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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 18, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. north korea warns of all—out war if the united states takes military action. after days of increasing tension, the us vice president mike pence tells north korea not to test america's resolve. good morning, it's tuesday the 18th of april. also this morning: a report claims nearly half of the planet's natural world heritage sites are being threatened by the illegal trade in wildlife. how a growing number of nhs mental health trusts across the uk are turning to private hospitals for help. we have a special report. today i will talk to the boss of tsb
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about the future of banking in the uk and why they're calling for the rules to be changed on credit checks. after 3a years out of english football's top flight, the wait is finally over for brighton and hove albion, they have been promoted to the premier league. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cold and frosty start for some this morning but a lot of sunshine around today. however, we'll see cloud building from the north—west through the day, turning the sunshine hazy with the odd spot of rain. i'll have more details in the next 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. north korea has stepped up its hostile language towards the us, warning there will be all—out war if america uses military force against it. it comes after days of growing tensions between pyongyang and the washington. on saturday the nation staged a huge military parade involving tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians. ballistic missiles designed to be launched from submarines
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were apparently on display for the first time. just a day later an attempt by north korea to launch a test missile failed. american officials say a land—based missile, which was in violation of un resolutions, exploded within seconds of take off. then yesterday, as us vice president mike pence arrived in the south korean capital for talks on the north's nuclear ambitions, a senior north korean official spoke to the bbc‘sjohn sudworth. if you could send one message to donald trump today, what would it be? translation: i would tell him that if the united states encroaches on oui’ if the united states encroaches on our sovereignty then it will provoke an immediate counterreaction. if the usa is planning a military attack against us, we will react with a nuclear pre—emptive strike by our own style and method. today the us vice president mike
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pence continues his tour of asia, arriving in tokyo where he'll meet with japanese president shinzo abe. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is there. rupert, it's very interesting and quite alarming to hear the kind of tone of the messages coming from north korea. good morning. good morning, luis. certainly the rhetoric from both sides has been ramped up quite a lot in the last few days, as you said in that introduction. essentially there is brinkmanship going on from both sides. first president trump and now vice president p saying to the north koreans don't push us or test us, we are prepared to take military action if necessary. we have seen in this interview withjohn if necessary. we have seen in this interview with john yesterday from the vice foreign minister in pyongyang saying, look, if you infringe on our territory and sovereignty, we will retaliate with nuclear weapons. it all sounds very alarming but actually what is going
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on here is diplomacy by other means if you like and i think what the american government is trying to do is send a message to north korea but also crucially to china, saying the american government is not prepared to continue with the status quo and making a realistic threat of military force if you like. but the purpose of that is to get china to tighten its sanctions against the north korean regime, and there are some signs that that might be starting to take affect. china has now said it might impose oil sanctions against north korea, it's never done that before, so perhaps this alarmist language is starting to have some effect. we know the us vice president is now visiting tokyo, what kind of priorities does he have there? well, he's meant to be here to talk about trade but of course north korea will dominate everything. my guess is he will get quite a lot of strong support from the japanese government. they didn't
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like president obama's old policy of what was called basically wait and see, give it time. instead donald trump much more bold, the japanese government quite happy and very supportive of that. thank you very much indeed. the duke of cambridge says the british stiff upper lip should not come at the expense of people's health. prince william made the comments in an interview with the charity, calm, which is dedicated to preventing male suicide. it comes after his brother, prince harry said he sought counselling to come to terms with the death of their mother. we will be talking about that later with someone else who has sought counselling as well. ministers are to set out new proposals to speed up appeals by foreign criminals and failed asylum seekers held in detention. a previous fast—track scheme was scrapped two years ago after the court of appeal ruled it unlawful. officials say that if implemented, the system could speed up around 2,000 cases a year. labour has promised to increase the benefits given to those who care for the vulnerable by £10 a week if the party wins
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the next election. during a visit to birmingham later today, leaderjeremy corbyn is expected to say a i7% increase in the carer‘s allowance would help around one million people who he calls unsung, unpaid heroes. our political correspondent ben wrightjoins us now. good morning to you, ben. what are the details of this policy? good morning, dan. social care is one of the most politically contentious and pressing issues of the moment. labour has said for a long time there's a crisis here. one of the groups of people they say are paying a price are the carers, who labour are picking up the fallout from overstretched councils struggling to deal with social care. about 6.5 million people in the uk receive carer‘s allowance, people who look after the old, the disabled and the seriously ill for more than 35 hours a week and labour are saying if they win the next election, in the first
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year of a labour government they will up that carer‘s allowance from £62 a week to about £72 a week and they say this could be paid for by scrapping the tories‘ planned cut to inheritance tax for married couples coming in later this year. they argue it is costly and will help people who really need the money. —— costed. the conservatives say the plans don't add up and they have promised so much already they can't cost of this, but clearly this is where there's a big political argument raging at the moment. ben, thanks very much for that this morning. donald trump has telephoned the turkish leader to congratulate him on sunday's referendum victory, which grants the president sweeping constitutional powers. the white house said mr trump thanked recep tayyip erdogan for supporting the us missile strike on a syrian government airbase earlier this month. turkey has extended the state of emergency in the country for a further three months. facebook has launched a review of how it deals with violent content after a video apparently showing the killing of a pensioner in ohio remained on the network
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for more than two hours. police are still looking for steve stephens, who posted a video of the attack on 74—year—old robert godwin, who was picked apparently at random. officers say the suspect is armed and dangerous. campaigners are warning that nearly half of the planet's natural world heritage sites are under threat from the illegal trade in wildlife. a report by the conservation charity wwf says poaching of elephants and illegal logging and fishing is putting the lives of critically endangered species at risk. our southern africa correspondent karen allen reports. stunning views you never forget. tanzania. it's one of hundreds of precious sites dotted around the globe designated by unesco as a place were in danger to wildlife should be able to roam free. but nearly half of these locations are threatened by criminals according to
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the conservation charity wwf. rangers are being deployed to try to outwit the thieves, but the prizes are huge, criminal gangs are earning billions from peddling this illicit trade. elephants are among the most at risk from poachers. 40% of all african elephants live in world heritage sites like these, yet nearly half of these places are threatened with wildlife crime. and four other prey, for whom sang trees like this are meant to be a refuge, they too are at risk, notjust from they too are at risk, notjust from the men with guns but bloggers who are stripping their habitats in their. and then the world's oceans, like this protected site off the coast of belize, creatures are vulnerable too. in nearly half of unesco's heritage marine sites, the threat to wildlife lurks deep. campaigners say without concerted international action now these precious places could become a thing of the past. as the criminals turn
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to more violent means to strip the planet their. karen allen, bbc news, southern africa. —— bare. and we'll be speaking to someone from the wwf conservation charity after 7am. families across england will this morning find out which primary school their child will attend from this september. a new report by education charity teach first suggests children from poorer homes in england are nearly half as likely to attend an outstanding primary school as richer children. the department for education says it's set out plans to make more good school places available the first woman ever to complete the boston marathon has run the race again 50 years after she first crossed the finish line. kathrine switzer entered the race in 1967 when only men were allowed to compete. yesterday she joined over 27,000 people to complete the race in four hours and 44 minutes, just 2a minutes more than she took
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half a century ago! so impressive, isn't it? absolutely wonderful. have you done the boston one? i've only done one marathon and ididn't one? i've only done one marathon and i didn't exactly do all of it. it was new york and i would never do another one. is that ill? i thought you would have a list. it is a long way, dan. —— is that it. you would have a list. it is a long way, dan. -- is that it. i'm not a runner, far too much baggage. were not built for running. more sprinting, shorter distances, a lot easier. brighton are up? yes, incredible, quite nervous for them yesterday because they were playing earlier and while they beat wigan 2-1, earlier and while they beat wigan 2—i, they had to wait for results elsewhere to go their way and huddersfield drew with derby, meaning promotion was confirmed but it was great, the club put on big screens, it was great, the club put on big screens, the fans stayed and watched and at the end all of the fans were
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on the pitch. it's not been a great few years for them, they've missed out on promotion via the play—offs so out on promotion via the play—offs so this was their crowning moment. fantastic for the fans as we'll see. brighton and hove albion will be a premier league side for the first time next season. great scenes at their home ground the amex stadium after beating wigan 2—i, promotion was confirmed when results elsewhere went their way. the palyers ready to test themselves against the likes of chelsea and manchester united next season. and it means the south coast will boast three sides in the premier league next season. arsenal are back up to sixth following a 2—1 win at struggling middlesbrough. meszut ozil's second half goal leaves the gunners seven points off the top four with a game in hand. john terry has called time on his 19—year chelsea playing career. the former england captain will leave stamford bridge at the end of the season. kyle edmund will face rafael nadal in the second round of the monte carlo masters. it's after he beat compatriot dan evans in straight sets in the first round. shaun murphy sets up a second round meeting with ronnie o'sullivan
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at the world snooker championship before claiming the five—time world champion can't get away with criticising the sport in the media. despite all the action going on at the moment, ronnie o'sullivan still commanding all the headlines following a bit of a fallout with world snooker and he's received a letter warning him about his behaviour, he's not happy, he gave an interview after his first—round match and everyone is talking about him, overshadowing the action. you can understand the frustration. he's the biggest name in the sport. you wa nt to the biggest name in the sport. you want to hear from the biggest name in the sport. you want to hearfrom him and what the biggest name in the sport. you want to hear from him and what he has to say but world snooker has to recognise he has to check what he is saying at times, it's about finding that balance. as with most things. you will be back with the papers later but now it is time for the weather. good morning. it is chilly and for
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some it is frosty, especially in rural areas. that means under the clear skies with low temperatures, a lot of sunshine today and for some we will hang onto it, others will have it easier. high pressure still firmly in charge, this weak weather front continuing to clear from the south taking showers with it and as it goes away, colder air will filter in. quite breezy across the south—eastern corner, extension waiting the chilly feel. look at all this sunshine, though —— extension weighting. the cloud will build in northern ireland and parts of wales and north—west scotland and that will introduce spots of rain coming in initially in outer hebrides, western scotland and then we will see it further eastwards, i love of dry and brighter weather and a lot of sunshine in central and eastern scotla nd of sunshine in central and eastern scotland —— a lot of. for much of england and wales again some fair weather bubbling up, a lot of sunshine. in northern ireland, a bit more cloud, possibly the odd shower
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coming out of that in the afternoon and temperature wise, ranging from about seven to about 13. then as we go on through this evening and overnight, you can see the advancement of that rain, not moving particularly quickly but it does go over to the northern isles. more cloud in scotland and northern ireland so here temperatures will hold up. but across england and wales it's going to be a cold night, these temperatures are indicative of towns and cities, as you come further south under the high pressure, temperatures close to freezing so some frost around. tomorrow under this high pressure there will also be a lot of sunshine. for northern england, northern ireland and scotland, more cloud, but even so it will break at times and some sunshine will come through. through tomorrow if you're in the sunshine it will feel pleasa nt in the sunshine it will feel pleasant enough, after the chilly start temperatures will respond. highs of iii in the south, up to about 12 or 13 as we go further north. then as we move into
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thursday, we've got some rain coming in across the north and west, again nothing too heavy. ahead of it we will see more cloud building, variable amounts in england, wales and northern ireland but essentially and northern ireland but essentially a dry, fine day, breezy in the north and as we look further south, you can see where we're likely to have maximums of 15. as we head into friday our weather front continues its descent, moving south, a fairly wea k its descent, moving south, a fairly weak affair bringing more cloud to northern england, southern scotland, northern england, southern scotland, north wales and northern ireland and behind it we have a fresh north—westerly wind, so in it it will feel cool. for further south in any sunshine we could see 17. will it last into next weekend? as we head into next weekend it will turn that bit colder. the milder yellows usurped by those colder bits of air coming our way, usurped by those colder bits of air coming oui’ way, 01’ usurped by those colder bits of air coming our way, or change. i was just getting used to sunshine.
