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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 20, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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pack. this country has got us into debt in all the other labour government in history. allard top priorities are absolutely the other way round. applause —— ourtop way round. applause —— our top priorities. way round. applause -- our top priorities. as the very question about the elites, i am very proud to represent islington north in parliament. cheering is true that our people in islington hubei and drink cappuccino every day. but it's also true that it is true that there are people sleeping on the streets of rob burrow, as there are all over this country. so don't run away with this
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idea that everyone living in london is living the life of riley. has prizes are driving people out? i wa nt prizes are driving people out? i want a government that deals with employment issues for the whole country. in former mining communities that have high levels of unemployment, deprivation, iwant communities that have high levels of unemployment, deprivation, i want a labour government and a national investment bank and invest in those communities and bring hope and opportunity is for those people just as much as i want to conquer homelessness on the streets of london, birmingham or manchester, it is the country we are talking about. you very helpfully mentioned the
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opinion polls, i am really pleased about that, it was very kind of you. all i can say is in 2015, almost exactly two years ago, i was given 200-1 exactly two years ago, i was given 200—1 as an outside chance. exactly two years ago, i was given 200-1 as an outside chance. cheering applause i think that is what my young people in brentwood call a ten one! isn't it great that we have a politician who actually answers questions? cheering can you imagine just how effective prime minister's questions would be if germany was there answering the questions? i will take a funeral.
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them pull i will take a few more questions. mr corbyn, talked about the system today, in your opinion how will you precisely change the system and wales that part of the rigged system in your opinion? this lady with a brown hair. sky news, we are about to go to the polls nationally for the third time in three years. we
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are hearing reports today that some in your party want you to call for a second referendum on the jewellery straight with the eu after we leave. is that right, are you considering it ought to be want to rule it out? thank you ray much. and that lady there with the flowery top —— thank you very much. thank you, compliment my fashion, let's see about the question. from bbc weatherman, you we re question. from bbc weatherman, you were described early as the next prime minister of the united kingdom. judging by those opinion polls, a lot of people have questions to ask you about that. you have outlined a number of policies. do you ever wonder that the policies themselves may be popular but labour underjuhasz themselves may be popular but labour under juhasz become a themselves may be popular but labour underjuhasz become a tainted brand? 0h, underjuhasz become a tainted brand? oh, you have such a lovely top on, as well? back over to you, jeremy. thanks, dawn. paul, the way that the syste m thanks, dawn. paul, the way that the system is rigged go something like
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this. multinational corporations play around with pricing systems in order to earn money in one country and pay lower tax in another. they play around with taxation systems and putting them in tax havens which are then not bothered to be chased down. we have a government far too ready to negotiate with very big companies about the levels of tax they should pay. i am sure you pay all your taxes, i know you do, because you are that kind of chap, but you don't call at the hmrc and sailor, that is cut a deal, using a 10,000,! sailor, that is cut a deal, using a 10,000, i will give you a 7500? is that all right? it doesn't work like that all right? it doesn't work like that for ordinary people and it shouldn't work at the top either. john mcdonnell who was here in the ordinance announced a couple of days ago that we would want the full tax returns of all medium and large corporations to be published so everyone can see what is going on. applause and i think that will help to open
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up and i think that will help to open up that system and we will then have a much fairer system, because they do think about it low paid and unpaid tax are very big corporations balls on who? it falls on small businesses that cannot evade it, you have to do they did. —— it falls on who? it falls on anybody else or it falls on public sector workers who lose theirjobs because there is not enough money. it is short—changing out enough money. it is short—changing our schools, and housing budget if big business does not pay the tax they should, john mcdonough will chase it down. applause there are elections coming up in june the 8th, there's also the mail elections and county council elections and county council elections coming up on may the 4th.
