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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 17, 2017 6:00am-9:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. prince harry reveals he turned to therapy to help him deal with the death of his mother, princess diana. in a newspaper interview, he describes how he went for counselling after coming close to a complete breakdown. there is actually a lot of stuff here that i need to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years ofjust total chaos. good morning. it's monday the 17th of april. also this morning: the turkish president narrowly wins a controversial referendum on plans allowing him to greatly increase his powers. police in the us search for a man who shot dead his victim at random while broadcasting on facebook live. police and prison officers join forces to tackle the drones flying
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drugs and phones into jails. good morning. in sport, the premier league title race is hotting up. the league leaders chelsea beaten two nil by manchester united. goals from marcus rashford and ander herrera trimming the gap at the top to four points from second—place tottenham. it was an 80s classic set in thatcher's britain. we'll hear from the cast of letter to brezhnev as they reunite 30 years on in liverpool. and we have the weather. good morning from london. i have two miniature donkeys, gilbert and sullivan, behind me. a mixture of bright spells and showers. some wintry in the hills in the north
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especially. behind them, it will turn much colder. i will have more details in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. prince harry has revealed he sought counselling after spending nearly 20 years "not thinking" about the death of his mother, diana, princess of wales. in an interview with the daily telegraph, he said it was not until his late 20s that he processed the grief, following two years of "total chaos." dan johnson reports. with public grief on a scale rarely seen before, we got very little insight into how to young boys were missing there mother. now, after two decades struggling to deal with princess diana's death, prince harry has told the daily telegraph how devastating the impact was. has told the daily telegraph how devastating the impact wasm has told the daily telegraph how devastating the impact was. it was around the age of 12. i shut down all of my emotions for the last 20 yea rs. all of my emotions for the last 20 years. it has had a quite serious effect on, not only my personal life, but also my work as well. my
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way of dealing with it was to refuse to think about my mother, because why would that help? it is not going to her back. the prince said boxing help them deal with aggression after help them deal with aggression after he nearly punched someone. and he talked about asking for professional mentor health advice. all of a sudden, all of this grief i had never processed came to the forefront, and there was a lot of stuff i had to deal with. it was 20 yea rs of not stuff i had to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. as i am sure you know, someone you never have met before, a shrink, as americans call them, you tell them everything. it was great. the heads together campaign, set up by harry and his brother and sister—in—law
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will be the main purpose of the charity next week. he says he spoke openly about his own experience in the hope of encouraging others to discuss mental health issues. dan johnson, bbc news. the us vice president, mike pence, has visited an american military base, close to the highly fortified demilitarised zone which separates north and south korea. it comes a day after pyongyang's failed missile test. america's top security advisor, lieutenant general hr mcmaster, has revealed the us is working with china on a "range of options" to deal with the regime, but mr pence said the us wants to achieve security through negotiations. 0ur correspondent, steve evans, joins us from seoul. steve does this mean a military response by the us has now been taken off the table? yeah. 0ne yeah. one of donald trump's advisers says it is time to look at all options except military options. all of that hype and talk over the last two weeks, with people speculate in about an immediate attack on north
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korea, seems to have done away. they need china to rein in north korea and keep economic pressure on. mike pence has been at the emc. it has emotional significance for him because his father fought in the korean war 60 years ago. —— dmz. he has been there talking about the strength of the alliance. so it is starting to look like the old policy. the big moment will come if north korea detonates a sixth nuclear device under a mountain. then it will be make your mind up time for the donald trump administration. thank you, steve eva ns, administration. thank you, steve evans, very much indeed. steve evans in seoul. president erdogan of turkey has narrowly won a referendum to vastly expand his presidential powers, which could keep him in office until 2029. welcoming the result, mr erdogan said he had won by 25 million votes, a margin of 1.3 million, and proposed reinstating the death penalty. but turkey's two main opposition parties have questioned the legitimacy of the vote and says it'll challenge the result.
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greg dawson reports. from the flag—waving and the fireworks, to the clattering of pots and pans in protest, the reaction to this vote reveals how divided turkey is about its future. it's a narrow victory, but it's one that vastly increases the power of this man. president erdogan will now be able to appoint several vice presidents, hire and fire judges, and can now potentially stay in power until 2029. translation: turkey took a historic decision, on a 200—year—old discussion on its constitutional system. this decision is not an ordinary event. this is the day on which a very important decision has been made. within hours of victory, he raised the idea of a referendum on reinstating the death penalty, a move which would kill off turkey's already—slim hopes ofjoining the eu. 0pponents fear the changes
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amount to one—man rule, without any checks on his power. there are also claims of voter fraud, after it emerged at least 1.5 million votes were allowed to stand, despite not having an official electoral board stamp. as a member of nato, turkey is viewed by the us and europe as a crucial ally to bring stability in the middle east. but it has been through one of its most volatile periods in recent history, a failed coup attempt, and several terror attacks in the last 18 months. president erdogan says his increased powers will help him restore security, but this was far from a resounding victory, and it is one that leaves this country polarised. greg dawson, bbc news. police in the us state of ohio are hunting a man suspected of posting a video on social media of him fatally shooting a stranger. officers in the city of cleveland say the suspect steve stephens broadcast the shooting of an elderly man on the video streaming service, facebook live. russell trott reports. speaking on his phone and
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broadcasting the conversation live on facebook, this is the moment steve stephens makes an extraordinary confession.” steve stephens makes an extraordinary confession. i just snapped, dog, i just extraordinary confession. i just snapped, dog, ijust snapped. ijust killed 13 people. he approached an earlier man after getting out of his car that he did not know and shot him dead. the violent killing, also on facebook. his victim, this 74—year—olds, robert goodwin. reports say he had just finished the easter meal with his family. his family gave their reaction. this man right here was a good man. he is gone. stephen appears in the video to confess to multiple killings, but police say so far they are only aware of one death. so far, there
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are no other victims that we know of. we have checked several other locations where we got information about and so far there are no more victims that we know that are tied to him. this isn't the first time a serious crime has been captured on facebook‘s live stream. injanuary, the assault of an eight—year—old man was broadcast. this man is armed and dangerous and police are still looking for him. russell trott, bbc news. a specialist squad of police and prison service staff has been formed to tackle the use of drones to smuggle contraband, like drugs and phones, into prisons. the officers in england and wales will study how to catch those operating the drones to deliver contra band direct to prisoners' cells. daniel sandford reports. wandsworth prison last year, and a delivery direct to a cell window of a package containing drugs and mobile phones.
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the parcel was being carried by a cheap quad—copter drone. the invention of these easy—to—fly, remote—control aircraft has caused a huge security headache. suddenly, prison walls are not much of a barrier for those wanting to smuggle contraband into jails. the prison service's response has been to set up a national squad of police and prison officers across england and wales, who will now pool intelligence. they will forensically examine captured drones, like this found near pentonville prison in london, to try and find out who was flying them and share information about the types of quad copters and methods used, in an attempt to curb the problem, though the prison service could give few details about how many officers would be involved in the drone squad, or how big their budget was. even before the squad was set up, there were some recent successes, with three men receiving jail sentences of over four years for their roles in flying drugs and phones over prison walls. daniel sandford, bbc news.
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united airlines is changing its policy of giving staff last—minute seats on overbooked flights. it's after a passenger lost two front teeth and suffered a broken nose when he was was violently dragged from his seat after refusing to leave the plane. united says staff will now be allocated seats at least an hour before take—off. until now, flying cars have been the stuff of science fiction, but a dutch start—up is claiming to have made them a reality. powered by a propeller and a 100 horse power engine, the car's lift comes from a rotor blade on top. it can travel at speeds of 110 miles per hour in the air and 100 miles per hour on the road. you would kind of thing that makes ita you would kind of thing that makes it a helicopter. but they're unlikely to catch on just yet. you need a private pilot's license to fly one, and the most basic model costs an eye—watering $400,000. goodness gracious. isn't that the
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kind of thing james bond had years ago? great for beating the traffic, though. someone will tell us the james bond film. you only live twice? it is all getting interesting in the sport. chelsea had a lead of, what, ten points at one stage. now it is four. second place spurs with six games to go, chelsea with six games to go, people will think, are chelsea going to blow up at the last minute? it is worth noting how well manchester united played yesterday. the manager may have something to smile about. jose mourinho up against his old steam, chelsea. it is hotting up, the premier league
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race. “— is hotting up, the premier league race. —— team. league leaders chelsea beaten two nil by manchester united. goals from marcus rashford and ander herrera trimming their lead at the top to four points from second—place spurs. a controversial late penalty earned ross county a precious point against champions celtic in the scottish premiership. they're now three points clear of the relegation play—off spot. there was delight in the desert for sebastian vettel. the ferrari driver got past both mercedes to win the bahrain grand prix. he now leads lewis hamilton by seven points in formula 0ne's drivers‘ championship. and five—time world champion ronnie 0'sullivan is safely through to the second round of the world snooker championship after beating qualifier gary wilson 10—7. after his win, he hit out at world snooker bosses, insisting he was done with being "bullied" and "intimidated" by officials. he is clearly not happy at the moment. he says following that
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victory, especially with the altercation with the geographer in the press conference, he feels following that letter he received he is being brought under too much pressure. “— is being brought under too much pressure. —— photographer. is being brought under too much pressure. -- photographer. the back pages in a minute. the front pages. the daily telegraph exclusive with prince harry as he talks about his struggle to come to terms with the death of his mother, the princess of wales. the times. another story featured heavily this morning. north korea defined as the us ramps up pressure. president trump increasing pressure. president trump increasing pressure on china yesterday to and the pursuit of nuclear weapons in north korea. —— defiant. the pursuit of nuclear weapons in north korea. -- defiant. if you were watching us yesterday, the former home secretary talked about the fact the failed missile test by the north
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koreans yesterday could have been because of an american cyber intervention which blew it up seconds after takeoff. that is the story the sun are going with this morning. they think that is what happened this. day yesterday. supporters of president erdogan celebrating in istanbul yesterday after the referendum that could transform recep tayyip erdogan's roll over turkey. 0pponents say they wa nt to roll over turkey. 0pponents say they want to challenge the result. different story millions miss out on full pension. they are talking about the flat rate pension and claims it has been mishandled. a combination of
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—— culmination of broadchurch tonight. and the uk's relations with russia are at an all—time low. the ambassador claiming that the relationship has deteriorated. the top diplomat in the uk. the back pages. bluebottle. chelsea are going to bottle it now. he blamed himself for the defeat. he said he didn't prepare his players properly. what can you do when manchester united played as well as they did yesterday? great picture on the back on that times. eleanor bakar. she won gold. it is one of five medals won. she actually won three, she had two silvers as well. there was no
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jason kenny, no laura trott. laurie ca nter jason kenny, no laura trott. laurie canter you. absolutely. -- laura kenney. we will be speaking to katie archibald after 830 about their success on the track. it will be interesting to see what they have to say as we are going into the next 0lympic cycle. we look forward to hearing more. and carol's bringing us the weather from spitalfields city farm in central london this morning. good morning, carol. we are looking forward to hear what today and the next few days has in store. i hope it's not too cold to you. i met city fields ——i am at city farm. about a mile from the city of london. let's look at these fine looking sheep. they have won lots of rosettes for
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being a rare breed. have a look at these miniature donkeys. they are rather cute as well. gilbert and sullivan. we will be getting amongst those donkeys and getting a closer look at them over the next 15 minutes or so. the weather, well, it certainly is chile. notjust here but across many parts of the uk. there will be some sunshine into their‘s forecast as well. as we start the forecast at nine o'clock in scotland, some winteriness. it will be in the hills. at lower levels, a cross shetland for example, we could see some sleet and snow. for the rest of scotland, dry until we get to the south where we have showers. the northern england, dry weather this morning and some sunshine. south into east anglia, some sunshine. take the midlands down towards london and the south
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coast, more cloud around. here, there are also some showers. we have already had some in london. drifting over to the south—west, some sunny skies amongst cloud. 10 celsius in plymouth. also in cardiff. in cardiff, although there will be dry weather, there will be some can showers as well. northern ireland is off toa showers as well. northern ireland is off to a dry and bright start. as we go through the course of the day, there will still be some showers. right spells at times and a bit more cloud but equally, some sunshine. the showers we have across the north of scotla nd the showers we have across the north of scotland this morning will continue to drift south lens, getting into northern england as we had three the afternoon and behind them, some bright skies with sunshine. —— drift southwards. in the evening and overnight, we lose the evening and overnight, we lose the showers from the south and the clyde —— sky is clear. it will be a cold night with sharp frost. a bus.