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i know it is not your fault, carol. plenty more from carol later on. the papers. i will go first. the telegraph. this interview with prince harry over the weekend. he revealed he had very serious issues and had to see a counsellor. some people are referring to it as a watershed moment for the mental health debate. we will talk about it later on bbc breakfast. many papers have this picture of donald trump yesterday appearing with the easter bunny at the easter egg roll. i love that the easter bunny has great big glasses. the guardian. the main story. the mother of all bombs at ground zero. they feel islamic state
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has taken a fatal hit. fears that turkey will reneged on the migrant deal. —— reneg. prince harry winning praise for talking about his mental health issues. what really happened the night that maddie disappeared? they are speaking to the nanny ten yea rs they are speaking to the nanny ten years after it happened. a story about the royal family with a "stiff upper flip." again reflecting on prince harry talking over the weekend about how he dealt with the death of his mother over the years. the mail. lots of papers. no spoilers on breakfast. docking about the finale of broadchurch. we will not tell you what happened. —— talking. people will be cross. it is ha rd to talking. people will be cross. it is hard to avoid. i have not seen it. i heard you talking about it this
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morning when i came into work.|j have not even seen morning when i came into work.|j have not even seen it at all. i cannot give you spoilers. are you up to the last episode? yeah. again. we we re to the last episode? yeah. again. we were talking about mental health. it is coming up. an interesting story in the times. good morning, everyone. some companies are looking at having pods in the companies were there will be a drum kit, yoga, things happening. it is all about helping people to deal with stress. they worked out it is estimated to cost something like 20 billion euros a year to the european economy, work—related stress and the problems that come with that. the uk, 6.5 billion. you don't know how they work it out. it could be absence, you don't know. it sounds cool. just go off and like rargh! like animal!
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we were talking aboutjohn terry leaving chelsea after 22 years. is itfairto leaving chelsea after 22 years. is it fair to say he has not always endeared himself to the wider public died of the club, perhaps? yeah. the highs and lows of his career. making his debut back in 1988. a freshfaced john terry. and that moment when he missed the penalty. not so memorable for him. the champions league. no doubt about it, what he achieved. for mayor league titles, one champions league, and fight fa cups. pretty good. —— premier league. champions league, and fight fa cups. pretty good. -- premier league. why do dogs put their tails between their legs? it is a bow of submissions saying they have done something wrong and you are in charge the blue after the big poo in the kitchen. please. iam
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charge the blue after the big poo in the kitchen. please. i am sorry. charge the blue after the big poo in the kitchen. please. iam sorry. i will go away. thank you very much, guys. these things happen. you are watching bbc breakfast. mental health trusts across the uk are becoming increasingly reliant on private psychiatric hospitals, as the nhs struggles to balance increased demand with over—stretched budgets. that's according to a bbc breakfast investigation. we've discovered that the number of inpatients being treated privately has risen by 80% in the last four years, at a cost of over £100 million. jayne mccubbin reports. you were in a really, really bad way, won't you? to say the least. in his first year of university, carl had a breakdown. he was taken to hospital after he feared he would ta ke hospital after he feared he would take his own life. he ended up 150 miles from home in a new bed. they could not say where i would end up.
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you ended up in a private hospital? idid, yeah. you ended up in a private hospital? i did, yeah. a four-hour round trip. i had no visits. it was very isolated. it was the threat of recall he said made it far worse. being moved to an nhs hospital when a cheaper bed became available. you would meet people and then they would meet people and then they would go and the explanation would be that they got recalled last night. you could get pulled out at 1am. it could inhibit recovery. you we re 1am. it could inhibit recovery. you were just very uncertain. you were just chasing beds? we are. this nurse told me she would be sacked she talked publicly. but she said so much is focused on the logistics of finding a bed rather than making people better. i wanted to care about my patience and spend time with them. that is why i became a nurse. but if i am looking for a
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bed, i don't have time to spend with my patience. that upsets me. bbc news found out there has been an 80% increase in the number of nhs patients receiving care in a private inpatient bed in the past five yea rs. inpatient bed in the past five years. that is up from just over 1800 patients in 2012 2/3000 300. and because of that to the nhs? that has increased 42% to just over £100 million in the last five years. the figures show a system that is stretched. they say there is two reasons. there are not enough beds. it is not good for the nhs to spend more money, clearly. but as a clinician, my concern is about the patient. it is not good for their recovery. nhs england admit they are spending too much on private bed. they say it is close to £5 million
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every month. here in peterborough, the problem is it is no longer affordable. they did what nhs england wants to do more often. they put more emphasis on a short inpatient assessment period with more support for patients in their own homes. 7096 of our patients go through that system and come back out into the community supported by home treatment. and that is a huge achievement. that is why nhs england is investing £400 million on crisis ca re is investing £400 million on crisis care in home later this year. the welsh government says that funding has increased to £600 million this year. scotland is investing £300 million over the next five years. northern ireland say this is not an issue for them as the proportion of privately treated patients is less than 1%. but it is causing some trusts in some patients clearly. jane mccubbin, bbc news. and jayne joins us now. good morning. good morning. carl is
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a good example. now he is back at university. but he was in a hospital for ours away from his home. there area for ours away from his home. there are a few problems. —— hours. he is so are a few problems. —— hours. he is so far away from his support network at home. because he is in a private bed which is more expensive at any moment he could be called to a cheaper bed because he cannot afford to be there. it is a twofold problems. it is not that private ca re problems. it is not that private care is not as good as nhs care. it is just not as good for private patients. he had some of the worst figures we discovered in our one. they have seen a 400% increase in private inpatients. —— foi. that is to £11 million for them. they say they have gotten on top of it. they have no patience and private debts. a lot of money. the royal college of
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psychiatrists want to know what is going on. not enough beds as part of the problems. the british medical association in debris said there was a large cut in the number of beds out there since 2001. you would not need hospital beds if early intervention was ok. but it has been the cinderella service in the nhs for so long. as you saw at the end of that report, governments are trying to address this. but what we are seeing is a bottleneck with too many patients not getting the care downstream, ending upstream in crisis with not enough beds. and i am told not enough beds privately as well. we would love to hear from people. if they have any experience on this, get in touch. we are talking about it through the programme because prince harry is speaking out about it. the huge impact of that interview. amazing. we will talk to somebody about that and whether that changes the sort of
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stigma people might feel about seeing a counsellor, for example. do feel free to get in touch with us that you can find us on facebook, social media, and on line. in the meantime, the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are this morning. we will see you in a couple of minutes. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. two men are in a serious but stable condition in hospital this morning, and ten others have suffered burns, after a suspected acid attack at a nightclub in east london. police believe the men, in their 20s, were targeted in the mangle club in hackney in the early hours of yesterday morning. no—one's been arrested. londoners work 100 hours a year more than the rest of the uk on average, according to new data. figures from the office for national statistics show the average working week in london is 33 hours long, compared to 31 hours across the uk. long hours and stressful working conditions have been called a "toxic burden on londoners" by the green party. a police dog, stabbed in the head and chest while chasing a suspect in stevenage, has made his
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first trip to the beach. finn wasn't allowed to leave hertfordshire while serving with the police. he's now retired from the force. following his attack, campaigners called for better protection for police dogs and horses. it has been difficult for finn and i to get any closer. since october, we have been through some massive ups and downs as well. we absolutely love the beach. i think there is going to be some pressure now, not only from him, but from his fans and the family, to move nearer to the beach so he can come here again. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, all lines are running a good service. on the roads in camden, the high street and eversholt street are closed near to mornington crescent tube station following a police incident. south kensington.
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thurlow place is closed between the tube station and the a4 following a collision. central london. the strand underpass remains closed until friday for maintenance works. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. a bright but cold start to the day. temperatures down in low single figures. a chilly start. the good news is we should see plenty of sunshine. a gentle and very light north—easterly breeze making things feel chilly. in the sunshine, not too bad. to the east, parts of essex, the fringes, you might geta parts of essex, the fringes, you might get a shower. they may disappear. 13— 14 degrees. overnight tonight, once the sun sets, temperatures will fall away quickly. it will be another cold night in the clear skiesin one one or two spots down close to freezing. the risk of maybe a little bit of trust. 3—6 degrees. bright tomorrow. similar sunshine. a gentle north—easterly breeze still. temperatures getting
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up breeze still. temperatures getting up to what in degrees. not bad in the sun. high—pressure dominates for much of this week, including two thursday and friday. not wall—to—wall sunshine. a bit of cloud developing. a spot of rain as we go through friday. a quiet week of weather. after the sunshine today, we should still see some sunshine through wednesday. more cloud on thursday and friday, and cooler into the weekend. that is it for now. we are back in half an hour. plenty more on the website at the usual address. we will see you soon. the usual address. we will see you soon. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... normally we run through the headlines of the main stories. a few technical issues so we will show you the main stories on the front pages this morning. the front page of the
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daily telegraph, something we will talk about later, some people are calling this a watershed moment for the mental health debate, prince harry has done an interview and it's a very honest interview with the telegraph, talking about the serious issues he had after the death of his mother and saying he didn't talk about it for many years and eventually he did, but in his late twenties. people are saying this is a real change in attitudes and may bring changes for lots of people, lots are saying they are touched by the way he has spoken out and schoolchildren will be given better access to nhs mental health workers in an effort to stop the rising tide of depression and anxiety, a reaction to that story. lots of the papers talking about what we are talking about today, north korea threatening to carry out weekly missile tests after us vice president warned america's iraq or strategic patience towards pyongyang was over. talking about prince harry andi was over. talking about prince harry and i think it will be a few days of
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similar coverage. leroux action here on the daily mail, prince william has been speaking to another charity called calm, let's lose our stiff upper lips, a reaction to what his brother said —— lots of reaction. the front page of the times, donald trump yesterday with the easter bunny, which put twitter into meltdown yesterday —— times. a white house event for thousands of children and a story about turkey and fears they could renege on the migrant deal after the referendum result. those are some of the front pages this morning. let's look at some of the other headlines. north korea has stepped up its hostile language towards the us, warning there will be all—out war if america uses military force against it. speaking to the bbc‘s john sudworth, north korea's vice—foreign minister said the nation would be willing to use a pre—emptive nuclear strike, and that it had no intention of stopping its missile tests. if the us is reckless enough to use
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military means it would mean from that very day and of all—out war. our nuclear that very day and of all—out war. 0ur nuclear weapons that very day and of all—out war. our nuclear weapons protect us from that threat. we would be conducting more missile tests on a weekly, monthly and yearly basis —— an all—out war. it comes as vice president mike pence has landed in tokyo and he is expected to reassure the country of america's commitment to reining in north korea's nuclear ambitions. the duke of cambridge says the british stiff upper lip should not come at the expense of people's health. prince william made the comments in an interview with the charity, calm, which is dedicated to preventing male suicide. it comes after his brother, prince harry said he sought counselling to come to terms with the death of their mother. ministers are to set out new proposals to speed up appeals by foreign criminals and failed asylum seekers held in detention. a previous fast—track scheme was scrapped two years ago after the court of appeal ruled it unlawful.
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officials say that, if implemented, the system could speed up around 2,000 cases a year. labour has promised to increase the benefits given to carers by ten pounds a week if the party wins the next election. in a visit to birmingham later today, leaderjeremy corbyn is expected to say a 17% increase in the carer‘s allowance would help around one million people. the government says it's recently committed an extra two billion pounds to the social care system, and that labour wouldn't be able to fund the promise. donald trump has telephoned the turkish leader to congratulate him on sunday's referendum victory, which grants the president sweeping constitutional powers. the white house said mr trump thanked president erdogan for supporting the us missile strike on a syrian government airbase earlier this month. turkey has extended the state of emergency in the country for a further three months. facebook has launched a review of how it deals with violent
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content after a video apparently showing the killing of a pensioner in ohio remained on the network for more than two hours. police are still looking for steve stephens, who posted a video of the attack on 74—year—old robert godwin, who was picked apparently at random. officers say the suspect is armed and dangerous. residents in newcastle upon tyne are being asked to approve plans to hand over their local parks to a charitable trust. the city council says the idea is being proposed because its park budget has been cut by more than 90% over the last seven years. a similar scheme is already in place in milton keynes. john is here with the sports news and brighton fans will be waking up very happy. they will be. a few sore heads as well this morning because some great scenes on the south coast after they won promotion to the
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premier league. not an easy few yea rs premier league. not an easy few years for them, they've missed out via the play—offs in three of the last four seasons. they were playing yesterday. they beat wigan, the result they needed, they needed to wait for other results, they went their way and that meant the players and the fans could celebrate at the amex stadium on the pitch. three south coast clubs in the premier league. absolutely. it is like a football mecca. it is. the king and the teams in the north but look at the teams in the north but look at the south coast are doing so well. —— looking at. some long trips next season! this is how they did it. they beat wigan 2—1, this their second goal. and when that went in and results elsewhere later went their way. promotion was confirmed. cue a pitch invasion at the amex stadium where they play. the players will be testing themselves at old trafford next season. and it means three south coast clubs now in the premier league, alongside bourmouth and southampton.