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we area elections coming up on may the 4th. we are a large party, we are campaigning all over the country in every pa rt campaigning all over the country in every part and we are putting forward policies of what will be a more socially just, forward policies of what will be a more sociallyjust, more cohesive society in this country. the european union negotiations are going on and we have set out our lines are negotiations primarily it is about gaining and retaining tariff free access to the european market. we have not threaten to turn britain into an offshore tax haven on the shores of europe to undermine every european economy, instead we have said we want to work with them to have an agreed process by which we continue to trade with europe, because walking away and trading under well trade organisation conditions will mean that manufacturing industry in this country will be severely damaged. every manufacturing enterprise in this country relies on imported material from europe or sales to
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europe and in some cases, income potato production the part crossed the channel several times as they are fabricated. it is an integrated and come potato production process. the idea that you can simply approach these negotiations by threatening to set up a tax haven and held... is simply not a sensible way of negotiating. so, i have reached out to socialist colleagues across europe ever since i became the leader of the party and i have invited them all to come to london in february for a discussion about oui’ in february for a discussion about our approach and what relationships we our approach and what relationships we wa nt our approach and what relationships we want with them in the dj. those lines of negotiation will be the ones that week at a labour country... we want to work with europe, we expect, except the result of the referendum but there still has to be an economic relationship with europe and we will not pair of the workers right agenda, or any
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human rights agenda. applause the idea that labour is somehow all that, as you kindly described it, tainted brand, well there are people in the audience who were wearing badges of kier hardy, who was vilified, people at how working man could go to parliament and represent people, anyone that stands up to create better, fairer more decent society gets vilified, our party gets vilified but we are bigger than we gets vilified but we are bigger than we have ever been, stronger there we have ever been and we are more determined than were going to be! applause
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i think we have to leave it there. applause so, now out of time, i am so sorry. isn't it great to end on a standing ovation! there is one undisputed fa ct, ovation! there is one undisputed fact, june always marks the end of may. thank you very much! applause so rather a brilliant enter that
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jeremy corbyn speech and question and answer session, that speech is his first major speech of this election campaign. and listening to it, as ever, our assistant political editor, norman smith. norman, jeremy corbyn seemed to set up at them and others narrative with that speech, didn't he? he is speaking about a cosy cartel of the elite. —— a them and us narrative. he wants to pitch this election as the people versus the establishment, the establishment of big corporation, the city, the media, the wealthy tax dodgers, the people represented, by the labour party he wants to present himself as the man standing up for the little quy: the man standing up for the little guy, taking on the big vested interest and it went down hugely well amongst the labour supporters in the hall, the big question is
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will it get any traction amongst the wider electorate, was this a config blanket speech which will please, delight, infused the party faithful buddhist does it go out be on tear, does it reach out to middle middle britain,. —— but does it reach out. at one pointjeremy corbyn cited keir hardy and how he had been vilified, but outside appear how many people even know who is? this is how mr corbyn wants to fight the election, not just to is how mr corbyn wants to fight the election, notjust to see the underdog, but as the outsider, the antiestablishment candidate taking on what he called the morally bankrupt conservative party will stop ina bankrupt conservative party will stop in a way it was authentic jeremy corbyn, the true voice of jeremy corbyn, the true voice of jeremy corbyn, the true voice of jeremy corbyn, it is how he campaigned join his leadership campaigned join his leadership campaign and how he defeated much more conventional candidates. the hope of team corbyn is that sort of
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radical uncompromising, unspun message will appeal to voters, many of whom may be fed up with politics as usual and they point to donald trump's success, they pointed to the election in france and to brexit as evidence of that mood of unhappiness and uncertainty and that sense that things have got to change and the big risk though is that if he has called this long, that is a message that will only shore up the party faithful, it will not reach out to the border of electorate. watching you earlier, you were saying watch out for the b word, mentioned brexit, ithink saying watch out for the b word, mentioned brexit, i think there was only a tiny mention to it. yes, in response to a question. it exposes i suppose, what is the core weakness in the corbyn campaign, that they still do not have a clear, simple,
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easily understood stance on brexit. if that continues throughout the election, they are going to get pummelled on the issue, because the data is they simply lose the main supporters to the liberal democrats and they risk losing batted —— brexit supporters to the conservative party. he wants to avoid brexit and only responded when he was asked a question about it. he didn't give us any further clues as to whether labour will offer a more simpler line on brexit. he wa nts to more simpler line on brexit. he wants to recreate the narrative of labour, jeremy corbyn, standing up for ordinary people against an over mighty city, and over powerful media, big corporations that he said lea ks of people, media, big corporations that he said leaks of people, on zero hours contracts. it is a big gamble in the
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sense that it is an uncompromising, radical, left—wing message. it is true, vintage, jeremy corbyn. the big question is, will that reach out beyond his committed supporters? norman, for the moment, thank you. norman, for the moment, thank you. norman smith in westminster for us. a reminder that at 11:30pm we will a nswer a reminder that at 11:30pm we will answer your election questions. questions with professor of politichohn curtice and bbc newsbeat‘s political correspondent eleanor roper. you can get in touch using the hashtag #bbcaskthis. looking forward to answering as many of your questions as possible. theresa may has been holding talks with the president of the european parliament in downing street this morning. the prime minister greeted antonio tajani with a handshake on the doorstep of number ten. the pair have much to talk about — earlier this month, the european parliament agreed a ha rd—line negotiating position over brexit — including demands for the uk to meets its financial
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obligations to the eu. the former ukip leader nigel farage has hinted he would stand in the general election, saying he will decide in the next few days. he told the bbc radio 4's today programme he believes he would win if he did stand, despite seven previous unsuccessful bids. haven't decided yet. i have to weigh it up. i am leading a group in the eu parliament where there will be a veto on the rector deal and whether negotiations will take place. i have ato negotiations will take place. i have a to way up, where are my best interest on brexit, and warning the british public where it's going, i'm i better off staying in strasbourg or staying in westminster? for ukip, it's perfectly clear what you're better off doing, that are staying or returning to this country, and standing ina or returning to this country, and standing in a by—election, a general
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election, which you yourself have said you would win. i think i would. i would not have in that constituency. like last time? perhaps in last time it wasn't in fair circumstances, but the crown prosecution can decide that. i also feel the fear factor, the snp fear factor, at a big threat, could dent in the ukip vote. you can see theresa may trying to play the same game about a progressive alliance. but that will with over the course of the next few weeks, i will make my mind up over the next few days. the culture secretary karen bradley has strongly defended the conservatives' commitment to foreign aid spending. her comments come as the microsoft founder bill gates urged the uk to retain its pledge to spend 0.7% of gdp on international aid, saying it was proof of its goodwill and humanity. there has been speculation the pledge could be dropped in the tory manifesto, but ms bradley said she was proud of the government's record.
