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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 12, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am — prosecutors investigating the attack on the borussia dortmund football team say they're looking into a possible islamist terror motive. talks begin in moscow between the united states and russia — less than a week after the us bombed a syrian air base. president trump's spokesman, sean spicer, admits making inappropriate and insensitive remarks about hitler's use of chemical weapons. it was a distinction that didn't need to get made. they both did horrendous, heinous things to innocent people and to make any kind of comparison is really regrettable and a mistake. the family of the man dragged off a united plane say he's being treated in hospital — and they‘ re grateful for the "outpouring of support". also this hour — she survived ebola — now pauline cafferkey is planning a return to sierra leone. the scottish nurse says she has no fears about going back, three years after becoming ill, when she returns to raise funds for children living there.
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it would be good to go back, just for things to come full circle for me and get a bit of closure and end up with something good, something positive as well. melania trump accepts damages and an apology from the publisher of the daily mail over allegations about her work as a professional model. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. police in germany believe the three explosions which hit a bus carrying the borussia dortmund football team, were directly targeting the club. local media reports the police
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are investigating an "islamic link" to the incident after a letter was found near the blast sight. but police have yet to confirm the validity of the letter. the team were on their way to its champions league match against monaco. one player has undergone surgery after the blast shattered windows on the coach. jane—frances kelly reports. forensic teams have spent the night examining the blast site. three devices in what police described as a targeted attack exploded as the players‘ bus left their hotel shortly after 7pm. it's believed the explosives were hidden in a hedge and were detonated as the bus passed. the vehicle had reinforced glass. but two panes at the back shattered, injuring spanish international marc bartra,
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who has undergone surgery. other team members were unharmed. at a press conference held soon afterwards, a spokesman for the team gave an update on his condition. translation: marc bartra is being operated on right now for a broken bone in his right hand and he has got various glass shards that have been blasted into his arm. the team, through captain marcel schmelzer, just rang me. they're still very shocked and thinking about marc. we hope he recovers quickly. the police are still trying to establish who was behind the attack and why. an official from the state prosecutor revealed that a letter had been found close to the scene. translation: i can say a letter was found near the blast scene. at the moment, due to the ongoing investigation, i can't give more information about the content. the authenticity is being investigated. the devices exploded about ten kilometres from germany's largest stadium. the match has been postponed until later today.
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the world of football has come together in wishing bartra a full recovery and condemning the attack, which has unsettled players and fans alike. our correspondent gavin lee is outside the hotel in dortmund where the monaco team are staying. gavin, federal prosecutors looking at this possible islamist terrorism link, but that is not the only possible motive they are investigating, is it? no, it isn't. there are two different letters. one was found on the road and one was posted online. the investigators have confirmed they are looking at both of these and checking the veracity of them. they are looking at whether there is anything credible. the first suggests it is jihadist islamist ‘s and it is a link to the berlin attacks.
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the suspect it carried out those attacks was in dortmund for a time. the second is something posted later on, infact the second is something posted later on, in fact this morning on the internet. it was an antifascist far left group that claimed they carried out the attack. this is what the german media is reporting at the time. we are waiting for a press conference for confirmation. you can see police behind me. the team is staying at the hotel here. the other tea m staying at the hotel here. the other team coach is behind me. i have talked to some players inside and they are worried. they are checking
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their mobiles for information, but they have confidence in the authorities. tell us more about how security will be different night from what it would have been last night if the game had gone ahead as planned. uefa and the police here are saying it is as high profile as you can get. extra elements of security, including here for the tea m security, including here for the team coach. throughout the night security teams have been watching the vehicles and anyone nearby. the tea m the vehicles and anyone nearby. the team from monaco are very nervous. i spoke to one of the players who does not want to come on camera. he said he is uncomfortable. he is playing to show whoever is behind these explosions, they will carry on and they are not scared. there was a
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social media site and on twitter people have been helping out fans who have had to stay for an extra day. thank you very much. so the game goes ahead tonight but that of course left thousands of monaco fans facing an extra night in germany. social media came to their aid with the hashtag bed for away fans. overnight there have been dozens of pictures as fans of both clubs getting together. the monaco fans were singing songs about dortmund after it was announced that the game was to be postponed. and two of them arejoining us now webcam from dortmund. mike magduschewski, a dortmund fan, and matthiu pesque a monaco fan. thank you for taking the time to
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talk to us. mike, first of all, how did you get involved in inviting your guests to stay with you? my brother checked the facebook page to see what was going on. he saw that they were writing on twitter, a bed for away fans and you could offer a spare bed to monaco fans to stay. that is what we did. he asked me if i'm 0k that is what we did. he asked me if i'm ok with that. i had to sleep on the couch, but it was exciting. you spotted this and you got in touch with mike and arrived at his place?