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iamas i am as excited as anybody. i have to have that little bit of sensibility as such because we've got another big game on friday, which, if we were able to win it on friday, would be the ultimate, which would be not only promotion but would be not only promotion but would see us winning the championship, and that's got to be the target now. arsenal boosted their fading hopes of reaching the top four in the premier league with a 2—1 win at middlesbrough. what a goal to get them on their way last night. they led before half time after alexis sanchez curled in a beautifulfree kick from the edge of the box. alvaro negredo equalised for struggling middlesbrough but they couldn't cling on for a point as meszut ozil poked home the winner. boro stay 19th, six points from safety. arsenal move up to sixth. chelsea captainjohn terry will leave the club at the end of the season after more than two decades at stamford bridge. since making his debut in 1998 terry's won four premier league
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titles and the champions league. terry says he still has plenty to offer on the pitch. what a night for leicester city to come. they host atletico madrid in the second leg of their champions league quarter—final tonight. the premier league champions trail 1—0 after the first leg after they fell behind to a disputed antoine griezmann penalty. leicester are the only british side left in the competition, but are heavy outsiders to make it through to the last four. we need to make sure defensively... we need to make sure defensively... we need to create more, we've got to get a goal back but by the same token we need to be mindful that we need to deny them space because they're a very, very good counter—attack team. so we're at home. we need to be more forceful than we were. as you say, but respectful of the opposition as well. manchester city women are on course to hold all three domestic titles after reaching the final of the women's fa cup
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for the first time. they beat liverpool 1—0 in the semi—finals. city will play birmingham, who beat chelsea on penalties. two members of the squad will be joining us on the sofa at around 8:40am to discuss that result. kyle edmund will face rafa nadal in the second round of the monte carlo masters. that's after he beat fellow brit dan evans. in the first meeting between the two on tour, british number three edmund won in straight sets. andy murray gets his tournament under way tomorrow. 2005 winner shaun murphy is through to the second round of the world snooker championship in sheffield. he had to come through a tough match against 17—year—old yan bingtao of china who almost pushed him all the way, the world number five eventually winning10—8. next up is ronnie o'sullivan, who earlier this week accused world snooker chairman barry hearn of bullying and intimidating him. murphy believes that isn't the case. ronnie can say whatever he wants about whatever he wants. but he
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can't get away with everything he says. he isn't right about everything he says either. and to claim that he's been bullied by the governing body is, in my opinion, quite inaccurate. and for one young fan having made the long trip from london and for one young fan having made the long trip from london to middlesbrough to watch arsenal last night. i don't think he would have minded thejourney home having got his hands on alexis sanchez‘s shirt. the goalscorer picked him out after the match. everybody wanted it but the little fella got it. very cute. he varies specifically gave it to him. how nice is that? p is still wearing it this morning i reckon, probably hasn't taken it off —— he is. this morning i reckon, probably hasn't taken it off -- he is. bet he hasn't taken it off -- he is. bet he hasn't even watched it! thanks very much. more from john and also carol
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later. "all out war". those were the words used by a senior official in pyongyang as north korea warned it would carry out a pre—emptive nuclear strike if it suspects america is planning military action. the comments came after the country's failed missile test on sunday, just hours before the american vice president mike pence touched down in seoul. he's warned north korea not to test the us. let's speak to scott lucas from the university of birmingham. he is professor of international politics. good morning and thanks for joining politics. good morning and thanks forjoining us. how significant is this language that has been used and specifically this statement from north korea about all—out war? this statement from north korea about all-out war? we've been here before on the north korean side. visa tense times but north korea for yea rs, visa tense times but north korea for yea rs , eve n visa tense times but north korea for years, even decades, has put out clear signals that if it is attacked it will respond with force —— these are. of course this time they're talking about nuclear force. what's really different about this phase is the us position. the talk on social media by donald trump, which says if
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china won't deal with north korea, we will, sending a navalforce china won't deal with north korea, we will, sending a naval force to the area, the largest training exercise with the south koreans in yea rs, exercise with the south koreans in years, i think personally, despite all the war of words, we are not going to war. in fact the focus will be on diplomatic and political steps which is part of the reason voice dial vice president mike pence is in south korea and japan today, which is why they are talking with them behind—the—scenes. is why they are talking with them behind-the-scenes. that's what i wa nt to behind-the-scenes. that's what i want to talk about, the role the us would like china to play and is their relationship changing? the relationship is definitely changing because donald trump came into office saying the chinese are raping our country, his exact words, i'm going to take economic steps to push them back on trade and currency. he signalled on twitter last weekend thatis signalled on twitter last weekend that is over, there will be no economic confrontation with the chinese. instead, let's be honest here, the real brokerfor stability is not the us in the region, it's
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the chinese. we will hear a lot of talk today about whether the chinese will put in more sanctions on north korea as an alternative to military force, but more important is the fa ct force, but more important is the fact that a lot of people in the region are looking to china as the one to separate north korea and the us, sort of like getting in between two guys fighting in a bath. dangerous thing to do sometimes! let's talk about the failed test because north korea say they will continue with tests —— a bar. there are rumours the us has implemented or help with that failure, what are your thoughts? one of the possibilities for the us has been to carry out covert and cyber operations to disrupt the north korean nuclear programme. they did this with iran in recent years for example. it's a possibility, we don't know anything beyond that, some interference with north korea's computer programmes may not only have affected this test but the last two tests. i appreciate your time,
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scott lucas, i understand we are having issues with sound. professor of international politics at the university of birmingham. we promised you a bit of carol, a bit chilly in places, look at that, beautiful. good morning. a chilly start for some. in edinburgh this morning, the temperature at the moment is —2 but as we go across other parts of the country: first thing this morning, there is a touch of frost around. under those clear skies, allowing the temperatures do dip so low, there will be a fair bit of sunshine around today. high pressure still firmly in charge, this weather front going south is continuing to take showers with it and then behind it, all of us will feel the cold air coming our way. this morning when the frost lifts, a wee bit of mist around, that will clear rapidly and around, that will clear rapidly and a lot of sunshine around. parisi in
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the south—eastern quarter, that will make it feel chillier and through the day the cloud will build in north—west scotland and northern ireland, producing spots of rain, initially in the outer hebrides then western parts of mainland scotland. away from that, the rest of scotland getting a sunny day. northern england will have a sunny day and northern ireland, the crowd will build through the day, sunshine turning hazier and a few spots of rain coming in. in wales, the midlands, east anglia, largely dry, in east anglia and can you could see the odd shower this afternoon but they will be the exception rather than leroux. if you're looking for rain, there is no substantial rain in the forecast this week —— the rule. we have a showery band of rain in to western scotland, going to the northern isles, some going to northern isles, some going to northern ireland, as a result with that cloud and rain in northern ireland, not as cold as it is under the clearer skies under this high pressure in england and wales. tomorrow morning we start with a
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touch of frost, but having said that, there will be a lot of sunshine. clearest in northern ireland, northern england and scotland, a bit more cloud around, but even so some brighter breaks and sunshine coming through. but still a few showers. temperature wise tomorrow, again, very similar to today in the sense we are looking at 12 to 14 as the top temperature. then as we move on to thursday, a lot of dry weather around where we had the clear skies by night. once again, some frost around so farmers, bear that in again, some frost around so farmers, bearthat in mind. again, some frost around so farmers, bear that in mind. all you if you been planting in the garden. a weather front from the north—west will introduce some rain, again nothing particularly heavy. our temperature range, up to 15 celsius. thank you very much. the dominance ofjust as handful of big names in banking could be leaving customers out of pocket. steph has the boss of tsb with her this morning. good morning. and we have the boss
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of tsb without. let me tell you more about what is going on. it's a bank that's been on our high streets for over 100 years in various forms. not that long ago tsb was part of lloyds banking group, but was then sold to the spanish bank sabadell in 2013. today the bank, which has fewer than 600 branches and over 7,000 staff says the banking sector here is too heavily dominated by a few big names, and that can leave customers out of pocket. paul pester is the ceo of tsb and hejoins me now. good morning. good morning. what is the problem in the banking sector? there are many. there are many tactics which are costing consumers £400 million a year to be if i want to ta ke £400 million a year to be if i want to take out a loan and buy a car, first of all, it is hard to understand the features of the product. can i pay it off quickly? cani product. can i pay it off quickly? can i take a repayment holiday? if i
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had the loan a few years ago, can i switch on to another rate now? what shocked us most is the more i shop around for a shocked us most is the more i shop around fora loan, shocked us most is the more i shop around for a loan, the likelihood it is going to cost me. if i ask one providerfor a quote, they will leave a ha rd providerfor a quote, they will leave a hard credit for print my credit file. if i go to the next loa n credit file. if i go to the next loan provider they will also leave a footprint. these footprints add up. it means i pay more. basically shopping around means there are many credit checks going on and it will make your profile or worse and it is therefore more expensive. who is doing the underhand thing? two thirds of all loan providers in the uk leave these unnecessary hard for print on your profile. you don't need to do it. —— footprints. if someone comes up and need to do it. —— footprints. if someone comes up and just asks for a
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rate, they are just asking for a price. do not need to leave a hard mark ona price. do not need to leave a hard mark on a credit file. it is wrong to do so. we think it is costing consumers £400 million a year. who needs to sort it out? where is coming from? us at tsb i tried to bring more competition to uk banking we are trying to blow the lid off these tactics we are working with policymakers. ultimately, the industry has to fix itself. this is an industry where a lack of competition has led to a culture where banks just don't care for comp —— companies. it is hard to get a better deal. we need better competition and better deals for consumers. are you notjust saying this because you want more competition and customers? of course we wa nt competition and customers? of course we want more customers. but we want a better dealfor we want more customers. but we want a better deal for consumers. we we want more customers. but we want a better dealfor consumers. we have had many customers join us. a better dealfor consumers. we have had many customersjoin us. the big
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five banks still have a stranglehold on the uk market and it is not good for consumers. your bank used to be pa rt for consumers. your bank used to be part of one of those. so, if these underhand tactics... they cannot just have been happening in the past two years. when you are part of lloyds banking group, you guys must have known about that we were a part of lloyds and spun out of them a few yea rs of lloyds and spun out of them a few years ago. part of being a separate bank is to bring more competition to the uk market. there is no need for me to be penalised every time i asked or ray price. if i go to the high street and ask for a fridge or a freezer, i don't expect the price to go up every ——a price. we would love all loa n to go up every ——a price. we would love all loan providers to sign up and say they will not do this. we would like to end underhanded tactics. you are obviously owned by a spanish bank now. what does brexit
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mean for you? it hasn't affected us. we look at our 5 million customers. we look at our 5 million customers. we have taken brexit in our stride. customers use current accounts and change banking behave is with us. we can see that. we have not seen much change. it is yet to be seen what happens in the next two years. but so happens in the next two years. but so far, so good. the uk economy is actually doing quite well. thank you so actually doing quite well. thank you so much. the chief executive of tsb. thank you, steph. illegal fishing in scottish waters is now being co—ordinated by rogue fishermen using social media to avoid patrol boats. our scotland correspondent, james shaw, has been finding out what's being done to catch the culprits. he joins us now from troon, on the firth of clyde. a very good morning to you. how are they catching them? good morning. it is really a cat and mouse game that is really a cat and mouse game that is going on in those waters of the
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firth of clyde just beyond troon harbour where i am now. it starts with the enforcement boats leaving the harbour. they turn off automatic identification so they cannot be tracked by other vessels. the fisherman are using facebook and other social media, which means they can share information about where enforcement boats are and stop fishing before they arrive. —— fishermen. it is a very valuable new market that has arisen recently in the far east. and that is why this conflict between marine scotland, the enforcement agency, and the fishermen, has started to escalate. the scottish coastline are patrolled patrolled by a small fleet of ships whose job is to safeguard the marine environment. it is a blustery day on the firth of clyde. the seas are
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looking grey and choppy. this is the marine protection vessel. it is the nerve centre of the ship. we are on the lookout at all times for illegal fishing activity. at about 1030 at night i spotted some lights on the bay. it is a known illegalfishing area. someone is working at night—time. in that depth of water it is unlikely he was just casually fishing. during daylight hours, the crew often use their high—speed inflata ble crew often use their high—speed inflatable to intercept fishing boats. the speed of interception is often critical to catch illegal activity. this boat, it is fishing for bronze. you are complying with all of the things they are interested in and have all of the rights licences, all of that kind of
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thing. there are some people who are not like that. i'm not really interested in what other people are doing, whether it is illegal or illegal. the real problem is the illegal. the real problem is the illegal fishing technique which uses live electricity cables to stun and ca ptu re live electricity cables to stun and capture razor clams. we have known activity that is illegal where they are fishing for these clams. on board they have this equipment. probes and cables and everything that comes with it. we recover them from our patrols. the job is made harder because the fishermen use social media to share where it is. just another challenge for the crew. now, we should clarify of course that none of these boats behind me are involved in illegal activities. they are all fishing perfectly legally. the question, i suppose,
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they are all fishing perfectly legally. the question, isuppose, is whether this conflict between enforcement and these illegal fishermen can be resolved. it is possible that it might be because the scottish government is organising a trial for a lecture electrofishing, the technique to ca ptu re electrofishing, the technique to capture these claims. if it proves to be safe, sustainable, and viable, thenit to be safe, sustainable, and viable, then it is possible that at least this particular dispute between marine scotland, the enforcement agency, and these rogue fishermen, it is possible it might be resolved. thank you very much for that. very interesting. more on that during the programme. and still to come, she has been named world player of the year twice and scored a hat—trick in 30 minutes in a quarter—final. we will bejoined by 30 minutes in a quarter—final. we will be joined by carly lloyd and her manchester city teammate. they will be here at a
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time later on. i think it is 8:30. that is correct. now it is time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. two men are in a serious but stable condition in hospital this morning, and ten others have suffered burns, after a suspected acid attack at a nightclub in east london. police believe the men, in their 20s, were targeted in the mangle club in hackney in the early hours of yesterday morning. no—one's been arrested. londoners work 100 hours a year more than the rest of the uk on average, according to new data. figures from the office for national statistics show the average working week in london is 33 hours long, compared to 31 hours across the uk. long hours and stressful working conditions have been called a "toxic burden on londoners" by the green party. a police dog, stabbed in the head and chest while chasing a suspect in stevenage, has made his first trip to the beach. finn wasn't allowed to leave hertfordshire while serving
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with the police. he's now retired from the force. following his attack, campaigners called for better protection for police dogs and horses. it has been difficult for finn and i to get any closer. since october, you know, we've been through some massive ups and downs as well. we absolutely love the beach. i think there's going to be some pressure now, not only from him, but from his fans and the family, to move nearer the beach so he can come here every day. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, all lines are running a good service. on the roads in camden, the high street and eversholt street are closed near to mornington crescent tube station following a police incident. south kensington. thurlow place is closed between the tube station and the a4 following a collision. the strand. central london. the strand underpass remains closed until friday for maintenance works. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning.
