Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 16, 2017 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

10:00 pm
tonight at 10pm, turkey votes yes to constitutional changes that will concentrate power in the hands of president erdogan. he can now dissolve parliament and abolish the role of prime minister, but says the country will enjoy political stability. the country will enjoy translation: this is a success, it is a victory for turkish people, turkish economy and for turkey as a whole. but it was a narrow victory, with opponents saying the country has become a dictatorship. with opponents saying the country we'll be live in istanbul. with opponents saying the country also on the programme. with opponents saying the country america says it's working on a range of options with china to resolve the crisis over north korea's weapons programmes. the number of people killed in a bomb attack on a civilian convoy in syria has risen to 126, most of them children. parents are calling for better special—needs teaching, as unions warn that budget cuts are depriving children of support. and, vettel‘s victory
10:01 pm
in the bahrain grand prix gives him a clear lead over lewis hamilton in formula 1. good evening. turkey's president recep tayyip erdogan has declared victory in a controversial referendum granting him sweeping new powers. he said tonight that the country had opened a "new page" in its democracy. the country had opened but opponents say the result amounts to one—man rule, with the president now able to abolish the role of prime minister and, if necessary, dissolve parliament. it was a close vote, with widespread support for the constitutional changes in rural areas, but with many rejecting the proposals in the bigger cities, including istanbul. in the bigger cities, including opponents are alleging voting fraud and say they'll
10:02 pm
challenge the result. fraud and say they'll john fraud and say they'll simpson reports. tonight, the victors were out in force, celebrating as though they had won by a big majority. in force, celebrating as though instead of by a whisker. in force, celebrating as though in fact, here in istanbul and in turkey's two other largest cities, izmirand in ankara, the capital, the no campaign seemed actually to have won. the capital, the no campaign seemed the worry is that the result has been too narrow to settle anything for good. has been too narrow the bangs aren'tjust fireworks. has been too narrow those are guns being fired. has been too narrow the fact is that there is a big underlying level of nervousness and anger here, which, really, the result of this referendum being so close hasn't done anything to calm down. "tayip erdogan will be a world
10:03 pm
leader, god willing", says this man. this is history, history! leader, god willing", says this man. however slight his majority in the referendum, president erdogan has taken the decision to push through his far reaching constitutional changes and deal with any consequences. today, with any consequences. the decision made by the turkish today, the decision made by the turkish public is historic, this is not an turkish public is historic, this is notan ordinary turkish public is historic, this is not an ordinary day, it is a very serious change for the future after k. -- serious change for the future after k. —— the future of turkey. then k. —— the future of turkey. he went out to speak to some k. —— the future of turkey. of his supporters face—to—face. k. —— the future of turkey. they chanted "bring back the death penalty" and he seemed favourable to that. penalty" and he seemed his argument all along has been that only a really strong presidency can galvanise turkey into being successful and wealthy.
10:04 pm
so he is getting rid of the old constitution‘s checks and balances. of the old constitution‘s he is giving himself the power to hire and fire the country's judges and he has made it possible for himself to stay as president until 2029. for himself to stay there had been one or two small opposition demonstrations but he stamped down so hard on his opponents in recent years that they are reluctant to come out onto the streets in any great numbers. out onto the streets the yes campaign may not have won the popular vote in the capital, ankara, but tonight it held its celebrations, all carefully choreographed in advance. this has been indeed a day on which history was made. but it is likely to cut turkey off further from its old allies in western europe and america. further from its old allies what we have seen today seems like a major change of course. john simpson, bbc news, istanbul. like a major change of course. john, this appears to be a fairly narrow victory.