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in towns and cities, the temperatures won't be as low as the countryside. —— for us. still pretty cold as we sink further south. as we head into tomorrow, it is going to bea head into tomorrow, it is going to be a fine day tomorrow. it will be breezy in the south—east but there will be some sunshine around. very few showers. most of us went to see them at all. we could see one or two in the south—east. sorry we have no graphics, hopefully we have them restored for the next hit. matt taylor made a sneaky appearance in best screen. it's always worth seeing him just quickly to say, it
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was you only live twice, the james bond film and little nelly was the name of the vehicle. a petition calling for the compulsory re—testing of older drivers has gathered more than 265,000 signatures. it was started by ben brooks—dutton, whose wife was killed after an elderly motorist hit his accelerator pedal instead of the brakes. it's expected that the number of drivers over 85 will double to one million by 2025, so is there more we can do to improve safety on the roads? holly hamilton reports. frank has been driving for most of his life. know where you are in relation to the traffic... but despite 56 years of experience behind the wheel, he feels he benefits from an appraisal from time to time. none of us gets sharper as we age. i can see i'm not as sharp asi we age. i can see i'm not as sharp as i was ten or 15 years ago. that
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must apply when i'm driving a car. i think it's a good idea. this driver skills scheme in hampshire accesses are around 50 elderly people each month. the aim is to keep people driving safely for longer. drive around their own area in their own car. we get our excess —— assessors to go around and monitor them. they don't have to get —— give up before us don't have to get —— give up before us to early that go on while it is u nsafe. us to early that go on while it is unsafe. under the current system, drivers have to renew their licence every three years from the age of 70. you will simply need one of these. a self—assessment form. you decide whether or not you are fit to drive based on your health and eyesight. there are no mandatory checks on your eyesight, hearing or even driving and reaction times. that is well into old age. for most drivers, this is not a problem but
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not disclosing a medical issue can have devastating consequences of the you did that when you are a baby... in 2012, ben's wife was killed when working with her sonjackson. in 2012, ben's wife was killed when working with her son jackson. a car came speeding around the corner and then struck my wife and she died at then struck my wife and she died at the scene. when the pressure was on, when the driver had to choose between accelerate and break, he wasn't able to make that decision and react. he was driving in an automatic vehicle and he thought he was breaking and broke harder but accelerated faster in stead. ben is campaigning for drivers to be retested every three years after the age of 70. so far, an online petition has —— petition has received over 200,000 that —— signatures. there needs to be a test to see that we are well enough to drive. that we can react in time to
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drive. that we can react in time to drive safely and regulate our own behaviour. at the moment, the self—assessment system doesn't do that. last year, experts published a report setting out a national strategy to save driving into old age. it made a number of recommendations including increasing the age of licence renewal to 75 is proof of the —— is proof of an eye testis proof of the —— is proof of an eye test is good. as we get older, we start to suffer from frailty, eyesight and hearing, problems can arise if we don't address them at an early stage. ben's petition is set to be discussed by a cross transport committee after getting support from his local mp. meanwhile, he is hoping his campaign will highlight theissues hoping his campaign will highlight the issues are thousands of families. nobody wants to take somebody‘s life and has that hanging over them for the rest of their life but a car is a powerful weapon in guinea to make sure you are capable and that is notjust about sticking
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to your guns. and that is notjust about sticking to yourguns. —— and that is notjust about sticking to your guns. —— powerful weapon, and you need to make sure. lots of people getting in touch. i know some pretty fit 70 rods and some unfixed 40 pretty fit 70 rods and some unfixed a0 —year—olds. karen pernell makes the point that we should all have some sort of assessment every ten yea rs some sort of assessment every ten years as well as a compulsory eye test. keith barro says most stats on the road i'd due to the actions of the road i'd due to the actions of the 17- 2a the road i'd due to the actions of the 17— 2a age groups. —— are due to the. le. 0ne the 17— 2a age groups. —— are due to the. le. one of those drivers? how do you feel about this idea? you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, get in touch on faceook or tweet us at the usual address. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: it was the tiny film from liverpool that travelled the world.
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now the cast of "letter to brezhnev" are reuniting — and the two leading characters let breakfast in on some very romantic news. find out what it is before 7:00. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. at least 11 people have suffered burns from a suspected noxious substance at a bar in east london. emergency services including a hazardous area response team were sent to sidworth street in dalston, around 1:00 this morning. a00 people had to be evacuated from the building — ten were taken to hospital, but the injuries are not believed to be life—threatening. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder following the death of a 20—year old in mile end. syed jamanoor islam was stabbed to death on tuesday near his home. his father released a statement calling on members of the community to stand up against violence.
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families of people with disabilities who attend two day care centres in southwark say they don't know where their relatives will spend their days after the centres close later this year. the council which owns the buildings have been allowing a charity to use the space rent free for many years, but says because of budget cuts it can no longer afford to. julia wilkinson's son uses the facilities. my my teaching would have to stop because i would literally be his 2a—hour carer. it is not only his independence but it's ours as well. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a disrupted service on the tubes this morning— the entire victoria line suspended and there is no service on parts of the circle, district, hammersmith & city and metropolitan lines. 0n the trains southeastern not running to or from cannon street and chiltern railways not running between marylebone
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and amersham all day. 0n the roads the cam a13 is closed out of town at the beckton roundabout. the exit slip road from the marylebone flyover to harrow road is closed because of a crash. and the strand underpass remains closed for works until the 21st. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. good morning. and improving teacher for many of us in this bank holiday monday. a cloudy start of the day with a few outbreaks of rain is removed through this morning but as we move into the afternoon, we start to see brighter intervals and sunny spells creeping in from the north. the outside risk of seeing an isolated shower, though. which is reaching a maximum of 13. as we move through into this evening and overnight, one two showers to look up. ——. . then we would see them chris dawes is removed throughout the night. a few showers in the east. that will also bring with it some cool air so we are looking at a chilly night. 0vernight lows of six
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degrees celsius. slightly cooler in the countryside where you could see a touch of frost. plenty of brightness around tomorrow and billing pleasant in any sunshine. highs of 1a. the risk of the odd isolated shower. into wednesday and again, and other chilly start of the day. a touch of frost not out of the question,. sunshine as we move through the day and for the time of year, it will feel pleasant in the sunshine despite the struggling temperatures. as we move through the next days, spells of sunshine but chilly nights. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we'll have more on that interview with prince harry, in which he reveals he sought counselling after coming close
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to a breakdown over the death of his mother. and the prince has done a lot to raise awareness of child mental health problems, but should classes be compulsory for all children from the age of five? we'll hear from one man who thinks they should in about an hour's time. and after an impressive medals haul in hong kong for britain's cyclists, we'll be speaking to, not one, but two gold—medallists before the end of the programme. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. prince harry has revealed he went for counselling after spending nearly 20 years trying to not think about the death of his mother. he said it was not until his late 20s that he processed the grief, following two years of "total chaos." prince harry said he was inspired to speak out because of his involvement with mental health charity, heads together. that's the top story. with public grief on a scale rarely seen before, we got very little
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insight into how two young boys were missing their mum. now, after two decades struggling to deal with princess diana's death, prince harry has told the daily telegraph just how big and long—lasting the impact was. i can safely say after losing my mum around the age of 12 and shutting down all of my emotions for the last 20 years, it has had a quite serious effect on, not only my personal life, but also my work as well. my way of dealing with it was to refuse to think about my mother, because why would that help? it is not going to her back. the prince said boxing help them deal with aggression after he nearly punched someone. and he talked about asking for professional mental health advice.
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all of a sudden, all of this grief i had never processed had come to the forefront, and there was a lot of stuff i had to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. as i am sure you know, a shrink, someone you never have met before, a shrink, as americans call them, you tell them everything. it was great. the heads together campaign, set up by harry and his brother and sister—in—law will be the main purpose of the charity next week. the prince says he spoke openly about his own experience in the hope of encouraging others to discuss mental health issues. dan johnson, bbc news. we will hear a much more about that later in the programme. —— much. turkey's president erdogan has vowed to press ahead with the constitutional changes approved in a referendum,
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which vastly expand his presidential powers. mr erdogan's victory was closer than expected, taking 51.5% of the vote. 0pposition leaders plan to challenge the result due to irregularities, including the acceptance of unstamped ballot papers at counting centres. police and prison officers are to start pooling intelligence to try to stop drones being used to smuggle contraband into prisons. drugs and mobile phones are the main items which criminals are trying to deliver to prisoners. the move by the government to form this new squad follows a number of successful convictions of offenders using drones to circumvent prison rules. the us vice president, mike pence, has visited the highly fortified demilitarised zone between north and south korea. mr pence, whose father served with the us army in the korean war, said there was an "unshakeable bond" between america and south korea. the visit comes a day after pyongyang unsuccessfully launched a missile. the us says it's working closely with china to address north korea's nuclear ambitions. more than a quarter of a million people have backed a petition calling for older drivers to have to retake their driving tests. it was started by ben brooks—dutton,
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whose wife was killed after an elderly motorist hit his accelerator pedal instead of the brakes. it's expected that the number of drivers over 85 will double to one million by 2025. police in the us state of ohio are hunting a man suspected of posting a video on social media of him fatally shooting a stranger. officers in the city of cleveland say the suspect steve stevens claimed to have killed 12 other people in a later broadcast on facebook live but the city's police chief said they did not know of any other victims. the video of the incident has now been removed by facebook. john is here, and the premier league might not be a done deal after all. we were thinking it. chelsea were so far in front, ten points. we thought they could not be caught. defeat the
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manchester united yesterday has brought the gap down to four points from second placed tottenham. exciting. so there was a little wobble yesterday. tottenham are looking strong. now we are wondering whether they could slip up and potentially lose that one. they need to dropa potentially lose that one. they need to drop a few points for tottenham to drop a few points for tottenham to get level. it is tight, but it is certainly interesting. a really impressive display from manchester united, a performance that mirrored the manchester united of old. and what a start! young england striker marcus rashford opened the scoring afterjust seven minutes. and united added a second immediately after the break when ander herrera's shot was deflected in. let's hear from jose mourinho. the performance was tremendous and
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it is really hard to play against a good team like chelsea. and at the top of that, a fresh team. 0ne good team like chelsea. and at the top of that, a fresh team. one that plays one match per week. we did amazingly. it is not normal, this season, if chelsea wins the title, because i think we started as the underdog. we must understand this to find the right solution and to reach this target. but it won't be easy. it won't be easy at all. united's victory significant following wins for top four rivals manchester city on saturday, and liverpool yesterday who beat west brom 1—0. the only goal came at the end of the first half from roberto fermino heading in from close range. liverpool are third, with city two points behind. you could only get 66 points. that
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is the maximum. it feels perfect. that is what we wanted. next week we will try with all we have together and all the people at anfield to get 69. we will carry on. that is what it is. if we do what we have to do, yeah, we will be where we want to be. that is it. a late penalty earned relegation threatened ross county a precious point against champions celtic in the scottish premiership. celtic were 2—1 up with just moments remaining but gave away a penalty when alex schalk went down in the box. liam boyce then levelled the match at 2—2. ross county are now three points clear of the relegation play—off spot. mercedes‘ recent domination of formula one looks like it could be coming to an end after sebastian vettel won the bahrain grand prix ahead of lewis hamilton. the german started from third, behind the two mercedes, but ferrari's smarter tyre strategy saw vettel claim the chequered flag for his second win of the season.
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it moves him seven points clear of hamilton in the drivers‘ championship. valtteri bottas was third in the other mercedes. i had ihada i had a good feeling yesterday. so, for many laps it worked very well. lewis hamilton was obviously a bit ofa lewis hamilton was obviously a bit of a threat towards the end. with the traffic, you never know. it was a dream. a difficult race. i tried my best. 19 seconds. i gave it everything i could. ryrie did a greatjob today. we will try to gather raise a team and come back fighting. —— ferrari. the fighting‘s over for bristol in rugby union‘s premiership. the south—west side relegated with two rounds still to play after losing 36—21 at home to wasps. that bonus point win for wasps means they‘ve secured themselves a home tie in the semi—finals. sunday‘s other match was a thriller, defending champions saracens winning it in the final few minutes at northampton saints,
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marcelo bosch with the decisive try as his side won 27—25. ronnie 0‘sullivan is through to the second round of the world snooker championship. the five time winner beat qualifier gary wilson ten frames to seven, his win included the highest break of the tournament so far, a 12a. after the match, he hit out at snooker‘s hierarchy, in particular world snooker chairman barry hearn. 0‘sullivan received a letter from disciplinary chiefs after he criticised a referee and swore at a photographer back in january at the masters. 25 years of service to this game. i think i have given enough to this game. i think think i have helped and done my bit. i don‘t need that. i don‘t need you and you probably don‘t need me. ijust want to enjoy my life and i am not putting up with someone who feels they can bully me.
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ain't someone who feels they can bully me. ain‘t happening. strong allegations. barry hearn declined to comment last night, but he recently told the bbc that 0‘sullivan isn‘t treated differently to anyone else. ronnie 0‘sullivan is a great player and a great advert for our game. he gets a small media and more ratings than anyone else. for that, we love him and admire him for his ability. but that is where it ends. there are no exceptions to people, and there cannot be. he is operating under the same rules and mindset as anyone else. rounding off with a lovely bit of skill from luke donald. luke donald finished second in the pga event in south carolina. he was a stroke behind the winner wesley bryan from the united states. donald produced one of the shots of the day. how about this for a birdie at the 11th? out of the bunker and into the hole. it wasn‘t quite enough to earn him a victory at a tournament where he‘s now been runner up five times. he certainly went out with a bang.