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in factl with mike and arrived at his place? in fact i saw it on the monaco facebook page that there was a hashtag to find a place. i prescribed to twitter and i saw there were a lot of germans offering i’ooitis. there were a lot of germans offering rooms. i saw mike's adverts and i asked him if he could call me if it is possible to come to your place? he called me two minutes later and his place was two kilometres away from where we were. so as simple as that and in many ways a simple gesture, but also a really important gesture, but also a really important gesture, given the circumstances of last night? yes, of course, but at that point we really didn't think about that. we just thought of us being in the situation and we would like a being in the situation and we would likea win being in the situation and we would like a win to stay in as well. we
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didn't really think of yes or no, we just did it. so i think that is right. the question to both of you. obviously you are going to the game tonight, but do you have any concerns about safety, given what has happened ? concerns about safety, given what has happened? honestly, i don't because i know the police will do their best to make it happen that nothing will happen. the police will work harder than they have ever done. we will be totally safe. mike, done. we will be totally safe. mike, do you think the same? of course. probably one of the safest places to night, so i feel comfortable and we go there a lot, so i feel co mforta ble go there a lot, so i feel comfortable going there anyway and i think it is an important sign as eve ryo ne think it is an important sign as everyone claims to date, but i think the same. it's an important sign to not get influenced by that kind of
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attack and just go on with your daily lifestyle. do you think it will be tough for the teams, particularly for dortmund tonight?|j think particularly for dortmund tonight?” think so, yes. when dortmund player at home we feel comfortable about what is going to happen, but this time everything will be very different from what is normal, but also i think even though for me it is pretty important to get into the next round, of course, the game is more a sign to night that it is important on the small. thank you for taking the time to talk to us and enjoy game tonight. thank you. goodbye. the daily mail has agreed to pay
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damages and costs to american first lady melania trump after publishing allegations about her work as a model. the paper and its online website published an article claiming she "provided services beyond simply modelling." the deal is thought to be costing the publisher of the daily mail millions of pounds. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, and the russian foreign minister sergei lavrov have begun talks in moscow, less than a week after the united states bombed an air base in syria. mr tillerson wants to persuade the kremlin to drop its support for the current syrian regime and its president, bashar al—assad. but russia has criticised the us' military action. speaking as the talks between the two sides opened, us secretary of state rex tillerson called last week's us missile strikes on a syrian airbase troubling, and said it was crucial not to let such actions happen again. and he said he hoped the talks would help end confusion between the two nations. our meetings today come at an important moment
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in the relationship so that we can further clarify areas of common objectives, areas of common interest, even when our tactical approaches may be different. and to further clarify areas of sharp difference so that we can better understand why these differences exist and what the prospects for narrowing those differences may be. and to have a very open and candid frank exchange so that we can better define the us—russia relationship from this point forward. the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, said that he wanted to clear up what moscow regards as washington's ambiguous and contradictory positions on syria. translation: we have given our position, we have got our message across to washington
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and to you as well multiple times. it is important for us to understand your intentions and intentions of the us and the real intentions of this administration and we hope we can clear up today these things. our correspondent olga ivshina joins us from moscow. going into this meeting sergei lavrov said that the uk position on syria was a mystery and the us have put forward ambiguous ideas. the two sides have a lot to learn about each other? absolutely. moscow is sending signals it wants to understand washington's position. at the beginning when trump just came to
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the white house, moscow had high expectations, but then there were various signals coming from washington and it seems that now the moscow kremlin is quite confused about washington's position and mr putin wants to understand what will happen in order to calculate his chances and his actions concerning the future of syria and the future ofa the future of syria and the future of a shall assad's regime. on state tv it has been said that this is the same as calling for assistance to stop and terrorists's hands to be untied. it seems that despite the attack in idlib province, several days on we are looking at the status
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quo in terms of russia's relationship with president assad, aren't we? well, those are the usual tactics used by moscow's million. mr putin never surrenders under pressure. what he usually does if he strikes back is too introduced some other accusation. mr putin is saying that washington has not provided any evidence. it's the usual rhetoric from the kremlin, but putin is trying to get as much information regarding washington's position. trying to get as much information regarding washington's positionm what would it take to shift the russian position on support for assad ? russian position on support for assad? what is important that tillerson may meet putin today. this
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shows how interested moscow is in these negotiations are now much russia has invested into this syrian operation. of course they want to remain influential in the region. on the other hand the implications for russia are serious at the moment and it seems they don't want to deepen this crisis any more. olga, thank you very much for that. that is the latest on those talks between rex tillerson and sergei lavrov in moscow. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: prosecutors investigating the attack on the borussia dortmund football team say they're looking into a possible islamist terror motive. talks take place in moscow between the united states and russia — following last weeks suspected chemical attack in syria. and the daily mail says sorry to melania trump — the president's wife accepts damages and an apology from the newspaper over allegations about her work as a model. and in sport — it's the biggest day in leicester city's history.
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they play atletico madrid in theirfirst ever champions league quarter—final. they'll be without their captain wes morgan though, he's travelled to madrid but isn't fit enough to start. johanna konta will lead great britain's fed cup team for next week's world group ii qualifier against romania. the world number seven will be joined by heather watson, laura robson, jocelyn rae and katie swan. and the city of liverpool want to host the 2026 commonwealth games, as well as the 2022 event, after the south african city of durban pulled out. former fa chief executive brian barwick will chair the bids. i'll be back with more on those stories just after half past. president trump's spokesman, sean spicer, has apologised for saying that adolf hitler didn't use chemical weapons. mr spicer made the remark in a white house press briefing, as he answered questions about the war in syria. journalists reminded him that nazis used gas to kill millions ofjews and others.
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our washington correspondent david willis has more. asked about the syrian government's use of chemical weapons, the president's press spokesman made this surprising assertion. we didn't use chemical weapons in world war two. you know, you had a... you know, someone as despicable as hitler who didn't even sink to the... ..to using chemical weapons. asked to clarify those remarks, mr spicer dug himself in even deeper. he brought them into, um... to the holocaust centre, i understand that. but what i'm saying, in the way that assad used them where he went into towns, dropped them down to innocent... ..into the middle of towns, it was brought. so the use of it, i appreciate the clarification. that was not the intent. in a statement, the anne frank centre on mutual respect accused mr spicer of engaging in what it called: "the most offensive form of fake news imaginable, by denying hitler gassed millions ofjews to death." calls mounting for his dismissal, the spokesman went back
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in front of the cameras to offer this apology. i was obviously trying to make a point about the heinous acts that assad had made against his own people last week, using chemical weapons and gas. and frankly, i mistakenly used an inappropriate and insensitive reference to the holocaust for which, frankly, there is no comparison and for that, i apologise. on monday, mr spicer suggested the use of barrel bombs by the syrian regime could merit renewed military action on the part of the united states, only for the white house to deny its policy had changed. now the trump administration is facing further unflattering headlines amid suggestions that this man's days at the lectern could now be numbered. some news just some newsjust coming into us
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some news just coming into us from the court. a terminally ill man has won the right to challenge the blanket ban on providing a person with assistance to die. he suffers from motor neurone disease and when he was diagnosed, he was diagnosed with the disease in november 2014 and is not expected to live beyond another 12 months, but his lawyers argued that when he has the ability and mental capacity to make a decision, he would wish to be able to do so. no conway has won the right to bring a high court legal challenge over the right to assisted dying. we will bring you more on that at 11:30am. the head of united airlines has apologised for what he called