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the manifesto will be published in due course and we can debate what is the manifest at the point. i'm not to speculate on what may or may not be in the manifesto. i voted for the act of parliament that put them up at 7% in parliamentary legislation, and am very proud of the record of this government in delivering for those most in need across the world, and britain will always be a leading force in that. the headlines on bbc news. jeremy corbyn uses his first major speech of the election campaign to insist the result of the poll isn't a "foregone conclusion". and says he will put the interests of the majority first. theresa may holds talks with the president of the european parliament over brexit. scientists say they are excited about the discovery of drugs which may be able to sop a range of degenerative brain diseases. in sport, left out of the lions
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squad but captaining his country, dyla n squad but captaining his country, dylan hartley will captain england against argentina. andy murray's serve against argentina. andy murray's serve still isn't firing after injury but he still took the first round match against ramos—vinolas. after confirming she is pregnant, serena williams says she is pregnant but could return in tampa next yea r‘s but could return in tampa next year's french but could return in tampa next yea r‘s french open. but could return in tampa next year's french open. more after 1130. scientists have discovered drugs which may be able to stop alzheimer's, parkinson's and a wide range of degenerative brain diseases. one of them is already safely given to people with depression. clinical trials are planned as the drugs have already been shown to stop brain cells dying in mice. the research has been described as potentially a major step forward. with me is is our health
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correspondent, james gallagher. this is an interesting study and they'll talk about re—purpose thing existing drugs? they haven't secured anything yet. these haven't been trialled in any human being. but what they are doing is incredibly ambitious and quite exciting. the aim is not a single drug that will cure or treat alzheimer's disease, orjust a cure or treat alzheimer's disease, or just a treat cure or treat alzheimer's disease, orjust a treat parkinson's disease, it work across our whole range of diseases. the way it should work in theory is there is something quite common to these diseases. they junked up brain cells with defective proteins which cause brain cells to starve and die. what the research tea m starve and die. what the research team did was about four years ago, they discovered a drug that stopped brain cells dying despite someone
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macro building up. but you couldn't give that to human beings as it was toxic. then they found to drugs that we re toxic. then they found to drugs that were already given safely to human beings and at the same protective effect on the brain, at least in mouth experiment. so when will people be able to use, when will human trials begin? very quickly. we know that these drugs are safe to give to people. a lot of, you know it says it will take ten years, but we are it says it will take ten years, but we are talking that these trials could start within a year and we could start within a year and we could get results within three yea rs. we could get results within three years. we will know whether the drugs could save the brain. it could happen quickly. to see the effect in mice will be replicated in humans. i saw an interesting quote from the lead researcher i think, earlier, saying you change a disease rather than kill it, the same way that hiv has been changed, it's i
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, —— it's not been killed, that's a really interesting analogies. the people with diseases like outsiders but stopping it from becoming debilitated. hiv has been a success story. people who have therapy, they have a normal life expectancy as if they didn't have the disease. but at they didn't have the disease. but at the idea here is not that you can use the new drugs if they work to magically restore brain functions, but it would act like a pause button. the day you will enter the doctorsurgery and they say you have dementia, they put you on the drugs and the brain would stop declining. if you're diagnosed when you live at home with early—stage dementia, you thought about stopping them being com pletely thought about stopping them being completely debilitating, it could radical, crow radically changed
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people's life to pause it is excited not cure. could this have applications beyond that it's currently used for? it's a massive field in general. half the work has been done for you. it's called re—purpose thing. once you know the target you're trying to hit. you askedif target you're trying to hit. you asked if people have hit it by fluke in the past. it's establishing and emerging things like mental health and re—purpose and drugs. it is a hot area, and it has different and interesting applications. for example, that the depression but dried here is off patent. there will not be a paycheque for a drugs company if this drugs was shown to work for this. james, thank you. police may now have to shoot at terrorists who use cars as weapons, a senior officer has said. the national lead for armed policing simon chesterman, said the tactics of armed officers
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will have to change following a string of attacks involving vehicles. in the past, police have been told not to shoot drivers of moving vehicles because it's too dangerous. joining me now is a former commander of special operations at scotland yard. this is a case of needs must. first of all, take us through the advice in the past where it wasn't thought to be a good idea to shoot at moving vehicles. was this because of the danger of bullets ricocheting off the vehicle? partly that but partly the fact that if you shoot at a musing, removing vehicle and incapacitate the driver then that vehicle could career into innocent people, kill pedestrians, cause a significant road traffic accident. the vehicle is perhaps escaping the
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scene of crime being used for crime, and not being used for a weapon. what we are seeing is a different situation where the vehicle is a weapon. as i said to begin this interview, it is a case of needs must. if police believe that someone is going to use the vehicle as a weapon, it may be the lesser of two evils to try and stop that first. how is training being adapted them, to allow police officers to tackle the threat? what we are seeing from the threat? what we are seeing from the national college of policing and today in the announcement, is the training is being upgraded. we are going to see this counterterrorist specialist firearms officers, we are seeing a high level of training, similarto seeing a high level of training, similar to what the military received. we already have extremely high levels of training and that is one of the reasons that many senior
