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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 15, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc news. the world watches as north korea lines up to celebrate its founders anniversary, but will there be an act of defiance against the us? the united states will be hoping its show of military power in afghanistan may make north korea's leader think again. a funeral is held for the pakistani student killed by a mob after being accused of blasphemy. from this window he would have seen the mob as he came down from the hospital, looking for him. eventually they found him here. they kicked him, they beat him, they hit him with sticks and shot him. also coming up we go inside the syrian city of homs to see how it is being rebuilt after six years of war. north korea's army has promised what
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it called ursula ‘s response to any us provocation, reflecting growing tension about the country's nuclear and weapons programmes. china has called for calm, saying it has feared conflict could break out at any moment. it comes as the united states says a huge bomb, dropped on so—called islamic state militants in afghanistan, was "the right weapon against the right target". the us military insists it was a local, tactical decision — others believe its principal aim was as a show of strength. our security correspondent frank gardner reports. a "powerful armada", in the words of president trump. this is the us navy's carl vinson carrier battle group, equipped with 90 strike aircraft and other weapons and diverted to the seas off north korea. mr trump is hoping it will intimidate that country's isolated regime into abandoning any further nuclear tests or long—range missile launches. china has warned of the imminent
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danger of a war being triggered on the korean peninsula, and north korea remains defiant, saying it's ready to respond to any attack with nuclear weapons. meanwhile, in afghanistan, the us has dropped an immense bomb, 11 tons of high explosive dropped on an isis tunnel complex in the mountains of eastern afghanistan. the blast was felt 30 miles away. the weapon used is called a moab, a massive ordnance airburst, also known as the "mother of all bombs." this was its first time used in combat. this was the right weapon against the right target. we will continue to work shoulder to shoulder with our afghan comrades to eliminate this threat to the afghan people, especially the people of nangarhar, to the people of the entire region and indeed, the people around the world. local villagers confirmed that isis fighters had set up bases in the mountains behind them, and said the bomb had hit its target. but the strike was condemned by both
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so—called islamic state and afghanistan's former president. how could the united states use afghanistan as its ground for experiments, for testing weapons of mass destruction? president trump's targets now include three major problem areas for the us — afghanistan, syria and north korea. the massive weapon that the pentagon has used in afghanistan is intended to send a message to its enemies that "you're not safe underground". in syria, the trump administration will be hoping that last week's cruise missile strike will deter presdent assad from any further chemical attacks. but north korea is the biggest gamble. mr trump is hoping that sending this powerful naval armada offshore will deter any further nuclear tests. the question now, though, is can he manage three global crises simultaneously?
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it's very possible that if these three scenarios come together, syria, afghanistan and north korea, that it would overwhelm the policy—making capabilities of mr trump's administration, it will overwhelm the strategic planning capabilities of the pentagon and it would overwhelm the resource capabilities of the us military. but president trump and his entourage now feel they're on a roll, tackling head—on the foreign policy challenges the previous administration was unable to resolve. there is now the risk that ramping up the rhetoric could lead america into more conflict, or that in the absence of any swift resolutions, mr trump may simply turn his back on foreign adventures and focus instead on domestic issues. what do we know so far about donald trump was make strategy? laura began is in washington. donald trump has said what he described is a very
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powerful armada, unable strikeforce to the korean peninsula, they are there and standing by, just in case. that north korea intends to carry out a sixth nuclear test, donald trump in the past has used language like "it won't happen", and in the last few hours, he said that north korea is "doing the wrong thing, making a big mistake." remember this isa making a big mistake." remember this is a president that within the last week alone has shown that not only is he willing to act, he is willing to act without warning. consider that syrian strike just last week, he casually turned to the president of china over dinner, while remarking about how nice a chocolate ca ke remarking about how nice a chocolate cake is, he then turns around and says he sent 59 cruise missiles to syria. that is a strong message that not only is he sending to china but he is sending to china's neighbours in north korea. he is trying to tell
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the world that there is a new sheriff in town, that there is a man in the white house who unlike his processor is willing to act —— predecessor is willing to act and cross, when he said there would be a red line, and if anyone crosses it, he is willing to act on it. and of course we have seen the us deploying its naval force around the korean peninsula, it won't have gone unnoticed that it is a sensitive time to be doing that, even if as we are being told, the secretary of state is saying it is just routine. they are saying it is routine, but yes, they are in an area, a very sensitive area at a time when north korea may be perhaps preparing to launch its six nuclear tests. it can be not entirely by accident, but what donald to —— donald trump's long—term strategy is when dealing with each of these foreign crises, is right now, it is unclear. what we
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are looking at is a president who is now giving more leeway to his generals at the pentagon, he also appears to be listening to them at the moment, he has surrendered himself by experts —— surrounded himself by experts —— surrounded himself by experts when it comes to military fields, he has surrendered himself with general that he feels he trust and his advice he is listening to. but this is also very uncritical president trump. he is also a very avid twitter fan, said everything can change in 140 characters or less. meanwhile pyongyang is thought to be preparing for a massive military parade at which its latest missile technology may be on display. they are there to celebrate the founder of the country, the. 0ur reporterjohn sudworth
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is with a group of foreign journalists invited to witness the event. they sing. in north korea, the spectre of war looms large over daily life. these girls are singing about being soldiers... while, not far away, real ones crowd into a shrine to the country's founding president, general kim il—sung. these are scenes akin to a religious pilgrimage, but of course, in honour of a still ruling family dynasty who have at their disposal all of the myth that would rival any of the world's great religions. and as the country prepares to display its devotion at the anniversary of kim il—sung's birth this weekend, there's an awareness of the rising tension with america. translation: we should have the nuclear weapons.