10:05 pm
5296. a fairly narrow victory. how is he going to bring the country together now? actually, the country together now? i really do not think tha he actually, i really do not think that he wants to bring people together very much, after all he has won this narrow victory by demonising his opposition, stirling and quite a lot of anger and sometimes a certain degree of violence in the country and they do not think he is going to say, you have your viewpoint which we are prepared to listen to. i think he is going to carry on, forcing it through as he forced the referendum through. as for the opposition, what do they do? you would have expected them to be right here in the centre of istanbul, where there have been so many demonstrations over such a long period. there is absolutely nobody
10:06 pm
here whatsoever. it looks as though the opposition, for the time being, is simply stunned by their failure to win. most people in the opposition thought that they would just make it. what do they do? well, i think a lot of people are going to leave the country, they will go to the west in different ways and i think they are going to... the last big demonstration by the opposition here once in 2013. and that was followed by death and a large amount of injury and i think the stuffing has gone out of the opposition altogether. john, many thanks for that. john simpson in istanbul. america says it's working on a "range of options" with china amid rising tensions over north korea's nuclear and missile programmes. north korea's nuclear
10:07 pm
pyongyang attempted to test fire what's thought to be a medium—range missile this weekend from a base in the shinpo region on the east coast, but it blew up shortly after take—off. the launch is being seen as a provocation, coming shortly before the us vice president mike pence arrived in south korea. vice president mike pence 0ur correspondent, john sudworth, is in the north korean capital, where his movements are being monitored and tightly controlled. this flower show, like almost everything else in north korea, is dedicated to its ruling family. everything else in north korea, and this display is in honour of their abiding obsession — missiles. honour of their abiding isn't it a little strange to have rockets and missiles in a flower show? rockets and missiles no, not strange at all. rockets and missiles there are reports that there
10:08 pm
was a missile test this morning and some suggestion that it failed. was a missile test this morning have you heard any of those reports? was a missile test this morning this is not a failure, we will win and we will have greater successes in the future. we will win and we will have greater there has, so far, been no mention of the missile on north korean tv. but it is true. of the missile on north korean tv. every launch, failure or not, takes the military one step closer to its goal. takes the military one the timing of the latest missile test is significant, coming just a few hours before the us vice president, mike pence, arrived in the south korean capital, seoul. in the south korean capital, it is a message of defiance from here in pyongyang. its quest to become a fully fledged nuclear power continues. at its big military parade yesterday, it put some of its newest missiles on display. yesterday, it put some of its newest the decades of threats and sanctions against north korea have clearly done little to stop it. against north korea have clearly mr pence's talks will focus on trying to find something that will work. focus on trying to find senior administration officials
10:09 pm
said military options are still on the table. said military options the president has made clear that he will not accept the united states and its allies and partners in the region being under threat from this hostile regime with nuclear weapons. and so we're working together with our allies and partners and with the chinese leadership to develop a range of options. at pyongyang zoo today, there was a relaxed holiday atmosphere. the looming crisis seemed far from anyone's mind. north korea appears confident that president trump's threats will turn out to be hollow and that he will conclude, like others before him, that war carries far too many risks. john sudworth, bbc news, pyongyang. that war carries far too many risks. the number of people thought to have died in a bomb attack in syria yesterday has risen to 126 — including 68 children.
10:10 pm
that including 68 children. is according to local activists. they were among busloads of civilians being brought out of two pro—government towns in the north—west that have been under siege. in the north—west that the blast happened on the outskirts of aleppo. this report from our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, contains some distressing scenes. correspondent, james landale, they were heading for what they thought was safety. thousands of civilians from government held villages had been under siege by rebel forces for two years. just a short bus ride from aleppo and a better life. but then this... from aleppo and a better life.