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the "truly horrific" incident in which a passenger was forcibly dragged, screaming, from a flight. footage of david dao being removed from the overbooked plane was posted on social media and sparked a backlash against the company. the chief executive, oscar munoz initially maintained staff has followed procedure, but has now said, "no one should ever be mistreated this way." lawyers have released a statement on behalf of dr dao's family, saying: any future referendum in the uk should learn lessons from last year's vote on britain's membership of the eu, according to a group of mps. the cross—party public administration and constitutional affairs committee says there must be adequate planning for
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referendum outcomes. it also recommends that any incumbent prime minister should stay in office to implement the result. if the government of today is going to call a referendum on big constitutional issue, they should be prepared for either eventuality in the result. and to rule out civil servants doing any preparation on the result they don't want, i mean clearly, that is irresponsible and we've suffered a six—month hiatus. unemployment fell by 45,000 to just over one and a half million in the three months to february, according to the office for national statistics. with me is our economic editor kamal ahmed. on the face of it, the employment figures is good news. employment has been very strong. we are very good at creating jobs, so despite the fa ct at creating jobs, so despite the fact the population has increased, there has been migration,
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unemployment now is approximately is at full employment levels. people who want a job can get a job and thatis who want a job can get a job and that is good for the economy and household incomes. lots of households where there was one person working and the other one wasn't, will now have two people working. it means household incomes have been higher and the employment story in britain has been a good news story. despite the financial crisis and despite worries about growth, employment has remained robust. there has been concerns about the row our contracts, but that headline figure is a good one. let's talk about average earnings then. they have fallen below inflation, depending on one major —— depending on what major you look at our must say. average earnings falling whilst inflation is rising and that is not good news for people because what you get is this incomes
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squeeze. because what you get is this incomes squeeze. if you look at inflation last september, 1%. it is now 2.3%. over the last month average earnings have fallen from 2.6% down to 2.3%. those lines cross over and people's incomes. to fall. this is significant and it has been an issue ever since the financial crisis in 2008 and 2009. since then, people's average incomes have hardly move. if you look at average weekly earnings, they are £26 a week below where they we re they are £26 a week below where they were in 2008. that's because people we re were in 2008. that's because people were worrying about the recession, people were worried about pay and inflation largely disappeared for large periods because of lack of demand, lack of growth. no inflation
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is increasing, average earnings are coming down and that creates this incomes squeeze and next month we expect inflation to go up again quite rapidly because we are going to have utility bills, they are set to have utility bills, they are set to go up. is the force later this year, which means there will be inflation around airfares as people ta ke inflation around airfares as people take holidays and that will go into the next month. inflation will rise and earnings will dip again. the squeeze will become even more significant. just briefly, as inflation rises, what are the thoughts from economists on what should be done about that? the inflation issue, that is largely due to be falling off the value of sterling following the referendum. there have been global forces because the global economy is starting to improve, whether it is the uk of the european or american economies. that means commodity prices rise, or oil prices, energy
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prices rise, or oil prices, energy prices and that feeds through into our economy. that can be difficult to control. the bank of england could use interest rates to control back, but the worry about increasing interest rates is that it costs people and if their income is coming down and you increase interest rates, it is a problem. this is one of the most significant economic and political issues for the government and everybody, the mention of inflation rising, incomes coming down and that big incomes squeeze that britain has been struggling with for the best part of a decade. thank you for taking us through that. britain's biggest supermarket chain, tesco, has reported a 30% rise in its underlying annual profits. it made more than one point two billion pounds in the last financial year. like—for—like sales, which strip out the impact of new store openings, grew1 % in the year to february. grew 1% in the year to february. the compa ny‘s chief executive dave lewis said he was pleased with the results. it's no surprise that the industry has been under pressure but it's
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been under pressure for the last three or four years as well. actually, i think where we sit as tesco now, is stronger than we've been for quite some time. our partnerships with our suppliers have never been stronger and actually while we see some of the challenges you talk about, actually we feel more confident about our ability to deal with them than perhaps we did just a few years ago. and we'll have more on tesco's profits in our business round up at 11.45am. a fashion advert for selfridges has been cleared by the advertising standards watchdog over a complaint that the model looked "unhealthily thin". a promotional email showed the woman standing side on in a long blue dress. it prompted a reader to complain she was too thin and question whether the advert was socially irresponsible. however, the advertising standards authorityjudged that the model did not appear to be "significantly underweight". for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on all those stories.
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a shrimp which makes some of the loudest sounds in the ocean has been named after the rock band pink floyd. let's have a listen. it might not sound like it but the pistol shrimp, sinalpheus pink floydee can use its claw to create a sound louder than a gunshot and is powerful enough to stun small fish. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel, but let's have a look at the weather forecast first. i don't know why i'm laughing. through our door it is not sparkling really, although it has improved across scotland. if you are tied up in the weather front, you can almost join the dots. there is low clouds,
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but further south holds onto some brightness. the trend is to drag the crowd and what is left of the rain ever further south. brighter skies in the north of england, north worlds and scotland. not feeling overly warm, given the strength of the breeze. the weatherfront overly warm, given the strength of the breeze. the weather front will slump away overnight. the skies are clear, there could be a touch of frost for central and eastern parts. a bright start tomorrow, crowd filling in from the west. always a chance of a speckling of showers across the north and west. see you later. good morning. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11.30am. police in germany are investigating whether an attack on borussia dortmund's team bus is linked to islamist terror. the us secretary of state rex tillerson is holding talks in russia with foreign minister sergei lavrov,
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as america urges moscow to stop supporting syria. but a kremlin spokesman said that would be absurd. the white house press secretary sean spicer has apologised after declaring that adolf hitler did not use chemical weapons during world war two. it was a distinction that didn't need to get made. they both did horrendous, tina staines. any comparison was regrettable and a mistake. milani trump has accepted damages from the daily mail. they we re damages from the daily mail. they were based on allegations made about her modelling career. lets get all your sport now. let's get all your sport now. the borussia dortmund players are back in training this morning, after that attack
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on their bus last night. the postponed champions league quarterfinal between dortmund & monaco will go ahead this evening. thousands of fans were already in the stadium when news began to filter in about the attack, & the opposing monaco fans chanted their support for the dortmund players. the football world has joined together in wishing defender marc bartra a speedy recovery, after he was admitted to hospital for surgery on his wrist, after being caught up in the explosion. this morning, the dortmund president praised the fans. i was lucky when i heard about how the fans reacted calling dortmund! this is the kind of reaction we have only in sport, and that is the only positive things we learned yesterday. it's sport. it's possible to make solidarity, respect, to help each other. i'm sure the people are
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discussing the whole day what happened yesterday, but when they come to the stadium, we will have a fantastic atmosphere. that is what i feel. in the other quarter—final, juventus put barcelona through another embarrassing champions league defeat — that's 3 in their last 4 games on the road now. paulo dibala scored twice injuve's 3—0 win. uefa has said security measures will be tight around all the european ties this week, including leicester's quarter final first leg against atletico madrid tonight. the leicester players will have to focus on matters on the pitch though, as they embark on one of the biggest days in the club's history. last year's premier league winners are the only english club left in the competition. captain wes morgan has travelled with the team but won't start, because of a bad back. bbc radio leicester's ian stringer is in madrid this morning, and says the players will relish the occasion. i think it's the biggest game in the club's history. i have been watching leicester since i was 4—5 years old.
