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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 12, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at two: president putin says relations between russia and the us have deteriorated since donald trump became president. german police say two suspects have been arrested in connection with the dortmond explosions and confirm strips of metal were in the device. the boss of united airlines appears on us television to apologise for a passenger being dragged off an over—booked flight. he describes the incident as a ‘system failure‘. you saw our sat a bad moment, and this can never, will never, happen again ona this can never, will never, happen again on a united airlines flight. that's my premise and that's my promise. energy firm edf is raising the price of electricity for the second time this year for customers on standard tariffs. and in the next hour: the daily mail says sorry to the first lady. melania trump gets an apology and damages from the newspaper over allegations about her work as a model. and, breaking the speed limit — the steam train that's travelled
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at more than 100 miles an hour, for the first time in nearly 50 years. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the russian president vladimir putin has said trust between moscow and washington has deteriorated since donald trump took office. his comments came as his foreign minister, sir guy love love —— surrogate lover of —— sergei lavrov. rex tillerson wants russia to withdraw its support for bashar
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al—assad. our correspondence is travelling with rex tillerson, and she sent this report from moscow. —— oui’ correspondence she sent this report from moscow. —— our correspondence is travelling with rex tillerson. this is not the kind of meeting that once seemed on the cards. long gone is talk of a grand resettling of relations with russia. that has been replaced over tensions over the that has been replaced by tensions over the chemical weapons attack in syria and russian anger over the american military response. it is important for us to understand your intentions, the intentions of the us aid and the real intentions of this administration. the secretary of state said both sides had some explaining to do. we can further clarify areas of common objectives, areas of common interests, even when our tactical approaches may be different. to further clarify areas of sharp difference so that we can better understand why these differences exist. the trump administration has raised the stakes by so publicly and strongly blaming
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russia for the actions of its syrian ally. it's a major shift in approach but it's not clear what the strategy is. relations have never been easy but moscow says they haven't been this low since the end of the cold war. the strike on a syrian air base seemed like a game changer but the americans said they were taking a stand against the use of weapons of mass destruction, not taking sides in the civil war. yet president trump is now pressing the russians to back away from supporting the syrian leader, bashar al—assad. frankly, putin is backing a person that is truly an evil person and i think it's very bad for russia, i think it's very bad for mankind, it's very bad for this world. that has reinvigorated western allies who met rex tillerson yesterday. they are hoping this means the us will take a more forceful role in pushing for a political solution.
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in moscow, though, that approach has backfired. president putin has only deepened his show of solidarity with assad and blames the rebels for the chemical attack. the relationship between the us and russia is as bad as it has been in a very long time. in the aftermath of this air strikes, rex tillerson is going over with the hope that he can somehow persuade russia of the critical importance of the us and russia not coming to conflict in syria. tillerson has a lot of expense of working with the kremlin, but cutting business deals when he was head of exxon mobil. but first, let's join sarah rainsford in washington —— in we know where we are, and things
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have never been worse since the cold war. the worry is, whether they go here? well, at this point, it seems clear that the us strikes on syria are not meant to indicate a new us military approach, so as the president indicated yesterday, the us is not going to escalate much farther than that. the question is whether the trump administration can generate new diplomatic momentum to put the squeeze on russia and compel it to enforce a ceasefire that moscow itself says it brokered three months ago that has been violated daily, especially with this latest use of chemical weapons. the problem with that approaches, the united
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states at the moment seems to have little to offer, and the risk for them is that the russians will simply run rings round them. very true. washington seems to have maximalist demands but has not made the investment that needs to be made to get russia to accept those demands. yesterday, the state department demanded that hezbollah withdraw from syria. how do you get a grip as powerful as them to do so? and are you willing to do what it ta kes ? and are you willing to do what it takes? it would take military action. the message has been all over the place for the last couple of days but has crystallised yesterday with the secretary of defence, james mattis. the americans will look for smaller factories from now on, after a bombastic start.l disastrous week at the g7. they have come empty—handed in terms of
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threats as a unified group. realistically, what position of strength does the united states really co m e strength does the united states really come from? the united states has leveraged, but that comes from diplomatic agility, from calibrating the message, from knowing what is feasible or not. there were options that existed under president obama in syria that no longer exist because syria has become so much more complex and because the risks of escalation have grown so much, but there are ways to try to compel the russians, such as imposing targeted sanctions. russia failed to persuade assad to enforce the chemical deal of 2013, of which russia was the guarantor. there are ways to calibrate pressure. the real question is whether president trump has the discipline to do that. even
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if he did and they brought in new sanctions, would russia care?” think russia would care if it felt that there was an international front against it. very clearly, yesterday at the g7, there wasn't a consensus on sanctions, so yesterday at the g7, there wasn't a consensus on sanctions, so i think the russians still feel comfortable. there are military adventure in syria has created great returns, much greater than moscow itself expected when it first intervened in 2015. i think moscow will be difficult to move on that, but there are ways to hurt and embarrass moscow. the fallout from the chemical attack last week, the united states will say repeatedly that the attack that they carried out was, they hope, a one—off, and at the end of chemical attacks was heralded by that action. that is a
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win situation for the united states, isn't it? yes, but a narrow win when you compare it to the declarations that followed from senior us officials. the united states, if it is against the use of chemical weapons on the battlefield, there are ways to achieve that. there is a question of whether chlorine and barrel bombs are acceptable. there isa barrel bombs are acceptable. there is a danger of a slippery slope there, but i think, at the moment, at leastjudging from the declaration of james mattis, the main strategists in the us administration know what they want to achieve. what president trump was to achieve. what president trump was to achieve. what president trump was to achieve is a different matter, and probably the most important one.