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police officers do not want to see a armed police force entirely. to train everyone to that level will be difficult. we have well—trained officers and that training will be improved again. these officers can be deployed with counterterrorism collea g u es be deployed with counterterrorism colleagues to deal with really serious crime and really serious incidents, and be placed in a position where, if necessary, they can be authorised to take a shot at the driver of a moving vehicle. but the driver of a moving vehicle. but the assessment will have to be, what is the risk of either shooting the driver now, or letting it continue? it's about trying to protect the public at every stage. to decide what the optimum point may be at which to take that decision to fire at what is clearly a highly pressurised and dangerous situation? very much so. this is a decision that has to be made between the
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incident commander who will be in possession of a lot more knowledge about the incident, perhaps can't convey all that knowledge to the file on solid, quote officers on the ground. —— firearms officers on the ground. —— firearms officers on the ground. he can authorise a shot but not direct the officer to take the shot. he can authorise it. that implies there is enough information here that this vehicle is being used asa here that this vehicle is being used as a terrorist weapon. former commander of special operations at scotla nd commander of special operations at scotland yard, thanks forjoining us. the bbc spent much presenter at says he has been cleared of assault. he appeared at court in malta. the wildlife campaigner was on the mediterranean island making an independent programme when he claims
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his team were shouted at and shoved. cycling to work could halve the risk of developing heart disease and cancer, according to new research published today in the british medicaljournal. scientists at the university of glasgow, who analysed data from more than 250—thousand people, said walking reduced the risk of the same conditions by a quarter. our reporter vishala sri—pathma has more the commute to work, for some, is the only exercise they get all day. well, for those of us that cycle to the office, there's some good news. experts from the university of glasgow say that it reduces the risk of developing cancer and heart disease. in fact, cycling to work is linked to a 45% lower risk of developing cancer, and a 46% lower threat of cardiovascular disease. that compares to driving, or even taking public transport. it also means you're less likely to die younger. walking has its benefits, too, although it's not as effective as cycling. you have to walk a total of two hours a week at an average speed of 3mph for the health benefits
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to kick in. so, we need to make it easier for people to cycle. so, we need to increase cycle lanes, we need to have cycle — city hire schemes, subsidised bike schemes, have people have showers at work, so they don't feel sweaty when they get to work. there's a whole host of things to make it easier for the average person to cycle. and if we can do that, we get more people on our bikes, and then we're going to improve public health, just like places like amsterdam and copenhagen have done. charities have welcomed the findings. cancer research uk says it's evidence that you don't need to join a gym or run the marathon, and that anything that gets you hot and out of breath can help make a difference. vishala sri—pathma, bbc news. time to check out how the weather is looking. for most of it is dry day
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with a view exception. for most it is cloudy but there are sunny spells around. the best sunshine today has been across the eastern side of scotland. those breaks are becoming more widespread in scotland and spreading to north—east england. this is not the sunniest weather will be today. further south across england and wales, there are weak weather fronts with a few spots of rain, more or less line from the bristol channel to the wash. barely even bristol channel to the wash. barely even enough to whet the ground but some spots of cloud. the warmest spot will be about 16 degrees in eastern scotland although north—east england is not far behind. overnight, the cloud will fill back in so it will not be a very cold night. mild conditions overnight with temperatures in double figures. we will start to see rain in north—west scotland and this is a weather front that will then slide southwards while weakening. we have cold air moving in, head of the front there will be milder weather. cabbages in london could reach 7
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degrees —— 17 degrees. cooling off and seven celsis in shetland. that the latest weather. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines. labour leaderjeremy corbyn says a conservative victory on 8thjune is not a "foregone conclusion". we will build the new economy, worthy of the 21st—century. and we will build an economy for the many, not the few. theresa may holds talks with the president of the european parliament over brexit. antonio tajani came to downing street to discuss meps' red lines. scientists say they are excited about the discovery of drugs which may be able to stop a range of degenerative brain diseases. two drugs have been found that stop brain cells dying and are being safely used
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in people. new guidance for police says officers may now have to shoot terrorists at the wheel of vehicles to stop them being used in attacks. the new guidance changes a previous policy, in light of recent terror attacks in europe. now a round—up of the sports news. another day, another rugby union squad announcement... after dylan hartley missed out on the lions touring party this summer... the england captain will lead eddie jones' squad for their tests in argentina. there'll be 15 new caps alongside him. our rugby reporter chris jones has more. the england coach eddiejones was relu cta nt the england coach eddiejones was reluctant today to talk about selection, but with 16 englishmen on
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the trip, the squad for the tour of argentina in the summer was always going to have a fascinating look to it. there are these startling 15 uncapped players in the 31—man party, including the teenagers ben and tom parody. after his lions disappointment, hartley will again captain england, while other big names to miss out, such as james haskel and george ford are also heading to south america. asjones says, his squad has a striking blend of youth and experience. what i want these young guys to do is not wait for the senior players to ask them to dues things. i want them to come into the squad and push the envelope. i only had to watch them play once and you could cease they
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had something about them. i want them to come in and raise the intensity of training. i want them to be the new energy in the team. the only thing the senior players should have to do with them is asked them to tone it down. at the only thing. jones insists those players who haven't made the squad, like christian wade, he says the door still open for them. butjones feels this is the best squad available to him to go to argentina and win the series 2—0. andy murray has won the first set of his third round match at the monte carlo masters against 15th seed alberto ramos—vinolas. the two games won by the spaniard were both breaks of serve... as the world number one continues to recover from an elbow injury... but murray eventually took it 6—2... it's currently 5—2 in the second set. serena williams has revealed that she's pregnant with her first child. she told the world via this post on social media, with the caption ‘20 weeks'...