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i'm privileged enough to work the bbc leicester. i believe this is the biggest game in their history. if they win, they will get a place in they win, they will get a place in the competition nextjeff, i think it is an enormous game if they can keep the game alive. johanna konta will lead great britain's fed cup team for next week's world group ii qualifier against romania. the world number 7 will be joined by heather watson, laura robson, jocelyn rae and katie swan. fernando alonso will missed the grand prix next month so he can race in the india grand prix. he will race for the honda power team and the car will be branded a mclaren. liverpool has put its bidding team together to host either the 2022
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or 2026 commonwealth games. former fa chief executive brian barwick will chair the city's bid, which was initiallyjust for the 2026 games. but durban's withdrawal from hosting the 2022 event, has provided another opportunity. birmingham and manchester have also expressed interest, with manchester potentially being part of a joint north west bid. and the world track cycling championships are underway in hong kong. there has been a big crash involving canada, in the men's pursuit. a big crash then. that was caused by a crack in the surface of the track and that had to be read take. live coverage begins at midday
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of that competition, on bbc two. that is all your sport for now. i have more view in half an hour. that must have hurt! we will see you, jessica, later on. let's bring you more news. the terminally ill man has won the right to challenge the law regarding assisted dying. he was taken to the court of appeal when demanding a judicial review on the right to die. fergus, can you remind us about the background to this case and mr conway's journey to this point. mr conway has motor neurone disease. he uses a ventilator. his condition is progressive and he is terminally ill. he fears becoming
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entombed in his body. he wants the right to ask a doctor for a lethal dose so that he can die with dignity. now, at the end of march, this was heard by the high court, and an application was put in to challenge the law which prohibits that. three out of five high court judges refused him permission to launch a judicial review of the suicide act, but today, to appeal courtjudges suicide act, but today, to appeal court judges overturned suicide act, but today, to appeal courtjudges overturned that decision and it now means the decision and it now means the decision goes back to the high court, and in the weeks, and months ahead, it will be sooner rather than later, because of mr conway's deteriorating condition, we will have a full hearing of this case and it will be the most significant case we have had since that of tony nicholson who had locked—in
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syndrome. this is a huge question for thejudges to decide syndrome. this is a huge question for the judges to decide on, with its moral and ethical implications. the huge, controversial question? its moral and ethical implications. the huge, controversial question7m is, and! the huge, controversial question7m is, and i was down in court yesterday listening to this case, where someone is asking the right to die with dignity, and then, only hours later, listening to mrjustice francis in the case of charlie guard, where he approved the application of great ormond street hospital to withdraw treatment for a terminally ill boy, to allow him to die with dignity. i should stress that the law in these two cases is com pletely that the law in these two cases is completely different. there will be people in this case who support mr conway, who say it is the same. if
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the little boy is allowed to die without suffering, then so should mr conway, but i should stress that parliament has overwhelmingly decided that the suicide act should stay as it is, and any doctor who assisted mr conway in suicide would be charged last, and could face imprisonment for up to 14 years. it's a controversial case. those opposed to assisted dying say this would be the slippery slope and put the right to die into a duty to die and be the vulnerable and week could be pressured into dying, so huge issues here. but, in the weeks ahead, we will get a full hearing of this case and it will attract a huge amount of attention. if he was to win that case, it would be up to
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parliament to decide what to do with it. parliament has made it clear that it does not want to change the law on assisted dying. ok, fergus. thank you. let's return to the us secretary of state's rex tillerson's visit to russia. mr tillerson's meeting with russia's foreign minister coincides with increased tension over last week's apparent chemical attack in syria and us military‘s response. the relationship between russia and the united states has set the tone for international relations since the second world war. the 1945 yalta conference resulted in a deal, but then came the cold war. the bbc‘s steve rosenberg examines what is at stake now. this is the palace in crimea and it is within this dramatic surroundings that stalin, churchill and roosevelt
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met to decide what the post war world should look like and to agree on the rules of the geopolitical game. and this is where the deal was signed, the so—called great powers deciding the big issues of the day. fast forward 72 years, and in russia today, there are lots of politicians and pundits who call for a new style agreement like the previous, between russia and the west, vladimir putin and donald trump, but what do russia wa nt and donald trump, but what do russia want from such a deal? based on the russian political elite, this is what moscow is looking for. the starters, a promise that nato troops will move away from russia's borders and a guarantee that ukraine and georgia won'tjoin the alliance. moscow also wants the west to accept that the former soviet space is
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russia's sphere of influence and crimea is part of russia. and then there are those sanctions. moscow wa nts there are those sanctions. moscow wants them scrapped. one more thing, russia wants to be recognised as a superpower again, as russia wants to be recognised as a superpower again, as one russia wants to be recognised as a superpower again, as one of the boys, at the top of the table, calling the shots. that is all very well, but right now, the chances of an east— west deal are rapidly receding. even if donald trump agrees with moscow's wishes, his ties with russia that are insinuated, could leave it out to —— leads to an outrage at home. norman, the government still
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stinging after that failure to get a further sanction, targeted sanction adopted by the g—7 meeting at which borisjohnson attended. how is the government trying to turn the conversation and make the idea of russia seem as relevant as possible? there's a postmortem going on at westminster after that rebus of boris johnson's westminster after that rebus of borisjohnson's suggestions westminster after that rebus of boris johnson's suggestions for westminster after that rebus of borisjohnson's suggestions for more sanctions against russia. there is a question whether borisjohnson overreached himself by stating that britain wanted more sanctions against russia. questions as to whether the foreign office maybe didn't provide him with sufficient detailed three things —— briefings.