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is that call day golden ferret? -- called a. is it? spoken like a professional. anyway, move on. thank you very much indeed. the people of turkey have voted to give extensive powers to president erdogan meaning he could remain in office until 2029. mr erdogan won the referendum by a narrow margin, but opposition parties say they will challenge the legitimacy of up to 2.5 million votes. let‘s have a look at exactly what the new constitution could look like. the draft constitution says the president will have a five—year tenure, for a maximum of two terms. thejob of prime minister, currently held by binali yildirim, will be scrapped. the constitutional changes will also widen the president‘s powers
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and he‘ll be able to directly appoint top public officials, including ministers. the president will also have the powers to intervene and decide whether or not impose a state of emergency. andrew finkel is an author and journalist and has been based in turkey for 20 years. he joins us from istanbul. andrew, what do these changes mean for erdogan? thank you for your time this morning. well, president erdogan already enjoys considerable powers. you have to remember that turkey has been under a state of emergency since a failed military to last july. under those powers, since a failed military to last july. underthose powers, he since a failed military to last july. under those powers, he he has the ability to make rules under victory. he can force the rule of
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law. —— decree. this vote will confirm the powers he already enjoys. essentially, we are moving towards 1—man rule. it makes, well, up towards 1—man rule. it makes, well, up until now, the president has been a figure above politics. he has ignored those rules over the past two years. now he will be a partisan figure with impunity. two years. now he will be a partisan figure with impunitylj two years. now he will be a partisan figure with impunity. i saw it described in one publication as, it may well have been you who wrote it, in the economist, that he is an elected dictator, basically. that is right. it would be difficult for anyone now to oppose his will. for example, there is now an appeal against the electoral processes. people are claiming fraud. mr erdogan went on to television last night and said don‘t bother. there is no point closing the stable door after the horse has bolted. i
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already have these powers, why bother to challenge me? since the failed coup and the powers that can do his position at that point, there have been suggestions that he has clamped down pretty strongly on voices of dissent and opposition. that is right. since the two, we have seen massive examples of people being fired from public office, close to 150,000 people. —— coup. a0,000 of those are in jail. close to 150,000 people. —— coup. a0,000 of those are injail. 150 journalists are behind bars. of course, one might argue that this is not the action of a secure man. although, turkey, mr erdogan, enjoys considerable powers at the moment, since the failed coup injuly, he is actually ruling over a much weaker country, where he actually has to
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exercise the extraordinary powers just to keep everything in place. given the geopolitical importance of turkey, so close to syria, of course, which we know all about, is this good for the rest of europe and for the immediate region, or not? well, i think europe rightly views what happened yesterday with great concern because one of mr erdogan‘s strategies to remain in power is to polarise the nation to really claim, in this case, 50% of the population, which supports him. but he seems to be applying that same strategy internationally. for example, one of the first things he spoke of when he wonders referendum last night was he said that turkey would now consider bringing back the death penalty. well, it is notjust ringing back the death penalty, that would be... there would be negotiations with the eu, and they would break up
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completely. it would also isolate turkey from the council of europe, which turkey is a member of. they are considering the cases ofjailed kurdish politicians and jailed kurdish politicians and jailed kurdish journalist. if they or ostracised that body, they would not be held by norms of the rest of europe, which includes countries like azerbaijan. andrew finkel, thank you very much indeed for your insight this morning. andrew finkel, a journalist based in istanbul. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: prince harry has revealed he received counselling to help him deal with the death of princess diana, saying he‘d been close to "a complete breakdown" having not processed his grief. turkey‘s president erdogan has narrowly won a referendum on his plans to increase the powers of the presidency, which could mean he stays in office until 2029. and carol‘s bringing us the weather
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from spitalfields city farm in central london this morning. good morning. aren‘t they gorgeous? these are miniature donkeys, gilbert and sullivan, tucking into their brea kfast. and sullivan, tucking into their breakfast. they are only two years old. miniature donkeys, with a bit of care and love, can live until they are 50. in the olden days, they we re they are 50. in the olden days, they were used to pull carts. all right, boys, i shall let you go off and do whatever you have to do. there you go. it‘s a chilly start today. lovely here, the sunny starting to come out and we have seen a beautiful sunrise. it‘s the same for many of us except for across the far
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north. after a chilly start, there will be some sunshine around but in the far north of scotland, some showers. some of those showers are wintry. more in the hills but in shetland, you could see some of that at lower levels. for the rest of scotland, largely dry. parts of east anglia are also seeing some sunshine. some of the cloud also producing a few showers. into wales, some sunshine. the temperature at cardiff will be 10 celsius but equally, some showers. northern island, off to a dry and brighter start. around nine celsius in belfast. through the course of the day, some sunshine. there will still be some sour —— showers. thinking ——
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the showers thinking southwards. it will feel quite cool. temperatures today are up to 1a. through this evening and overnight, we lose the showers quite quickly. cold air follows in behind and then for all of us, a cold night. there will be some frost and it will be severe in parts of the highlands. in towns and cities to night, temperatures holding up but he ruled all areas, it will be going down. it could fall down to about minus. we start off. breezy across the south—east. showers will be few and far between. as we head into wednesday into another cold night. gardeners and rowers, be aware. it will be some
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frost around at all the rest of england, some sunshine. for the north and west, that‘s where we will see a bit more in a way of cloud. temperatures up to about 15. well, and it it back to feeding these boys who are looking a bit hungry so back to you. gilbert and sullivan look like they are very happy to be company this morning. set against a backdrop of thatcherism and industrial decline, "letter to brezhnev" portrayed life in liverpool from the point of view of two friends — more pre—occupied with partying than politics. filmed entirely in the city, for a budget of less than half—a—million pounds, it became one of the most loved british films of the 1980s, and was even nominated for a bafta. now, more than 30 years on, the cast is reuniting for a special screening. 0ur entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been to meet them. where‘s my doorway? which one was
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at, chris? one of these. it was this one. the director, one of the stars of letter to brezhnev, taking a trip down memory lane. roman hands and russian fingers. it was the tiny film from liverpool that travelled the world. here cheers, chris! it told a simple tale of a per of local girls spending a night with russian sailors. set against the political backdrop of the time. we were sick of seeing how the city was portrayed and how the truth wasn‘t being told. much like today. thatcherism. nobody
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had any money. food was on the low down. you just take a walk into any back kitchen, you will see food shortages. can't be any worse living in russia than living here. at that time, we had no industry. it had all been closed down. no ships on the river, nothing was happening. from letter to brezhnev, it gave us the film industry. now the cast is reuniting for the first time in 30 yea rs reuniting for the first time in 30 years for a special screening. celebrating on blu—ray. years for a special screening. celebrating on blu-ray. a beautiful evening. it's lovely, isn't it? the leading cast will be there. they have happy memories of the shoot despite the minute budget and lack
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of catering. somebody is mother showed up with some parties. they had laid on some food at the pub for us because they thought we must be starving. i have nothing to gain, just you. you'll make it takes longer than a few minutes, you know? and in real life, happy ending as well. we went out together for a couple of years. we had an onset romance , couple of years. we had an onset romance, as they say. and then we we re romance, as they say. and then we were both working away a lot and drifted apart. don't forget me, ok? i will always love you. seven years ago... wejust i will always love you. seven years ago... we just drifted back together, didn't we, darling? are very happy ending to a very cute story. but maybe it won't be the
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end. muggy has dreams of a sequel. e—mail to putin. we heard it all there, didn‘t we? who knew? we were talking about older drivers this morning. the question that over 70s to retake the test. 0nce question that over 70s to retake the test. once in awhile, while, we three people out there for people to comment on that really catches a nerve. carol kelly has e—mailed, i‘m 67, i still work for a living, i rely on a car and i agree for a regular review of everybody‘s driving. which bracket has the higher accident rate? all drivers, this doesn‘t matter what age, should
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be tested every ten years. if you are one of those older drivers and wa nt to are one of those older drivers and want to feed us back anything on that, you can get in contact on our facebook or twitter. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: cats have claws, eagles have talo ns and dogs have teeth — but a new documentary explores extreme animal weapons, and what they can teach us about the world around us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. at least 11 people have suffered burns from a suspected noxious substance at a bar in east london. emergency services including a hazardous area response team were sent to sidworth street in dalston, around 1:00 this morning. a00 people had to be evacuated from the building — ten were taken to hospital, but the injuries are not believed to be life—threatening.
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three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder following the death of a 20—year old in mile end. syed jamanoor islam was stabbed to death on tuesday near his home. his father released a statement calling on members of the community to stand up against violence. a london plumber has become a successful gin distiller, thanks to a move to a new office. ian puddick moved in 2012, but discovered that the 100 and 50 year old bakery also used to sell illegal gin. so he decided to try making it himself. his simple recipe gin is now sold in fortnums and harrods as well as his local farmer‘s market. the bakers back in the day made or sold illegal gin so i tracked down the family and got the original recipe and bought a little stalk on the played around with a provision fund and now i meet gin. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a disrupted service on the tubes this morning—
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the entire victoria line suspended and there is no service on parts of the circle, district, hammersmith & city and metropolitan lines. 0n the trains southeastern not running to or from cannon street and chiltern railways not running between marylebone and amersham all day. 0n the roads the cam a13 is closed out of town at the beckton roundabout. and the strand underpass remains closed for works until the 21st. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. good morning. an improving teacher for many of us in this bank holiday monday. a cloudy start of the day with a few outbreaks of rain as we move through this morning but as we move into the afternoon, we start to see brighter intervals and sunny spells creeping in from the north. the outside risk of seeing an isolated shower, though. temperatures reaching a maximum of 13. as we move through into this evening and overnight, one two
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showers to look out for. a few showers in the east. a few showers in the east. that will also bring with it some cool air so we are looking at a chilly night. 0vernight lows of six degrees celsius. slightly cooler in the countryside where you could see a touch of frost. chilly butter fresh start to the day. plenty of brightness around tomorrow and billing pleasant in any sunshine. highs of 1a. the risk of the odd isolated shower. into wednesday and again, and other chilly start of the day. a touch of frost not out of the question,. sunshine as we move through the day and for the time of year, it will feel pleasant in any sunshine despite the struggling temperatures. as we move through the next days, spells of sunshine but chilly nights. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello.
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this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. prince harry reveals he turned to therapy to help him deal with the death of his mother, princess diana. in a newspaper interview, he describes how he went for counselling after coming close to a complete breakdown. there‘s actually a lot of stuff here i need to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. good morning.
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it‘s monday the 17th of april. also this morning: the turkish president narrowly wins a controversial referendum on plans allowing him to greatly increase his powers. police in the us search for a man who shot dead his victim at random while broadcasting on facebook live. police and prison officers join forces to tackle the drones flying drugs and phones into jails. good morning. in sport, the premier league title race is hotting up. the league leaders chelsea beaten two nil by manchester united. goals from marcus rashford and ander herrera trimming the gap at the top to four points from second—place tottenham. this has really got you talking this morning. should older drivers be made to retake their test? more than a quarter of a million people sign a petition asking for a change in the law. and we have the weather. good morning. we are in london. i am
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joined by mario, a cute little cockerel. the weather, dry. some showers earlier. a chilly start. some showers, some will be wintry in the north. i will have more details in15 the north. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. prince harry has revealed he sought counselling after spending nearly 20 years "not thinking" about the death of his mother, diana, princess of wales. in an interview with the daily telegraph, he said it was not until his late 20s that he processed the grief, following two years of "total chaos." dan johnson reports. with public grief on a scale barely seen before, we got very little insight into how two young boys were missing their mum. now, after two decades struggling to deal with diana‘s death, prince harry‘s told the daily telegraph just how big and long—lasting the impact was. i can safely say that losing my mum
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around the age of 12 and therefore shutting down all of my emotions for the last 20 years, has had a quite serious effect on, on not only my personal life, but also my work as well. my way of dealing with it was refusing to ever think about my mum, because why would that help? it is not going to bring her back. the prince said boxing help them deal with aggression after he nearly punched someone. and he talked about asking for professional mental health advice. all of a sudden, all of this grief i‘d never processed had come to the forefront, and i thought there‘s a lot of stuff here i have to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. as i am sure you know, some of the best people to help
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you deal with it are shrinks, someone you never have met before, as americans call them, you tell them everything. i have done it a couple of times. more than that. it was great. the heads together campaign, set up by harry and his brother and sister—in—law will be the main charity at next week‘s london marathon. the prince says he spoke openly about his own experience in the hope of encouraging others to discuss mental health issues. dan johnson, bbc news. the us vice president, mike pence, has visited an american military base, close to the highly fortified demilitarised zone which separates north and south korea. it comes a day after pyongyang‘s failed missile test. america‘s top security advisor, lieutenant general hr mcmaster, has revealed the us is working with china on a "range of options" to deal with the regime, but mr pence said the us wants to achieve security through negotiations. 0ur correspondent, steve evans, joins us from seoul. mike pence has said the us is keen to avoid military solutions. he is not saying it quite as lightly as
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that. he is basically saying to south koreans we have an unshakeable bond. that is the word he is using. people close to trump administration seemed to be backing away from this idea of immediate military action. they say everything is on the table except military options. you get a sense of policy being in a state of flux and becoming much more like the barack 0bama flux and becoming much more like the ba rack 0bama policy. flux and becoming much more like the barack 0bama policy. the big moment will come when and if north korea tests say six nuclear device under the mountains in the north—east. —— sixth. it appears they are ready for that test. if they go ahead and do it, how will the us react? that will be the big question. it is going to be the big question. it is going to be make up your mind is time for
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donald trump are really. -- mind. steve evans in seoul, thank you. president erdogan of turkey has narrowly won a referendum to vastly expand his presidential powers, which could keep him in office until 2029. welcoming the result, mr erdogan said he had won by 25 million votes, a margin of 1.3 million, and proposed reinstating the death penalty. but turkey‘s two main opposition parties have questioned the legitimacy of the vote and says it‘ll challenge the result. greg dawson reports. from the flag—waving and the fireworks, to the clattering of pots and pans in protest, the reaction to this vote reveals how divided turkey is about its future. it‘s a narrow victory, but it‘s one that vastly increases the power of this man. president erdogan will now be able to appoint several vice presidents, hire and fire judges, and can now potentially stay in power until 2029. translation: turkey took a historic decision on a 200—year—old discussion on its constitutional system. this decision is not an ordinary event. this is the day on which a very important decision has been made.