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thank you forjoining us. now we can speak to our russian correspondence. this meeting between rex tillerson and sergei lavrov has clearly. . . rex tillerson and sergei lavrov has clearly... doesn't appear to hold out very much promise for the air being cleared. on the one hand, yes, there is not that much that we can elaborate on. but there are important signs coming from the kremlin today. a spokesman said that later today, a meeting between rex tillerson and vladimir putin is possible. in previous days, he was denying that this meeting is in putin's schedule. this is an opportunity for washington's agenda
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to become clear. fascinatingly, rex tillerson is used to dealing with russia, but in a different role, in his previous life as a businessman. but that may help in terms of his relations in moscow right now, do you think? i think, yes. he met putin in person before and they know each other. he is a good business negotiator, and this may help. moscow is showing that it is interested in negotiations. despite the harsh language used by mr putin, clearly moscow is trying to calculate how cost—effective its support for president assad is at the moment. in terms of the moscow perspective, what would be a good outcome for president putin from this meeting? well, we saw that rex tillerson has a clear agenda and wa nts to tillerson has a clear agenda and wants to put pressure on russia to
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stop the support of mr assad. for russia, it is crucial that it controls the leave retains its influence in the region and continues to control the russian basesin continues to control the russian bases in syria, and also to keep its influence in the process of negotiations concerning syria's future. it is also important for moscow to tie the syrian crisis with other questions of urgent interest for moscow. the crisis in the uk the question —— the crisis in the ukraine and the question of sanctions. olga, thank you. police in germany have identified two suspects that they say are from
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an islamic background. our correspondent is outside the hotel in dortmund were the monaco team are staying. news of these arrests coming in the last couple of hours. they have. i am a few minutes away from the hotel, at the stadium, because in the next couple of hours, fa ns because in the next couple of hours, fans will be here in the midst of this huge police operation, this ongoing investigation following the attack yesterday which the federal prosecutor's offers have confirmed two suspects have been arrested. we know about the two letters that were discovered, one found on the roadside six miles away from here by the police, which claims responsibility for an attack in berlin. they asked for an strikes
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against so—called islamic state in syria to stop otherwise they will target high—profile stars. there was a second letter posted online by an anti—far right group, which the police say is a hoax. let me show you the scene. the match will start $0011. you the scene. the match will start soon. this is the size of immediate security. these armed personnel carriers... this goes on all the way around the main chord in. let's speak to a few fans as they start to come in. this is anton and anton junior. you arrived a short while ago — how are you feeling right now? today i feel safe because of the police over here, but also, because of the terrorism attack... last
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night, the game didn't start. were you told inside what was happening? a bit later. we got a message on the phone from family at home, and they told us that we had to wait some minutes. they gave us information. a few minutes after that, they told us that the had to go home but we had to wait. it was very professional. did you think twice about taking your son today, given what had happened? yesterday, we talked about it, but i think if you go home, but
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i think the terrorists... we don't wa nt i think the terrorists... we don't want to have terrorism over here and we don't want it in our sports. to let them win. you showed me this picture a few minutes ago with the police just behind picture a few minutes ago with the policejust behind us. making picture a few minutes ago with the police just behind us. making the most of the occasion, trying to make it fun for him. yeah, it's fun, but also, i want to show him that he is safe over here. the police is ok, andl safe over here. the police is ok, and i don't have to think about other people or something like that. you say. anton, and anton, like you very much for talking to me. i should say, simon, it is moving fast in terms of the investigation. a big public event this, and at the same time, this ongoing operation continues. the chief executive of united airlines has appeared on american television in the last hour, to apologise for what he's described as the truly horrific
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removal of a passenger from an overbooked flight — and to promise it will never happen again. 0scar munoz had been under growing pressure after initially defending what had happened. the family of the passenger say he's being treated in hospital — and they‘ re grateful for the outpouring of support they've received. simonjones reports. no! it's the footage that has gone viral, caused widespread revulsion, and led to shares in united airlines falling. david dao is dragged from a plane in chicago after he refuses to obey officials who tell him he must give up his seat. united insisted it needed four seats for crew members. there has been condemnation on social media. the video clips have now been viewed more than 100 million times. oh, my god! look at what you did to him! and people have protested outside chicago airport calling for a boycott of united. the boss had at first
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defended what happened, saying the passenger had been disruptive and belligerent. but now a shift in tone. the first thing i think is important to say is to apologise to doctor dao. his family, the passengers on that flight. our customers, our employees. that is not who our family at united is. finally and you saw us at a bad moment and this can never, the will never happen again. on a united airlines flight. that is my premise, that is my promise. the family of david dao have issued a statement expressing gratitude for the outpouring of support. he is undergoing treatment at a chicago hospital. but some passengers want convincing that the airline really will learn lessons. i hope this never happens again to anyone. and i will continue to fly united, i will continue to also check on other airlines as well. ijust got asked to volunteer to give up, but travelling
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with two kids, i said no. so i'm hoping it is a better situation today. pr experts believe the belated apology should have come much sooner. they have done all the wrong things really, really well. and i think, you know, people in pr will be looking back at this for many years as the perfect way to explain what not to do in the social media. performing together with a single, united purpose. the slick adverts seem a world away from what was caught on camera phones. the company now needs to unite to limit damage. simon jones, bbc news. america's first lady melania trump is to receive damages and a public apology from the daily mail after it published a story questioning the nature of her work when she was a professional model. the newspaper ran an article which included allegations that she ‘provided services beyond simply modelling' — it later retracted the story and apologised. the sum of damages has not been disclosed. with me is our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba.