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it's a bright but cold start to the day. temperatures down in low single figures. so, a chilly start. but the good news is we should see plenty of sunshine. now, there is a gentle, very light north—easterly breeze making things feel chilly. in the sunshine, not too bad. to the east, parts of essex, the fringes, you might get a shower. they may disappear. maximum temperatures, between 13 and 14 degrees. overnight, tonight, once the sun sets, temperatures will fall away quickly. it will be another cold night in the clear skies. in one or two spots down close to freezing. the risk of maybe a little bit of trust. the risk of maybe a little bit of frost. down to 3—6 degrees. bright tomorrow. similar sunshine. a gentle north—easterly breeze still. temperatures getting up to what in degrees. not bad in the sun. high pressure dominates
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for much of this week, including two thursday and friday. but it's not wall—to—wall sunshine. we will start to see a bit of cloud developing. a spot of rain as we go through friday. a quiet week of weather. after the sunshine today, we should still see some sunshine through wednesday. more cloud on thursday and friday, and cooler into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. north korea warns of all—out war if the united states takes military action. after days of increasing tension, the us vice president mike pence tells north korea not to test america's resolve.
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good morning, it's tuesday the 18th of april. also this morning: a report claims nearly half of the planet's natural world heritage sites are being threatened by the illegal trade in wildlife. after prince harry opens up about having counselling, his brother says the british stiff upper lip shouldn't stop anyone seeking help. what the last thing you bought on the high street? if it was a pint or a coffee rather than clothes you're not alone. figures out today suggest an increasing number of us are visiting our high streets outside of regular shopping hours. i'll have the more on what this means for the future of our high streets.
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after 34 years out of english football's top flight, the wait is finally over for brighton and hove albion, they have been promoted to the premier league. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cold and frosty start for some this morning but a lot of sunshine around today. however, we'll see cloud building from the north—west through the day, turning the sunshine hazy with the odd spot of rain. i'll have more details in the next 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. north korea has stepped up its hostile language towards the us, warning there will be all—out war if america uses military force against it. it comes after days of growing tensions between pyongyang and the washington. on saturday the nation staged a huge military parade involving tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians. ballistic missiles designed to be launched from submarines were apparently on display for the first time. just a day later an attempt by north korea to launch a test missile failed. american officials say a land—based missile, which was in violation of un resolutions, exploded within seconds of take off. then yesterday, as us
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vice president mike pence arrived in the south korean capital for talks on the north's nuclear ambitions, a senior north korean official spoke to the bbc'sjohn sudworth. if you could send one message to donald trump today, what would it be? translation: i would tell him that if the united states encroaches on our sovereignty then it will provoke an immediate counterreaction. if the usa is planning a military attack against us, we will react with a nuclear pre—emptive strike by our own style and method. this morning us vice president mike pence landed in tokyo on the next step of his tour of asia. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes told us that north korea was likely to be high on the agenda. certainly the rhetoric from both sides has been ramped up quite a lot in the last few days, as you said in that introduction.
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essentially there is brinkmanship going on from both sides. we've seen first president trump and now vice president pence saying to the north koreans don't push us, don't test us, we are prepared to take military action if necessary. we have seen in this interview with john yesterday from the vice foreign minister in pyongyang saying, look, if you infringe on our territory and sovereignty, we will retaliate with nuclear weapons. is diplomacy by other means if you like and i think what the american government is trying to do is send a message to north korea but also crucially to china, saying the american government is not prepared to continue with the status quo and making a realistic threat of military force if you like. but the purpose of that is to get china to tighten its sanctions against the north korean regime,
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and there are some signs that that might be starting to take affect. china has now said it might impose oil sanctions against north korea, it's never done that before, so perhaps this alarmist language is starting to have some effect. the duke of cambridge says the british stiff upper lip should not come at the expense of people's health. prince william made the comments in an interview with the charity, calm, which is dedicated to preventing male suicide. it comes after his brother, prince harry said he sought counselling to come to terms with the death of their mother. we will be talking about that later with someone else who has sought counselling as well. ministers are to set out new proposals to speed up appeals by foreign criminals and failed asylum seekers held in detention. a previous fast—track scheme was scrapped two years ago after the court of appeal ruled it unlawful. officials say that if implemented, the system could speed up around 2,000 cases a year. labour has promised to increase the benefits given to those who care for the vulnerable by £10 a week if the party wins the next election.
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during a visit to birmingham later today, leaderjeremy corbyn is expected to say a 17% increase in the carer‘s allowance would help around one million people who he calls unsung, unpaid heroes. our political correspondent ben wrightjoins us now. ben, can you tell us a little more about this proposal? good morning, dan. there are about 6.5 million people in the uk caring full—time for elderly, disabled, seriously ill friends or relatives. that's a lot. and about 800,000 of those are eligible for carer‘s allowa nce. those are eligible for carer‘s allowance. these are unsung heroes according tojeremy corbyn. at the moment there in title to claim about £62 a week in carer‘s allowance, jeremy corbyn is saying if labour winds the next election in the first year of their government they would increase that to just over £72 a week and they are saying labour
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campaignfor week and they are saying labour campaign for this by reversing a planned cut to inheritance tax that is coming in later this year. he is saying he is taking muggy from the well off and giving it to those at the bottom doing this valuable caring work. —— monique. the issue of social care is contentious at the moment. —— monique. the conservatives say they have increased in the carer‘s allowance by £450 a year since 2010, and they say this is yet another uncrossed it spending commitment from the labour party. then, thanks for that this morning —— uncrossed it. —— ben. donald trump has telephoned the turkish leader to congratulate him on sunday's referendum victory, which grants the president sweeping constitutional powers. the white house said mr trump thanked recep tayyip erdogan for supporting the us missile strike on a syrian government airbase earlier this month. turkey has extended the state of emergency in the country for a further three months. facebook has launched a review of how it deals with violent content after a video apparently showing the killing of a pensioner in ohio remained on the network for more than two hours.