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within hours of victory, he raised the idea of a referendum on reinstating the death penalty, a move which would kill off turkey‘s already—slim hopes ofjoining the eu. 0pponents fear the changes amount to one—man rule, without any checks on his power. there are also claims of voter fraud, after it emerged at least 1.5 million votes were allowed to stand, despite not having an official electoral board stamp. as a member of nato, turkey is viewed by the us and europe as a crucial ally to bring stability in the middle east. but it has been through one of its most volatile periods in recent history, a failed coup attempt, and several terror attacks in the last 18 months. president erdogan says his increased powers will help him restore security, but this was far from a resounding victory, and it is one that leaves this country polarised. greg dawson, bbc news. a specialist squad of police and prison service staff has been
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formed to tackle the use of drones to smuggle contraband, like drugs and phones, into prisons. the officers in england and wales will study how to catch those operating the drones to deliver contra band direct to prisoners‘ cells. daniel sandford reports. wandsworth prison last year, and delivery direct to a cell window of a package containing drugs and mobile phones. the parcel was being carried by a cheap quad copter drone. the invention of these easy—to—fly, remote—control aircraft has caused a huge security headache. suddenly, prison walls are not much of a barrier for those wanting to smuggle contraband into jails. the prison service‘s response has been to set up a national squad of police and prison officers across england and wales, who will now pool intelligence. they will forensically examine captured drones, like this found near pentonville, to find out who was flying them and share information about the types of quad copters and methods used, in an attempt to curb the problem, though the prison service could give few details about how many officers would be involved in the drone squad, or how big their budget was. even before the squad was set up, there were some recent successes,
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with three men receiving jail sentences of over four years for their roles in flying drugs and phones over prison walls. police in the us state of ohio are hunting a man suspected of posting a video on social media of him fatally shooting a stranger. officers in the city of cleveland say the suspect steve stephens broadcast the shooting of an elderly man on the video streaming service, facebook live. russell trott reports. speaking on his phone and broadcasting the conversation live on facebook, this is the moment steve stephens makes
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an extraordinary confession. dog. ijust snapped, dog, ijust snapped. ijust killed 13 people. that‘s what i did. i killed 13 people. just moments later, he got out of his car and approached an older man that he didn‘t know and shot him dead. the violent killing, also on facebook. his victim, robert goodwin, 7a—years—old. reports say he had just finished the easter meal with his family. his family gave their reaction. this man right here was a good man. i hate he‘s gone. stephens appears in the video to confess to multiple killings, but police say so far they are only aware of one death. currently, there are no other victims that we know of. we‘ve checked several locations that were either in the post itself
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or we got information about and so far there are no more victims that we know that are tied to stephens. this isn‘t the first time a serious crime has been captured on facebook‘s live stream. injanuary, four people in chicago broadcasted the assault of an eight—year—old disabled man. police say this man is armed and dangerous and the fbi joined the search for him. russell trott, bbc news. united airlines is changing its policy of giving staff last—minute seats on overbooked flights. it‘s after a passenger lost two front teeth and suffered a broken nose when he was was violently dragged from his seat after refusing to leave the plane. united says staff will now be allocated seats at least an hour before take—off. until now, flying cars have been the stuff of science fiction, but a dutch start—up is claiming to have made them a reality. powered by a propeller and a 100 horse power engine, the car‘s lift comes
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from a rotor blade on top. it can travel at speeds of 110 miles per hour in the air and 100 miles per hour on the road. but they‘re unlikely to catch on just yet. you need a private pilot‘s license to fly one, and the most basic model costs an eye—watering $a00,000. isn‘t it just a isn‘t itjust a helicopter? actually, $300,000. the price is tumbling. the united states‘ top security adviser has said america is working with china on a "range of options" to address north korea‘s weapons programmes. the us vice president, mike pence, has visited an american military base, close to the highly fortified demilitarised zone which separates north and south korea. america‘s top security advisor, lieutenant general hr mcmaster, has revealed the us is working with china on a "range of options" to deal with the regime, but mr pence said the us wants to achieve security through negotiations. speaking to the abc news network during a trip to afghanistan, lieutenant general hr mcmaster said
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there is now international consensus that north korea‘s threatening behaviour can‘t continue. we are working together with our allies and partners and with the chinese leadership to develop a range of options. and the president has asked the national security council to make efforts with the department ofjustice council to make efforts with the department of justice and intelligence agencies to provide options for him if this pattern of destabilising the region continues and if the north korean regime refuses to denuclearise, the accepted objective of both the united states and chinese leadership, as well as of our allies. so it is time for us to take allies. so it is time for us to take all actions we can short of a military option to try to resolve this peacefully. president trump‘s national security advisor, general mcmaster speaking there. let‘s get the thoughts now of rear admiral chris parry, a former nato commander. thank you forjoining us this morning. well, we heard phrases they
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are being used like a range of options. —— there. doesn‘t appear now that the us is backing away from the immediate possibility of a military option? well, i think the military option? well, i think the military option? well, i think the military option has been considerably hyped up by different media in the few days. i think the americans have always been thinking about a range of options, including what i would call the worse if democracy, involving china and its allies. the military option is simply there to show the americans are now prepared to grasp the nettle that should have been grasped a long time ago. general mcmaster is saying there is an international consensus including china now that this is a situation that cannot continue. what do you take that to mean? well, i think that it means that eight years of the 0bama administration just marking time has come to an end. the americans are now prepared to get together with allies and other
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interested partners to say, look, we cannot have this dangerous regime with nuclear weapons and missiles. frankly, if it is a bad situation now if north korea were to get nuclear weapons, it would be infinitely worse. how will china put pressure on north korea? it is easy. they could deal with a range of importand they could deal with a range of import and export issues. they have borrowed it closed down some of the north korean exports to china. —— already. they could also cut down on oil and gas with north korea. and they have already put brigades on they have already put brigades on the border with north korea to exert pressure. i think they could actually bring the north korean leader into a sense of reality into his relation of where he sits in the world. i think we should see this as more of, if you like, a symptom of crisis in the north korean leadership rather than a symptom of strength. i think we will need to read the signals very carefully
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indeed. we have seen pictures and scenes of missiles and weapons on display. how to you see north korea‘s military capability? display. how to you see north korea's military capability? -- do. people should be in no doubt that we could squash north korea very heavily indeed. the americans may have taken, obviously, a bit of a lesson from iraq and afghanistan, but one thing the americans are very good at is conventional war fighting. when i saw one of those things travelling past on those trailers, i did not see much in the way of infrastructure. it may well be that some of those missiles are dummies rather than the real thing. donald trump said he sent in our ride to the region. what does that show as a signal of strength? —— armada. armada is an overstatement. in the past that has always been the first tool in the president‘s toolbox. the carrier itself carries
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90 warplanes, a considerable strikeforce. it‘s 90 warplanes, a considerable stri keforce. it‘s destroys 90 warplanes, a considerable strikeforce. it‘s destroys and missiles carry cruise missiles. —— it. it is in a position to strike any target the americans the irene range, but also useful to coerce the north korean regime. —— are in. thank you forjoining us, rear admiral chris parry. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: prince harry has revealed he received counselling to help him deal with the death of princess diana, saying he‘d been close to a complete breakdown, having not processed his grief. turkey‘s president erdogan has narrowly won a referendum on his plans to increase the powers of the presidency, which could mean he stays in office until 2029. we have had donkeys and a cock role.
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carol has some new friends. bringing us the weather from spitalfields city farm in central london this morning. good morning to you both. beautiful bunnies with us this morning. and jenny who is the farmyard water metre. tell us, the city farm. i didn‘t expect to find a farm here. is used to be a railway depot that got abandoned in the late 70s. it was taken over by squatters and they turned it into a allotments for food growing. since then, they started putting in chickens and ducks and —— it is. it has then becomes charity status. we sell produce, have animals to teach about animal care
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and welfare, we go out to shows and outreach work. what kind of bunnies are these? there are various crossbreeds but they are all rescue rabbits. rabbits can live 8— ten yea rs. rabbits. rabbits can live 8— ten years. the key for having us this morning. we have had gilbert and sullivan, the two lovely miniature donkeys. it‘s a chilly start to the day. across the board. if you have been tempted into the garden, as we go through this week, there will be quite a bit of frost. today, some sunshine. as we start the forecast at nine o‘clock in scotland, some wintry showers. most on the hills. in shetland, you can expect it at lower levels. for the rest of scotland, some sunshine but more sunshine in the southern uplands at
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the northern england, a cold start and sunshine. some sunshine across parts of east anglia that most of east anglia and down towards the south coast, quite a bit of cloud. from that cloud, few showers. into the south—west, some sunny spells. temperatures in plymouth at about nine o‘clock, 10 celsius. also shared by cardiff. although there is some sunshine around, there is some thicker cloud and showers for wales. northern ireland, are largely dry start to the day with temperatures at about in belfast. through the course of the day, you will find the showers across the north of scotland moving steadily south, hitting into northern england as we head through the course of the afternoon. behind them, some sunshine. this afternoon, them, some sunshine. this afternoon, the forecast is bright spells, some sunny spells and showers with temperatures up to 1a. through this evening and overnight, the showers
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across northern england move down the east and eventually clear allowing cold air to flow in behind. it will be a cold air tonight. in rural areas, temperatures below freezing, as low as minus seven in some parts of the highlands, generally though, we are looking at a range from freezing to about five. the cold and frosty start of the day tomorrow but with the clear skies, it will also be sunny. for most of us, it will remain dry through the course of the day. one shoe hours getting into a east anglia and kent that they will be the exception rather than the rule. ——1 or two showers. the wednesday, some cloud around. southern england seeing more cloud. more cloud across the north and west are generally. again, producing the odd spot. much going in the forecast, don‘t forget the
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cold nights. if you have binny —— busyin cold nights. if you have binny —— busy in the garden. lots going on there as well this morning. lovely to see so many animals including those sheep happily eating their brea kfast those sheep happily eating their breakfast behind you in the phone box. i know, it‘s brilliant. see you later, carol. i‘m in our cherie with carol this morning. this is a story subjects that has really got you in touch with us this morning. should older drivers take a test? a petition calling for the compulsory re—testing of older drivers has gathered more than 265,000 signatures. it was started by ben brooks—dutton, whose wife was killed after an elderly motorist hit his accelerator pedal instead of the brakes. it‘s expected that the number of drivers over 85 will double to one million by 2025, so is there more we can do to improve safety on the roads? holly hamilton reports.
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frank has been driving for most of his life. know where you are relative to as much traffic as you possibly can... but despite 56 years of experience behind the wheel, he feels he benefits from an appraisal from time to time. none of us gets sharper as we age. i mean, i can see i‘m not as sharp as i was ten or 15 years ago and that must apply when i‘m driving a car. ijust think it‘s a good idea. this driver skills scheme in hampshire for the over 60s assesses around 50 people each month. the aim is to keep people driving safely for longer. it‘s delivered from their own home in their own car. we get on of our assessors to go along and sit with them and offer advice, really. and then we can monitor how their driving is going so they don‘t have to give up too early before they‘re ready but they don‘t go on too long and they become unsafe. there‘s no legal age to stop driving in the uk but under the current system, drivers have to renew their licence every three
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years from the age of 70. to do that, you will simply need one of these. a self—assessment form. you decide whether or not you are fit to drive based on your health and eyesight. there are no mandatory checks on your eyesight, hearing or even driving and reaction times. that is well into old age. for most drivers, this is not a problem but not disclosing a medical issue can have devastating consequences. you drew that when you were a baby. you drew that with mummy. in 2012, ben‘s wife was killed while working with their 2—year—old sonjackson. a car came speeding around the corner, skimmed my son‘s push chair but then struck my wife and she died at the scene. when the pressure was on, when the driver had to choose between an accelerator and a brake, he wasn‘t able to make that decision, he wasn‘t able to react. he was driving in an automatic vehicle and he thought he was braking and as he broke harder, he was actually accelerating faster. ben is campaigning for drivers to be retested every three years
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after the age of 70. so far, an online petition has received over 200,000 signatures. i think there needs to be some sort of test to check that we are well enough to drive, that we can react in time to drive safely and regulate our own behaviour. at the moment, the self—assessment system doesn‘t do that. last year, leading road safety experts published a report setting out a national strategy for safe driving into old age. it made a number of recommendations including increasing the age of licence renewal to 75 if proof of an eye test is made compulsory. 0lder drivers, at the age of 70, are no more likely to be involved in a collision. but obviously, as we do get older and start to suffer from frailty, eyesight and hearing, yes, problems can arise if we don‘t address them at an early stage. ben‘s petition is set to be discussed by a cross party transport committee after getting
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the support from his local mp. meanwhile, ben is hoping his campaign will highlight the issue for thousands of families. no one wants to take someone‘s life. no—one wants that hanging over them for the rest of their life but a car is a powerful weapon, you need to make sure you are capable and that is notjust about sticking to your guns and saying, i‘m fine. this is about checking that you definitely are. thank you for your comments on this this morning. lewis from cardiff is very passionate about the subject and says everybody should be retested every ten years and the money should go into infrastructure to pay for fixing money should go into infrastructure to pay forfixing potholes money should go into infrastructure to pay for fixing potholes and building new roads. heather dobson says let‘s retest male drivers regularly, they have the worst accident record. she also points out that just because one accident record. she also points out thatjust because one or two elder people who rely on shopping, there is no reason to rant us all
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incompetent. please keep getting in touch with us. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, get in touch on faceook or tweet us at the usual address. lots of people getting in touch. thanks for all your comments this morning. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: more of the interview and prince harry in which he said he sought counselling after coming close to a breakdown after the death of his mother. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. at least 12 people have suffered burns from a suspected noxious substance at a bar in east london. emergency services including a hazardous area response team were sent to the mangle club in dalston, around 1:00 this morning.
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a00 people had to be evacuated from the building — ten were taken to hospital, but the injuries are not believed to be life—threatening. families of people with disabilities who attend two day care centres in southwark say they don‘t know where their relatives will spend their days after the centres close later this year. the council which owns the buildings have been allowing a charity to use the space rent free for many years, but says because of budget cuts it can no longer afford to. a london plumber has become a successful gin distiller, thanks to a move to a new office. ian puddick moved in 2012, but discovered that the 100 and 50 year old bakery also used to sell illegal gin. so he decided to try making it himself. his simple recipe gin is now sold in fortnums and harrods as well as his local farmer‘s market. we learnt that the bakers back in the day made and sold illegal gin so i tracked down the family descendants, got the original recipe and bought a little still, played around with itjust for a bit
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of fun and now i make gin. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a disrupted service on the tubes this morning— the entire victoria line suspended and there is no service on parts of the circle, district, hammersmith & city and metropolitan lines. 0n the trains southeastern not running to or from cannon street and chiltern railways not running between marylebone and amersham all day. 0n the roads the cam a13 is closed out of town at the beckton roundabout. and the strand underpass remains closed for works until the 21st. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. good morning. an improving picture for many of us in this bank holiday monday. a cloudy start of the day with a few outbreaks of rain as we move through this morning but as we move into the afternoon, we start to see brighter intervals and sunny spells creeping in from the north.
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the outside risk of seeing an isolated shower, though. temperatures reaching a maximum of 13. as we move through into this evening and as we move through overnight, one or two showers to look out for. then some dry and clear spells as we move through the night with some introduction of some cloud. a few showers in the east. that will also bring with it some cool air so we are looking at a chilly night. 0vernight lows of a—6 degrees celsius. slightly cooler in the countryside where you could see a touch of frost. chilly butter fresh start to the —— chilly, but a fresh start. plenty of brightness around tomorrow and billing pleasant in any sunshine. highs of 1a. the risk of the odd isolated shower. into wednesday and again, and other chilly start of the day. a touch of frost not out of the question,. sunshine as we move through the day and for the time of year, it will feel pleasant in any sunshine despite the struggling temperatures. as we move through the next days, spells of sunshine but chilly nights. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. we‘ll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we‘ll have more on that interview with prince harry, in which he reveals he sought counselling after coming close to a breakdown over the death of his mother. he said he experienced two years of total chaos following 12 years of shutting down his emotions to deal with it. and the prince has done a lot to raise awareness of child mental health problems, but should classes be compulsory for all children from the age of five? there‘s actually a lot of stuff here i need to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. some of the easiest people to speak to our shrinks. someone you never have met before who listens to you.
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—— are. have met before who listens to you. -- are. and you have done that? a couple of times. it was great. the us vice president has visited the dmz. it comes a day after pyongyang u nsuccessfully dmz. it comes a day after pyongyang unsuccessfully launched a missile. the us says it is working closely with china to address the nuclear ambitions of north korea. bite the former nato commander had this analysis. north korea should be in no doubt that the americans have the capability to squash north korea heavily. the north koreans may have taken a bit of a lesson from iraq and afghanistan. but the americans are great at war fighting. when and afghanistan. but the americans are great at warfighting. when i saw one of those missiles trundling pass on a trailer, i thought they had not much infrastructure. —— past. they may not even be real.