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if we do not have nuclear weapons, the nuclear weapon of another country will fall on our soil. translation: it doesn't matter whether the americans make the situation on the korean peninsula tense. it doesn't matter. we feel safe because we have the great leader, kimjong—un. this week, the current ruler, kim jong—un, held this meeting where his late grandfather was honoured. he is also thought to be planning a massive military parade as a powerful tribute, and a message of defiance. children sing. this is a country where art and armaments are blended in singular purpose, to demonstrate to the watching world that its nuclear ambitions will not be stopped. funeral prayers have been held in
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pakistan for a university student who was killed by a mob after being accused of sharing blasphemous content on social media. blasphemy is legally punishable by death in pakistan, but the incident has shocked many. a quiet, dignified funeral begins for a young student who is life was so brutally end. park ridge —— mashal khan's father helped bury his body, offering prayers for the latest victim to be accused of blasphemy and killed in pakistan. inflation make in this country there is no freedom of expression. they cut peoples tongues. they have killed my son and then laid the blame on him. i am his father, he used to sit at home and
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talk lovingly about the message of profit muhamed. mashal khan had been studying communication at the university in the northern city. —— mohammed. yesterday a young man —— a group of young men accuse him of spreading blasphemy online. this is his dormitory. he had written phyllis of all quotes on the wall. from his window he would have seen the mob as they came down the park, breaking into the hostel looking for him. eventually they found him here. they kicked him, they beat him, they hit him with sticks and they shot him. they dragged him downstairs and continued to beat him. all films on video is too horrific to fully show. even long after he was dead, they continued to attack his body. they wa nted continued to attack his body. they wanted to assert his body in place,
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but the police took action and his body was taken and protected. the university has been closed indefinitely and a number of arrests have been made. close to 70 people have been made. close to 70 people have been made. close to 70 people have been murdered in pakistan after being accused of blasphemy in the past 30 years. this incident has shocked many but there has not been a level of outrage from government officials one might expect. translation: i want justice officials one might expect. translation: i wantjustice for my country. and they want it so that nothing like this happen to any other child. they didn'tjust attacked my son, by doing it in the university, they challenge the state, so the state should ensure justice. mashal khan describes himself on facebook as a humanist, in solidarity many have been writing —— sharing his writings online. some now seem particularly poignant. you are watching bbc world news. stay with us, still to come, the near
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extinct bison being reproduced to a canadian national park 140 years on. pol pot, one of the century's greatest mass murderers is reported to have died of natural causes. he and the khmer rouge movement he led were responsible for the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million cambodians. there have been violent protests in indonesia where playboy has gone on sale for the first time. traditionalist muslim leaders have expressed disgust. the magazine's offices have been attacked and its editorial staff have gone into hiding. it was clear that paula's only contest was with the clock and as for a sporting legacy, paula radcliffe's competitors will be chasing her new world best time for years to come. quite quietly, but quicker and quicker, she seemed just to slide away under
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the surface and disappear. news. i am ben bland. the latest headlines: north korea gets ready to celebrate its founder's anniversary while defying the us. a funeral is held for the pakistani student killed by a mob after being accused of blasphemy. several thousand people have been resettled from four besieged towns in syria. they are the first of up to 30,000 people due to be moved. inhabitants from two government—held towns in opposition territory in idlib arrived near aleppo, which is controlled by president bashar al—assad's forces.