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police are still looking for steve stephens, who posted a video of the attack on 74—year—old robert godwin, who was picked apparently at random. officers say the suspect is armed and dangerous. campaigners are warning that nearly half of the planet's natural world heritage sites are under threat from the illegal trade in wildlife. a report by the conservation charity wwf says poaching of elephants and illegal logging and fishing is putting the lives of critically endangered species at risk. our southern africa correspondent karen allen reports. stunning views you'll never forget. tanzania, one of hundreds of precious sites around the globe designated by unesco as a place where endangered wildlife should be able to roam free. but nearly half of these locations are threatened by criminals, according to the conservation charity wwf. rangers are being deployed
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to try to outwit the thieves, but the prices are huge. elephants are among the most at risk from poachers. 40% of all african elephants live in world heritage sites, yet nearly half of these places are threatened with wildlife crime. and for other prey, for whom sanctuaries like this are meant to be a refuge, they too are at risk. notjust from the men with guns, but loggers who are stripping their habitats bare. and in the world's oceans, like this protected site off the coast of belize, creatures are vulnerable too. in nearly half of unesco's heritage marine sites, the threat to wildlife lurks deep. campaigners say that without international action now, these precious places could become a thing of the past as the criminals turn to more violent means
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to strip the planet bare. karen allen, bbc news, southern africa. and we'll be speaking to someone from the wwf conservation charity in just a few minutes. families across england will this morning find out which primary school their child will attend from this september. a new report by education charity teach first suggests children from poorer homes in england are nearly half as likely to attend an outstanding primary school as richer children. the department for education says it's set out plans to make more good school places available residents in newcastle upon tyne are being asked to approve plans to hand over their local parks to a charitable trust. the city council says the idea is being proposed because its park budget has been cut by more than 90% over the last seven years. fiona trott reports. they're the places we treasure. the
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quiet corners of every town or city at the heart of our community. some of them quarter of a century. but they need to be maintained and here in newcastle the council is running out of money. they say the park budget has been cut by 90% over the past seven years. the solution, it could be this. a parks charity like the one here in milton keynes which looks after some 5000 acres of greenery. they say it works because they're not competing for money against other services. here in newcastle it would mean 33 green spaces would be handed over to a charitable trust along with some 50 allotments. they would be responsible for the day—to—day management and attracting new investment. people have already expressed their views on the plans. some say they don't want parks falling into a state of disrepair, but they don't want to be charged for using any part of them either, something they fear may happen if
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green spaces are taken out of the council's hands. the public consultation ends on friday. the council have been asked to share their findings with other local authorities in case they want to follow their example. fiona trott, bbc news, newcastle. the first woman ever to complete the boston marathon has run the race again 50 years after she first crossed the finish line. kathrine switzer entered the race in 1967 when only men were allowed to compete. yesterday she joined over 27,000 people to complete the race in four hours and 44 minutes, just 24 minutes more than she took half a century ago! imean, i mean, anything with a four in it in my view is fantastic. never mind the winner, anything with a four. well done to her! you're watching brea kfast. they're home to the likes of african elephants, the critically endangered javan
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rhino and almost a third of the world's remaining tigers. but according to a report by the conservation charity wwf, poaching and illegal trading are threatening almost half of the planet's natural world heritage sites. we're joined now by chris gee from the charity. thank you so much forjoining us. give us an overview because this is really alarming, these are protected sites and they are still being targeted? absolutely, good morning to you and happy world heritage day, one of the reasons we did the report today. they are some of the world's most precious places and they've been given the highest status of protection so it's alarming to see almost half of all natural world heritage sites are threatened by the illegal wildlife trade. as you said, one of the —— some of the most precious species are under threat. does it mean those bodies, which we have talked about over the last
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months and years, are they failing in their attempts to not allow these things do happen? we've identified the current setup is not working. unesco needs to get their act together to improve the situation. unesco are focused on the sites and sities is focused on the trade and they have to join up to solve this. the livelihoods of people relies on this, up to 11 million people worldwide, either through tourism or fishing, so it's good for the wildlife and people if we get this sorted. let's talk about the illegal trade, they are in all sorts of different animals. which ones are vulnerable and why are they targeted for illegal trade? we see tigers, about a third of the remaining tigers in the world are in world heritage sites around the world, they are targeted for the illegal wildlife trade for traditional
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medicines in asia but it's notjust tigers, we have looked at trees as well that are in danger at and they are affected well that are in danger at and they a re affected by well that are in danger at and they are affected by this illegal trade. —— endangered. tackling the illegal trade is good for the places, which should be the most protected in the world, but clearly aren't, and also it's the same criminal networks who are smuggling people and drugs who are smuggling people and drugs who are involved in the wildlife trade. you've been to belize in central america, what did you see? belize is an amazing place to be. the belize barrier reef system is the second—largest in the world, home to some amazing species of fish, sharks and rays. they are threatened in belize. are some threats to belize, overfishing is a threat that there are. the government has taken some action but last year belize was threatened by oil exploration near
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to the barrier reef. what we found was when we raised the alarm and people in belize and around the world were aware of this issue, within two days of us taking this globally, the government of belize act away from oil explorer asian. one of the main threats to the area was removed. people taking action, we have an area on our website for this, it is making a difference. it's important people know what is going on and become involved. what about security? is it also about having the resources to put in security to stop this? clearly, resources a re security to stop this? clearly, resources are an issue. governments need to celebrate these places. they are crucial to the economy. protecting them should be a priority. it is over the last ten yea rs priority. it is over the last ten years that over 1000 rangers have
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died protecting these places. there isa died protecting these places. there is a real need to make sure that they are properly equipped to protect them and fishing patrols are making sure it legal fishing protect them and fishing patrols are making sure it legalfishing is not happening. part of the problem is this trade is worth £15 billion a year. that is one of the real issues if you are going to tackle it. you have to tackle that side as well. absolutely. here in the uk, the government is hosting the conference for this next year. this issue will be the top priority at the conference. it will be important to protect these amazing places in the creatures that live there and the people that rely on them. thank you very much for coming in to talk to us very much for coming in to talk to us this morning. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a senior north korean official has warned the bbc of an "all out war" if the united states decides to attack it. nearly half the planet's most precious natural areas are under threat from illegal poaching and logging, according to a leading conservation charity. here's carol with a look
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at this morning's weather. it really is quite cold. look at that! good morning. you are quite right. a chilly start. some parts of the uk have temperatures around freezing. some way below freezing. frosty. patchy mist. all of it will give way to sunny spells if you don't already have them. a weak weather front crossing the south—east. that will clear very smartly and take showers with it. cooler air behind that. despite the fa ct cooler air behind that. despite the fact it will be a sunny and pleasant day, it will not be especially warm for many of us. quite a keen breeze in east anglia and the south—east. the south—west. cloud will build. showers. one or two showers in east anglia and kent this afternoon. they are the exception, not the rule. southern england is generally enjoying sunshine with fairweather cloud. the same in the channel
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islands. it will be not wall—to—wall blue skies. some cloud around. wales, a similar story. a dry afternoon. sunny, 11 degrees. northern ireland. after a fine start, the cloud will build. sunshine will turn hazy. some showers. the same showery rain in the north and west of scotland. the rest of scotland, a sunny afternoon. northern england, also a sunny and pleasa nt northern england, also a sunny and pleasant afternoon. through this evening, what you will find is we have got that rain across the north—west. and it is going to advance a little further east. it will be not particularly heavy. it will be not particularly heavy. it will not just affect scotland, will be not particularly heavy. it will notjust affect scotland, but northern ireland. not as cold as under the clear skies in england and wales. these temperatures in towns and cities and rural areas will be cold enough for frost. and cities and rural areas will be cold enough forfrost. high pressure is in charge of the weather, especially in england and wales.
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after a cold start tomorrow, lots of sunshine. cloud in northern england, northern ireland and scotland. a few showers here and there. nonetheless, sunny spots developing as we go through the course of the day to be cloud building as we go through the day as well in parts of wales. temperatures are fairly similar to today. between around 11 and 13— 14 degrees. for thursday, while we still have a weather front producing some cloud as it goes southwards, it will be a weak affair. unlikely rain. sunny spells in england and wales. also northern ireland. at another weather front coming in from the north—west of scotland will introduce rain. here it will be breezy as well. temperatures on thursday, between about ten and 15 degrees. by the time we get to friday, the weather front will be continuing its descent southward, eventually moving out of scotland into northern england and ireland as well. behind that, breezy. this is
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cold. north—west. you will feel it as you are standing in it. in the south, here it is by the end of the afternoon. sunshine and temperatures up afternoon. sunshine and temperatures up to 17 degrees. 63 fahrenheit. back to you. thank you very much. i have heard a rumour you are looking at serial. is that true? it is. -- cereal. good morning. whatever you're tucking into for brekkie this morning, you'll definitely have heard of weetabix. made in the uk since the 1930s, it was bought up by a chinese firm a few years back. they wanted to sell cereal there but the chinese prefer rice. so now, the firm is set to be sold off again to an american business for a reported £1.4 billion. and official data shows we're working the longest number of hours a week in almost a decade, an average of 31 hours in work in the uk. londoners work the hardest, clocking in an extra 100 hours a year,
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followed by staff in northern ireland and west midlands. those in the south—west of england put in the least on average. and this week, we're expecting to get details of a scrappage scheme for old diesel car drivers. the reports said ministers may opt for a scheme that pays drivers up to £2,000 towards a new, cleaner car. however, it is likely to be restricted to certain drivers to minimise costs. it's all about a drive to reduce air pollution. we will have more details on that has information comes out. it is about trying to drive down that air pollution. there you go. that is what happens after we get back from the weekend. it feels like it is halfway through the week already but we have only just halfway through the week already but we have onlyjust started. right. thank you for watching us on brea kfast thank you for watching us on breakfast this morning. thank you.
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mental health trusts across the uk are becoming increasingly reliant on private psychiatric hospitals, as the nhs struggles to balance increased demand with over—stretched budgets. that's according to a bbc breakfast investigation. we've discovered that the number of inpatients being treated privately has risen by 80% in the last four years, at a cost of over £100 million. jayne mccubbin reports. you were in a really, really bad way, weren't you? yeah. to say the least. in his first year at university, carl had a breakdown. he was taken to his local hospital after fears he would take his own life. he ended up 150 miles from home in a private bed. there was a frantic search for beds across the country and they couldn't say where i would end up. you ended up in a private hospital?
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idid, yeah. a four—hour round trip. i had no visits. it was very isolated. it was the threat of recall he said made it far worse. being moved to an nhs hospital when a cheaper bed became available. you would meet people and then they would just be gone and the explanation would be that they got recalled last night. you could get pulled out at 1am. it can sort of inhibit recovery, i think. you are just very uncertain. you're just chasing beds? we are, yeah. this nurse told me she would be sacked she talked publicly. but she said so much is focused on the logistics of finding a bed rather than making people better. look, i became a nurse because i wanted to care for my patients and spend time with them. but if i am looking for a bed, i don't have time to spend with my patients. that upsets me. bbc news found out there has been an 80% increase in the number of nhs patients receiving care in a private inpatient bed in the last four years.
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that's up from just over 1800 patients in 2012 to over 3,300. and the cost of that to the nhs? that has increased 42% tojust over £100 million in the last five years. the figures show a system stretched. and here, they say there are two reasons. it's clear there aren't enough acute inpatient beds. clearly, it's not good for the nhs to spend more money. but as a clinician, my concern is about the patient. it is not good for their recovery. nhs england admit they are spending too much on private bed. they say it is close to £5 million every month. here in peterborough, the problem was no longer affordable. they did what nhs england wants to do more often. they put more emphasis on a short inpatient assessment period with more support for patients in their own homes.
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and 70% of our patients go through that system and come back out into the community supported by home treatment. and that is a huge achievement. that's why nhs england is investing £400 million on crisis care in the home this year. wales says nhs funding has increased to £600 million this year. scotland is investing over £300 million over the next five years. northern ireland say this isn't an issue for them as the proportion of privately treated patients is less than 0.1%. but it's clear it's causing some trusts in some patients clearly. but it's clear it's causing some trusts and some patients clearly. jane mccubbin, bbc news. we are continuing with that theme. the most high—profile person to speak openly about mental health. could prince harry's comments clear
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the stigma about mental health and help others go seek help for themselves? does no. you can find us on social media to tell us your thoughts. right now, the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are watching. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. two men are in a serious but stable condition in hospital this morning, and ten others have suffered burns, after a suspected acid attack at a nightclub in east london. police believe the men, in their 20s, were targeted in the mangle club in hackney in the early hours of yesterday morning. no—one's been arrested. londoners work 100 hours a year more than the rest of the uk on average, according to new data. figures from the office for national statistics show the average working week in london is 33 hours long, compared to 31 hours across the uk. long hours and stressful working conditions have been called a "toxic burden on londoners" by the green party. a police dog, stabbed in the head and chest while chasing a suspect
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in stevenage, has made his first trip to the beach. finn wasn't allowed to leave hertfordshire while serving with the police. he's now retired from the force. following his attack, campaigners called for better protection for police dogs and horses. it has been difficult for finn and i to get any closer. since october, you know, we've been through some massive ups and downs as well. we absolutely love the beach. i think there's going to be some pressure now, not only from him, but from his fans and the family, to move nearer the beach so he can come here every day. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, all lines are running a good service. on the roads in camden, the high street and eversholt street are closed near to mornington crescent tube station following a police incident. the m25 slow clockwise at the qeii bridge after a broken—down vehicle. islington: essex road is closed
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northbound at islington green for repairs to a burst water main there. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a bright but cold start to the day. temperatures down in low single figures. so, a chilly start. but the good news is we should see plenty of sunshine. now, there is a gentle, very light north—easterly breeze making things feel chilly. in the sunshine, not too bad. to the east, parts of essex, the fringes, you might get a shower. but they should disappear. maximum temperatures, between 13 and 14 degrees. overnight, tonight, once the sun sets, temperatures will fall away quickly. it will be another cold night in the clear skies. temperatures in one or two spots down close to freezing. the risk of maybe a little bit of frost. down to 3—6 degrees. bright tomorrow with some sunshine. a gentle north—easterly breeze still. temperatures getting up to what in degrees. not too bad in the sun. high pressure dominates for much of this week, including two thursday and friday. but it's not wall—to—wall sunshine. we will start to see a bit of cloud developing. a spot of rain as we go through friday. but it is a quiet week of weather.
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after the sunshine today, we should still see some sunshine through wednesday. more cloud on thursday and friday, and cooler into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. north korea has stepped up its hostile language towards the us, warning there will be all—out war if america uses military force against it. speaking to the bbc‘s john sudworth, north korea's vice foreign minister said the nation would be willing to use a pre—emptive nuclear strike, and that it had no intention of stopping its missile tests.