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the people of turkey have voted to give extensive powers to president erdogan meaning he could remain in office until 2029. mr erdogan won the referendum by a narrow margin, but opposition parties say they will challenge the legitimacy of up to 2.5 million votes. 0ur correspondent is in istanbulfor us this morning. tell us more about this result. 5196 said yes, 4896 said no. this is a knife—edge result showing how polarised this country has become. it was already polarised leading into the referendum. now it feels more deeply divided than ever. president erdogan said the nation has decided in the nation has spoken. he said that the yes vote, the yes result, would bring stability to the country, if the proposed constitutional changes went through. however, with such a
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result, and with the opposition campaign, the campaigns for no, saying there was rigging, this is not something that will quell critics. there were protests and jubilant celebrations last night. it is unknown whether president erdogan will be a figure to unite the nation. the eu is calling for a public consensus could be reached on whether president erdogan, who has been this polarising figure ever since he took power, whether he could make any concessions to the no campaign. but following the steps he has taken so far, it does not seem very realistic. thank you. police in the us state of ohio
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are hunting a man suspected of posting a video on social media of him fatally shooting a stranger. officers in the city of cleveland say the suspect steve stevens claimed to have killed 12 other people in a later broadcast on facebook live but the city‘s police chief said they did not know of any other victims. the video of the incident has now been removed by facebook. police and prison officers are to start pooling intelligence to try to stop drones being used to smuggle contraband into prisons. drugs and mobile phones are the main items which criminals are trying to deliver to prisoners. the move by the government to form this new squad follows a number of successful convictions of offenders using drones to circumvent prison rules. more than a quarter of a million people have backed a petition calling for older drivers to have to retake their driving tests. it was started by ben brooks—dutton, whose wife was killed after an elderly motorist hit his accelerator pedal instead of the brakes. it‘s expected that the number of drivers over 85 will double to one million by 2025.
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iam not i am not asking for people to come off the road, i want them to go through an age—appropriate test. we are try to find out whether they are healthy, well, and able to react properly in order to stay on the road. an for your comments. -- thank you. united airlines is changing its policy of giving staff last—minute seats on overbooked flights. it‘s after a passenger lost two front teeth and suffered a broken nose when he was was violently dragged from his seat after refusing to leave the plane. united says staff will now be allocated seats at least an hour before take—off. until now, flying cars have been the stuff of science fiction, but a dutch start—up is claiming to have made them a reality. powered by a propeller and a 100 horse power engine, the car‘s lift comes
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from a rotor blade on top. it can travel at speeds of 110 miles per hour in the air and 100 miles per hour on the road. but they‘re unlikely to catch on just yet. you need a private pilot‘s license to fly one, and the most basic model costs an eye—watering $a00,000. it looks like a james bond film. if you have both of those things, why not? coming up, the bank holiday weather. now for the sport. manchester united are celebrating. totte n ha m manchester united are celebrating. tottenham perhaps were really celebrating their win over chelsea. yes. it boosts their chances for qualification. at the top of the table, the premier league title race, it is very much on between chelsea and tottenham. the gap was ten points at one stage. chelsea had such a big advantage that many
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thought it was a done deal. now it is down to four points. that opens the doorfor tottenham. is down to four points. that opens the door for tottenham. six games remaining. chelsea need to lose one and draw one out of the six games remaining. it could get very interesting. people are watching these matches thinking, could chelsea lose this? it is very interesting. a really impressive display from manchester united, a performance that mirrored the manchester united of old. and what a start! young england striker marcus rashford opened the scoring afterjust seven minutes. and united added a second immediately after the break when ander herrera‘s shot was deflected in. let‘s hear from jose mourinho. the performance was tremendous and it is really hard to play against a good team like chelsea. and at the top of that, a fresh team. one that plays one match per week. we did amazingly.
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it is not normal, this season, if chelsea wins the title, because i think we started as the underdog. we must understand this to find the right solution and to reach this target. but it won't be easy. antonio conte says he has a 50—50 chance of his side winning. united‘s victory significant following wins for top four rivals manchester city on saturday, and liverpool yesterday who beat west brom 1—0. the only goal came at the end of the first half from roberto fermino heading in from close range. liverpool are third, with city two points behind. you could only get 66 points. that is the maximum. it feels perfect. that is what we wanted. next week we will try with all we have together and all the people at anfield to get 69.
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we will carry on. that is what it is. if we do what we have to do, yeah, we will be where we want to be. that is it. a late penalty earned relegation threatened ross county a precious point against champions celtic in the scottish premiership. celtic were 2—1 up with just moments remaining but gave away a penalty when alex schalk went down in the box. liam boyce then levelled the match at 2—2. ross county are now three points clear of the relegation play—off spot. mercedes‘ recent domination of formula one looks like it could be coming to an end after sebastian vettel won the bahrain grand prix ahead of lewis hamilton. the german started from third, behind the two mercedes, but ferrari‘s smarter tyre strategy saw vettel claim the chequered flag for his second win of the season. it moves him seven points clear of hamilton in the drivers‘ championship. valtteri bottas was third in the other mercedes. i had a good feeling yesterday.
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so, for many laps it worked very well. lewis hamilton was obviously a bit of a threat towards the end. with the traffic, you never know. it was a dream. a difficult race. i tried my best. 19 seconds. i gave it everything i could. ferrari did a greatjob today. we will try to gather a team and come back fighting. the fighting‘s over for bristol in rugby union‘s premiership. the south—west side relegated with two rounds still to play after losing 36—21 at home to wasps. that bonus point win for wasps means they‘ve secured themselves a home tie in the semi—finals. sunday‘s other match was a thriller, defending champions saracens winning it in the final few minutes at northampton saints, marcelo bosch with the decisive try
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as his side won 27—25. ronnie 0‘sullivan is through to the second round of the world snooker championship. the five time winner beat qualifier gary wilson ten frames to seven, his win included the highest break of the tournament so far, a 12a. after the match, he hit out at snooker‘s hierarchy, in particular world snooker chairman barry hearn. 0‘sullivan received a letter from disciplinary chiefs after he criticised a referee and swore at a photographer back in january at the masters. 25 years of service to this game. i think i have given enough to this game. i think think i have helped and done my bit. i don‘t need that. i don‘t need you and you probably don‘t need me. i just want to enjoy my life and i am not putting up with someone who feels they can bully me. ain‘t happening. barry hearn declined to comment last night, but he recently told the bbc that 0‘sullivan isn‘t treated differently
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to anyone else. ronnie 0‘sullivan is a great player and a great advert for our game. he gets a small media and more ratings than anyone else. for that, we love him and admire him for his ability. but that is where it ends. there are no exceptions to people, and there cannot be. he is operating under the same rules and mindset as anyone else. luke donald finished second in the pga event in south carolina. he was a stroke behind the winner wesley bryan from the united states. donald produced one of the shots of the day. how about this for a birdie at the 11th? out of the bunker and into the hole. it wasn‘t quite enough to earn him a victory at a tournament where he‘s now been runner up five times. he would be pleased with that shot.
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what is it called? a golden ferret. idrag it what is it called? a golden ferret. i drag it up from memory banks. i thought it was great. thank you to the golfers who have confirmed for me. prince harry‘s comments this morning have put mental health to the top of the news agenda. so what about those from the age of five? 25 clinical psychologists have signed a petition to the times saying they should introduce the subject of a young age in schools to fix early access to help. we have some people coming in to talk about this. this man has experience with those around five with mental health. thank you for
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your time. adam, you suffered with mental health problems. the age of five. how did you know? how did they ma nifest five. how did you know? how did they manifest themselves?” five. how did you know? how did they manifest themselves? i knew something wasn‘t right. i suffered from intrusive thoughts. i thought it was mental health. there was no education around it. i could not confide in anyone. i did not know what was happening. it was never mentioned at school or by my pa rents. mentioned at school or by my parents. generation after generation is let down because we don‘t encourage conversation. in the 80s and 90s, the only times i heard about mental health was on the news, and it was usually something tragic happening, like somebody killing somebody else. it is fear. it was mental torture. a lot of children, a lot of children, three in every classroom, are going through
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something like this. you want compulsory lessons in schools? we must make it compulsory. we must make it compulsorym filters right through to the nhs. anybody who has children who has a passion about mental health, we have 60,000 signatures already. go to our website facebook page and sign the petition. you need to get so the hunt —— government can debate it. sherborne, you are a head teacher in our studio sherborne, you are a head teacher in ourstudio in sherborne, you are a head teacher in our studio in cardiff. as we know, budgets are stretched. d think this isa budgets are stretched. d think this is a good idea? i think anything that raises the profile of
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children's health and well—being is good. times have changed since your guests a story about his experiences. schools are well equipped for dealing with children's mental health. i do fear that a single lesson is not really going to address the depth of the issues. children's mental health issues are deeperand children's mental health issues are deeper and more profound than that. i'm worried that this could become a seeking plaster approach. —— sticking plaster. schools have provisions that they pay for within their school budgets and those are under serious threat at the moment from the most stringent jet cuts that schools have faced in a generation. if there was a compulsory lesson, it would put it on the curriculum and put it out that, wouldn‘t it? really raising the profile. it would. but a single
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lesson that might be covered every so lesson that might be covered every so often is not going to put it high profile. what puts it more high profile. what puts it more high profile is the approach that schools are trying to use at present which is to incorporate a values —based education which would look at skills like resilience, skills like independence, being happy. we would build those into lessons on a much more regular basis thanjust build those into lessons on a much more regular basis than just a single 1—off lesson every now and again. again, that is under pressure in the curriculum which is narrowing the agenda for children and narrowing the curriculum experience and leaving less time for teachers to be able to address those issues in the extent they really want to. we have heard today about prince harry talking about his mental health problems. if anybody of that kind of standing talks about this, you would welcome it. am so pleased he came out and said this today. that‘s just the thing. he is an example of what is going wrong with
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society and mental health because it has shown that for the last 20 yea rs, has shown that for the last 20 years, he kept it to himself until he got to breaking point and that‘s what‘s going on with society and mental health at the moment. i agree with your other speaker that there isa with your other speaker that there is a lot of pressure on teachers and teachers need to be heroes so the government needs to support the teachers to do this. it has to be compulsory and there is no excuse. it is as fundamental as reading and writing. it is a life skill. it touches everything. prince harry coming out is a wonderful thing and it highlights where the failings are because prince harry didn‘t receive any mental health education. that‘s why he got to the point of 20 years and not speaking to somebody. he got to breaking point like all i got to. the only way we can do that is to make it compulsory. thank you to you both. and carol‘s bringing us the weather from spitalfields city farm in central london this morning. lots of very friends, carol.
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surrounded by goats. it is hamish but there is lots of different types. the black and white ones, they are all heading over there to have some breakfast with their hay. the golden guernsey goats as well. generally, goats live between 8— 12 yea rs generally, goats live between 8— 12 years and their ages determined by their teeth. they were one of the first animals tamed by humans is an interesting fact about them is that there pupils are rectangular and it gives vision 320— 3a0 degrees. when you hint —— thinking human‘s vision is 160- 160, it is you hint —— thinking human‘s vision is 160— 160, it is not bad. they have good balance and they are well caught naked. i think i might get one. let‘s show you hamish again. he is cute. he they have been eating
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these branches. they all had lots of flowers a nd these branches. they all had lots of flowers and they have in strict. the weather, the weather this morning is a chilly start the day, wherever you are. the temperature will rise as the sun gets up but for many of us, there will be some showers around today as well as the sunshine. we start the forecast at nine o‘clock in scotland. there is showers across the north. we also have winteriness coming out of those showers, especially up the hill. at shetland, even lower levels. for the rest of scotland, largely dry but in the southern uplands, further showers. across northern england, a lot of sunshine around this morning but it isa sunshine around this morning but it is a cool start. as it comes start, you can see how the cloud builds with showers so parts of east anglia seeing some early sunshine. along the south coast, once again, variable amounts of cloud, some showers and sunshine. for wales, a few showers around as well. 0ut showers and sunshine. for wales, a few showers around as well. out of the showers, it is dry and bright. 0r northern ireland this morning, we
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are again looking at a bright start with highs lows of nine celsius in belfast. as we go through the course of the day, the showers are crossed scotla nd of the day, the showers are crossed scotland migrate southwards and by the afternoon, they get into northern england. behind them, a lot of sunshine. england, wales and northern ireland, we are looking at showers, bright spells and sunshine with highs of up to 1a celsius. if you are in the breeze, it will feel cool you are in the breeze, it will feel cool. through this evening and overnight, you will find the showers in northern england continuing moving southwards across eastern parts of england and behind them, we will see cold air following on. it is going to be a cold night and in towns and cities, temperatures stay above freezing but in the countryside, they will fall below. for some of us, well below. for example in the highlands, we see minus 5— minus seven. generally, the
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range of freezing to about minus five. a frosty start of the day tomorrow, a cold start at a dry one. there will be a lot of sunshine around and breezy across the south—east tomorrow. rather like today, temperatures will get up to about 1a. that leads us on into wednesday. for wednesday across central parts of england, we start off on central parts of england, we start offona central parts of england, we start off on a cold and frosty note with some sunshine. there will be a bit more cloud across the south, the north and the west. that cloud will be thick enough here and there for the odd shower and temperatures again into the mid—teens at best. bearin again into the mid—teens at best. bear in mind, for the next few nights, there would be frost around so if you are a farmer, a grower or have just been in the garden, watch out for the tender plants. a quick peek behind me. not many goats left but hamish is still there. hello, little man. thank you, carol. you made a real friend stay with hamish. ——a friend. set against a backdrop of thatcherism and industrial decline, "letter to brezhnev" portrayed life in liverpool from the point of view of two friends — more pre—occupied with partying than politics.
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filmed entirely in the city, for a budget of less than half—a—million pounds, it became one of the most loved british films of the 1980s, and was even nominated for a bafta. now, more than 30 years on, the cast is reuniting for a special screening. 0ur entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been where‘s my doorway? which one was it, chris? one of these. it was this one. the director and one of the stars of letter to brezhnev, taking a trip down memory lane. roman hands and russian fingers. talk about roman hands and russian fingers. don‘t wait up. it was the tiny film from liverpool that travelled the world. stop! it told a simple tale of a pair of local girls spending a night with russian sailors. there from russia, unbaked?
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set against the political backdrop of the time. we were sick of seeing how the city was portrayed and how the truth wasn‘t being told. much like today. it was getting battered by thatcherism. nobody had any money. food was on the low down. you just take a walk into any back kitchen, you will see food shortages. can't be any worse living in russia than living here. at that time, it was almost dead. we had no industry. it had all been closed down. no ships on the river, nothing was happening. from letter to brezhnev, it gave us the film industry. now the cast is reuniting for the first time in 30 years for a special screening. celebrating its release on blu—ray.