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striking this morning that the government appear to be standing by mrjohnson's stance in calling for a more robust approach to russia and to sanctions with the chancellor, philip hammond, who has been involved with some very public spats withjohnson against exit, not acting boris johnson's withjohnson against exit, not acting borisjohnson's stance. it was surprising that the other country said they didn't have such a forward leaning attitude towards russia. let's hear what mr hammond had to say. the british government position has been and will remain to lead the way on arguing for a robust approach towards russian aggression in syria. we've been doing it for years and we will go on doing it and we have to make that case and we will continue making that case.
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sometimes some of our partners are less forward leading than we are but that won't stop us making the case for what we believe is the right approach in dealing with russia. as for those who are around mr johnson, they are looking to play down that setback at the summit, insisting they were able to achieve agreement with the other countries, the president assad had to go. think the president assad had to go. think the concern will be that mrjohnson was pinning a lot on the us secretary of state being able to go to moscow with a firm stick to wield at mr putin, that stick being sanctions, but now the secretary of state has to go to moscow without that, and it's a setback in what mr johnson was trying to achieve. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom.
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prosecutors investigating the attack on the borussia dortmund football team say they're looking into a possible islamist terror motive. talks take place in moscow between the united states and russia — following last weeks suspected chemical attack in syria. following last week's suspected chemical attack in syria. and america's military response. the president's wife accepts damages and an apology from the newspaper and the daily mail says sorry to melania trump. the president's wife accepts damages and an apology from the newspaper over allegations about her work as a model. i'm ben thompson. this is your business news. energy firm, edf is to raise the price of electricity for the second time this year for its customers on standard tariffs.
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from the 21st ofjune, edf customers was the electricity prices rise by 996 was the electricity prices rise by 9% and gas prices will go up by 5.5%. tesco has reported a fall in full—year pre—tax profit after it was fined for overstating its profits in 2014. the supermarket giant says a charge of £235m and other costs associated with closing stores and paying redundancy pushed profits down nearly 30%. without those charges, the supermarket‘s underlying profit was up 30%. unemployment in the uk remained unchanged at 4.7% in the last three months. but rising inflation is wiping out any growth in wages. inflation statistics released yesterday showed inflation was running at 2.3 per cent, just above the bank of england's 2% target. there are so many percentages to get through there! let's start with tesco. its profits are up despite having to pay a big fine. supermarket giant tesco has reported a fall in full—year pre—tax profit after paying a big fine for overstating its profits in 2014. that cost it £235m charge. without that — and some other costs associated with closing stores or making staff redundant,
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it actually beat full—year profit targets. like—for—like sales, which exclude opening any new stores were up 1% in the year. earlier, our business correspondent, emma simpson, sat down with tesco's boss, dave lewis. i'd describe them as another year of solid progress in tesco. the very pleasing thing is that on every dimension of customer service, we've had positive feedback from the customers of the service we are giving and that's allowed us to drive to improve sales and profitability so a year of very good progress. the impression is that consumers are now modifying their spending as inflation starts to eat into their spending power. what changes are you beginning to see in tesco in the way shoppers are behaving? i suppose the first thing i would say is that our position is that we want to do everything we can to stop prices rising so our position is, we don't want there to be inflation for our customers and it's only very much as a last resort that we do indeed raise prices. we work with our partners
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to try to mitigate that. but the fact is, they are and there is some pressure in terms of pricing. we talked about it at the very end of our last fiscal year. what we see customers doing is being as they've always been, very savvy about what they buy, when they buy it, so there are some subtle shifts back to more fresh food, back to more everyday essentials and some subtle savings on what might have been luxuries in the past, have been things they've chosen in the first part of this year not to buy. that's dave lewis, the boss of tesco, speaking to our business correspondent. let's speak to natalie now in salford. let's talk through these figures. they are up about bertie. down, 31, in the long run is it doing ok? let's look at
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the profitability to get the bigger picture. where is tesco today? it's a clear indication that the recovery strategy is working and they are doing the right things to get on track. i think dave lewis has done a fantastic job track. i think dave lewis has done a fantasticjob in a relatively short period of time to rebuild the tesco brand. this was a brand that went through an identity crisis a few yea rs through an identity crisis a few years back and shoppers became disillusioned with tesco on what it stood for but he has changed their experience. often, bosses will blame what happened before and dave lewis did inherit quite a few problems, including the mispricing scandal. it's important to look at how they are getting shoppers back into their
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stores. they've made significant investments in price, so if a tesco customer walks into a store today they pay 6% less than a few years ago. it is a broadly flay sherry environment. but prices are on the rise and it will be interesting to see if they can maintain that. they have simplified their pricing communication, reduced their offers in—store. they've made improvements to availability and a lot of work has been done. they are trying to say that they are the cheapest and the best service. they can't really compete on price any more. aldi is now the fifth biggest, head of
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waitrose. so tesco can't beat them on price. the big question is who is going to absolve the cost of inflation? there's an intense discussion between all supermarkets and their suppliers. some brands have been delisted from tesco's shelf. we've had unilever and heineken brands delisted. they don't wa nt to heineken brands delisted. they don't want to pass the cost onto the customer. times ahead. ijust want to pass the cost onto the customer. times ahead. i just want to show you what is happening, tesco shares 5.5% down. airports, railway stations, doing well. the high street for w h smith is still a big problem. see you shortly. in an exclusive interview,
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the scottish nurse pauline cafferkey has explained to the bbc why she's going back to the country where she contracted ebola — a disease which twice nearly killed her. she says she has no ‘trepidation' about returning to sierra leone, three years after she became ill and suffered multiple organ failure. she was talking exclusively to victoria derbyshire. i thought my chances would be pretty good, more so than had i got it when i was good, more so than had i got it when iwas in good, more so than had i got it when i was in sierra leone and treated when i was out there. i knew having access and being treated by the nhs, i knew my chances would be higher than they were. without a doubt, if i wasn't treated here, i would be dead. you saw people dying in large numbers of this disease, as part of your charitable work. 11,000 people died in total. and now you are going back? yes. why? i'm going back next
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month with a small uk charity who are doing great things in sierra leone. i'm going to run ten k also. i think, psychologically it's important to go back. it's where things started for me and i have had a terrible couple of years since then. i want to go back so things come full circle for me and get a little bit of closure, and end up with something good, something positive. how do you reflect on the fa ct positive. how do you reflect on the fact that you were investigated?” don't hold anything against those who were doing theirjob. it came at a really bad time. it was very difficult for me with my physical health, so it was a massive stress
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on me when i was already going through a difficult time. i guess if anything, i feel disappointed with public health include, how they looked after me when i was at heathrow. is this the start of you travelling again? you've done a lot of volunteering in the past. is this pa rt of volunteering in the past. is this part of the new phase? i'm not sure ifi part of the new phase? i'm not sure if i would go and volunteer or do aid work again. i'm not sure. i'm still smiling and i plan onjust carrying on and just smiling. pauline cafferky. lets get your weather now. we've got
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a zone, a weather front here with a bit of rain at times, low cloud. this central suede of the richard giles is a battle ground at the moment. this is trying to go north here, but going south in this direction, and the southern counties of england and wales, holding on to some brightness, but it is increasingly cloudy here. this weather front will slump its way further south. anywhere near that front, there's a possibility of a little bit of rain. slightly fresher across the north, but not disappointing to this time of year. from wednesday into thursday, tonight, this weather front will push away, and there would be this
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north westerly breezes, still quite chilly with some ground frost. all the while, through thursday, this cloud through the west, ringing the possibility of a shower or two. temperatures, bad for the time of year, a bit lower than what we have seen year, a bit lower than what we have seen of late. on good friday, the weather is pretty much the same. the possibility of a small bit of rain. more rain getting into the north—western corner of scotland. into the easter weekend, it's not a write—off across the entire british isles. lots of ice above so it could bea isles. lots of ice above so it could be a blustery start in the east of scotland, and the western part is rainy. stay tuned for more weather.