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and with the baby due in the autumn she'll miss the next three grand slams... but could potentially return for the french open in may 2018. that would be four months before her 37th birthday. manchester united can secure their place in the semi—finals of the europa league this evening. they play anderlecht at old trafford looking to build on their 1—all draw from the first leg. captain wayne rooney in the green looks set to return from injury. winning the europa league would guarantee united a place in next season's champions league — even if they finish outside the premier league's top four. when you are getting to this level, i think the motivation has to be very high. and we must equalise at least, and under that motivation and that dream, i think we showed in brussels at the are a stronger team.
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the british cyclist simon yates will race in this summer's tour de france. he returns after being banned for last year's event, for failing a drugs test. his team, orica—scott, maintained it was the result of an administrative error, over the use of an asthma inhaler, and yates had done nothing wrong. that's all sport for now. the rosettes are being dusted off and the sound of battle buses are already revving up. seven weeks today — that's thursdayjune 8th — voters will go to the polls in theresa may's snap general election. it's three years earlier than expected — and there's lots of questions being asked. here to answer some of them are bbc newsbeat‘s political
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reporter eleanor roper, and in glasgow, professorjohn curtice, politics professor at the university of strathclyde. good daddy booth with us. john, this question to you, when will the ma nifestos question to you, when will the manifestos be available for the public to read? i don't know if you have any insight. i think you should bearin have any insight. i think you should bear in mind parliament gets dissolved on the 3rd of may, we have local elections in most of the uk on the 4th local elections in most of the uk on the 11th of may, so i think you can anticipate that the manifestos and the election campaign probable begin on the monday after that, so that's the 7th of may. i anticipate that in that week, we will begin to see
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ma nifestos that week, we will begin to see manifestos appear. but in the meantime, we will be in the hiatus where a general election has been called, but in just two weeks, we have elections locally and that is what politicians will be focusing on. a huge amount for the politicians to focus on and a lot for the public to digester. emma asks, how do i check on the electoral register? it says on the electoral register? it says on the electoral register? it says on the electoral register website they cannot help —— tell whether you are on the register, but they can give you the local contacts who can tell you. we've been speaking to people who were not old enough to vote in the referendum, but would be old enough to vote in this general election. the deadline to register is the 22nd of may. gareth is looking even further ahead, asking if the next election is injune, does that mean the 15 years after that will more longer be in may and
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when is the next general election june after 2017? the next election will take place under the regular terms of the acts on the first thursday in may 20 22. that date is fixed. the act says the next election takes place on the first thursday in may. but we have just seen what happens to the fixed term elements act. yes, but the scheduled day will still be the first thursday in me, because that date is fixed u nless we in me, because that date is fixed unless we get an election called as we now unless we get an election called as we now have. the next election will be forfour we now have. the next election will be for four years and 11 months and not for five years. a few questions nobody on mps' constituencies and boundaries. john, how does the party nominate somebody to stand for mp in
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a constituency? if a party is nominating somebody, there are essentially two parts of the process. one is that the party has just sent a form that says, yes, this person is indeed our candidate in this constituency. the second pa rt in this constituency. the second part is the individual has descended sendin part is the individual has descended send in nomination form signed by ten registered electors in the constituency in which that person wishes stand. you can stand as an independent and then you don't need a party to see you're one of their candidates. you just need ten people to sign your form. candidates. you just need ten people to sign yourform. in candidates. you just need ten people to sign your form. in both cases, though, you have to cough up 500 quid and if you don't get 5% of the vote, that 500 quid will go to the coffers of her majesty's treasury.|j think labour's deadline is 6pm today, so i wonder if they have enough people to fill the candidate lists. the deadlines for nominations
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to be in is the 11th of may, so we have three weeks are sought for the parties to sort themselves out. because this election has been called so suddenly, we're getting announcements over who called so suddenly, we're getting announcements over who is going to stand on who is not. some surprises that kenneth clarke is still standing, but equally that george osborne is not. the parties have to sort out who is going to be their candidate in each constituency where they don't have somebody in place. if they don't have somebody in place, they have three weeks to sort out who they will nominate. eleanor says, how do i find out who is standing to represent me? we have to wait and see. that information will be made public. david says, will there be boundary changes? there will be boundary changes, but not for this election. i think they're due to comment in 2020. that is a