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translation: if the us is reckless enough to use military means it would mean from that very day an all—out war. our nuclear weapons protect us from that threat. we would be conducting more missile tests on a weekly, monthly and yearly basis. his comments come as us vice president mike pence arrives injapan as part of his visit to asia. he has landed in tokyo in the last few hours, where he's expected to reassure the country of america's commitment to reining in north korea's nuclear ambitions. the duke of cambridge says the british stiff upper lip should not come at the expense of people's health. prince william made the comments in an interview with the charity, calm, which is dedicated to preventing male suicide. it comes after his brother, prince harry said he sought counselling to come to terms with the death of their mother. we will be talking about that
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shortly on bbc breakfast. ministers are to set out new proposals to speed up appeals by foreign criminals and failed asylum seekers held in detention. a previous fast—track scheme was scrapped two years ago after the court of appeal ruled it unlawful. officials say that, if implemented, the system could speed up around 2,000 cases a year. labour has promised to increase the benefits given to carers by £10 a week if the party wins the next election. in a visit to birmingham later today, leaderjeremy corbyn is expected to say a 17% increase in the carer‘s allowance would help around one million people. the government says its recently committed an extra £2 billion to the social care system, and that labour wouldn't be able to fund the promise. donald trump has telephoned the turkish leader to congratulate him on sunday's referendum victory, which grants the president sweeping constitutional powers. the white house said mr trump thanked president erdogan for supporting the us missile strike on a syrian government airbase earlier this month. turkey has extended the state
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of emergency in the country for a further three months. facebook has launched a review of how it deals with violent content after a video apparently showing the killing of a pensioner in ohio remained on the network for more than two hours. police are still looking for steve stephens, who posted a video of the attack on 74—year—old robert godwin, who was picked apparently at random. officers say the suspect is armed and dangerous. residents in newcastle upon tyne are being asked to approve plans to hand over their local parks to a charitable trust. the city council says the idea is being proposed because its park budget has been cut by more than 90% over the last seven years. a similar scheme is already in place in milton keynes. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. that will be in around 15 minutes. now i look at the sport. if you like
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trips to the south coast and you're a premier league football fan, next season, bournemouth, southampton and brighton. a footballing powerhouse, amazing! fantastic for them having book their place in the premier league next season. not an easy run for them, they almost dropped out of the football league a number of yea rs the football league a number of years ago, without a stadium for a long time, but sensible investment, growing the club on the field and off it, they are reaping the rewards now and fantastic scenes for the players and fans. results when their way and that means they are going to be in the premier league. celebrations in brighton! yes, i bet some of them are yet to wake up! this is how they did it. they beat wigan 2—1, this their second goal. that was from glenn murray. and when that went in and results elsewhere later went their way. promotion was confirmed. cue a pitch invasion at the amex stadium where they play. the players will be testing themselves at old trafford next
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season. and it means three south coast clubs now in the premier league, alongside bourmouth and southampton. i am as excited as anybody. i have to have that little bit of sensibility as such because we've got another big game on friday, which, if we were able to win it on friday, would be the ultimate, which would be not only promotion but would see us winning the championship, and that's got to be the target now. arsenal boosted their fading hopes of reaching the top four in the premier league with a 2—1 win at middlesbrough. what a goal to get them on their way last night. they led before half time after alexis sanchez curled in a beautifulfree kick from the edge of the box. alvaro negredo equalised for struggling middlesbrough but they couldn't cling on for a point as meszut ozil poked home the winner. boro stay 19th, six points from safety. arsenal move up to sixth. it is mathematically still alive and
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we will be able to win our games. we have started with one and now we have started with one and now we have the break with the fa cup and then we will come back and focus on then we will come back and focus on the championship, yes. chelsea captainjohn terry will leave the club at the end of the season after more than two decades at stamford bridge. since making his debut in 1998 terry's won four premier league titles and the champions league. terry says he still has plenty to offer on the pitch. no talk of retirement though, at 36, he plans to play on. we've seen them pull off the remarkable. can leicester reach teh semi—finals of the champions league, by knocking out the spanish side ateltico madrid later? the players have been preparing as they look to overturn a 1—0 deficit from the first leg. the premier league champions are at home later, and remain the only british side
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left in the competition. we need to make sure offensivley we need to create more, we've got to get a goal back but by the same token we need to be mindful that we need to deny them space because they're a very, very good counter—attack team. so we're at home. we need to be more forceful than we were. as you say, but respectful of the opposition as well. manchester city women are on course to hold all three domestic titles after reaching the final of the women's fa cup for the first time. they beat liverpool 1—0 in the semi—finals. city will play birmingham, who beat chelsea on penalties. we will speak to a couple of their players later today as well. kyle edmund will face rafa nadal in the second round of the monte carlo masters. that's after he beat fellow brit dan evans. in the first meeting between the two on tour, british number three edmund won in straight sets. andy murray gets his tournament under way tomorrow. 2005 winner shaun murphy is through to the second round of the world snooker championship in sheffield.
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he had to come through a tough match against 17—year—old yan bingtao of china who almost pushed him all the way, the world number five eventually winning10—8. next up is ronnie o'sullivan, who earlier this week accused world snooker chairman barry hearn of bullying and intimidating him. murphy believes that isn't the case. ronnie can say whatever he wants about whatever he wants. but he can't get away with everything he says. he isn't right about everything he says either. and to claim that he's been bullied by the governing body is, in my opinion, quite inaccurate. it's all very tight in super league. just three points separate the top five teams after leaders castleford suffered only their second defeat of the season at st helens, while leeds have gone level with the tigers after victory over widnes. wigan warriors remain fourth but earned their second win of the easter weekend by beating wakefield trinity 16—10. liam marshall's late try confirming the victory for the reigning champions. we were talking about arsenal ‘s
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match with middlesbrough earlier. and for one young fan having made the long trip from london to middlesbrough to watch arsenal last night. i don't think he would have minded thejourney home having got his hands on alexis sanchez‘s shirt. the goalscorer picked him out after the match. the probably thought he would head home with the match day programme but instead he has got a shirt. lovely! see you later on. mental health campaigners have welcomed prince harry's decision to reveal he had counselling to help him come to terms with losing his mother, diana, princess of wales. the prince told the daily telegraph he'd spent nearly 20 years not thinking about her death. so is there still a stigma around speaking about our emotions? we'll explore this in just a moment, but first, let's hear some of what prince harry had to say. ican i can safely say that losing my mum
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at the age of 12 and therefore shutting down all of my emotions for the last 20 years has had a quite serious effect on not only my personal life but also my work as well. my way of dealing with it was refusing to ever think about my mum because why would that help, its only going to make you sad, it's not going to bring her back. all of a sudden all of this grief i never processed came to the forefront, there's actually a lot of this stuff i needed to deal with. there was 20 yea rs of not i needed to deal with. there was 20 years of not thinking about it and then two years of total chaos. we'rejoined now by beki cook, who first sought counselling when she was 15, and chartered clinical psychologist mia scotland. so many people are getting in touch to say how inspiring it is to hear someone to say how inspiring it is to hear someone like prince harry speak about going to seek help. beki, talk us about going to seek help. beki, talk us about your experiences, you were quite young when you sought help?|j was quite young when you sought help?”
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was 15 when i started going to counselling, i had been referred. my pa rents counselling, i had been referred. my parents broke up when i was 12 so a few years after that i got the teachers to recognise i might need help. it was pushed through the school, which was really good, we had a counsellor coming in once a week but she had that many pupils who were on her books, are used to see her outside of school hours as well because she had that many in school. it showed a lot of students needed help. how did that help you? it was good to go to someone impartial and someone who wasn't mean to me and couldn't say there was... there was nojudgement mean to me and couldn't say there was... there was no judgement and to be able to go to a room where i could say what i wanted and leave it in the room and carry on. and you can say what you want without hurting someone else, is that what you were thinking? i knew whatever i said wouldn't necessarily offend my counsellor or upset them, whereas talking to a family friend or
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someone talking to a family friend or someone at school or whatever, if i said something they could be really offended and that would never be my intention, to upset a friend. it would just be how i was feeling at the time. you can see the impact it had on beki and other people watching this this morning. when you see someone watching this this morning. when you see someone like prince harry, one of the most high—profile people to speak about this kind of issue, what was your reaction when you first heard he was talking about this? just delighted because lifting the stigma of mental health is so important and the problem is it is so important and the problem is it is so hidden, people don't share they are seeing a therapist or they are struggling, they worry about who to share it with. one of my most importantjobs share it with. one of my most important jobs as a psychologist is confidentiality because people are ashamed and there's no reason to be. for someone like harry to stand up, very successful, good—looking, a lovely chap, to say i struggle, that allows others to say, i think he's amazing, if i can see him say that
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thenl amazing, if i can see him say that then i can too and not to be judged and accepted is wonderful. prince william has talked about the stiff upper lip, is it uniquely british, we are all embarrassed to show we are emotional beings? there is something cultural about it absolutely. it is something very much that the americans are quicker to address, that it could be something better for you and to enjoy and get something out of rather than something you do when you are desperate, a last resort and don't tell anybody. the british are a bit like that with regards to mental health and showing feelings. and crying, so many people apologise in therapy, as beki said, just a small room, but people apologise when they cry. that's what we do as british people, apologise about everything. when you heard prince harry saying these things, how did it affect you as someone who had
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been through it, taken the step, found it difficult at times but been through it? it was wonderful for him to come out, the more high profile people that come out it makes ordinary people feel less alone and it's not that there's something wrong with us. we're all human beings at the end of the day, mental health can affect anyone, which prince harry has shown, regardless of background you can be affected by it, regardless of privilege or age. what points do you go back to and who with? ijust what points do you go back to and who with? i just completed what points do you go back to and who with? ijust completed and 08 week self—esteem counselling therapy group, iwent week self—esteem counselling therapy group, i went back to my gp. there was an online referral so you could do it if you didn't want to do that —— an eight week self—esteem counselling therapy group. i have done it a few times. that's another thing, if people want to reach out and get help, is it via your gp, is that the place to start? there is a
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lot of help out there, there's a lot of people to help, it's about finding them and it's also about resources. if you want to go through the nhs then definitely go to your gp because there are services set up in britain for psychological talking therapies. there's been a lot developing in the last few years with the government so every gp should be able to get you access to a counsellor or a cognitive behaviour therapist within the nhs. as louise said earlier, there have been so many comments this morning, sue says thank you prince harry, after the loss of my daughter, thank you. jackie, asking for help isn't even considered at first because you believe you can cope until the floor falls from underneath you. picking up falls from underneath you. picking up on those points, you were lucky that you... you got easy access, but what is your message to people watching you this morning, something you really need help with, what
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should they do? don't be afraid to speak out, if you're too scared to speak out, if you're too scared to speak to a gp, someone close to you. and there's really good online mental health resources, such as the lilyjoe mental mental health resources, such as the lily joe mental health mental health resources, such as the lilyjoe mental health initiative, never be scared because you're not alone, so many people suffer and the more that speak out the more people are going to be able to come out and say i have struggled. so many people echoing that, saying the day they realised they had to speak out, and when they do, a massive white off their shoulders, it's not perfect from that point on but it makes a massive difference —— a massive white. we are finally on time for carol. good morning. a chilly start. frost around. patchy mist, especially in wales and somerset. that will give
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way to sunny spells. currently, a weather front near northern ireland in scotland is producing cloud. this has cleared. in between, sunshine. it will feel chilly, especially if you are exposed to the breeze in the south—east or indeed parts of scotla nd south—east or indeed parts of scotland and northern ireland. the cloud continues to build through the day in northern ireland and scotland. eventually, rain. cloud and sunshine. depending on where you are, you could see some showers in east anglia and kent. most parts of england and the channel islands will be dry. the isles of scilly and the south—west of england, a lot of dry weather and sunshine around, as it will be across wales. temperatures getting up to 11 degrees. northern ireland. cloud continuing to build. hazy sunshine. the cloud will weaken enough for a few showers, showery rain in the north and west of