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at the same time, similar operation took place in two rebel—held towns west of damascus. other six years of conflict in syria, the historical centres of places like aleppo and homs now lie empty. there are now, however, the first tentative signs of rebuilding. beast to set —— lyse doucet reports from homs. from the ruins of war, the first rebuilding. this is the restoration project in the ancient quarter of homs. some of the worst battles took place here. this man has been the leading architect, designing the roof of the silk. —— souk. translation: the importance of rebuilding is notjust about stoves.
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this was a place to trade. it was a social hub where people from all religions and social groups would meet and spend time with each other. we saw how such a wonderful place was destroyed when we started rebuilding. we are rebuilding the social fabric. workers around you are all from homs. they understand the city and its pain. walking through this ancient market is a walk through the story of syria. going back thousands of years. this public bath dates back to the ottoman empire. he explains how the hamam was built in the best way to bring in the light. so this is from the roman era? it is very different from the ottoman one. down to the depths of the old city, with another architect. this is the main hall.
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all of it was covered by ashes. architect. this is the main hall. all of it was covered by ashesm has been cleared now. would there have been fighting right in here? yes. there was a main battlefield here. it is not easy to rise from the roars. it is not easy. —— ashes. we need to contemplate over this and we have two realise how important it is to come up with something good out of it. she hasjust written a book about how architecture matters and has to be part of rebuilding syria. beautiful. the oranges are growing at mac you see? this is what i talk about in the book. about how generous the old cities were. they we re generous the old cities were. they were generous even with the planting. —— the oranges are growing
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at! you see? we have something beautiful and harmonious in our lives. in our daily lives. we vandalise a lot of it. and we mistreated a lot of it. so maybe we have the chance to start over, now. this woman and her husband worried this chance will be missed. how to build on a painful past, these roof punctured by shrapnel, inspiring her new design. now they say syria's cities need to be rebuilt to bring communities together, not to have them apart. lyse doucet, bbc news, in the old city of homs. more details of a motor that a doctor in the united states who has been charged with carrying out female genital mutilation on young girls. the case centred on to seven year olds, but officials believe that he may have conducted the
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operation are many and more girls. asa gish operation are many and more girls. as a gish and say that she carried out 12 years conducting the process. —— prosecutors say. —— she may have. one of the main issues is there was no priority on addressing sgm in this country. people were not aware that female genital mutilation was happening. —— matter too. that female genital mutilation was happening. —— mattertoo. overthe last couple of years, we have seen a strong movement. we have been partnering with survivors who are standing up and speaking out. they've been really advocating towards the us government to do more. they look to work in the communities and with many bodies like religious leaders who can stand up like religious leaders who can stand up and say this is not a religious practice. in that sense, i think a lot had been happening under the
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radar in this country. we were defining it as a cultural practice. therefore people did not want to get involved. it is now seen much more as violence and child abuse. and we are as violence and child abuse. and we a re really as violence and child abuse. and we are really pushing those who have responsibility to protect children, to step forward and really become more involved in that.|j to step forward and really become more involved in that. i know this particular case centres on 27—year—old girls. do we have any idea how many more could have had the procedure carried out on them by the procedure carried out on them by the mud as doctor? —— on them by this doctor. —— drawn. the mud as doctor? —— on them by this doctor. -- drawn. one thing we do know is how many different girls are do know is how many different girls a re cross do know is how many different girls are cross the communities are affected. —— two seven—year—olds. 13,000 women all girls are at risk of fgm in the united states. and over 200 million are living with fgm around the world. we are seeing this
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happen everywhere across communities, and while we do not know the exact numbers of this particular doctor, we do know that it is happening to many, many girls, across many, many communities. it is happening to many, many girls, across many, many communitieslj across many, many communities.” just wonder if you see a time where they could perhaps be a federal approach across all states to try and deal with this, or do you think that this is something that will inevitably be done on a state— by—state inevitably be done on a state—by—state basis? inevitably be done on a state— by—state basis?” inevitably be done on a state-by-state basis? i think right here we have a federal law. this case has been brought under that law. the federal bureau of investigation launched the investigation. right now, 25 of our 50 states have laws against fgm. we are pushing for the other 25 to join. it is good out of both levels. —— federal bureau of investigation. when it stays to step up even though we have a federal law. because the most engagement on a day—to—day basis for individuals is that the state level. when we are looking at
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doctors who are licensed to the state, we want to make sure that the state, we want to make sure that the state laws are very clear. about not only it being illegal to perform the practice, but the responsibility to report child abuse of other physicians. christians around the world have been marking good friday. in rome, pope francis led eight procession around the colosseum as an egyptian family carried the cross. —— a procession. security was tight. tens of thousands attended. the pope intends to visit egypt at the end of the month, despite attacks on palm sunday there last week. the canadian rockies awoke welcome him back —— welcoming back old friends. prices were hunted to near extinction, but thank you to a new
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programme, they have been reintroduced to the banff national park. —— thanks to. the word for bison is inni in blackfoot. i don't it will ever see the huge herds again. but having a back here is having them come back
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home. —— having them back here. i think we are now all of one mind. the future looks very promising. it is absolutely unprecedented disagreement between all the indigenous people in this area. without their support and traditional knowledge and the advice and input that we see from them, this project would not have been possible. first nations people and the bison, we are from the same world. we have similar challenges. now to the movie trailer that has sent star wars fans into a frenzy.”