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they knew they had got it wrong and 110w they knew they had got it wrong and now they are paying for it? the daily mail ‘s print edition in the uk made these allegations in a 2—page article. the article made claims about her time working as a model in the 1990s, saying that she basically provided services beyond simply modelling, that she was working as an escort. today at the high court, associated newspapers, which publishes the daily mail, said it now accepted those allegations we re it now accepted those allegations were absolutely untrue and that they wished to apologise to mrs trump for any distress and embarrassment. the same allegations were made by the daily mail online in the united states. the court has no jurisdiction there, but simultaneously, a statement from mrs trump and the mail online has said
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that the mail online also accepts as far as the publication in america is concerned as well that the allegations they made were run true and that they wished to retract them. it means that mrs trump has 110w them. it means that mrs trump has now had an apology in the high court this morning from the daily mail and their lawyers. the daily mail print edition will print an apology in this country. the daily mail online 01’ this country. the daily mail online or printan this country. the daily mail online or print an apology in the united states. associated newspapers have said that they will pay her legal costs a nd said that they will pay her legal costs and an undisclosed amount in damages. a bit unusual for a lady of this profile to go abroad. to go for a british newspaper like this can be inherently risky. the legal situation if somebody has a reputation to defend in the uk, they can bring proceedings here at the high court in london, and it seems that she felt that these allegations, which are now being said to be untrue by associated
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newspapers, who have now accepted that, that they had to be answered and that she was going to take action here and in the united states to set the record straight, which is exactly what she has done. thank you. the headlines: president putin says relations between russia and america have deteriorated since donald trump became president. german police arrest the man with an islamic background in relation to the bombing of the borussia dortmund tea m the bombing of the borussia dortmund team us. fernando alonso dart—mac silver on
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the opening day of the world track cycling championships. more on those stories at half—past. 27 men have appeared in court in huddersfield charged with historical sex offences against women. the offences include rape and trafficking of the women, who were aged between 11 and 17 at the time. 0ur correspondent is at huddersfield magistrates‘ courts. spencer, tell us magistrates‘ courts. spencer, tell us about what the court has heard about the background to this case. yes, this was a major police investigation, three and a half yea rs investigation, three and a half years long, which ended last month and resulted in 27 men and two women being charged with historical sexual
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offences. those offences relate to rape, trafficking with intent to engage in sexual exploitation, sexual activity, and the supply of drugs to 18 women in total, those women aged between 11 and 17 years. those offences took place over a seven—year period between 2004 and 2011 in the huddersfield area. all of the defendants came from west yorkshire apart from one man from dudley. as the defendants arrived at court this morning, many of them faced abuse from groups of protesters shouting at them as they made their way towards the court. 0nce made their way towards the court. once inside, the magistrate started working his way through the cases and all of them have now been referred to leeds crown court. the person facing the largest number of charges is from the thornton lodge
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area of huddersfield. 54 charges in total, 21 of rape, and 14 of trafficking girls, along with a number of other charges. 0k, spencer, we‘ll leave it there. president trump‘s spokesman sean spicer has apologise again after saying that adolf hitler did not use chemical weapons. in the last few minutes, he has been speaking in washington, once again apologising for his remarks. there is no other way to say it, i got into a topic that i shouldn‘t have, and i screwed up. i hope that i shouldn‘t have, and i screwed le that i shouldn‘t have, and i screwed up. i hope people understand that we all make mistakes. i hope i showed that i understand that i did that, and that... i saw people‘s forgiveness because i screwed up.