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scotla nd rain in the north and west of scotland largely dry. northern england, a lot of dry weather around. something different in manchester at 12. the evening and overnight. the rain moves further east getting into the northern isles and northern ireland. not particularly heavy. with all the cloud across scotland and also northern ireland, it won't be as cold a night as the one that has just gone. clearer skies in england and wales, especially in rural areas. cold enough forfrost. under the influence of high pressure, not much happening with the weather tomorrow. england and wales are seeing a lot of sunshine. scotland and northern ireland in the final of england, cloud at times. cloud will break at times and sunny spells coming through. always the risk of showers in the west. temperatures tomorrow not dissimilar to what we are expecting today. 11—12 in the north. highs as 14 in the south. in
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the sunshine out of the wind, quite pleasant. thursday, a weatherfront across scotland and northern ireland will be thinking south. a weak affair. this cloud will continue to break up. england and wales, writes hills or sunny spells. —— bright spells. cloud around. rain in the north—west of scotland. going into friday, thinking south, getting into northern england and also northern ireland. brightening up behind. ahead of that, bright spells and sunshine. 17 degrees as the top temperature. look at that. if you are exposed to the north—westerly wind, a cold direction, it will feel a little bit colder than the temperatures are suggesting. cool again. we will try to be on time again. we will try to be on time again next time. we will be put to the test again. what is the last
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thing you bought on the high street? vegetables. i thought you might go for some sort of clothing item. the reason i ask is because more and more people are taking the trip into town, but necessarily for the usual things. not necessarily for vegetables. there we go. good morning, everyone. we get regularfigures on how our high streets are doing, and this month's footfall data shows the fastest growth in three years. but that wasn't during normal opening hours, most of that increase comes after 5pm. so, we're popping in for a pint, rather than hitting the sales. we asked some shoppers out yesterday why. i think that people tend to go for major shopping outside into, you know, something like the trafford centre. they want a different experience. drinks and bars and food and restaurants. finding places to eat. especially if you just come
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from the cinema. it is good to find someone you want from the cinema. it is good to find someone you want to eat. depending on how you are feeling, you can stroll and pick one. on line shopping has kind of killed retail. the high streets have become more about socialising and food and drink. mixed thoughts. diane wehrle is from the firm that gathered these figures. this is about how habits are changing, is indeed? we are going out and doing more entertainment things. —— isn't it? out and doing more entertainment things. -- isn't it? we have more choice. we do need to go to high streets and shopping centres any more to buy stuff. we can do that at home. when we do go out, we want an experienced. that is part of the evolution of how we do our lives. they have been changing for some time. people have been writing saying there are more charity shops and less of the other stores that
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used to exist. there are always changes happening in retail. sometimes they are not actually that visible until you see a lot of it. charity shops have been on the high street for some time and have been pa rt street for some time and have been part of the retail environment. they are embracing changing needs and creating mixed use within their stores. bookshops were the first to do this, introducing coffee shops into bookstores. that was the first time we saw that mix of use in one retail outlet. that will continue. the change will continue. many people were worried with on line shopping that it would be the death of the high streets and all of those headlines that came from that. but people still want experiences. they wa nt to people still want experiences. they want to go as families and friends to shopping areas. we are social beings don't want to socialise. what we are seeing is that people are still going out but less people are
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going out doing the traditional retail fingering the traditional hours of 9—5 and are doing so at early evening when we have more opportunity to do so. when i was young there were limitations on restau ra nts young there were limitations on restaurants in the coffee shops available. there are so many available. there are so many available now. there are so many pressures on businesses now, business rates, people complaining about parking, you cannot get into town centres and high streets. could that be a problem? ultimately, there will be some fallout. tastes change and they do so quickly in hospitality. we dimanche new staff and new experiences. that will shift. -- and new experiences. that will shift. —— demand new stuff. operators will need to adapt and capitalise on changing tastes or they will become obsolete overtime. the arrears the changing nature of competition in retail environments. that has always happened. as
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consumers, we all want to get the best there is to offer. thank you very much. that drink has made me thirsty the whole way through this. we need something different than cocktails for breakfast. may be a smoothie. a mohito? it is a little early. illegal fishing in scottish waters is now being co—ordinated by rogue fishermen using social media to avoid patrol boats. our scotland correspondent, james shaw, has been finding out what's being done to catch the culprits. he joins us now from troon, on the firth of clyde. it looks rather lovely and calm the head this morning, actually. good morning to you. that is right. you can see there are many fishing boats. it is a lively fishing port, troon, on the west coast of scotland. you can see that those fishing boats behind me are fishing legally or prawns. but there are rogue fishermen going for high value
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catches like razor clams. and that is the source of the conflict with the enforcement agency, marine scotland. the seas around the scottish coastline are patrolled by a small fleet of ships whose job is to safeguard the marine environment. it is a blustery day on the firth of clyde. the seas are looking grey and choppy. this is a marine protection vessel. this is the nerve centre of the ship. we are on the lookout at all times for illegal fishing activity. at about 10:30 at night i spotted some lights on the bay. it is a known illegal fishing area. someone is working at night—time. in that depth of water, it is unlikely he was just casually fishing. during daylight hours, the crew often use their high—speed inflatable to intercept fishing boats. the speed of interception is often
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critical to catch illegal activity. this boat is fishing. you are complying with all of the things they are interested in and have all of the right licences, all of that kind of thing. there are some people who are not like that. i'm not really interested in what other people are doing, whether it is legal or illegal. the real problem is the illegal fishing technique which uses live electricity cables to stun and capture razor clams. we have known activity that is illegal where they are fishing for these razor clams. on board they have this equipment. probes and cables and everything that comes with it. we recover them from our patrols. thejob is made harder because the fishermen use social
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media to share where it is. just another challenge for the crew. one now, there is going to be a trial of electrofishing for razor clams. if that is successful it could resolve the difficulty between enforcement and rogue fishermen. thank you. thank you for your m essa g es thank you. thank you for your messages this morning for everything, including bins. our bin collection is usually on monday. we cannot solve everything for you. you will just have cannot solve everything for you. you willjust have to figure it out. we can try. the whole country? ! good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm victoria hollins. two men are in a serious but stable condition in hospital this morning, and ten others have suffered burns, after a suspected acid attack at a nightclub in east london. police believe the men, in their 20s, were targeted in the mangle club in hackney in the early hours of yesterday morning. no—one's been arrested. londoners work 100 hours a year more than the rest of the uk on average, according to new data. figures from the office for national statistics show the average working week in london is 33 hours long, compared to 31 hours across the uk. long hours and stressful working conditions have been called a "toxic burden on londoners" by the green party. a police dog, stabbed in the head and chest while chasing a suspect
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in stevenage, has made his first trip to the beach. finn wasn't allowed to leave hertfordshire while serving with the police. people are not cleaning up after their pets. they need to put it in their pets. they need to put it in the right been. i have noticed there isa the right been. i have noticed there is a lack of pins. i have often been in the position where i have to leave it. children are encouraged to put their litter in the bin. i have just put one in and i don't think it is hygienic. travel news. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the roads in camden, the high street and eversholt street are closed near to mornington crescent tube station following a police incident. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a bright but cold start to the day. temperatures down in low single figures. so, a chilly start. but the good news is we should see plenty of sunshine. now, there is a gentle, very light north—easterly breeze making
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things feel chilly. in the sunshine, not too bad. to the east, parts of essex, the fringes, you might get a shower. but they should disappear. maximum temperatures, between 13 and 14 degrees. overnight, tonight, once the sun sets, temperatures will fall away quickly. it will be another cold night in the clear skies. temperatures in one or two spots down close to freezing. the risk of maybe a little bit of frost. down to 3—6 degrees. bright tomorrow with some sunshine. a gentle north—easterly breeze still. temperatures getting up to what in degrees. not too bad in the sun. high pressure dominates for much of this week, including two thursday and friday. but it's not wall—to—wall sunshine. we will start to see a bit of cloud developing. a spot of rain as we go through friday. but it is a quiet week of weather. after the sunshine today, we should still see some sunshine through wednesday. more cloud on thursday and friday, and cooler into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. north korea warns of "all out war" takes military action. after days of increasing tension, north korea warns of "all out war" if the united states takes military action. after days of increasing tension, the us vice—president, mike pence, tells north korea not to test america's resolve. a report claims nearly half of the planet's natural world heritage sites are being threatened by the illegal trade in wildlife.
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how a growing number of nhs mental health trusts across the uk are turning to private hospitals for help. we have a special report. after prince harry opens up about having counselling, his brother says the british stiff upper lip shouldn't stop anyone seeking help. we'll discuss that with a clinical psychologist. it has been confirmed that weetabix will be bought by the american firm shredded wheat. after 34 years out of english football's top—flight, what a night for brighton & hove albion as their fans celebrate promotion to the premier league. after a gripping series and an all—star cast — we'll ask if the last ever episode of broadchurch
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lived up to expectations. no spoilers, we will not reveal what has happened in that final episode. carroll has the weather. chilly start of the day for some of us and a frosty one, with some mist, all of that will clear, we will be looking ata that will clear, we will be looking at a lot of sunshine, the exception will be parts of scotland and northern ireland, and later, a little spot or two of rain. we will have more details in 15 minutes. -- carol. good morning. first, our main story. north korea has stepped up its hostile language towards the us, warning there will be "all out war" if america uses military force against it. it comes after days of growing tensions between pyongyang and washington. on saturday the nation staged a huge military parade involving tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians. ballistic missiles designed to be launched from submarines were apparently on display for the first time. just a day later an attempt by north korea to launch a test missile failed, american officials say a land—based missile,
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which was in violation of un resolutions, exploded within seconds of take off. then yesterday, as us vice—president mike pence arrived in the south korean capital for talks on the north's nuclear ambitions, a senior north korean official spoke to the bbc'sjohn sudworth. if you could send one message to donald trump today, what would it be? treble i would tell him that if the united states in crutches on our sovereignty, then it will provoke an immediate counter reaction. if the usa is planning a military attack against us, we will react with a nuclear pre—emptive strike by our own style and method. this morning us vice president mike pence landed in tokyo on the next step of his tour of asia. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes sent this report. certainly the rhetoric from both sides has been ramped up quite a lot in the last few days, as you said in
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the introduction, there is brinkmanship going on from both sides, we have seen first president trump and now vice president pence saying to the north koreans, don't push us, don't test us, we are prepared to use military action if necessary and then we have seen in this interview with john yesterday from the vice foreign minister in pyongyang armour them saying, look, if you infringe upon our territory, we will retaliate with nuclear weapons. actually what is going on here is diplomacy by other means the american government is not prepared to continue with the status quo, and making a realistic threat of military force if you like, the purpose of that is to get china to tighten its sanctions against the north korean regime. there are some
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signs that that might be starting to ta ke signs that that might be starting to take effect, china has now said it might impose oil sanctions against north korea, it is never done that before. perhaps this alarmist language is having some effect. the duke of cambridge says the british "stiff upper lip" should not come at the expense of people's health. prince william made the comments in an interview with the charity, calm, which is dedicated to preventing male suicide. it comes after his brother, prince harry said he sought counselling to come to terms with the death of their mother. and, as part of their campaign, the princes have enlisted the help of lady gaga. in a clip released on kensington palace's facebook page, the duke of cambridge is seen chatting to the pop star about the importance of being open about your mental health. i wanted to ask you about speaking out and how it made you feel.
