more female care workers take their own life than any other occupation. graham satchell reports.
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you go home with a permanent headache. i feel permanently stressed. jayne has been a care workerfor over 30 years. she has seen dramatic changes. a rise in a number of people with chronic illnesses, low wages, with chronic illnesses, low wages, insecure contract and a lack of time to do her work properly, i've been told i have to do them. doesn't matter if someone needs to go to the toilet. it'sjust rush, rush, rush. i am on permanent antidepressants and i am not ready to come off them. the pressure of herjob, a constant sense of guilt that she should be doing better. it eventually meant she was unable to cope. i remember taking a tablet in front of my children and my children shouting at me not to do it. but when i think about it now
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i almost feel ashamed because i could have left my children and my family without me and i think, i suppose i was doing it to cry out for help, saying i need help. figures from the office of national statistics show a rise in the number of care workers taking their own lives. up from 66 in 2010 to 96. while there is no direct evidence of the link between someone's job and their mental health, the home care association says the issue needs further investigation and the union that represents care workers say the figures are worrying. these statistics tell us that it is time to start investing in the health and well—being of care workers. it is time we eroded some of the poor terms and conditions and it is time to invest in skills and training. that is why the government has to ensure we get fair funding for social care. jayne says her current employer
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is compassionate understanding. but, she says, policy from the top needs to change. they need to sit up and listen. i challenge them to come on to the shopfloor for a week to change their attitude. the department of health in england says it has increased funding to support groups who are at risk of suicide. but the challenges, the time pressures, the stress on care workers remains. thousands of stroke patients in england stand to benefit from a new programme to train more doctors in a complex procedure which could save lives and help reduce disability. it involves doctors catching and removing a clot which is causing the stroke to help restore the flow of blood to the brain. here's our health correspondent jane dreaper. back on herfeet, margaret had a stroke just three weeks
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ago at the age of 50, but she's benefited from a revolutionary treatment. i was very, very lucky because i should have probably come out more severe, you know, i could have been paralysed and taken months and months of therapy and everything else, rehab. but i was very lucky. this is margaret's angiogram. margaret's doctors at this london hospital have led the way in trying this new procedure. it has a much higher success rate than clot busting drugs. patients can be completely weak down one side and not have any speech and as soon as you take out the clot they can start talking to you sometimes and moving immediately, other times it takes several hours or by the end of the evening or the next day they can have recovered a lot of function. yes, it can have a massive impact. doctors use this incredibly delicate piece of wire to fish the clot out of the patient‘s brain,
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although sometimes use another piece of wire, like this one, to suck it out. 8,000 patients across england will benefit from this treatment every year once the programme is rolled out. not all patients will have the treatment, as some strokes are caused by a bleed rather than a clot, and it will take time to train the doctors and nurses needed to expand services. but nhs england says it's making the investment because patients recover their health so quickly. jane dreaper, bbc news. ministers have been accused of not having a proper plan for the future of the natural environment. publication of the official ‘25—year strategy for nature' has been repeatedly delayed and is not now expected until the summer. a copy, obtained by the bbc, sets out a vision for clean air and water, green landscapes, urban parks and a low carbon economy. but critics complain it's devoid of policies, as roger harrabin reports. english woodland in the springtime
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glory. the report aspires for eve ryo ne glory. the report aspires for everyone to be able to enjoy nature. it admits to serious problems with the countryside, like soil loss and the countryside, like soil loss and the degrading of peatlands. european farm policies have driven away birds, it says. our farm policies have driven away birds, it says. 0urwaters farm policies have driven away birds, it says. our waters and the airwe birds, it says. our waters and the air we breathe need to be cleaner, the report says. environmentalists welcome its vision, but say policies are virtually absent from the document. it is lightweight. in fa ct, document. it is lightweight. in fact, it's eight has no weight at all and that is really disappointing given how long we have been waiting for it we may still have to wait before the government tells us how it isa before the government tells us how it is a chilly going to achieve its noble ambition to have the environment in a better state for the next generation. the forests. the document says that by far the
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best is the planned new woodlands is near cities were people can enjoy them. eight times better than planting them in the countryside, for instance. so what is the policy recommendation to ministers? absolutely nothing. the government says it will develop policies in due course. its critics say it should have done that already. hopefully, you are hearing us loud and clear, but did you know that the bbc gets more complaints about the sound quality on television programmes than bad language, inappropriate content or political imbalance. so what's to blame? could itjust be a case of technical trouble? or are more and more actors starting to mumble? 0ur arts correspondent david sillito has been trying to find out. they mumble. do you hear this? they continue to mumble.