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and i hope each person can understand that part of existing is understanding when you‘ve done something wrong and owning up. which idid. something wrong and owning up. which i did. there are two takeaways: 0ne is it is a very holy week for the jewish and christian people this week. to make a gaffe and a mistake like this is inexcusable and reprehensible. and so, of all weeks, this was not... this comes pounds that sort of mistake. —— this compounds. it really is painful to myself to know that i did something like that, because that obviously was not my intention. and to know when you screw up that you possibly offended a lot of people, ijust, you know... and so i would ask folks‘ forgiveness and say that i
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should not have try to make a comparison. there is no comparing atrocities. and it is a very solemn time for so many folks, and this is pa rt time for so many folks, and this is part of that. that‘s obviously a very difficult thing personally to deal with, because you know that for a lot of people who don‘t know you, they wonder why you would do that. so that is first and foremost. and then secondly, from a professional standpoint, it‘s obviously disappointing... i think the president‘s had an unbelievable couple of weeks. he took decisive action in syria, made incredible progress with president xi jin ping. the spokesperson‘s job is to help amplify the president‘s actions and accomplishments, and i think he‘s had an unbelievably successful couple of weeks. when you are distracting from that message of accomplishment, and your job distracting from that message of accomplishment, and yourjob is to be exact opposite, on a professional level, it‘s disappointing, because i think i‘ve the president down. and so, ona
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think i‘ve the president down. and so, on a personaland think i‘ve the president down. and so, on a personal and professional level, that will definitely go down is not a very good day in my history. white house spokesman sean spicer there. unemployment has fallen to its lowest level in a decade. the number of people out of work fell by 45,000 to 1.56 million — the unemployment rate remained at 4.7 per cent. but average earnings have started to slow down as inflation wipes out growth. yes, some people such as civil servants have seen their wages frozen, so they are worse off last year than this year. we are expecting inflation to increased an average earnings not to go up. inflation will increase because of the weakness in the pound, higher energy prices, higher travel prices, which we know are in the pipeline, so that will push up inflation and people will feel the squeeze. they will not have as much money to spend as they did last year as those prices wipe out their salaries and to put that
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in context, it has been going on a very long time. people are still paid slightly less than they were ten years ago and that is unprecedented. because of the credit crunch, the recession and the squeeze on salaries and spending we have seen ever since then. there is to be a second price rise in four months for customers of the energy company edf. the price hike has been described as ‘difficult to justify‘ by the energy regulator. it follows price rises by other leading energy companies. with me is the head of energy at moneysavingexpert.com, archna luthra. pit is a lot of edf customers will find this particularly galling because it is the second rise in six months. and it is adding about £90 to people‘s bills. months. and it is adding about £90 to people's bills. why is it happening? they are saying it is
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rising costs. wholesale costs and the cost of transporting energy. the challenge to providers is, they need to look at being more efficient with costs. there are a lot of challenger brands out there that are able to offer cheap prices because they are efficient. the big providers need to look at doing the same. so, the advice is to look around? absolutely. everyone should urgently look for a whole of market comparison, so look for a whole of market comparison, so use look for a whole of market comparison, so use one look for a whole of market comparison, so use one of the comparison, so use one of the comparison websites out there. it is quick and easy, takes five minutes, enter your details and it will tell you the cheapest provider for you. if you don‘t want to do that, bring up if you don‘t want to do that, bring up your current provider and ask them to put you under cheapest deal. edf are introducing a new three—year fixed deal, but whatever they bring out, these cost increases are quite dramatic, aren‘t they? out, these cost increases are quite dramatic, aren't they? they are. absolutely. the three—year deal is likely to be pricey, but it will
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protect you against further increases. the most important thing to do is look at the whole of the market, not just your to do is look at the whole of the market, notjust your current provider. everybody says, i haven't got time, i pay by direct debit and it will be a hassle. perhaps if they look at the figures... absolutely. the cheapest deal on the market at the moment is about £840. after this increase, edf will charge £1160 on its standard tariff, so that is a huge saving you could make. its standard tariff, so that is a huge saving you could makem you‘re looking at fixed rates, joint deals, getting gas and electricity from the same provider, are they still the cheaper way of doing it? 0ften it‘s cheaper to get gas and electricity from one provider but it‘s worth double—checking, look at separate providers, you might be able to skim costs more. thank you very much. the time isjust able to skim costs more. thank you
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very much. the time is just after half past two, time for a look at the weather. weather not looking too bad to the rest of the afternoon, spells and sunshine for most. across the central suede, week weather front bringing patchy rain. no great amount. we have showers pushing in across scotland, too. shout was forming this beautiful rainbow in the highlands. this picture sent to us the highlands. this picture sent to us by peter. a week from pushing south. probably no rain across southern england. the skies clear overnight. with clearing skies, the winds falling light, it would be chilly. temperatures on the low side, five or 6 degrees in city centres and towns. in the countryside could get down to zero itself. a chilly start on thursday. we start with sunshine. if a cloud over pretty quickly as the morning goes by and the cloud will be thick enough for showers across western scotla nd enough for showers across western