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i wanted to ask you about speaking out and how it made you feelm made me nervous at first. if you are so made me nervous at first. if you are so full of anxiety that you can barely think. it was like saying, this is a part of me and that is ok. that is quite a conversation. we will see more of that in a moment. thank you for all of your comments coming in on the issue of mental health, we will read a few more out later on. ministers are to set out new proposals to speed up appeals by foreign criminals and failed asylum seekers held in detention. labour has promised to increase the benefits given to those who care
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for the vulnerable by £10 a week if they win the next election. during a visit to birmingham later today, leaderjeremy corbyn is expected to say a 17 per cent increase in the carer‘s allowance would help around 1 million people who he calls "unsung, unpaid heroes". our political correspondent, ben wright, joins us now. telus about these proposals and how do they imagine they will pay for them? 800,000 people are eligible to claim carers allowance. that is a very small proportion of the 6.5 million people who are caring full—time for the elderly, for people who are disabled, for people who are seriously ill, many of those are pensioners, they do not qualify for disability allowance that carers allowa nce for disability allowance that carers allowance by jeremy corbyn for disability allowance that carers allowance byjeremy corbyn says people receiving the benefit are unpaid unsung heroes and they should get more money, at the moment the allowa nce get more money, at the moment the allowance is £62 a week, jeremy corbyn says labour will up that by £10 to corbyn says labour will up that by £10tojust corbyn says labour will up that by £10 tojust over corbyn says labour will up that by £10 to just over £72 a week in the first year of a labour government and they say they will pay for that
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i reversing the current government planned cut to inheritance tax that is coming in in april. that will mean couples can hand on properties worth up to £1 million. take from the rich, give to people who are far more von rebel, that is the labour policy. we have talked a lot about social care, there is a long—term structural problem. the conservatives have increased carers allowa nce conservatives have increased carers allowance by £450 a year since 2010 and fundamentally, labour sums do not add up, they say. donald trump has telephoned the turkish leader to congratulate him on sunday's referendum victory, which grants the president sweeping constitutional powers. the white house said mr trump thanked president erdogan for supporting the us missile strike on a syrian government airbase earlier this month. turkey has extended the state of emergency in the country for a further three months. facebook has launched a review of how it deals with violent content
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after a video apparently showing the killing of a pensioner in ohio remained on the network for more than two hours. police are still looking for steve stephens, who posted a video of the attack on 74—year—old robert godwin, who was picked apparently at random. officers say the suspect is armed and dangerous. campaigners are warning that nearly half of the planet's natural world heritage sites are under threat from the illegal trade in wildlife. a report by the conservation charity wwf says poaching of elephants and illegal logging and fishing is putting the lives of critically endangered species at risk. our southern africa correspondent karen allen reports. stunning views you'll never forget. tanzania, one of hundreds of precious sites dotted around the globe designated by unesco as a place where endangered wildlife should be able to roam free. but nearly half of these locations are threatened by criminals, according to the conservation charity wwf. rangers are being deployed to try to outwit the thieves, but the prizes are huge. criminal gangs are earning billions from peddling this illicit trade. elephants are among the most
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at risk from poachers. 40% of all african elephants live in world heritage sites like these, yet nearly half of these places are threatened with wildlife crime. and for other prey, for whom sanctuaries like this are meant to be a refuge, they too are at risk. notjust from the men with guns, but loggers who are stripping their habitats bare. and in the world's oceans, like this protected site off the coast of belize, creatures are vulnerable too. in nearly half of unesco's heritage marine sites, the threat to wildlife lurks deep. campaigners say that without international action now, these precious places could become a thing of the past as the criminals karen allen, bbc news, southern africa.
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the first woman ever to complete the boston marathon has run the race again — 50 years after she first crossed the finish line. kathrine switzer entered the race in 1967 when only men were allowed to compete. yesterday, shejoined over 27,000 people to complete it in 4 hours, 44 minutes, just 24 minutes more than she took half a century ago. mental health trusts across the uk are becoming increasingly reliant on private psychiatric hospitals, as the nhs struggles to balance increased demand with overstretched budgets. that's according to a bbc breakfast investigation. we've discovered that the number of inpatients being treated privately has risen by 80 per cent in the last four years, at a cost of over 100 million pounds. jayne mccubbin reports.
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you were in a really, really bad way, weren't you? yeah. to say the least. in his first year at university, carl had a breakdown. he was taken to his local hospital after fears he would take his own life. he ended up 150 miles from home in a private bed. there was a frantic search for beds across the country and they couldn't say where i would end up. you ended up in a private hospital? idid, yeah. a four—hour round trip. i had no visits. it was very isolated. it was the threat of recall he said made it far worse, being moved to an nhs hospital when a cheaper bed became available. you would meet people and then they would just be gone
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and the explanation would be that they got recalled last night. you could get pulled out at 1am. it can sort of inhibit recovery, i think. you are just very uncertain. you're just chasing beds? we are, yeah. this nurse told me she would be sacked if she talked publicly. but she said so much is focused on the logistics of finding a bed rather than making people better. look, i became a nurse because i wanted to care for my patients and spend time with them. but if i am looking for a bed, i don't have time to spend with my patients. that upsets me. bbc news found out there has been an 80% increase in the number of nhs patients receiving care in a private inpatient bed in bbc news found out there has been an 80% increase in the number of nhs patients receiving care in a private inpatient bed in the last four years. that's up from just over 1,800 patients in 2012 to over 3,300.
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and the cost of that to the nhs? that has increased 42% to just over £100 million in the last five years. the figures show a system stretched. and here, they say there are two reasons. it's clear there aren't enough acute inpatient beds. clearly, it's not good for the nhs to spend more money. and 70% of our patients go through that system and come back out into the community supported by home treatment. and that is a huge achievement. that's why nhs england is investing £400 million on crisis care in the home this year. wales says nhs funding has increased to £600 million this year. scotland is investing over £300 million over the next five years. northern ireland say this isn't an issue for them as the proportion of privately treated patients is less than 0.1%. but it's clear it's causing some trusts and some patients clearly. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. and the problems because of recall?
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so many of these patients in private beds are so far from home. that is the problem. he is doing great and back at university but the trust he is looked after did have some of the worst figures we were given. almost a 500% increase in the number of patients in private beds and the cost had gone up from 1.5 million to over £11 million. they said they have put it right now and have no patients in private beds. that is an issue and funding bid talk about. you have had messages from people watching this morning. rosemary said she could not get her son in patient ca re she could not get her son in patient care and feared because of the
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shortage of beds. she said he rang a crisis line three years ago and though one called him back and he took his life that day and says mental health provision is in crisis and many families living with devastating consequences. stephen lives in high wycombe and his daughter has an eating disorder and the only bed was in glasgow and he agrees the threat of being recalled, the threat he says of having the rock taken from under her and being placed in an nhs unit has got in the way of recovery. we would love to hear more. carol, you have shown is the picture but it tells as it is cold. a frosty start with temperatures in parts of scotland below freezing. the frost means clear skies and
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sunshine. we have a weather front across parts of northern ireland. moving into scotland. high pressure is generally in charge of the weather is a lot of sunshine to start the day and we have a keen north—easterly breeze in the south—east which will accentuate the cold feeling. and western scotland bringing in rain in the west but the rest of scotland fine and dry. northern england, a lot of sunshine. in the midlands, to east anglia, a lot of dry weather. east anglia and kent, you may see the odd shower but they will be the exception rather than the rule. southern counties and england, including the channel islands, a lot of dry weather. in wales, dry weather around and temperatures up to 12 degrees with sunny spells but in northern ireland
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we see a change with hazy sunshine, and we will see showers in the afternoon. in the evening and overnight, rain advancing further east, getting into the northern isles. breezy, as well and rein in northern ireland, but as a result of cloud, it will not be as cold overnight in scotland and northern ireland. but here under clear skies in england it will be colder and we are looking at frost in the countryside. when it clears, many seeing sunshine. the clout in the north will break and we will see sunshine at times but still showers in the north of northern ireland and also western scotland. temperatures tomorrow are similar to today. thursday, the weather front in scotla nd
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thursday, the weather front in scotland and northern ireland moves further south. it is not producing much more than a band of cloud. bright rather than blue skies across england and wales but behind that brighter skies with showers in northern ireland, north wales and northern england. a weatherfront then coming in from the north—west introducing rain. on friday that will sink southwards. as you can see getting weaker all the time. a cold north—westerly wind behind it and ahead of its sunshine. if you are looking for substantial rain in the forecast, perhaps if you are a farmer, at the moment it looks like potentially we will not see any until the end of april. a lot of dry weather for much of the uk on the cards. if you are tucking into cereal this
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morning, you have information. good morning. weetabix has been made in the uk since the 30s and was bought a few yea rs since the 30s and was bought a few years ago by a chinese firm. they wa nted years ago by a chinese firm. they wanted to sell it there but it did not go down well and now it has been bought by an american firm, the same company that makes shredded wheat. the boss of tsb has told me this morning he wants to see a shake—up of the personal loans market. paul pester said a whole range of underhand tactics mean that consumers were frequently overpaying when it came to borrowing money due to the number of credit checks. the chief exec says that two—thirds of loans providers will leave a mark on your credit record even if you only ask for a quote that could mean paying more when you
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get the deal. do you think you work long hours? official data shows we are working longer now than we have done for over a decade. londoners put in the most hours — clocking in an extra 100 hours a year — followed by staff in northern ireland and west midlands. those in the south west of england put in the least, on average. since i mentioned this people in the south—west are kicking off. stuart in devon said maybe they are more efficient. a point well made, to be fair. and it has started a conversation about how many of that cereal people eat. somebody here once had eight weetabix. in one sitting? i had a long glass dish that i used for bumper cereal days. it was an award—winning meal. you are definitely special.
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i tell you the secret things. secrets alert! we are about to do one of those. it needs to be more obvious. it's kept viewers gripped. steph has not seen the last episode. and last night up to 12 million viewers tuned in to watch the final episode of broadchurch. now, we should say, we're not going to reveal the culprit — but if you don't want to hear anything about last night's programme, leave it now. in a moment, we'll chat to tv critic morgan jeffery from digital spy about the return of week—by—week tv thrillers. but first, let's take a non—spoilery peek at the final episode. don't make me do this. make you ? you have a moral duty and legal duty to tell us the truth. a woman was raped that night. you have no choice.
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it will be worse for you if you keep quiet. i only gave them a lift home. gave who a lift home? we said we would give nothing away. morgan jeffery from digital spy joins us on the sofa now. tv habits, we have been speaking a lot about binge watching on services like netflix have changed the way we watch television put something like broadchurch, and line of duty, people must watch television that comes once a week and you feel you have to be there as a tv event. comes once a week and you feel you have to be there as a tv eventm is the way we watch television that is the way we watch television that is changing with catch up and binge
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watching and boxed sets. overnight ratings arguably are less important but having said that there are exceptions, line of duty being one and broadchurch. they are still appointment to watch television. when you have tv thrillers, people really have to watch live, because if they do not, they are at risk of being left behind. also you might be enjoying whatever it is and you do not watch it and your social media is filled with spoilers. previously you might go to work the next day and said don't tell me, i don't want to know. now you have twitter and facebook and social media ablaze with spoilers. twitter and facebook and social media ablaze with spoilersm twitter and facebook and social media ablaze with spoilers. it is harder to avoid. we will see another part of last night's broadchurch, have a look. are you 0k?
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no. he is not what men are. he is an aberration. i hope so. imean, aberration. i hope so. i mean, people are really upset because that is the last one. yes. it isa because that is the last one. yes. it is a sad thing in some ways. can they not go on for ever these things? it is interesting, you could not have another traumatic event happen in this small town, it would stretch credibility. having said that, the case of who attacked the person was wrapped up in last night's episode,
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to me it felt like the stories of the characters played by david tennant and the characters played by david tenna nt and olivia the characters played by david tennant and olivia colman were left open. they will not be another series in two years but they might revisit it in ten years. does it work well with crime drama? we watch so work well with crime drama? we watch so much and think we are an expert and can work out who is responsible. we have theories. we are amateur detectives. i think that is the upside of having twitter and social media. spoilers are everywhere but previously you could talk about it in work, who did it? now we can share theories with the entire world. inky very much. you think you know who is responsible in line of duty. i only told you! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. plenty of sunshine, cold and frosty
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start the morning thanks to the clear skies and this area of pressure has brought in, week weather front, moving pressure has brought in, week weatherfront, moving into the north—west of the uk, bringing thicker cloud, and eventually reign, for the vast majority, dry weather picture, plenty of sunshine. the early—morning patchy cloud we had across wales and south—west england will be clearing out of the way, also quite breezy across east anglia and the southern counties, that breeze will feel fresh. if you isolated showers just moving near to the coast, of east anglia and kent, pretty unlucky to catch one. it'll turn quite damp for the western isles, highlands of scotland late in the day as the wind begins to pick up, and the mid—atlantic front begins to push in. overnight, front wea ke ns begins to push in. overnight, front weakens further, to a strip of cloud working across scotland and northern
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ireland, for the most part that should keep the frost at bay. further south, it will be a really cold night, temperatures down in cold est cold night, temperatures down in coldest spots cold night, temperatures down in cold est spots to cold night, temperatures down in coldest spots to —5, potentially damaging gardeners may want to take note and take some measures against the frost, adding up some of your pla nts the frost, adding up some of your plants will be a good idea. tomorrow, apart from the cold start, sunshine for england and wales, northern england and wales, and into the afternoon, as the weather front moves in. behind that, probably a few showers for western areas of scotland, mainly dry day, tempted between 12 and 14 degrees, on thursday the generally dry theme continues, loud round for some, a few more showers for western scotland, otherwise, dry, high is between 12 and 15 degrees. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. can the us do a deal with japan?
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after president trump dumped a key trade deal with asia — the vice president begins a visit to the country to drum up trade — and rebuild bridges. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 18th april. the americans have also accused japan of currency manipulation. so what are the odds of the two sides achieving a trade deal?
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