10:11 pm
a massive suicide bomb attack. a vehicle supposedly carrying food packed, instead, with explosives. carrying food packed, devastating the convoy of buses and cars. a potato truck, as they were very hungry, comes and offers for the kids potato chips, potato bags. so the kids, who were very hungry, some of them left the buses and went to the truck and as soon as they approached the truck, the truck exploded. as they approached the truck, and that is why it emerged today that among the 126 people dead were 68 children, according to british—based activists who monitor the conflict. according to british—based activists hundreds of others injured in the attack were rushed to hospital in aleppo. in the attack were rushed it is still not clear who was responsible for the attack, although local islamist rebel groups have denied any involvement. the people travelling in these buses were part of a deal between government and opposition forces to evacuate civilians from towns besieged by both sides. forces to evacuate civilians they were attacked as they waited for another convoy to get going in the south, evacuating civilians from rebel—held areas. but an attack like this, that left so many dead, will raise doubts about whether there will be more evacuation deals in the future. the remaining survivors in the convoy continued theirjourney on to aleppo in relative safety. the united nations condemned the attack and urged all sides
10:12 pm
to ensure the security of evacuees. the attack and urged all sides but there are already fears that civilians in rebel—held areas may well face revenge attacks. civilians in rebel—held areas may james landale, bbc news. civilians in rebel—held areas may one of the biggest teachers' unions says children with special needs, aren't getting the support they're entitled to because of budget cuts. speaking at the nasuwt conference in manchester, the general secretary warned that pupils could be "seriously compromised" without extra funding. pupils could be "seriously the government insists it's spending nearly £100 million extra on education this year. nearly £100 million extra 0ur education editor, branwen jeffreys, has the story. 0scar is ten. branwen jeffreys, has the story. he is a bright, clever little boy. branwen jeffreys, has the story. he is friendly and sparky and smiley. but his autism causes him an awful lot of issues with the world, thatjust isn't set up for children like him. that includes primary school, where support was patchy. 0scar went part—time but struggled. where support was patchy. oscar's meltdowns can
10:13 pm
include self harm. he will bite himself, he might head—butt. head—butt walls, doors, so it could involve having to sit there with a cold compress between the wall and his head. i want handcuffs. between the wall and his head. handcuffs? between the wall and his head. you want to arrest us? between the wall and his head. children with special needs are seven times more likely to be permanently excluded. are seven times more likely to be that's what happened to oscar last year. then a placement at a special school broke down. the impact we have now got is we have got a child who has very little self worth. is we have got a child who has we have a child with mental health issues. we now have in the region of a0 professionals involved with our family. of a0 professionals we feel massively let down by an education system that is meant to help us. by an education system extra money has gone to councils to top up special needs support but charities say the demand for help is rising faster. getting the support you need for a child with special needs can feel like a relentless battle and with school budgets facing their biggest
10:14 pm
squeeze for 20 years, that is likely to get harder. squeeze for 20 years, and if more children like 0scar are excluded, the local council has to pick up the pieces. he is waiting for a place at a more expensive autism school to be confirmed. at a more expensive autism the battle to agree it has left 0scar out of school for many months. all of the failure to provide for him is financially driven. he doesn't understand why he can't play with his friends. he gets very distressed about it. play with his friends. he doesn't entirely understand what has happened because for him, we had very good days where his needs are being met and things went really, really well. where his needs are being met and his understanding is, but, mummy, when they help me i can do it. but, mummy, when they two weeks ago he threatened to take his own life. we ended up on suicide watch for two nights in a row with very little,
10:15 pm
if any, sleep. we have not asked for anything he is not entitled to. we have not asked for the world. he is not entitled to. we have been very clear that we just wanted him to have a fair access to an education like any other child. just like his sister, madison, who goes to a local school. something oscar's family believe would have been possible with early support. believe would have been branwen jeffreys, bbc news. believe would have been special services have been held around the world this easter sunday. here, the queen and prince philip attended a service at windsor castle accompanied by several members of the royal family, including the duke and duchess of cambridge. of the royal family, including meanwhile, religious and political leaders have been speaking out about the need to alleviate global suffering and protect religious freedom. suffering and protect 0ur religious affairs correspondent, martin bashir, reports. st peter's square was resplendent as pope francis celebrated mass and delivered the fifth easter sermon of his papacy
10:16 pm
but his message was sober. sermon of his papacy pleading for an end to what he called the horror and death syria and asking that international leaders have the courage to prevent the spread of conflict. leaders have the courage to prevent at canterbury cathedral, archbishopjustin welby drew attention to the plight of christians in egypt following twin bomb attacks on palm sunday that killed 46 and injured more than 100 people. on palm sunday that killed 46 and he said that suffering was not confined to war zones. was not confined to christians in egypt live surrounded by bombs and terror. but the words jesus says on that first easter day, he says to you and me now. to each of us, to listen, to take hold of with our hearts. do not be afraid. to take hold of with our hearts. the prime minister in her own easter message also focused on the issue of religious persecution.
10:17 pm
we must be mindful of christians and religious minorities around the world who do not enjoy these same freedoms, but who practise not enjoy these same their religion in secret and often in fear. labour leaderjeremy corbyn said that regardless of one's faith, he wanted to affirm every act of kindness that helps alleviate suffering across the country. of kindness that helps alleviate i meet christians and others of all faiths and none on a daily basis who share and live these ideals. people who give their time for others, whether those running food banks, protecting the vulnerable, looking after the sick, the elderly and of our young people. both religious and political leaders have drawn sober lessons on this easter sunday. leaders have drawn the celebration of the resurrection has been placed in the context of persecution and suffering. has been placed in the context of martin bashir, bbc news, in central london.