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a very beautiful evening. yeah, it's lovely, isn't it? the leading couple will be there. peter firth who will go on to play harry in spooks and alexandra pigg. they have happy memories of the shoot despite the minute budget and lack of catering. somebody‘s mother turned up with a tray of butties. or a pan of scouse. there was a pub we were filming outside and they‘d laid on a pan of scouse for us because they thought we must be starving. i want you, elaine, i want you to marry me. i have nothing to gain, nothing, just you. it takes a bit longer than a few minutes, you know? please... and in real life, there‘s a happy ending too. we actually went out together for a couple of years. during. we had an onset romance, as they say in the business. and that spread out for a couple of years, didn't it. but then we were both working away a lot and drifted apart. yeah, went our own separate ways. just don‘t forget me, 0k?
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i‘ll always love you, you know. seven years ago, we realised that perhaps... we just drifted back together again, didn‘t we, darling? exactly, we did. so, it's a very happy ending to a very cute story. but maybe it won‘t be the end. margie has dreams of a sequel. e—mail to putin. colin paterson, bbc news, liverpool. romantic revelations. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. at least 12 people have suffered burns from a suspected noxious substance at a club in east london. emergency services including a hazardous area response team were sent to the mangle club in dalston, around 1:00 this morning. a00 people had to be evacuated from the building — ten were taken to hospital, but the injuries are not believed to be life—threatening.
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families of people with disabilities who attend two day care centres in southwark say they don‘t know where their relatives will spend their days after the centres close later this year. the council which owns the buildings have been allowing a charity to use the space rent free for many years, but says because of budget cuts it can no longer afford to. a london plumber has become a successful gin distiller, thanks to a move to a new office. ian puddick moved in 2012, but discovered that the 100 and 50 year old bakery also used to sell illegal gin. so he decided to try making it himself. his simple recipe gin is now sold in fortnums and harrods as well as his local farmer‘s market. we learnt that the bakers back in the day made and sold illegal gin so i tracked down the family descendants, got the original recipe and bought a little still, played around with itjust for a bit of fun and now i make gin. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now.
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there‘s a disrupted service on the tubes this morning— the entire victoria line suspended and there is no service on parts of the circle, district, hammersmith & city and metropolitan lines. 0n the trains southeastern not running to or from cannon street and chiltern railways not running between marylebone and amersham all day. very quiet at the blackwall tunnel. and the strand underpass remains closed for works until the 21st. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. good morning. an improving picture for many of us in this bank holiday monday. a fairly cloudy start of the day with a few outbreaks of rain as we move through this morning but as we move into the afternoon, we start to see brighter intervals and sunny spells creeping in from the north. the outside risk of seeing an isolated shower, though. temperatures reaching a maximum of 13. as we move through into this evening and overnight, one or two showers to look out for. then some dry and clear spells as we move through the night with some introduction
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of some cloud. a few showers in the east into early hours. that will also bring with it some cool air so we are looking at a chilly night. 0vernight lows of a—6 degrees celsius. slightly cooler in the countryside where you could see a touch of frost first thing tomorrow. chilly but fresh start to the day. plenty of brightness around and feeling pleasant in any sunshine. highs of 1a. the risk of the odd isolated shower. into wednesday and again, another chilly start of the day. a touch of frost not out of the question. sunshine as we move through the day and for the time of year, it will feel pleasant in any sunshine despite the struggling temperatures. highs of 11. as we move through the next days, spells of sunshine but chilly nights. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. prince harry reveals he turned to therapy to help him deal with the death of his mother — princess diana. in a newspaper interview, he describes how he went for counselling after coming close to a complete breakdown.
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there is actually a lot of stuff here i needed to deal with. there was 20 years of not thinking about it and then to make of total chaos. —— two years of total chaos. good morning. it‘s monday 17th april. also this morning: the turkish president narrowly wins a controversial referendum on plans allowing him to greatly increase his powers. police in the us search for a man who shot dead his victim at random before posting the killing on facebook. police and prison officers join forces to tackle the drones flying drugs and phones into jails. in sport, the premier league title race is hotting up. the league leaders chelsea beaten 2—0 by manchester united. goals from marcus rashford and ander herrera trimming the gap at the top to four points from second—place tottenham. should older drivers be made
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to retake their test? more than a quarter of a million people sign a petition asking for a change in the law. and carol has the weather. good morning from this lovely farm here in the middle of london. i have two pigs with me, holmes and watson. it isa pigs with me, holmes and watson. it is a chilly start from many of us, but there will be sunshine and also some showers, some wintry. more details in 15 minutes. you are having a busy morning! good morning, first our main story. prince harry has revealed he sought counselling after spending nearly 20 years "not thinking" about the death of his mother, princess diana. in an interview with the daily telegraph, he said it was not until his late 20s that he processed the grief, following two years of "total chaos". dan johnson reports. with public grief on a scale barely
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seen before, we got very little insight into how two young boys were missing their mum. now, after two decades struggling to deal with diana‘s death, prince harry‘s told the daily telegraph just how big and long—lasting the impact was. i can safely say that losing my mum around the age of 12 and therefore shutting down all of my emotions for the last 20 years, has had a quite serious effect on, on not only my personal life, but also my work as well. my way of dealing with it was refusing to ever think about my mum, because why would that help? it is not going to bring her back. the prince said boxing helped him deal with aggression after he nearly punched someone. and he talked about asking for professional mental health advice. all of a sudden, all of this grief i‘d never processed had come to the forefront, and i thought there‘s a lot of stuff here i have to deal with.
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it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. as i am sure you know, some of the best people to help you deal with it are shrinks, someone you never have met before, as americans call them, you tell them everything. i have done it a couple of times. more than that. it was great. the heads together campaign, set up by harry and his brother and sister—in—law will be the main charity at next week‘s london marathon. the prince says he spoke openly about his own experience in the hope of encouraging others to discuss mental health issues. dan johnson, bbc news. president erdogan of turkey has narrowly won a referendum to vastly expand his presidential powers, which could keep him in office until 2029. his victory was narrower than expected. election officials say he took 51 and a half per cent of the vote. but turkey‘s two main opposition parties have questioned the result
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as greg dawson reports. from the flag—waving and the fireworks, to the clattering of pots and pans in protest, the reaction to this vote reveals how divided turkey is about its future. it‘s a narrow victory, but it‘s one that vastly increases the power of this man. president erdogan will now be able to appoint several vice presidents, hire and fire judges, and can now potentially stay in power until 2029. translation: turkey took a historic decision on a 200—year—old discussion on its constitutional system. this decision is not an ordinary event. this is the day on which a very important decision has been made. within hours of victory, he raised the idea of a referendum on reinstating the death penalty, a move which would kill off turkey‘s already—slim hopes
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ofjoining the eu. 0pponents fear the changes amount to one—man rule, without any checks on his power. as a member of nato, turkey is viewed by the us and europe as a crucial ally to bring stability in the middle east. but it has been through one of its most volatile periods in recent history, a failed coup attempt, and several terror attacks in the last 18 months. president erdogan says his increased powers will help him restore security, but this was far from a resounding victory, and it is one that leaves this country polarised. greg dawson, bbc news. the us vice president, mike pence, has visited the demilitarised zone which separates north and south korea. it comes a day after pyongyang‘s failed missile test. america‘s top security advisor, general mcmaster, has revealed he addressed the troops and said
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that the period of strategic patience was over. we commend them for their vigilance, patience was over. we commend them fortheirvigilance, here, patience was over. we commend them for their vigilance, here, along this historic frontier of freedom, and we express the resolve of the people of the united states of america to stand together in the months and years ahead with the people of south korea to both preserve their freedom and ensure the objective of a korean peninsula without nuclear weapons. our correspondent steve evans joins us from south korea. how was the visit being seen there? on the streets, life goes on. it is almost as if people are used to the kind of threats that come from pyongyang. there was a food festival going on.
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mike pence has been emphasising in the last few minutes just how solid he thinks this alliance is. before the election, mr trump seemed to cast doubt on the alliance with south korea and with japan. mike pence is here to say, have no doubts, it is 100% support, the alliance is ironclad. he said to north korea, if you attack, there will be an overwhelming response. do not test the resolve of the president, was the way he put it. what remains completely unclear is how the us and south korea planned to derail north korea‘s nuclear efforts. he is calling on them and threatening them, but it‘s not quite clear how he‘s going to achieve what 0bama, bush and clinton could not. steve, thanks very much.
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police in the us state of ohio are hunting a man suspected of posting a video on social media of him fatally shooting a stranger. officers in the city of cleveland say the suspect, steve stevens, claimed to have killed 12 other people in a later broadcast on facebook live but the city‘s police chief said they did not know of any other victims. there are no other victims that we know of. we have checked. there are no more victims that we know that are tied to this. this is not the first time that a serious crime has been captured on facebook‘s lifestrea m. been captured on facebook‘s lifestream. in january, been captured on facebook‘s lifestream. injanuary, four people in chicago broadcasted the assault ofan in chicago broadcasted the assault of an 18—year—old man. police warn that steve stevens is armed and dangerous and the fbi have joined
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the hunt for him. united airlines is changing its policy of giving staff last—minute seats on overbooked flights. it‘s after a passenger lost two front teeth and suffered a broken nose, when he was was violently dragged from his seat after refusing to leave the plane. united says staff will now be allocated seats at least an hour before take—off. if he was still around charlie chaplin would have celebrated his 128th birthday yesterday. and how about this as a way to mark the occasion? 662 of his fans decided to get together and don baggy trousers, bowler hats and, of course, his trademark moustache. the gathering at a museum in switzerland set a world record of the highest number of charlie chaplin lookalikes in once place. drugs and mobile phones are highly
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sought after in uk prisons, so much so that some criminals are using drones to get contra band over the walls and into prisoners‘ hands. in response, a specialist squad of prison and police officers has been formed to counteract the threat. for more on this, let‘s speak to john podmore, former head of the prison service‘s anti—corruption unit. how big a problem is this at the moment in our prisons? well, the latest figures from the probation service suggest there were something like 33 incidents in 12 months. the service said it would be a world leader in evidence —based policy, but i don‘t see any evidence for drones being a problem. it will be a method for drugs and mobile phones are getting, but not that many. the
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prison service said it finds something like 10,000 mobile phones a year. they have not come in from 33 drones. they are not difficult to spot. they are noisy and intrusive. iamon spot. they are noisy and intrusive. i am on record as saying if we are looking at contra band i am on record as saying if we are looking at contraband coming into prisons, the primary route is through a very small but disproportionately effective group of corrupt staff, and if resources are going into tackling contraband, they should be going into corruption prevention. the drone thing strikes me as prevention. the drone thing strikes measa prevention. the drone thing strikes me as a bit ofa prevention. the drone thing strikes me as a bit of a red herring, to be honest. the ministry ofjustice has said it is vigilant to prison corruption, investing £3 million in a new intelligence unit looking at corruption strategy. i suppose, with the drones, the pictures that we have are so dramatic, in a way, and certainly it has been in the headlines quite a lot, the use of
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drones, because you seem to see them almost delivering what ever the contraband almost delivering what ever the contra band is to almost delivering what ever the contraband is to somebody‘s window. it looks exciting, it‘s dramatic, and that‘s why it hits the headlines. i‘ve neverflown a drone, but i would suspect it would be very difficult to negotiate a drone direct to a window to hand something over. if that did happen, one hopes that prison authorities would hear it, would see where it was being delivered and maybe go to that place, search and take the contraband. place, search and take the contra band. it is place, search and take the contraband. it is a bit of a red herring. certainly, iwould contraband. it is a bit of a red herring. certainly, i would welcome better police — prison cooperation. a few years ago, there were some senior secondments of police officers into prison headquarters to tackle a range of issues, including corruption. that was abolished, which i think was a retrograde step. if something is coming forward that
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is better at getting police and prisons working together to tackle the problem, that is to be welcomed. so, that is where you would like to see the emphasis. what do you think is key to tackling that corruption, as you put it? it is about acknowledging the problem. we‘re talking about a very small number of staff. of that small number, i would say very few of those are corrupt and have criminal intent. many become corrupt because they are threatened, intimidated, blackmailed, so we need policies in place to support staff. when i was working in prevention, staff and unions welcomed the attention given to corruption. it is notjust officers, the workforce in prisons is very varied — doctors, teachers, nurses, chapmans, volunteers. —— priests and volunteers. they are all
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vulnerable to becoming involved in bringing contra band vulnerable to becoming involved in bringing contraband into prison. this concentration on drones, i think is a distraction. thank you very much for your thoughts. let‘s catch up with the weather. and carol‘s bringing us the weather from spitalfields city farm in central london this morning. she‘s gorgeous, isn‘t she! she‘s called lily. iam joined byjenny, the farm co—ordinator. why are you feeding her? she is five days old, she was sadly abandoned, rejected by her mother. we have been on hand to bottle feed her for the last few days. she is the cutest wee thing. she‘s very sweet and we have had lots of offers to be her mum. we have the milk in the bottle now.
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what is it, cow‘s milk? have the milk in the bottle now. what is it, cow's milk? a mix of mum‘s own milk and milk specially made for sheep. will she be reunited with her mum? she will be introduced to groups and has a sibling to play with soon. i have been kissing her all morning and i could carry on. thanks, jenny. the weather is not so beautiful. at the moment we have a bit of cloud here in london and it has been a chilly start to the day too. that‘s the forecast for many parts of the uk. it‘s a chilly start, and we are also going to look at some sunny spells. there are also some showers. this morning across scotland in the north there are some showers. they‘re mostly over lower levels, perhaps sleet but falling as snow on modest hills and at low levels in shetland. for the rest of scotland sunshine until the southern uplands, then some showers. for northern england, a chilly start but a sunny one.