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public consultation going on at the moment. the final result should be in 2018. philip is asking, is there any discussion on lowering the voting age for this election?|j don't voting age for this election?” don't think so. in 2015, mps voted to reject proposals that 60 rods and 17—year—olds should be allowed to vote in the european referendum. they were allowed to vote the scottish referendum, but there's been no mention of loading the agent this election. if you 17 now, but will be 80 and byjune eight, you can register to vote. interesting to see how that youth vote will go. the question tojohn see how that youth vote will go. the question to john from see how that youth vote will go. the question tojohn from ruth, who asks if labour are the lib dems win, would they have the power to stop brexit? that is the subject of some uncertainty. the diplomat responsible for writing an article 50 has expressed a view that actually, it would be possible for a country to reverse an application to
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leave the european union. there are others who take a different view and basically, article 50 is not clear. in the end, it would be a political decision and it would be surprising if the uk were to decide to change his mind, that the european union would say no. but neither labour nor the lib dems have been saying that we the lib dems have been saying that we should reverse it. the lib dems are saying we should have a second referendum on the terms of the deal before we finally leave and that would open up the possibility of a change of mind. we still await a clear statement on labour's position, but so far they've been saying we have to accept brexit. that ties into questions about electoral pacts. eileen is asking can brexit be an
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old? which ties in with the question you have just been answering. yes indeed. clearly, we can decide as a country to change our position, but the question is whether the article 15 notification can be revoked or not. that is where that is a degree of uncertainty. but i suspect in practical terms, the answer to the question is yes, so long as we do it at some point between now and march 2019. at some point between now and march 20 19. catherine is at some point between now and march 2019. catherine is asking, can jeremy corbyn or any leader be replaced in time for the general election? that is not a legal question, is a question for the political parties. certainly, political parties. certainly, political parties. certainly, political parties can do what they want, but given for example that the
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labour party's want, but given for example that the labour pa rty‘s constitution want, but given for example that the labour party's constitution would normally require that a beer and election, it doesn't provide a mechanism forforcing election, it doesn't provide a mechanism for forcing jeremy corbyn to resign, it would be very difficult to replace him or any other party leader at this juncture. it's probably pretty clear that all the party leaders now have their political careers on the line, as far as their performance on the 8th ofjune is concerned. discussions on that will occur on the 9th ofjune and afterwards. a question on twitter, what are the chances of labour making net gains? this comes back to a question of, do we believe the opinion polls? given what happened two years ago, you might feel the answer to that question is,
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not necessarily. for what it's worth, opinion polls have been putting the conservatives about 16 points ahead. another survey this morning but the 2a points ahead, with the conservatives on 40% and labour on 24%. even if those polls are considerably inaccurate, they are considerably inaccurate, they are all pointing to a very substantial swing from labour to conservative, as compared to 2015, when labour were just seven conservative, as compared to 2015, when labour werejust seven points behind. there may well be the odd individual constituency somewhere rather which goes against the trend. the cattle that out, but at the moment at least, is going to be a very considerable surprise indeed of the labour party managers, up with net gains from the conservatives. if that happens, jeremy corbyn will prove a lot of commentators wrong, that there is an effective leader.
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eleanor, what will happen to that manchester gorton by—election? eleanor, what will happen to that manchester gorton by-election? we know that has been cancelled, after mps voted to back our plans. it was meant to happen on the 4th of may, it has now been cancelled and will happen on the 8th ofjune. eleanor, give us the sense of what news beat‘s viewers are asking about? what issues matter to them? they have been asking what a snap election is, why is it being held? or does it mean for brexit? the reaction to the sudden, unexpected nature of the announcement, and the shock and surprise. we have time for one more question. andy is asking, why is now not the time for a score
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second scottish independence referendum, but it is a time for another general election? theresa may said it's not the time, because she wants to focus on brexit. she thinks it would be a distraction. she says that/ is called the general election, because she says she needs apparently going forward. she sobering this'll strengthen her position. we will have to see. john, that points to the annoyance of scottish nationalists, who feel that electoral timetables are out of their hands because of what theresa may is doing. that is certainly true. nicola sturgeon was expected to make an announcement probably next week about how she proposed to progress a scottish independence referendum, given theresa may's relu cta nce referendum, given theresa may's reluctance to endorse one in the house of commons. the question is a
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political question. the prime minister's answer will be getting a big commons majority will enable to me to get our big deal for big commons majority will enable to me to get our big dealfor britain, whereas an independence referendum would undermine position. not all her opponents would agree with. some would argue that this general election is an opportunistic attempt to increase the conservative majority in the house commons. thank you both tojohn and eleanor. and thank you to everyone who sent in questions. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: jeremy corbyn uses his first major speech of the election campaign to insist the result of the ball is not a foregone conclusion. he says he will put the interests of the majority first. theresa may hold