10:18 pm
the bodies of five former archbishops have been found inside a secret tomb underneath a church in london. the discovery was made during renovation work in st—mary—at—lambeth church next to lambeth palace in london. builders found a hidden crypt containing at least 20 coffins, including one belonging to richard bancroft, who became archbishop in 160a. to richard bancroft, with all the sport, here's karthi gna nasegram at the bbc sport centre. here's karthi gna nasegram good evening, clive. here's karthi gna nasegram the teams at the top of the premier league table are doing their best to keep the title race alive. it's time to pop out of the room if you don't want to know today's results as match of the day 2 and sportscene in scotland follow shortly on bbc one. and sportscene in scotland premier league leaders chelsea are stilljust four points ahead of second—placed tottenham with six games now remaining this season. chelsea's title hopes were dented by a 2—0 defeat to a dominant manchester united. were dented by a 2—0 defeat jose mourinho's side move up
10:19 pm
to fifth place in the table. roberto firminho scored the only goal of the game as liverpool beat west bromwich albion 1—0. goal of the game as liverpool beat liverpool have moved back up to third place with that win. celtic have already been crowned scottish premiership champions but they had to share the points today with ross county after a controversial 89th minute penalty. the final score was 2—2. 89th minute penalty. sebastian vettel has won his second formula one race of the season with victory in the bahrain grand prix. britain's lewis hamilton was given a five second penalty for gamesmanship and was second. a five second penalty his mercedes team—mate, valtteri bottas, eventually finished in third, having started on pole in what was an eventful race.
10:20 pm
nick parrot reports. in what was an eventful race. lewis hamilton found himself in an unfamiliar place on the grid in on the grid in bahrain, behind his new mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas. behind his new mercedes the finn was on pole for the first time and when the lights went out he didn't blink, beating everyone to the first corner. beating everyone hamilton, though, sees sebastian vettel as his main rival this year and the german took the fight to the britain in the desert, roaring past into second. the fight to the britain in the before the dust could settle carlos sainz shook things up, his crash brought out the safety car and hamilton in for fresh tyres but on his way to the pit he deliberately held up daniel ricciardo. he deliberately held up daniel he regained third place after the restart but would have five seconds added to his finish time and it got worse for hamilton, ferrari's smarter strategy gave vettel the lead after the final round of pit stops. vettel the lead after the final 0n fresher tyres, hamilton passed bottas but could not catch vettel‘s prancing horse, galloping to his second win of the season and the 7—point lead in the championship. nick parrott, bbc news. in the championship. bristol have been relegated from rugby union's premiership after defeat today to leaders, wasps. they lost 36 points to 21. wasps.
10:21 pm
third—placed saracens had a slender 27 points to 25 win over northampton, thanks to a late try, which boosts their hopes of a home premiership semi—final. elinor barker has added a gold medal to her collection at the world track cycling championships in hong kong. to her collection at the world track barker won the 25 kilometre points race today to add to the two silvers she had already claimed. race today to add to the two silvers great britain have won a total of five medals to finish fourth in the table. of five medals to finish and the five time champion, ronnie 0'sullivan, criticised ronnie 0'sullivan, the governing body of snicker criticised the governing body of snicker after progressing to the second round of the world championship at the crucible today. he beat gary wilson 10—7. but is the sport. that's it. sport. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. but do stay with us on bbc one. stories on the bbc news channel. it's now time for the news where you are. hello, this is bbc news.