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scotland where it stays breezy. temperatures cooler across southern england. those just a temperatures cooler across southern england. thosejust a degree or so high across the north of the uk. that is your latest. you‘re watching bbc news with reeta chakrabarti you‘re watching bbc news with reeta chakra barti and you‘re watching bbc news with reeta chakrabarti and simon mccoy. the headlines at 2:30pm. vladimir putin has said trust between his country and the us has deteriorated since president trump took office. his remarks came as the russian and us foreign ministers met in moscow for talks on syria. german police have detained a suspect with "islamist links" following a bomb attack on the bus of the borussia dortmund football team. the head of united airlines has publicly apologised on american tv for an incident where a passenger was dragged off an overbooked flight. you saw us at a bad moment and this can never, will never happen again on a united airlines flight, that‘s my premise and that‘s my promise. president trump‘s wife, melania,
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has accepted undisclosed damages and an apology from the daily mail, following allegations about her work as a model. let‘s ta ke let‘s take a look at the sport and go over tojess at bbc sports centre. good afternoon. after that attack on the dortmund team bus the players we re the dortmund team bus the players were back in training this morning. the postpone quarterfinal will go ahead. thousands of fans were in the stadium when news began to filter in about the attack and the opposing monaco fans seen here chanting their support for the dortmund players. the football world has joined together in wishing mark bartra a speedy recovery after being admitted to hospitalfor surgery speedy recovery after being admitted to hospital for surgery on speedy recovery after being admitted to hospitalfor surgery on his wrist. the dortmund president has praised his fans. i was lucky when i heard how the fans reacted and
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called "dortmund!" . the solidarity we have like this only in sport. that is the only positive thing we learned yesterday. in sport it is possible to make solidarity, to make respect. to help each other. i‘m sure that the people are discussing the whole day what happened yesterday. but when they come to the stadium we will have a fantastic atmosphere, that‘s what i feel. stadium we will have a fantastic atmosphere, that's what i feel. uefa has said security measures will be tight around all of this week‘s european matches including leicester‘s quarterfinal first leg against atletico madrid. the lesser players will have to focus on matters on the pitch as they embark on one of the biggest days in club history. they are the only english clu b history. they are the only english club left in the competition and the manager craig shakespeare says the players will relish the occasion. walking through the stadium in terms
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of by the changing rooms, seeing all the cups. it‘s a lovely, traditional ground. it gives you a little tingle. i‘m on this side now and you have to make sure you enjoy these moments, but to enjoy it you have to make sure you try and get a result. fernando alonso will miss the monaco grand prix next month so he can race in the indianapolis 500. the double world champion has the full support of mclaren and their engine partner honda, who are having difficulties this season. the world track cycling championships under way in hong kong and great britain have already had some early success and great britain have already had some early success on day one. elinor barker picked up a silver medal in the women‘s scratch race. she won gold at rio as part of the tea m she won gold at rio as part of the team pursuit, and it looks like she might have got her hands on another
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gold. picked in the closing stages by her italian rival. it worked out pretty well to be honest. not fast enough. maybe pushed too much air early on in the sprint. when i came round, i thought, early on in the sprint. when i came round, ithought, she early on in the sprint. when i came round, i thought, she is the fastest sprinter there is. you need to watch out for different people all the time. i‘m really disappointed. staying with cycling, mark cavendish will be out of action for an uncertain time scale according to his professional cycling team after picking up a virus. he‘s been suffering unexplained fatigue during training and has been diagnosed with glandularfever. his training and has been diagnosed with glandular fever. his team training and has been diagnosed with glandularfever. his team insists his main goal remains to race at the tour de france in july. johanna konta will lead the great britain fed cup team for the qualifier against romania. she‘ll bejoined by heather watson, laura robson, jason lindley and katie is one as they aim
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to reach the top level for the first time since 1993. —— katie swann. tesco has reported its first annual sales growth in seven years but the supermarket giant‘s pre—tax profits fell by nearly a third to £145 million, because find an compensation related an accounting scandal. our business correspondent emma simpson explains. tesco is still paying the costs of its past mistakes, but things are moving in the right direction for britain‘s biggest retailer. sales up, so to are profits, once you exclude its penalties and costs. fresh food has done especially well. the boss also told me he had detected a shift in spending by shoppers. what we see our customers doing is being, as they have always been, very savvy about what they buy and when they buy it. so there‘s a subtle move back to more fresh food, back to more sort of everyday essentials and some subtle savings