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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday: talks begin in moscow between the united states and russia — less than a week after the us bombed a syrian air base. prosecutors investigating the attack on the borussia dortmund football team say they're looking into a possible islamist terror motive. melania trump accepts damages and an apology from the publisher of the daily mail over allegations about her work as a professional model. the family of the man dragged off a united plane say he's being treated in hospital — and they‘ re grateful for the "outpouring of support".
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also this hour — president trump's spokesman apologises after declaring that adolf hitler did not use chemical weapons. sean spicer admitted making inappropriate and insensitive remarks during a white house press co nfe re nce . it was a distinction that didn't need to get made. they both did horrendous, heinous things to innocent people and to make any kind of comparison is really regrettable and a mistake. disability campaigners hit out after figures show over 50,000 specially adapted vehicles have been taken away since benefit changes. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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the us secretary of state rex tillerson and his russian counterpart sergei lavrov have begun talks in moscow, less than a week after the united states bombed an air base in syria in retaliation for a chemical weapons attack it says the syrian government carried out on a rebel—held town. mr tillerson wants to persuade the kremlin to drop its support for the current syrian regime and its president, bashar al—assad. speaking as the talks between the two sides opened, us secretary of state rex tillerson called last week's us missile strikes on a syrian airbase troubling, and said it was crucial not to let such actions happen again. and he said he hoped the talks would help end confusion between the two nations. our meetings today come at an important moment in the relationship so that we can further clarify areas of common objectives, areas of common interest, even when our tactical approaches may be different. and to further clarify areas of sharp difference so that we can
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better understand why these differences exist and what the prospects for narrowing those differences may be. and to have a very open and candid frank exchange so that we can better define the us—russia relationship from this point forward. but in an uncompromising opening statement, mr lavrov criticised the american air strike and warned that the kremlin was not prepared to be made to choose between its relations with the west and with syria. he added that moscow wanted the us to clarify what the kremlin regards as its contradictory positon on syria. translation: we have given our position, we have got our message across to washington and to you as well multiple times. it is important for us to understand your intentions and intentions of the us and the real intentions of this
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administration and we hope we can clear up today these things. earlier i spoke to our moscow correspondent olga ivshina, who said the kremlin is hoping to seek clarification on washington's position on syria. it seems that moscow is sending signals that it wants to understand washington's position because at the beginning of trump, in the beginning when trump just came to the white house, moscow had quite high expectations, but then there were various signals coming from washington. now it seems that moscow's ming is confused and mr
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putin wants to understand what will happen in order to calculate his chances and his actions concerning the future of syria and the future of assad's regime. we've just seen a quote from a kremlin spokesman on russian tv who says it is absurd to raise the issue of russia supporting assad and the efforts to fight islamic state. it seems to be calling for assistance to stop and terrorists hands to be untied. it seems that despite the attack in idiot have province, several days on we are looking at the status quo in terms of russia's relationship with president assad. —— idlib providence mr putin never surrenders. he usually strikes back and introduces some counter offence, some other
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accusations and that is what moscow is doing. this time mr putin is saying that washington is helping terrorists and they have not provided any reference. that is the usual rhetoric from the kremlin. russia want to calculate how cost—effective support of assad's regime for russia will be in the future. so what will it take to shift things? tillerson may meet with lover of today. —— with russia today. they want to remain influential. implications for russia
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are complicated and they don't want to deepen this conflict. we can now speak to leslie vinjamuri, an associate fellow of the us and the americas programme at the international affairs institute, chatham house. thank you for coming to talk to us. things have got really bad between russia and the us, even in the last few days? that's right. russia has said the air strikes were unlawful. they have not recognise, in fact they attribute the use of chemical weapons to rebels and not president assad. there is a basic disagreement on assad. there is a basic disagreement o n fa cts assad. there is a basic disagreement on facts and russia can see that there is not a coherent strategy coming out of the united states. it's not clear what the position is. the us ambassador to the united nations has suggested that there could be a regime change, but primary goals haven't changed. there isa primary goals haven't changed. there is a lot of confusion that is making
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the relationship between the us and russia worse. as a result the things we are hearing around this meeting today are about clarification, about understanding one another‘s positions. basic stuff, never mind getting into the detail of what might bea getting into the detail of what might be a way forward on strategy in syria? that's right. this meeting is important. it's important to have these two men in the same room and to recognise the greatest risk right now is that the relationship between us and russia gets worse and there is an escalation in syria. the us needs to articulate what the us strategy is. that has been far from clear. it seems to be the first priority of the us is the fight against isis and russia not getting in the way is important. let's bring
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in the way is important. let's bring in the comments from the kremlin spokesman. this is the same as calling for assistance to be stopped and terrorists and still be untied. so russia is saying that its fight against so—called islamic state is also a priority, but hand—in—hand goes with that its support for assad. in terms of the relationship between russia and syria, things haven't changed after what happened in idlib? it hasn't. the united states had given space to the russian position. now that has changed. there is pressure and the greater expectations that the us will do something about assad, not
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just isis. this raises a question for russia as to whether the us position on assad has fundamentally changed? position on assad has fundamentally changed ? part of position on assad has fundamentally changed? part of the meaning will be about the us is reassuring russia that it hasn't changed. in other words, the us really is being forced into a position where it has two declare whether fighting is into a position where it has two declare whetherfighting is is more ofa declare whetherfighting is is more of a priority for it than dealing with regime change in syria? that's right and the problem, of course, is if you look at the statements coming out, they've been all over the map of what this position is now and so clarification on the basic us strategy would be essential in today's's meetings. thank you very much. police in germany believe the three explosions which hit a bus carrying the borussia dortmund football team, were directly targeting the club. local media reports the police are investigating an "islamic link" to the incident after a letter was found near the blast sight.