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only know one truth. it is time for thejedi. only know one truth. it is time for the jedi. this clip released on the internet was just a bit of a case. —— taste. it follows on from the force awa kens and —— taste. it follows on from the force awakens and will feature carrie fisher. it amassed thousands of views online in just a few minutes. if you would like to watch a little more of it, or watch it in full, you can find it on the bbc newsbeat site. you can get in touch with me or most of the team online. iam ben with me or most of the team online. i am ben bland. with me or most of the team online. iam ben bland. thank with me or most of the team online. i am ben bland. thank you for watching. hello. whether some of us on good
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friday. a very few of us, though, during saturday. it is an easter weekend of up weather. it is cool throughout, but there is only a day. saturday will be one of those. there are wetter days. some of us, the rain will come back on sunday. it will get into easter monday as well. we will start with saturday. it will brighten up after clouds early on saturday. a blustery day across the northern half of the uk. some girls across parts of scotland and the showers are going to be most frequent coming into northern scotland. there will be some snow on the high hills. one or two showers elsewhere in scotland, northern ireland, and pushing into northern england of the wind. breezy, so the showers will move through quickly. for the rest of england and for wales, we will see few showers. just one or two around. the mist majority are going to stay dry, not quite as
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windy, the further south we come, but a cool, fresh appeal wherever you are, especially in that breeze. on through the day, a feat of showers will keep coming into scotland, northern scotland in particular. one of two per northern ireland and northern in them, but few for the rest of england and wales. those temperatures will be done compared with good friday. 14 degrees possible in london. 19 glasgow. most of us will see nine to 12 degrees in the wind. bed that in mind heading into the high scottish hills. there will be some snow showers up that possible. as eager to saturday evening, it will turn quite chilly. many of the showers that we have had will start to fade away. we are left with a mainly dry saturday evening. where watching a weather system coming into the atla ntic weather system coming into the atlantic for part two of the weekend. that is is today, for sunday. still some uncertainty about the detail. rain into northern ireland, possibly feeding into scotland. the risk of snow in parts
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of scotla nd scotland. the risk of snow in parts of scotland and into the pennines. much of southern england will be mainly dry and the far north to scotland. some uncertainty about the position and timing of this weather system, so keep watching the forecast during saturday if you have plans on sunday. those temperatures are around nine to 50 celsius. easter monday, showers. most frequent and the eastern side of the uk where it will be windy. there will be sunny spells around, too, bearin will be sunny spells around, too, bear in mind that there will be away on monday night. it is looking frosty. some chilly nights for this time of year coming up next week.
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the latest headlines from bbc news: north korea gets ready to celebrate its founder's anniversary as the world watches for any signs of defiance against the us. china warns that pensions are so high that conflict could break out at any time. —— tensions. the united states will be hoping its show of military
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power in afghanistan will make north korea's leader think again. america's most senior and military commander in afghanistan says the bomb was the right weapon for the target. funeral prayers have been held in pakistan for a university student who was killed by a mob after being accused of sharing blasphemous content on social media. mashal khan was stripped naked and beaten with planks. several thousand people have been resettled from four besiege towns in syria. they are the first of up to 30,000 due to be moved, it follows a swap of detainees between the rebels and government forces. now on bbc news, it is time to whether world, and this time nick miller and sarah keith lucas had been to northern

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