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on what might have been luxuries in the past, being things they have chosen in the first part of this year not to buy. after years of falling prices, the cost of food is now on the rise. all retailers are having to cope with the fall in the pound, putting pressure on costs. tesco says it is passing on less inflation than its competitors. the question is, where? the current trend we‘re seeing from the supermarkets are that they are putting up prices of nonessential items, so for example items like candles and light bulbs. we have seen a 13% increase since last october. the reason they are putting up the price of the nonessentials is that customers are less likely to notice these price increases. but if the retailer was to put up the price of the essential everyday items like milk or bread, customers will notice straightaway and they might take their shop elsewhere. are you using stealth tactics to pass on price rises? absolutely not. i'm familiar with the claim, that is not at all how we look at it. we measure all of our price basket
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and what we have been trying to do over the past two and a half years that i have been here is to lower prices, make them more stable, make them more predictable, not to be playing with promotions in a way which actually skews the way that people buy. so our intention is to keep inflation away as best we possibly can across the whole basket. but can he do that and also keep improving tesco‘s profits? this is a business that still has an awful lot of hard work ahead. emma simpson, bbc news. a terminally—ill man has won the right to bring a high court challenge over the law on assisted dying. retired college lecturer noel conway who has motor neurone disease took his case to the court of appeal. he‘d been refused permission to bring a judicial review over the blanket ban on providing a person with assistance to die. he told judges he feared becoming entombed inside his body. the ruling means there will be a full hearing of the case in the next few weeks. the scottish nurse pauline cafferkey
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has told the bbc why she‘s going back to the country where she contracted ebola — a disease which twice nearly killed her. she says she has no fear about returning to sierra leone, three years after she became ill and suffered multiple organ failure. she was talking exclusively to victoria derbyshire. when i was first told that i had it i thought my chances would be pretty good, certainly more so than hard i got it when i was in sierra leone and been treated when i was out there. i knew that having access to there. i knew that having access to the nhs, treated by the nhs, my chances would be much higher, and they were, without a doubt if i wasn‘t treated here i would be dead now. you saw people dying in large numbers of this disease as part of your charitable work. 11,000 people died in total. and now you‘re going
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back. yeah. why? i'm going back next month with a small charity, street child, they are doing some great things out in sierra leone. i plan to run ten k. psychologically it‘s important as well that i go back. that is where things started for me. i‘ve had a terrible couple of years since then. it would be good to go back for things to come full circle for me. a little bit of closure. and end it with something good, something positive. do you fear it returning? not any more, no. you did though? i did, especially after having a relapse. it‘s not so long ago i was carrying a thermometer with me everywhere. the sort of
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paranoia, that if i get a fever again that‘s it. i no longer have that. how do you reflect on the fact you were investigated ?|j that. how do you reflect on the fact you were investigated? i don't hold anything against the nursing and midwifery council, they were purely doing theirjob stop it kind of came ata doing theirjob stop it kind of came at a really bad time, it was very difficult for me with my physical health. it was a massive stress on me when i was already going through a difficult time. i guess if anything ijust a difficult time. i guess if anything i just feel disappointed with public health england and how they looked after me when i was in heathrow. is this trip to sierra leone the start of you travelling ain? leone the start of you travelling again? because you done a lot of that, a lot of volunteering in the past, did you think this is the start of a new phase? i'm not sure ifi start of a new phase? i'm not sure if i would go and volunteered to do
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aid work again, i‘m not sure about that. but i‘m still smiling, and i plan onjust that. but i‘m still smiling, and i plan on just carrying on and just smiling. ina in a moment a summary of the business news but first i had lines. as us and russian foreign ministers meet in moscow, president putin says relations between the countries have deteriorated since donald trump became president. german police arrest a man with an islamist background in connection with yesterday‘s attack on the burussia dortmund team bus. the boss of united airlines apologises on tv for a passenger being dragged off an over—booked flight — and promises it will never happen again. i‘m rachel horne. energy firm edf is to raise the price of electricity for the second time this year for its customers on standard tariffs. from 21 june, edf customers will see electricity prices rise by 9% and gas prices will go up by 5.5%.
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tesco has reported a fall in full—year pre—tax profit after it was fined for overstating its profits in 2014. the supermarket giant says a charge of £235m and other costs associated with closing stores and paying redundancy pushed profits down. however uk like—for—like sales were up almost 1%, their first reported growth since 2009/10. unemployment in the uk remained unchanged at 4.7 per cent in the last three months. but rising inflation is wiping out any growth in wages. inflation statistics released yesterday showed inflation was running at 2.3 per cent, just above the bank of england‘s 2 per cent target. now, let‘s turn to some corporate news. the head of communications for uber has become the latest executive to leave the embattled ride—sharing firm. chief executive travis kalanick confirmed rachel whetstone‘s departure in an all—staff email on tuesday.