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other media outlets are reporting a second letter is circulating online, claiming an anti—fascist group had carried out the attack. but police have yet to confirm the validity of either letter. the team were on their way to its champions league match against monaco when the explosions hit in the hoechsten district. one player has undergone surgery after the blast shattered windows on the coach. our europe correspondent gavin lee is outside the hotel in dortmund where the monaco team are staying — and says detectives are following a number of possible motives. two letters were found, one near the
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incident and one line. there has been a suggestion that this is linked to the bowling attacks. the bowling attack killed 12 people before christmas and he had been in dortmund for a while. but there was no information to assist as the eight that. secondly, something was posted this morning on the internet. it was an antifascist far left group that claimed they had carried out the attack. this is what german media is reporting, but they could be force flags to knock the police off the scent. this is where the monaco team is staying, hotel negresco did. the match is due to ta ke negresco did. the match is due to take place tonight. this is the other team coach. i've been talking
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to some of the players inside. they are worried about to light. they are checking their mobiles for information, but they have confidence in the german authorities. there will be extra elements of security and police. the vehicle and anyone thereby having watched, along with the hotel. the players are nervous. i was talking to one of the players. he does not want to come on camera, but he said he is uncomfortable. he is playing in the spirit to show that if they did not play tonight, whoever who was behind
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these explosions it will suggest they have one. some monaco fans have been staying over. there was a social media site and on twitter people were saying, open the door to these fans who have had to stay over. gavin lee reporting from dortmund. president trump's spokesman, sean spicer, has apologised for saying that adolf hitler didn't use chemical weapons. mr spicer made the remark in a white house press briefing, as he answered questions about the war in syria. journalists reminded him that nazis used gas to kill millions ofjews and others. our washington correspondent david willis has more. asked about the syrian government's use of chemical weapons, the president's press spokesman made this surprising assertion. we didn't use chemical weapons in world war two. you know, you had a... you know, someone as despicable as hitler who didn't even sink to the...
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..to using chemical weapons. asked to clarify those remarks, mr spicer dug himself in even deeper. he brought them into, um... to the holocaust centre, i understand that. but what i'm saying, in the way that assad used them where he went into towns, dropped them down to innocent... ..into the middle of towns, it was brought. so the use of it, i appreciate the clarification. that was not the intent. in a statement, the anne frank centre on mutual respect accused mr spicer of engaging in what it called: "the most offensive form of fake news imaginable, by denying hitler gassed millions ofjews to death." calls mounting for his dismissal, the spokesman went back in front of the cameras to offer this apology. i was obviously trying to make a point about the heinous acts that assad had made against his own people last week, using chemical weapons and gas. and frankly, i mistakenly used an inappropriate and insensitive reference to the holocaust for which, frankly, there is no comparison and for that, i apologise. on monday, mr spicer suggested
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the use of barrel bombs by the syrian regime could merit renewed military action on the part of the united states, only for the white house to deny its policy had changed. now the trump administration is facing further unflattering headlines amid suggestions that this man's days at the lectern could now be numbered. we are used to the ush tramp administration talking about fake news. what was your reaction? disbelief.
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—— the trump administration. either mr spicer is ignorant about the holocaust, which does not seem credible to me. one who is an educated man entered as america, or he is completely incompetent or this isa he is completely incompetent or this is a symptom of something far wider. injanuary is a symptom of something far wider. in january when the white is a symptom of something far wider. injanuary when the white house issued a statement about international holocaust day, they left out the jew —— jews. international holocaust day, they left out thejew —— jews. i don't think this isjust left out thejew —— jews. i don't think this is just some inadvertent mistake. it could be a sign of an atmosphere, not necessarily president trump himself, but in some
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circles in the white house. you're saying there is a pattern of sorts? there is a pattern, if you look at the number of clashes and confrontations that trump and his staff have had withjewish sensitivity. ever since the start of his campaign, president trump himself made disparaging remarks aboutjews. himself made disparaging remarks about jews. the himself made disparaging remarks aboutjews. the use the star of david alongside a picture of hillary clinton, which he refused not to use even though he was told it was anti—semitic. these are unable to the —— we are dealing with a single
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case of incredible incompetence, but it is getting harder and harder to maintain that there isn't something systemic that is the problem here. shall spicer has apologised, but do you think you should either resign or should be sacked? -- sean spicer. i don't care one way or another, thatis i don't care one way or another, that is for mr trump to decide. i don't know how far from mr trump's believes that mr spicer has strayed. ifi believes that mr spicer has strayed. if i was his boss, i would think twice about employing him. we have this trump administration that was basking in its first consensual success , basking in its first consensual success, but trump was receiving more positive growth since the bombing in syria and now the person who is meant to promote his success
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has turned it into a disaster. what they are doing is damage control and ifi they are doing is damage control and if i was his boss, i would sack him. personally, i don't care if he stays or goes. you've written a piece today called five ways of dealing with sean spicer‘s insanely stupid hitler analogy. what does the article say? it reflects what i went through on what i'm going through. by through on what i'm going through. by the way mr spicer is lucky because most american jews the by the way mr spicer is lucky because most americanjews the know about this year because they are still celebrating passover. it is ha rd to still celebrating passover. it is hard to come to terms with this. it's ignorance. it's hard to fathom it. there is this dichotomy because
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israelis are generally quite happy with mr trump's policy, or at least they were happy with him bombing syria. this is quite dismaying and mrtrump has syria. this is quite dismaying and mr trump has tried to diminish the charges of anti—semitism against him. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: talks take place in moscow between the united states and russia — following last weeks suspected chemical attack in syria. prosecutors investigating the attack on the borussia dortmund football team say they're looking into a possible islamist terror motive. melania trumps the mail — the newspaper apologises
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to the president's wife and pays out damages over allegations about her work as a model. now some sport. uefa have said that security will be tight around or matches. lest the players tonight will have to focus on matters on the pitch as they embark on one of the biggest days in the car's history. they are the only english club left in the competition. wes morgan will travel with the team, but he won't start. johanna konta will lead great britain's fed cup team