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stocks with the president of the european parliament antonio tajani over european parliament antonio tajani over brexit in downing street. scientists welcome the discovery of drugs which they say may be able to stop a range of degenerative brain diseases. debenhams says its turnaround strategy could involve the closure of ten stores and regional distribution sectors. it wants to boost sales and improve its online service, amid fears of competition on the high street and online rivals. the news comes after reports of their profits are down. sky has announced a tie—up and says sales we re announced a tie—up and says sales were up 11%. that is for the first
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nine months of the year. top talk and bt have received the worst customer satisfaction scores in a survey of 12 broadband providers. they were closely followed by sky and ee. price rises, connections that failed, unreliable speeds and awful customer service were all blamed for the poor rating. more now on the debenhams news that ten stores are at risk of closure as the firm continues its closure plan. it has also announced to cut the number of products and brands at cells to concentrate on its core business, as well as boosting its online offering. let's be to catherine, who isa offering. let's be to catherine, who is a retail analyst, joining us from yorkshire. let's talk first of all about those figures. on one hand, you might see some improvement on what we have seen in the past, but
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still not good news for debenhams. really tough times on the high street and difficult times for debenhams, which is borne out in a slightly reduced profits this morning. and an admission they have to make significant structural changes to their business to allow them to be competitive. let's talk about the strategy to slimline its business and get back to its core business, because debenhams hasn't done very well and online and we have seen competition from other firms eating into that share. but what does debenhams stand for the high street these days? they have 165 high st stores up and down the country, as an awful lot of stores compared to some mightjohn lewis, who have 30. they have to find a place that is really sure the shopper about what debenhams is about. they're shopper about what debenhams is about. they‘ re responsible shopper about what debenhams is about. they're responsible for the third of the beauty sales in the uk. they recently sold a new beauty
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products online and got £1 million sales in a week. they have a new chief executive in place and they said they need to get back to a strong core and make britain understand what debenhams is. does that explain why they want to cut the number of brands and products they provide? it's about concentrating on what they do well, rather than hitting every market they can? yes, they need to be famous for things and famous for what shoppers want. shoppers are saying they want experiences, younger shoppers in particular, wanting experiences alongside the products they buy. they have been putting in extra beauty services and branded restaurants. they want people to have a good time in their stores, but they also want to improve their online sector. they have appointed someone who has
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worked for amazon. let me run you through some of the other stories. premier league clubs have record—breaking news in this season of 2015 and 2016, but still struggle to make a profit. a payment card thatis to make a profit. a payment card that is got a fingerprint sensor has been unveiled by mastercard, following successful trials in south africa. the technology works in the same way as it does with mobile payments. users must have their finger over the sense of when they make a purchase. let me show you this story, celebrities and the united states have been warned about the use of social media. they've been asked identify when they are promoting products on instead round when they are promoting products in return for payment. it is being
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called the wild west of hidden advertising. that's all your business from me. more from us a little later. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with chris for a look at the weather. for most of us, it is looking dry, but this cheeky weather front is bringing cloud and a few spots of rain. that will continue to work southend eastwards over the next few are as. don't be surprised if you see the odd spot of rain, barely enough to whet the ground. the code breaking up nicely in scotland, but
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the england and wales, and not cloud around. the sunny spots across north england and particularly, the north east of england. scotland having decent sunshine, further west, one or two passing showers possible for the northern and western isles and the northern and western isles and the highlands, but for many, it will be dry here as well. tonight, the cloud will fill in, but it looks like it's going to be a mild night. for many, 10 degrees. this band of rain, this cold front will be sinking its way further southward as we sinking its way further southward as we head into friday. rain moving southwards, moving into high pressure, so it will weaken and would amount to much as we head into friday afternoon. temperatures going down behind the front. temperatures
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in england and wales will be higher, they could peek at 17 in london. this area of low pressure moves into northern areas during the second half of the weekend. mainly dry through saturday and sunday with sunny spells, but it could be chilly workload breaks to start the morning. quite a bit of code, but it will be prone to thinning and creaking. 17 degrees in the sunshine and light winds will not feel too bad. chavez moving across northern parts of scotland, particularly on sunday. next week, it's set to get colder. this is bbc news, and these are
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the top stories developing at 12pm. jeremy corbyn uses his first major speech of the election campaign to insist the result of the poll isn't a ‘foregone conclusion', attacking the media and political establishment. but of course they do not want us to win, because when we win it is the people not the powerful who win. theresa may holds talks with the president of the european parliament at downing street over brexit. scientists say they are excited about the discovery of drugs would may be able to stop a range of degenerative brain diseases. new guidance for police says officers may now have to shoot terrorists at the wheel of vehicles to stop them being used in attacks. and the benefits of pedal power.