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further south there is quite a bit of cloud around with one or two brighter breaks particularly across east anglia. the cloud is thick enough for those showers this morning and as we drift across southern counties to the south—west of england again we hang on to a bit of england again we hang on to a bit of cloud with one or two brighter breaks. a little bit of sunshine coming through. for wales, breaks. a little bit of sunshine coming through. forwales, south wales seeing some sunshine, but for much of wales it‘s a cloudy start again with some showers. across northern ireland, a cloudy start with some bright spells but it‘s mostly dry for you. through the day the showers across northern scotland will sink southwards getting into northern england by the afternoon. it will brighten up with sunshine behind them. the forecast for most of the uk is one of bright spells, meaning bits of cloud at times, or sunny intervals and a few showers. temperatures up to 1a. through this evening and overnight the showers across northern england will continue to slip southwards, down the east coast of england,
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eventually clearing allowing cold airto push in eventually clearing allowing cold air to push in behind. it is going to bea air to push in behind. it is going to be a cold night with clear skies, temperatures in towns and cities staying in single figures but in the countryside they will be below freezing, in fact, widely below freezing. we are looking at a range zero to minus five. so, severe frost. if you have been out planting, bear that in mind. tomorrow clear skies and a lot of sunshine. also breezy across the south—east, here we could see the odd shower but most of us won‘t. temperatures again up to 1a. that leads us into wednesday. central parts of england again getting off to a cold start with frost. here too there will be some sunshine. across southern counties, northern ireland, northern england, scotland, parts of wales, there will bea scotland, parts of wales, there will be a bit more cloud around. i need to go back and joinjenny with this
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cute little lamb. back to you both. prince harry was just 12 years old when he lost his mother in a car crash and has rarely talked about how the experience shaped him, until now. in an interview he‘s detailed his struggles with mental health issues following princess diana‘s death and admitted to experiencing two years of total chaos before seeking counselling. let‘s hear a bit of that interview. i can say losing my mum at the age of 12 and shutting down all my emotions for the last 20 years has had a quite serious effect on, not only my personal life but also my work, as well. my way of dealing was it was
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refusing to think about my mum, because why would that help? it‘s only going to make you sad, it‘s not going to bring her back. all of a sudden this grief i had never processed had to come to the forefront and there was a lot of stuff i needed to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. it's and then two years of total chaos. it‘s a fascinating process, for me, that i have been through, notjust personally but all the people that i get to meet. so fortunate to get to meet these people who have literally turned their lives around and it‘s all part of a conversation, being able to talk to a brother, a sister, able to talk to a brother, a sister, a parent, a colleague or a complete stranger. as i am sure you know, some of the easiest people to speak to isa some of the easiest people to speak to is a shrink or whoever the americans call a shrink, or someone to just listen and let it all rip. you have done that? more than a couple of times, it‘s great! the columnist bryony gordon, who did that interview,
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joins us from our london newsroom. thank you for taking the time to talk to us this morning. given this is something that harry has struggled with for so many years how difficult did you sense he found actually doing that interview with you and talking about it?” actually doing that interview with you and talking about it? i think he found it really difficult. i mean, he said to me at the beginning his chest was feeling quite tight, he was feeling nervous and i had to say don‘t worry, i don‘t bite. it was a big step and i was shocked when he started to say all this stuff, i thought maybe he would talk generally about the importance of talking about mental health and he was incredibly candid and it was astonishing and i am so, i can‘t say iam astonishing and i am so, i can‘t say i am proud of him because we are not friends, i don‘t really know him that well, only met a few times but it‘s such an incredible thing for someone of his profile to be talking openly about their mental health, it‘s a huge, huge, huge moment for anyone who‘s ever had to suffer in
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silence. and many people do suffer in silence as you say. some people getting in touch this morning are saying he‘s got a privileged position and everything else, and ordinary people perhaps don‘t have the ability to access the help they might need, i suppose he would say or you might say that it‘s the same illness regardless of who you are, prince or pauper. yeah, i think that‘s the thing. i don‘t think it is surprising he has had issues given everything he has had to go through. i think with mental illness, one in four of us will experience it this year which means we know someone who will be experiencing it. probably people watching right now who are having grim timest watching right now who are having grim times t doesn‘t matter if you area grim times t doesn‘t matter if you are a prince or a pauper as you say, depression and other mental health issues don‘t care about that. the thing here, he is in a privileged position and what‘s great is he is using that position to create this conversation about mental health because if we don‘t talk about it we
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can‘t get the resources, we can‘t get the funding, we can‘t do anything. so, no one has got better from a mental illness but not talking about it and the only way we are going to get the correct funding is by screaming and shouting about it, as harry has done. many people have difficult times with lots of different things but in some ways although they‘re a famous family, the royals, it‘s a complex family. he had to watch his parents go through a divorce, men the tragic death of his mother. then his father to remarry, as well. there‘s been a lot for him to deal with during his adolescent years. i always said this, if you gave those set of circumstances to any normal person you would probably have some issues going on. then to kind of magnify it bya going on. then to kind of magnify it by a billion, you know, every kind
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of cough, and splutter he has made has ended up in the press. it‘s quite a life, i don‘t think we can understand what it must have been like. what‘s special to me about this interview, as well as it being someone talking so frankly about mental health which is a subject very close to my own heart, i have suffered as well, is that it‘s really unusual to hear a royal talking just for half an hour. usually it‘s kind of polished, it is soundbites but he really let his guard down. we were sitting on a sofa in a room with a cup of tea and just us in a room and it was kind of, amazing. i am so chuffed, that‘s in thea of, amazing. i am so chuffed, that‘s in the a very good word, but as someone who, i write a lot about my mental health and i run a mental health support group and it‘s so exciting to be part of this moment where we are taking these huge negatives and turning them in
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massive positives. . briefly, did you sense that he is in a good place now? i did, yeah. obviously, you know, i wanted to ask more about his personal life, but i didn‘t want to push it. yeah, i got the sense he was really sorted. he‘s really articulate, he is a really sound quy- articulate, he is a really sound guy. i think what they‘re doing is absolutely brilliant. i think a lot of people will have had the same thing where you have had issues for yea rs thing where you have had issues for years and years and it takes decades to get treatment. i think that‘s an ordinary journey to get treatment. i think that‘s an ordinaryjourney for to get treatment. i think that‘s an ordinary journey for lots to get treatment. i think that‘s an ordinaryjourney for lots of people when it comes to mental health. so, it‘s really good to hear he is in a good place, but yeah, ithink it‘s really good to hear he is in a good place, but yeah, i think he is awesome, i can‘t say that enough. i was like, can i hug you a bit more? it was very uncool, but, you know. just quickly, you are running the marathon for heads together, which is the charity, are you ready for sunday? as ready as i can be. i am
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excited about it. six months ago i couldn‘t run for a bus, i ran 20 miles last week and i am really excited. good luck. 26 next weekend. 26.2! excited. good luck. 26 next weekend. 26. 2! we wish you all the best. thank you for talking to us. fascinating. here in a few minutes a summary of this morning‘s main news. and we will have the sport. cats have claws, eagles have talons and dogs have teeth but a new documentary explores extreme animal weapons, and what they can teach us about the world around us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. at least 12 people have suffered burns from a suspected noxious substance at a club in east london. emergency services, including a hazardous area response team, were sent to the mangle club in dalston, around one o clock this morning. a00 people had to be
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evacuated from the building — ten were taken to hospital — but the injuries are not believed to be life threatening. families of people with disabilities who attend two day care centres in southwark say they don‘t know where their relatives will spend their days after the centres close later this year. the council — which owns the buildings — has been allowing a charity to use the space rent free for many years, but says because of budget cuts it can no longer afford to. my my teaching would have to stop. i would be his 2a—hour, round the clock carer. it is not only his independence but ours as well. a london plumber has become a successful gin distiller, thanks to a move to a new office. ian puddick moved in 2012, but discovered that the 150—year—old bakery also used to sell illegal gin. so he decided to try making it himself. his simple recipe is now sold in fortnums and harrods as well as his local
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farmer‘s market. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a disrupted service on the tubes this morning. 0n the trains... quiet on the roads this morning. this is the blackwall tunnel. heavy traffic on the m11. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. and improving picture for many of us. a few outbreaks of rain as we move through the morning. we will start to see brighter interval is and sunny spells sweeping in from the north. still the outside risk of
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an isolated shower. as we move through into this evening and overnight, one or to showers to look out for. we will see dry and clear spells through the night. a few showers in the east into the early hours which will bring cooler air. we are looking at a chilly night. slightly cooler in the countryside, where you could see a touch of frost first thing tomorrow. plenty of brightness around and feeling pleasa nt brightness around and feeling pleasant in the sunshine. the risk of seeing the odd, isolated shower. 0n of seeing the odd, isolated shower. on wednesday and other chilly start to the day. a touch of frost not out off the question. it will feel quite pleasa nt off the question. it will feel quite pleasant in any sunshine despite the struggling temperatures. highs of 11 celsius. for the next few days some good spells of sunshine but chilly nights. hello, this is breakfast
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with rogerjohnson and sian lloyd. prince harry has revealed he went for counselling after spending nearly 20 years trying to not think about the death of his mother. he said he endured two years of "total chaos" almost 20 years after he "shut down" his emotions following the road accident that killed princess diana. prince harry said he was inspired to speak out because of his involvement with mental health charity heads together. all of a sudden, all of this grief i had never processed came to the forefront. i thought there was a lot of stuff i need to deal with it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. some of the easiest people to speak to isa some of the easiest people to speak to is a shrink, what the americans call a shrink. someone you have never met before. you sit on a sofa and say, i do not need your advice
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orjust listen. i and say, i do not need your advice or just listen. i have and say, i do not need your advice orjust listen. i have done that it couple of times, more than a couple of times. it is great. president erdogan of turkey has won a referendum to vastly expand his presidential powers, which could keep him in office until 2029. mr erdogan won by a narrow margin of 1.3 million but opposition parties say they will challenge the result‘s legitimacy. 0ur turkey correspondent mark lowen is in the capital ankara now. a very narrow referendum victory for president erdogan. how is the reaction to that this morning? erdogan supporters want to say this isa erdogan supporters want to say this is a fait accompli, albeit now than they would have hoped. they will be disappointed they did not get the resounding victory that president ten, i had originally wanted. among the opposition, they are questioning
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these results quite challenging them and say they are disputed. this is a pro—government newspaper talking about the people‘s revolution, calling president erdogan a world leader, having achieved an historic victory. the staunchly secular opposition paper, one of the view which exists and has not been closed down by the government says, is your confidence —— conscience comfortable? that is the kind of division this country faces. it is that a very dangerous moment. 0ne side of the country is jubilant and feels it will push forward with the biggest little change in modern turkish history. the other side is not accepting the result and is promising street protests. a profoundly divided country and one really which, a few years ago, held up really which, a few years ago, held up as really which, a few years ago, held upasa really which, a few years ago, held up as a model of a slipping ever further into another chronically unstable part of the
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middle east. thank you. police and prison officers are to start pooling intelligence —— police in the us state of ohio are hunting a man suspected of posting a video on social media of him fatally shooting a stranger. officers in the city of cleveland say the suspect steve stevens claimed to have killed 12 other people in a later broadcast on facebook live but the city‘s police chief said they did not know of any other victims. the video of the incident has now been removed by facebook. police and prison officers are to start pooling intelligence to try to stop drones being used to smuggle contraband into prisons. drugs and mobile phones are the main items which criminals are trying to deliver to prisoners. the move by the government to form this new squad, follows a number of successful convictions of offenders using drones to get around prison rules. charlie chaplin would have been 128
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yesterday. 662 of his fans decided to get together. they were donning the baggy trousers and bowler hats and trademark moustache. they set a world record for the highest number of charlie chaplin lookalike is all in place. john is here. in the premier league, everyone thought chelsea, ten points clear, would run over the finishing line any time now. that does not seem to be the case. it looked like they we re be the case. it looked like they were already away and it was a done deal. you just wonder now. everyone is looking at the fixtures to come thinking, where potentially could chelsea drop points? it keeps it interesting for everyone, apart from chelsea fans when are nervous.
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united fans will be delighted. a really impressive display from manchester united. a performance that mirrored the type of free flowing football so often seen at old trafford through the years marcus rashford taking him beyond chelsea‘s defence to open the scoring after seven minutes. united added a second immediately after the break, ander herrera‘s shot deflected in. earlier in the day, liverpool beat west bromwich— zero. ross county are three points clear of the relegation spot in the premier league. mercedes‘ recent domination of formula one looks like it could be coming to an end after sebastian vettel won the bahrain grand prix ahead of lewis hamilton. the german started from third, behind the two mercedes, but ferrari‘s smarter tyre strategy saw vettel claim the chequered flag for his second win of the season. ronnie 0‘sullivan is
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through to the second round of the world snooker championship. the five time winner beat qualifier gary wilson 10 frames to 7, his win included the highest break of the tournament so far — a 12a. he is still clearly frustrated with the way he is being treated by world snooker, having received a letter from them warning about his behaviour after he criticised referee and swore at a photographer backin referee and swore at a photographer back in january referee and swore at a photographer back injanuary in the masters. 25 years of service to this game. i think i have given enough to this game. i think think i have helped and done my bit. i don‘t need that. i don‘t need you and you probably don‘t need me. i just want to enjoy my life and i am not putting up with someone who feels they can bully me. ain‘t happening. strong words from 0‘sullivan. world snooker chairman barry hearn declined to comment last night, that he is clearly frustrated because he wants to concentrate on his snooker and fears things on the periphery get in the way. people
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turn up to see him and he puts bums on seats, to coin a phrase. it is the other things going on in and around the game which he feels are a distraction. it is this affecting the way he is playing the game at the way he is playing the game at the moment. thank very much. this is a topic lots of you have been getting involved with. should older drivers had to take a test to make sure they are fit to drive? quarter of a million people have backed a petition asking for a tray —— a change in the law. it was started by ben brooks—dutton, after his wife was killed in a road traffic accident. it‘s expected that the number of drivers over 75 will double to one million by 2025. so is there more we can do to improve safety on the roads? holly hamilton reports. frank has been driving for most of his life. know where you are relative to as much traffic as you possibly can...
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but despite 56 years of experience behind the wheel, he feels he benefits from an appraisal from time to time. none of us gets sharper as we age. i mean, i can see i‘m not as sharp as i was ten or 15 years ago and that must apply when i‘m driving a car. ijust think it‘s a good idea. this driver skills scheme in hampshire for the over 60s assesses around 50 people each month. the aim is to keep people driving safely for longer. it‘s delivered from their own home in their own car. we get one of our assessors to go along and sit with them and offer advice, really. and then we can monitor how their driving is going so they don‘t have to give up too early before they‘re ready but they don‘t go on too long and they become unsafe. there‘s no legal age to stop driving in the uk but under the current system, drivers have to renew their licence every three years from the age of 70.