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for next week's world group ii qualifier against romania. the world number 7 will be joined by heather watson, laura robson, jocelyn rae and katie swan. fernando alonso will missed the grand prix next month so he can race in the india grand prix. he will race for the honda power team and the car will be branded a mclaren. mark cavendish has been diagnosed with glandular fever. his mark cavendish has been diagnosed with glandularfever. his main goal is to raise at the tour de france
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though. the world cycling championships are underway with great britain hoping to match the tally from last year's great britain hoping to match the tally from last yea r‘s event great britain hoping to match the tally from last year's event in london. earlier this morning there was a big crash involving canada and new zealand in the men's team pursuit. it looked very painful indeed and i'm sure there will be some grazed limbs in that one. that crash caused a crack in the surface of the track that had to be read tait. that is all the sport for now. i will have more for you in the next hour. the daily mail has agreed to apologise and to pay damages and costs to american first lady melania trump after publishing allegations about her work as a model. the paper and its online website published an article claiming she "provided services beyond simply modelling." the deal is thought to be costing the publisher of the daily mail millions of pounds. the daily mail has put a statement
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on its website. it says we accept these allegations about mrs trump are not true and we retract and withdraw them. we apologise to mrs trump for any distress our publication caused her. we have agreed to pay her damages and costs. unemployment fell by 45,000 to just over one and a half million in the three months to february,
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according to the office for national statistics. and average earnings increased by 2.3% in the year to february. unemployment fell by 45,000 to just over one and a half million in the three months to february, according to the office for national statistics. and average earnings increased by 2.3% in the year to february. unemployment is very strong. it's approximately at full employment levels. people who want a job can get one. it is good for the economy and household incomes. household incomes have been higham and the unemployment —— employment has remained robust. there were concerns aboutjobs, zero
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remained robust. there were concerns about jobs, zero our contracts, remained robust. there were concerns aboutjobs, zero our contracts, but the headline figure is a good one. let's talk about average earnings then? they have fallen below inflation. depending on what measure you look up. take us through that. average earnings are falling whilst inflation is rising. you get this incomes squeeze. if you look at inflation... the inflation line is going up, the average earnings line is going down. it means they cross over and people's incomes will start to fall. this is a significant issue and has been one since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009. since then, people's average incomes have hardly moved. if you look at average weekly earnings, they are still £26 a week
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below where they were in 2008. the reasons for that are the recession, people were worried about that. inflation largely disappeared for large periods because of the lack of demand, the lack of local growth. there was no inflation, but now it is increasing and average earnings are coming down. that creates an income squeeze. we expect income to go income squeeze. we expect income to 9° up “ income squeeze. we expect income to go up —— inflation to go up. there are utility bills. easter has come later. average earnings will dip again. the squeeze will become even tighter. as inflation rises, what other thoughts from economists? it's
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due to the fore in the value of sterling just after the referendum. but the global economy is improving. commodity prices are rising, energy prices are rising. that feed through into our economy. that could be difficult to control. the bank of england could use interest rates to control back, but the big worry about that is the increased cost for people. if incomes are coming down a new increase interest rates, that is a problem, so the bank has to make that balance. it's one of the most significant economic and political issues. the notion of inflation rising and incomes coming down and the big incomes squeeze that britain has been struggling with the best pa rt has been struggling with the best part of a decade. the head of united airlines has
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apologised for what he called the "truly horrific" incident in which a passenger was forcibly dragged, screaming, from a flight. footage of david dao being removed from the overbooked plane was posted on social media and sparked a backlash against the company. the chief executive, oscar munoz initially maintained staff has followed procedure, but has now said, "no one should ever be mistreated this way." lawyers have released a statement on behalf of dr dao's family, saying: time now for the weather. the weather is not looking too bad, but it won't be entirely dry for all of us. patchy rain across northern ireland. showers following up
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through into scotland. a mixture of sunny spells and showers will bring a view rainbows. one of these were ca ptu red a view rainbows. one of these were captured by one of our weather watchers. doubt whether working its way across wales. pretty much next to nothing across the midlands and east anglia. maybe one or two isolated showers, but mainly drive. it will be chilly overnight in northern parts of the uk. a few pockets of frost in the coldest parts. as we go into thursday, not a bad start. they should be sunshine, but crabbe will develop from the west. the cloud could be thick enough to bring a few showers here and there, most notably towards the west of scotland. cooler in the south. temperatures rising a bit in the north. that is your weather. good morning.
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this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12.30am. the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov is holding talks with his american counterpart, rex tillerson in moscow. police in germany investigating last night's explosions targeting the borussia dortmund football team, are reported to be looking into two claims of responsibility. melania trump has accepted the apology from the daily mail about insinuations over her modelling career. let's return to the us
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secretary of state's rex tillerson's visit to russia. mr tillerson's meeting with russia's foreign minister coincides with increased tension over last week's apparent chemical attack in syria and us military‘s response. the relationship between russia and the united states has set the tone for international relations since the second world war. the 1945 yalta conference resulted in a deal, but then came the cold war. the bbc‘s steve rosenberg examines what is at stake now. this is the lavadia palace in crimea and it is within this dramatic surroundings that stalin, churchill and roosevelt soon to be the victors of world war two met to decide what the post war world should look like and to agree on the rules of the geopolitical game. and this is where the deal was signed, the so—called great
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powers deciding the big issues of the day. fast forward 72 years, and in russia today, there are lots of politicians and pundits who call for a new style agreement like the previous, between russia and the west, vladimir putin and donald trump, but what do russia want from such a deal? based on the russian political elite, this is what moscow is looking for. for starters, a promise that nato troops will move away from russia's borders and a guarantee that ukraine and georgia won'tjoin the alliance. moscow also wants the west to accept that the former soviet space is russia's sphere of influence and crimea is part of russia. and then there are those sanctions. moscow wants them scrapped. even. lf—dfifisld tfllmfi sfirgéfi
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he is pressure links g- -, vria b the us, ..i.f —is;:.—— a
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