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no reason has been given for her resignation, though it follows months of turbulence at uber. ms whetstone joined the company from google in 2015. michelle fleury is at the new york stock exchange. thanks forjoining us. in her leaving statement rachel whetstone said, i love this company as much as idid said, i love this company as much as i did when i booked my first ride six years ago. why is she going? i did when i booked my first ride six years ago. why is she going7m an e—mailto her six years ago. why is she going7m an e—mail to her staff she talked about the fact there are some jobs that are always on jobs in other words, 20 47 round—the—clock dealing with one pr crisis, one issue. —— 24-7. with one pr crisis, one issue. —— 24—7. 0thers with one pr crisis, one issue. —— 24—7. others are reporting there was tension between her and the chief executive of cuba. that they
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a p pa re ntly executive of cuba. that they apparently didn‘t always see iti. he in an e—mailto apparently didn‘t always see iti. he in an e—mail to staff, though he didn‘t givea in an e—mail to staff, though he didn‘t give a reason, was full of praise for what she had done for the company and that he looked forward to hiking the skyline trail with her for many years to come. it's been struggling under the weight of negative press this year, uber. 0ur people seeing a way forward for the country? that is an understatement. there was a grassroot campaign urging users to delete their accou nts urging users to delete their a ccou nts to urging users to delete their accounts to do with trump‘s immigration ban and the perception it was somehow profiting from this. then there were high—profile departures, the head of engineering, the president of the company who took a shot at the corporate culture on the way out. there have been claims of sexual harassment. being made by a former employee. that claim ended in an investigation led by former president barack 0bama‘s
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top police chief, eric holder. he is due to hand over results of that investigation soon. it‘ll cause the spotlight to shine once again on hooper and the corporate culture there. it will certainly mean that miss whetstone‘s successor will have their hands full. it raises questions for investors, they will be watching closely. this is a company that has been hugely successful at raising money, will they be able to continue to do so? the number of people unemployed fell by 45,000 to 1.56 million in the three months to february. but average weekly earnings including bonuses increased 2.3%. inflation is ata similar bonuses increased 2.3%. inflation is at a similar level. the work and pensions secretary damian green has
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responded to the figures. these are historically good and implement figures, unemployment is lower than it has been since the mid—19 70s. i think the most encouraging figure below the surface is vacancies are atan below the surface is vacancies are at an all—time high. for the historically small number of people who haven‘t got a job, there are jobs out them for them to do. vodafone is scrapping roaming charges for uk customers in 40 countries, meaning they can use their phones without additional costs. the new terms are being applied only to new or upgraded contracts. the eu is expected to abolish charges for its 28 member states in june. shares abolish charges for its 28 member states injune. shares havejumped on reports they are in talks with merging their businesses. talks are reported to have started earlier this year. bombardier‘s shares rose on tuesday. in japan
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this year. bombardier‘s shares rose on tuesday. injapan there is a crisp crisis as the crisp maker and its main rival are making a major crunch in the supply chain. both firms will be discontinuing brands afterjapan firms will be discontinuing brands after japan suffered its firms will be discontinuing brands afterjapan suffered its worst potato harvest in 34 years. typhoons and floods caused a shortage of the vegetable. let‘s see how the market had going. the ftse down slightly. just go better than expected profits but lots of underlying concerns. issues over the pension deficit dublin... at the tesco share price went up about 6% in anticipation of these results. smith gave a good result but underlying concerns about growth. all of it is in railway stations, airports, wh smith shops. we‘ll have more on all of the market
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news at 4:40pm, and back with more general business news at 3:40pm. crunch in their supply chain. that took you while! we do listen. a steam locomotive has been driven at 100 miles an hour — for the first time since steam power was abandoned by british rail, nearly 50 year ago. the new steam locomotive, tornado, reached the speed as part of an experiment, to assess whether steam trains can safely run faster than the current limit of 75 miles an hour. judith moritz reports. it may look like something from a bygone era but the tornado steam locomotive is a very modern train. to run competitively on the railways today it must hit top speeds. which is why in the middle of the night, its volunteer crew did something that has not been done since 1966. 0n the line between newcastle and doncaster, they took the train to the maximum, past the normal running speed, past 90 miles an hour and beyond. right up to the top of the dial.
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we did what we set out to do. we need to see, we have not got it home yet so it really only counts when you get it home. but the guys had an inspection and we seem to be all right. it is all about gathering data, that is the difference with this, then we will take the engine to the shed and put to bed and put ourselves to bed. this class of steam train was common throughout the 1950s until the end of the 1960s when it was scrapped in favour of diesel. the tornado was built in 2008 at a cost of £3 million and it runs a charter service. but to fit into the modern railway network timetable the crew had to show that it could cope at more than 90 miles an hour. a lucky few were on board last night as the train hit the 100 mile an hour mark. i have every confidence and faith in them to be honest, they're wonderful people
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and they have done us proud. absolutely incredible. she's the only locomotive that could have done it. brilliant. if there was any problem they would have backed off immediately and they were just cruising in the high 90s. as smooth as silk, amazing. it is an achievement built on soot, steam and sweat and for the group huge cause for celebration. rather than champagne though they were gasping for a cup of tea. the tornado was the first steam locomotive to reintroduce a timetabled service to england. now it has shown what it can really do and the hope is that by the end of this year it will operate regularly at express speeds. doctor who is back this weekend and this time he has a new companion travelling with him. that‘s not the only reason this series is highly anticipated — it‘s also the last outing for peter capaldi as the doctor and for its writer stephen moffat.