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to do that, you will simply need one of these. a self—assessment form. you decide whether or not you are fit to drive based on your health and eyesight. there are no mandatory checks on your eyesight, hearing or even driving and reaction times. that is well into old age. for most drivers, this is not a problem but not disclosing a medical issue can have devastating consequences. you drew that when you were a baby. you drew that with mummy. in 2012, ben‘s wife was killed while working with their 2—year—old sonjackson. a car came speeding around the corner, skimmed my son‘s push chair but then struck my wife and she died at the scene. when the pressure was on, when the driver had to choose between an accelerator and a brake, he wasn‘t able to make that decision, he wasn‘t able to react. he was driving in an automatic vehicle and he thought he was braking and as he broke harder, he was actually accelerating faster. ben is campaigning for drivers to be retested every three years after the age of 70. so far, an online petition
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has received over 200,000 signatures. i think there needs to be some sort of test to check that we are well enough to drive, that we can react in time to drive safely and regulate our own behaviour. at the moment, the self—assessment system doesn‘t do that. last year, leading road safety experts published a report setting out a national strategy for safe driving into old age. it made a number of recommendations including increasing the age of licence renewal to 75 if proof of an eye test is made compulsory. 0lder drivers, at the age of 70, are no more likely to be involved in a collision. but obviously, as we do get older and start to suffer from frailty, eyesight and hearing, yes, problems can arise if we don‘t address them at an early stage. ben‘s petition is set to be discussed by a cross party transport committee after getting the support from his local mp. meanwhile, ben is hoping his campaign will highlight the issue for thousands of families.
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no one wants to take someone‘s life. no—one wants that hanging over them for the rest of their life but a car is a powerful weapon, you need to make sure you are capable and that is notjust about sticking to your guns and saying, i‘m fine. this is about checking that you definitely are. lots of people have been in touch this morning. we would be here after ten o‘clock if we tried to read them out. we have printed out a selection of e—mails. james miller says, i gave up driving at 6a due to eyesight problems after it straight. my eyesight problems after it straight. my eyes have got better but do i wa nt to my eyes have got better but do i want to drive again? no. the government is increasing the working age limit. if they see you are fit enough to work, then you are fit enough to work, then you are fit enough to work, then you are fit enough to drive. brian doherty says, it may be an issue. what should be considered is an assessment to be
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done for everyone every ten years when you renew your photo license. mark from the isle of man has said, it should be a legal requirement to ta ke it should be a legal requirement to take the new test once people reach a certain age because the test has changed so much over the years. then perhaps they should be retested every five years afterwards so that eve ryo ne every five years afterwards so that everyone is still capable and it would bring them up to date with changes in driving laws. alanjudge is 78. he says, in my opinion, younger drivers and boy racers need retesti ng younger drivers and boy racers need retesting more than we old people. the e—mails are still coming in. thank you for the contact you have made. we do read them all but have just been ever to get through a selection. carol‘s bringing us the weather from spitalfields city farm in central london this morning. and the breakfast for the donkeys! it has been fabulous being here this morning. the charities supported by
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volunteers. you can come and have a look. look at this! never work with animals or children. come on. that looks delicious. these are the miniature donkeys. they‘re not interested in what i am doing at all. let‘s try the standard sized donkeys. would you like to try some of this breakfast? clever boy. he is having a nibble. this is not going down terribly well. do you want to try it? maybe they have just had a lot of straw and repeat. it is gorgeous here this morning. lots of animals to look at. sheep, pigs and acute, orphaned lamb for the and of course the donkeys and cats. a big thank you for having us this morning. the weather is warming up quite nicely after a chilly start. there will be sunshine in the forecast. there are some showers around. showers in scotland in the
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north, some of them are wintry, especially on the hills. low levels in shetland. for the rest of scotla nd in shetland. for the rest of scotland got some sunshine. we run into showers across the southern uplands. in the north of england a beautiful. to the day, albeit cold. for the rest of the midlands and down into the south east of the midlands and down into the south east are —— there are showers. temperatures roundabout 10 celsius, not just temperatures roundabout 10 celsius, notjust implement temperatures roundabout 10 celsius, not just implement but temperatures roundabout 10 celsius, notjust implement but also in cardiff. north wales is seeing more cloud and some showers. in northern ireland who are starting off on a largely dry note and also a bright one with temperatures roundabout nine celsius in belfast. through the course of the day, many of us will have a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. these will get into northern england by afternoon. behind them, it will brighten up and
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temperatures up to 1a celsius. this evening and overnight, the showers across the north of thing or move down the eastern side of england eventually clearing and allowing cold air to filter across our shores. you‘ll be a cold and frosty night was if you are a farmer or a grower, bad that in mind. in towns and cities, temperatures will stay in single figures. temperatures will be freezing to minus five. in the highlands it could be as low as —7 full stop after a cold and frosty start tomorrow, there will be some sunshine around. you mightjust the one or two showers but they will be the exception rather than the rule. today, temperatures —— like today, temperatures will be up to 1a. across southern england, parts of wales, northern ireland, parts of northern england and scotland, there will be more cloud around and the
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odd shower. temperatures roughly into the mid—teens. that is how it is looking weather—wise. i must say it has been fabulous here on the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been the on farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been the on the farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been the on the phone farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been the on the phone and farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been the on the phone and says farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been the on the phone and says your farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been the on the phone and says your donkey farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. editor of countryfile has been on the phone and says your donkey skills farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. on the phone and says your donkey skills farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. needed on the phone and says your donkey skills farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. needed some on the phone and says your donkey skills farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. needed some work! skills needed some work! thank farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. skills needed some work! thank farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. you, skills needed some work! thank farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. you, carol. set against a backdrop of thatcherism and industrial farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. decline, letter to brezhnev portrayed life in liverpool from farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. the point of view of two friends, more preoccupied with farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. partying than politics. more preoccupied with farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. filmed entirely in the city, for a budget of less farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. than half a million pounds, it became one of the most loved farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. british films of the 1980s, and was even nominated for a bafta. farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. now, more than 30 years on, the cast is reuniting farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. for a special screening. the cast is reuniting farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. 0ur entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. been to meet them. colin paterson, has farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. where‘s my doorway? colin paterson, has farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well.
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which one was it, chris? colin paterson, has farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. one of these. colin paterson, has farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. it was this one. colin paterson, has farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. the director and one of the stars of letter to brezhnev, farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. taking a trip down memory lane. of letter to brezhnev, farm this morning. i hope you have enjoyed it as well. roman hands and russian fingers. it was the tiny film from liverpool that travelled the world. here it is, chris! that travelled the world. it told a simple tale of a pair of local girls spending a night with russian sailors. of local girls spending a night set against the political backdrop of the time. we were sick of seeing how the city was portrayed and how the truth wasn't being told. the city was portrayed much like today. the city was portrayed thatcherism. the city was portrayed
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nobody had any money. the city was portrayed food was on the low down. the city was portrayed you just take a walk into any back kitchen, you will see food shortages. into any back kitchen, can‘t be any worse living in russia than living here. at in russia than living here. that point in time it was dead. at that point in time it was almost dead. we had no industry. it had all been closed down. dead. we had no industry. no ships on the river, nothing was happening. from letter to brezhnev, it gave us the film industry. now the cast is reuniting for the first time in 30 years for a special screening. for the first time in 30 a very beautiful evening. for the first time in 30 yeah, it‘s lovely, isn‘t it? for the first time in 30 the leading couple will be there. for the first time in 30 peter firth who will go on to play harry in spooks, and alexandra pigg. they have happy memories of the shoot despite the minute budget and lack of catering. somebody‘s mother turned up
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with a tray of butties. or a pan of scouse. with a tray of butties. there was a pub we were filming outside and they‘d laid on a pan of scouse for us because they thought we must be starving. i want you, elaine, i want you to marry me. i have nothing to gain, nothing, just you. it takes a bit longer than a few minutes, you know? please... than a few minutes, you know? and in real life, there‘s a happy ending too. we actually went out together for a couple of years. during. for a couple of years. we had an onset romance, as they say in the business. and that spread out for a couple of years, didn't it. but then we were both working away a lot and drifted apart. working away a lot and yeah, went our own separate ways. working away a lot and don‘t forget me, 0k? working away a lot and i‘ll always love you, you know. working away a lot and seven years ago, we realised that perhaps... we just drifted back together again, didn‘t we, darling? exactly, we did. didn‘t we, darling? so, it's a very happy ending to a very cute story. but maybe it won‘t be the end. to a very cute story. margi has dreams of a sequel. to a very cute story.
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e—mail to putin. to a very cute story. that‘s the first time this morning i‘ve caught what she actually said! is approaching the end of the programme. many animals carry some pretty extreme weaponry. we‘re notjust talking about mighty beasts like african elephants and american elk — numerous species have evolved ways to gore, bite and batter each other. evolved ways to gore, a new series of the long—running programme natural world aims to take a closer look at how and why animals have developed such sophisticated ways of defending themselves. have developed such sophisticated let‘s take a look. have developed such sophisticated 0h have developed such sophisticated my god! 0ne! — doug
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oh my god! 0ne! —— where! doug and then is a professor of biology. he spent his lifetime trying to unlock the secrets of extreme animal weapons. look at this. this is an answer from an elk from here in montana. this is £20 of bone. most any animal has a weapon of some sort. cats have claws, eagles have talons. even dogs have a respectable set of teeth. but those weapons stay small. there is nothing big or awkward, anything that would slow these animals down, nothing sticking out of their bodies in some crazy way. but here and there, sprinkled through the tree of life, our species where their weapons are taken to an extreme. for me, i‘m interested in the weapons of 0ffense. weapons used for fighting. and in particular the weapons that are big. those are the pieces that keep me awake at night.
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—— species. that was a clip from nature‘s wildest weapons. and the show‘s producer, peter fison, joins us now. breathtaking peter fison, joins us now. stuff. tell us about what breathtaking stuff. tell us about what we were just watching? that place is an amazing cathedral of a ntlers. place is an amazing cathedral of antlers. and being in montana, which is where the man who takes us through the story lives, that collection is from an antler enthusiast. he goes out into the hills in america and he finds these a ntlers hills in america and he finds these antlers shared naturally on the floor. i think he has got about 16,000 antlers. incredible. he doesn‘t sell them. he just collect them. he has made of this bizarre, eerie and all some collection, which is where we start of the film about animal weapons. is where we start of the film about animalweapons. you is where we start of the film about animal weapons. you said they shared naturally. is that something many animals do? yes, animals shed their
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a ntlers animals do? yes, animals shed their antlers every year. there are animals with horns who don‘t shed their horns every year. dear in our country, they will shed their a ntlers country, they will shed their antlers every year and grow them back until autumn. they use them to fight, to mate and pond. what made you want to get closer to these weapons? this film originated from a book. we follow a scientist, an enthusiastic biologist who lives in america. he is obsessed with animal weapons. he has spent his whole lifetime working out some animals grow them and why they grow them, what they are used for. so i read this book and thought, this guy is fascinating. i have never thought about animal weapons before. i never thought they were joined and had similar origins thought they were joined and had similarorigins and thought they were joined and had similar origins and were used for similar origins and were used for similar things. elephants are one of
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the biggest there is. they are not all cute animals though, are they? yeah. there are some funny moments in the film where we are looking at something that is this big. what‘s important is how proportionately those weapons are huge. if you look ata those weapons are huge. if you look at a beetle, it‘s weapon may be that big but its body is even smaller. the size of the weapon is half the size of its body. we go and look at crabs in the film. there is a crab lab. these things have huge claws which would be like you carrying your whole body as one arm. they walk around with this all day. we explain why that is and is it really worth it? do you learn in the programme that perhaps how they have evolved and the different weapons have changed ? evolved and the different weapons have changed? yes. the film is really about evolution and weapons.
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it is about the evolution of antlers and horns. they look totally different. you have fought once, pincers. .. different. you have fought once, pincers... —— forked once. it is explained through the film why those involved. and actually, that they are all the same. at the end of the film, the scientist has an amazing theory that all of that, it all applies to our weapons as well, which is kind of weird and wonderful, and makes you think. what is the most fearsome of the lot that you have looked at? i don't know. so in the film, in our fiddler crab lab, ourson has in the film, in our fiddler crab lab, our son has been bitten a few times. he said it was really painful. even though they are small, the power they bite with is huge. i think you saw the elephants earlier.
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they are the biggest land animals on earth. when they crash into each other, there is nothing more awesome than that. you were saying about the different types. the curly ones, the straight once. what did you learn about how they have changed over the yea rs ? about how they have changed over the years? i think they have all changed. but most of them came from nothing. an elephant would have begun probably without tusks. the deer would have started with tiny spikes. it means they can breed and reproduce. that means that the weapons got bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger over time, and thatis bigger and bigger over time, and that is why you enter up with these huge weapons you may be don‘t expect. those weapons are so important and useful for the animals. you talked about the mating side of things. what is the main
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reason animals need these things? defence, mating, territory? yeah, thatis defence, mating, territory? yeah, that is it. the theory we explained is that these weapons are all for from reproducing, and for having more offspring. they fight with each other. they are not fighting different species. two ale —— male elements fight each other, two male crabs. they are using the weapons to normally get a female, to mate with her and have more offspring. 0ften those children will inherit their big antlers or tusks. that is why they keep getting bigger. i‘d much rather long did it take to make? probably took about nine months. we went to montana, which is big on sheep and elk, and nuclear airbases. lots of big weapons in one place! we we re lots of big weapons in one place! we were there for just lots of big weapons in one place! we were there forjust under a month. thank you for talking to us. we
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looking forward to the programme. nature‘s wildest weapons: horn, tusk and antlers is on bbc two tomorrow night at 9pm. tusk and antlers is on bbc two that‘s it from us today. tusk and antlers is on bbc two dan and lou will be on bbc one from six o‘clock tomorrow morning. have a lovely bank holiday. from six o‘clock tomorrow morning. goodbye. from six o‘clock tomorrow morning. this is bbc news. i‘m joanna gosling. the headlines at nine: prince harry reveals he‘s had counselling, after spending nearly 20 years ‘not thinking‘ about his mother‘s death. there‘s actually a lot of stuff here i need to deal with. it was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. us vice president mike pence tells north korea not to test donald trump‘s patience, and says all options are on the table. turkey‘s president erdogan vows to press ahead with new sweeping powers after narrowly winning the constitutional referendum. police in the us state of ohio are searching for a man who fatally shot a "random" victim and posted the footage on facebook. and in the next hour: bringing
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a halt to the use of drones being used to smuggle contraband into prisons. a specialist unit will try to combat the problem of drugs and mobile phones being flown in for prisoners.
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