10:22 pm
let's return to turkey, and its president recep tayyip erdogan has declared victory in a controversial referendum granting him sweeping new powers. he said tonight that the country had opened a "new page" in its democracy. but opponents say the result amounts to one—man rule, with the president now able to abolish the role of prime minister and, if necessary, dissolve parliament. we can speak to our turkey correspondent mark lowen, who's in the turkish capital. some responses from international bodies, council of europe, the european union, urging caution? yes, they are very muted indeed, they are urging people to wait and see what the observers say, the us state department said it would not comment until it receives a report from the international observer mission, which is due to comment publicly tomorrow. the council of europe says the president needs to tread
10:23 pm
carefully, given the closeness of the result. clearly, there are anxieties and apprehensions in the west. you would expect that, given how much the relations between turkey and the west have eroded in recent weeks and months. during the campaign the president's feisty invective, calling the dutch and german leaders nazis and fascists. it brought turkey/ eu relations to a new low. if there are going to be bridges to be rebuilt, but would have to take some time, and they would not be rubbing hands in glee at all in the west, given how bitter the campaign has been, given how divisive the president has been, and how close this result is, and also the fact that the opposition is contesting it. how have the state m e nts contesting it. how have the statements that have been made on television by the president and the prime minister been received in turkey? in some ways, the language
10:24 pm
they were using was more conciliatory than some might have expected. initially it was more conciliatory. the first speech that the president gave appeared to be more muted, than he usually is. he was not feisty as he often is. he called on international allies to respect the result. but then he went out on the balcony and he spoke to the masses, to his adoring fans, and there he was rabble—rouser and, he talked about reinstating the death penalty and said he would call another referendum on bringing back capital punishment. that is something that is hugely divisive, it is vintage erdogan, a policy that caters for his adoring fans, and the rest of the country cannot stand it at all. they feel that it epitomises the slide towards dictatorship. when you talk about how his messages are being responded to, you have to see
10:25 pm
it through the prism of a very divided country, which has shown itself tonight more polarised than ever. the bbc understands lloyds banking group has decided to set up a european base in germany after the uk leaves the eu. lloyds has decided to convert its berlin branch into a european hub, in orderto maintain a presence inside the eu, sources told the bbc. lloyds is the only major british lender that does not currently have a subsidiary in another eu nation. the bank already has a branch in berlin and employs 300 people in the city. the tombs of five former archbishops of canterbury have been unearthed by builders undertaking refurbishment work near lambeth palace in london. undiscovered for centuries, the coffins were found in a hidden crypt. lambeth palace has been the london residence of archbishops of canterbury since the 13th century. but a chance discovery during recent
10:26 pm
renovation work next door yielded a startling discovery. some of them are still there. a very interesting day. we were exposing the ground as part of the job, and we were lifting the slabs in this area, and we uncovered an entry to what looked like a tomb, and we got a camera on the end of a stick and discovered numerous coffins, and one of them had a gold crown. we knew the archbishops had been buried there, but all of the other bodies had been taken away by the victorians who rebuilt the church, so it was just this one that was left, to our surprise. among the 30 lead coffins, they believe there are five former archbishops. i came here thinking, "this sounds like bad news, problem," and, wow, it is the crown, the mitre for an archbishop, gleaming in the dark. we know there are five archbishops buried here. the first was archbishop bancroft, who chaired the committee that wrote the king james bible. what we don't know is
10:27 pm
who else is down there. the redeveloped garden museum where they were discovered is due to reopen next month. you are going to get a clue of the steps leading down, and we will hopefully put on a little exhibition. it is very much deep underground. for now, the coffins will remain where they are. the vault in which they sit is too fragile to explore. expecting a bit more sunshine across the uk for the easter monday. it is coming from the north. clear sky between the cloud. unlike what we have had through today. the thicker cloud continues to move away through tonight, and a few splashes of rain for east anglia and the south—east. partly clear skies. for easter monday, high pressure
10:28 pm
towards the west, it will play a big pa rt towards the west, it will play a big part in this week. low pressure to the east, which brings in colder air. it leads to a cold start. quite air. it leads to a cold start. quite a bit of sunshine around northern england, increasingly into northern ireland. sunny spells. blood, but showers pushing south. sleet and hail to low levels. northern england, the showers get going. for the southern half, we start with cloud. any rain will be light and patchy, most places are predominantly dry. more sunshine developing as we go through the day and into the afternoon. we will see temperatures held back across the north—east because of the breeze. an
10:29 pm
added bite to the wind. more sunshine to the south and west, it should feel pleasant. the finished the evening with showers in northern england. there could be an ice risk to ta ke england. there could be an ice risk to take us into tuesday. temperatures getting close to freezing. he might avoid a frost in the east. a bit more breeze. it could shepherd in one or two isolated showers. thickening cloud into the hebrides. foremost, tuesday will be and sunny. with lighter wind, the temperatures struggle, but the strength of the sunshine should compensate. into the middle part of the week, the front
10:30 pm

46 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on