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you are not alone. rememberjamaica inn? they mumble. and more recently, ss—gb? was it a problem with technology or was it more about diction? we filmed our own drama and our actors mabel and jamie acted it out in a variety of styles. i suppose you must work here? i do a lot of unpaid work. i do unpaid work. sort of. a little unpaid work. three options. clear diction, this is more mumbly, and finally, something regional. and also, what happens if you change the sound effects? the level of noise around us. how about music? can you still hear what i am saying? really? we then played the results at bradford's science and media museum. did you get any of it?
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no. odd bits. the clearest diction in there was the lift! it is either too quickly spoken or they do not speak clearly enough. but it was not the same for everyone. i could hear it, there were only three words that were not clear, and i am 85 in may. washing out my lugholes! the music bed is a lot higher than i would like it. watching all this was simon clark, a professional sound recordist. his conclusion, the big issue is diction. i would say there is too much mumbling. i come across it an awful lot. 0n set, all i can do is go up to my director and say, "i am not really sure what that person said, and i am reading it from a script at the same time."
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naturalism is a wonderful thing, but if you want reality, go and stand on the pavement. this is not reality. so, proof, if needed, that hearing varies dramatically, and that while this may seem a more—realistic way of speaking... kind of, i do a little unpaid work. sort of, i do a little unpaid work. it is this that will stop millions hitting the off button. historical drama the crown has dominated this year's tv bafta nominations after securing five nods, including best actress and best drama series. claire foy is tipped for her portrayal of the younger queen elizabeth ii in the netflix show‘s first season, while jared harris, john lithgow and vanessa kirby are featured in the line—up for best
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supporting actors. but tom hiddleston has surprisingly missed out on a nomination for his role in the night manager. the british star had been expected to be up for lead actor after winning a golden globe for his work. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. we would look ahead to the easter weather forecast in a few minutes, but first of all another quiet day for most of us. the further west you go the cloudier disguise and even across england and there is some high cloud in the sky. in greater london, this weather watcher picture shows some of that high cloud from earlier in the morning. as we go on through the rest of the day, there will be fair weather cloud bubbling
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up will be fair weather cloud bubbling up across will be fair weather cloud bubbling up across england and wales but overall more sunshine than yesterday. northern england quite cloudy at times, along with northern ireland, but in the sunshine out of the cool wind it will probably not feel too bad. temperatures in london reaching 15 or 16 degrees. in northern ireland, bright conditions for the rest of the day. northern scotla nd for the rest of the day. northern scotland it will be windy and there will be outbreaks rain, targeting the highlands, and quite wet times for the western and northern isles. 0vernight tonight the weather front will begin to is way southwards. towards the end of the night we will see the rain arriving across northern ireland, but making little overall ingress. another cold one in the countryside tonight. in the south we could have pockets of frost in the coldest spots. wednesday, this weather front pushes
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southwards, bringing wet weather across northern england. at the same time the weather brightening up for scotla nd time the weather brightening up for scotland and northern ireland. there could be a few showers. in the side that stays dry but it will tend to cloud over. notice how the weather from of his old site. that probably be out of the way by thursday. thursday looks like a quiet day. cloud and western areas, but the occasional bright or sunny spell. temperatures between ten or 14 degrees. looking ahead to the easter period, low pressure will often be in charge of weather. the wind coming in from the west and the wind will bring us a mixture of bright spells, some sunshine, but also a number of showers. that is true pretty much anywhere across the uk, but we could see more general rain coming into northern ireland on sunday. g7 foreign ministers fail to agree on new sanctions against russia or syria, in the wake of the chemical attack the foreign secretary had been
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pushing for targeted sanctions. he insists russia still has to think hard about its support for president assad. they have a choice now. he has been exposed as a user of both gas and chemical weapons. they have a choice of sticking with him like glue, or deciding to work with the rest of the world towards a new political solution. we have the latest from moscow and westminster. also this lunchtime... united airlines apologises as footage of one of its passengers being forcibly dragged off a flight sparks outrage. new figures show 900 adult social care workers left theirjob every
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