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tim muffett went down to london‘s south bank to catch up with him. there is a strange alien landscape here on london‘s southbank. daleks, bit of a clue. it‘s been created by joe hill, the artist, in honour of the new series of doctor who which begins this saturday. it‘s the last series to feature peter capaldi as the doctor. it‘s also the last series to be overseen by the show when as he‘s known, the writer and executive producer stephen moffat. i had a chat with him to ask how it feels to be overseen his last series. at the moment flat-out working so it doesn‘t feel like the end, it‘ll suddenly feel like the end, it‘ll suddenly feel like the end when i am dumped in the skip i think. until this moment itjust feels like i‘m working very hard. metaphorically dumped? no there an actual skip, russell is in there already. why did you decide to call
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ita already. why did you decide to call it a day? i've been doing it a very very long time. i certainly never got tired of doctor who, never got tired by it, but i wanted it the beginning of something new, i wanted to enter the phase of my career known by britain as regret and failure. scottish people are brilliant at presenting last success. peter capaldi's last series. are the two thing is not entirely unrelated ? series. are the two thing is not entirely unrelated? they are unrelated, i told entirely unrelated? they are unrelated, itold him i entirely unrelated? they are unrelated, i told him i was leaving and said, whatever you want to do, you want to stay with chris, leave with me, it‘s entirely up to you. he took a long time to make up his mind but in the end he decided, as so many doctors have, three years is the right amount of time. he still loves it to bits, the difficulty with doctor who is you love it so much you realise you have to hand it on at some point and the big red for any doctor and any show runner is, you don‘t want to be the last one. you want to be handing it on in good shape to somebody else. the last
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series to be overseen by steven moffat, the last series to start peter capaldi as the doctor. it is the next doctor going to be? amongst bookies favourites, chris marshall, tilda swinton, david harewood... we‘re going to have to wait and see on that one. for now all the attention is on the latest series, series ten, of doctor who, which begins this saturday. tim muffett talking to steven moffat! i got that the right way around. you did, those new teeth are good. chris fawkes has the latest weather. the weather is looking bad through the rest of the afternoon. a weather front sliding south, bringing this area of cloud across central portions of the uk. amongst the cloud, patchy outbreaks of rain. north wales, a fuse box into east anglia, bit of dampness around north england. not too much to be honest.
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in the north skies are brighter. showers moving in bringing rainbows to the highlands. thanks to weather watchers for snapping those pictures on an early walk. in lyme regis cloud breaking up and thinning. looking at the weather around 6pm as we head home from work, quite a bit of cloud. prone to breaking across southern england. the dregs of the front bringing in dampness across mid wales. next to nothing across the midlands. most of northern england dry and bright with some train. should be sun—dried for scotla nd train. should be sun—dried for scotland and northern ireland. in scotla nd scotland and northern ireland. in scotland particularly further showers driven in by brisk north—westerly winds. temperature eight or 9 degrees for most of the towns and cities. 0vernight the remainder of the front clears south as bits and pieces of cloud... should stay dry in the south. 0vernight, clearing skies with winds falling. particularly across
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northern parts of the uk. the deep valleys. good get cold in scotland. in towns and cities temperatures holding above freezing, six and 7 degrees. should be a fair bit of sunshine but richard cloud over quickly. that cloud should be enough to bring passing showers. 0ne across the north of the uk compared with today, cooler in the south. eyes of 14 in london. good friday brings cloud for england and wales. 0utbreaks cloud for england and wales. outbreaks of rain especially across western areas. 16 degrees in london, temperatures coming up. brighter skies across the north west. but further showers here. looking ahead to the easter weekend, low—pressure close to the north of the uk, high pressure in the south keeping the worst of any weather fronts at bay. to be honest the weather isn‘t looking too bad. for many areas, this is an idea of the kind of weather. most will see sunny spells,
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temperatures similar to what we‘ve seen over recent temperatures similar to what we‘ve seen over recent days. we could have a spell of rain working across scotla nd a spell of rain working across scotland on sunday but otherwise most of us will see sunshine with one or two showers particularly in the north. this is bbc news. i‘m reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 3pm: as us and russian foreign ministers meet in moscow, president putin says trust between the two countries has deteriorated since donald trump became president. german police identify two suspects, arresting one, in connection with yesterday‘s attack on the borussia dortmund team bus. the boss of united airlines apologises on tv for a passenger being dragged off an over—booked flight and blames "system failure" for the incident. you saw us at a bad moment and this can never and will never happen again on a united airlines flight. that‘s my premise and that‘s my promise.
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going up again — energy firm edf hikes fuel prices for the second time in four months.

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