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cycling to work could halve the risk of developing heart disease and cancer according to new research. and serena williams — the most successful female player of the open era — confirms she is pregnant. good afternoon and welcome to bbc newsroom good afternoon and welcome to bbc newsroom live. labour leaderjeremy corbyn has said a conservative victory on 8thjune is not a "foregone conclusion", in his first big general election campaign speech. mr corbyn vowed to change the direction of the election by "putting the interests of the majority first". i'm joined from westminster by our assistant political editor norman smith. at least a couple of times at speech
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i heard jeremy corbyn roberti what he called a cosy cartel of the elite. setting up a them and asked narrative for this campaign. this was a vintagejeremy corbyn, classic corbyn castigating the elite, the tax dodgers, the media, unscrupulous bosses, the city, those businessmen who leeched off people on zero hours contracts, it was a speech with jeremy corbyn has been made many times before. the question mark about the speech, is how far that speech which went down a storm among those in the hall listening to him, will have reached out beyond corbyn's existing supporters. will it have engaged with the broader electorate? bows around mr corbyn believes there is no point trying to pack it in as some kind of
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conventional or stereotypical politician, they want to present mazzarri is, —— him as he is, a radical left—winger prepares to take on the establishment. there is no point to try to prevent as anything other than a man who was campaigned all his life on these issues. they think that narrative drove him to success in the labour leadership contest, and contriving to excess —— to success in this campaign. listen to success in this campaign. listen to what he says about his candidate. we don't accept the british people have to take what they are given and that they don't deserve better. in a sense, the establishment and their followers in the media, are quite right. i don't play by their rules. and, ifa right. i don't play by their rules. and, if a labour right. i don't play by their rules. and, ifa labour government right. i don't play by their rules. and, if a labour government is elected on the 8th ofjune, we won't play by their rules either. of course, appealing to a small
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group of labour party supporters, very different than appealing to millions in the electorate. but the hope of team corbyn, is that there isa hope of team corbyn, is that there is a change of mood in the electorate, that there is a feeling of discontent with politics as usual, and they point to donald trump in america, the french election, brexit, as examples of people wanting things done differently. they resent what they see as a powerful elites keeping all the money and power. and they are looking for someone to shake things up. but as the pope. mr corbyn spoke about how many people are fed up of what he called —— that is their hope. people are fed up up of upofa up of a rigged system according to him. the angry -- this is the rigged economy that the tories are
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protecting that labour is committed to challenging. in the question and answer section afterwards there were some tense moments. mr corbyn bridled a bit when journalists mentioned that he was very behind in the election polls! opinion poll. this this is his response to the idea that labour are a tainted brand. the idea as you so kind kindly described it, that labour are a tainted brand. the people wearing badges of keir hardie. he was vilified beyond belief when he was elected as the first ever labour mp. he said, how can working man go to parliament and stand as an mp? anyone who stands up gets vilified.
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our party does. but we are bigger and stronger than we have ever been and stronger than we have ever been and more determined than we have ever been. it isa it is a gamble whether those m essa g es it is a gamble whether those messages will resonate with a change electorate. but he starts from a position where he is way behind in the polls. he has to do is election to do things differently. if he fights a conventional campaign than it seems unlikely he will be able to overhaul the massive poll lead that theresa may currently have. the current thing for team corbyn is that they have to take risks, think outside the box. in mr corbyn's words, tear up the rules. let's go live to holyrood where nicola sturgeon is holding the first minister's questions since the snap election was announced. there is nicola sturgeon. she says
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the key issue in the election is who will stand up for scotland against what she called this hardline conservative government. in this chamber, the true colours of ruth davidson and the conservatives. given the opportunity to stand up andjoin given the opportunity to stand up and join others in this government, and join others in this government, and say that the rape clause that woman and say that the rape clause that woman has two proves she is raped. ruth davidson refuses to do so, that is aptly shameful. ! it brings into sharp focus the key issue at the heart of this election. i ask people to think about this. the rape clause has been introduced bya the rape clause has been introduced by a tory government at westminster with a tiny majority. if that is what a tory government can do with a tiny majority, let's what we can do
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with that a unfettered, out—of—control tory government can do with a bigger majority. if people in scotland want protection against a tory government. if people in scotla nd wa nt a tory government. if people in scotland want an effective, strong opposition to a tory government. they won't get it from unelectable labour, they won't get it from the lib dems. who still say they support a tory government, they will only get it from the snp and scotland's needs protection from the tories. residing officer in the weeks ahead, these benches will set our vision for britain's future. we will stand up for britain's future. we will stand up for scotland to stay in the united kingdom. we will say no to a second referendum so scotland can get on with building better schools and public services. but what about the snp's plan. the first minister's
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first intervention in this election has been to say that she put jeremy corbyn and number ten. has been to say that she put jeremy corbyn and numberten. is has been to say that she put jeremy corbyn and number ten. is it because, uniquely, this first minister season mr corbyn the wisdom and foresight and leadership skills that are needed in a prime minister. or could it possibly be because, in his own words, jeremy corbyn is fine with another independence referendum. is that the alliance she was really seeking in london? this is hired staff on the tories. you only have to look at it to see corbyn is not going near number ten. that brings us back to the core issue. because of the unelectable of labour, scotland faces the prospect
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ofan labour, scotland faces the prospect of an unfettered, out—of—control court tory government and we know that that can do damage to scotland, to the vulnerable, to the budget, to pensions, to be economy. that is the choice to scotland. vote snp to make sure that scotland's voice is heard and scotland has protection against the tories. the problem for ruth davidson, as she has so clearly said today, scotland knows the tory vision for scotland, the rape clause, penalising the vulnerable, taking notability vehicles away from disabled people. people across scotla nd disabled people. people across scotland now the vision of the tories and that is why people of scotla nd tories and that is why people of scotland now if they want detection against —— protection against that, they must vote s and p. —— snp. against —— protection against that,
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they must vote s and p. -- snp. what has she planned for the rest of the week. going to the plan. one. she has discussed the rape clause, devolution, and said the tories are taking to a cliff edge on hard brexit. she hasjust told us what the damage the tories can do. so why did the snp and stein yesterday instead of voting with labour to get rid of this tory government?” instead of voting with labour to get rid of this tory government? i hate to be the one that has to point it out. kezia dugdale. it wasn't the snp that voted with the tories yesterday in the house of commons, it was labour who took through the lobbies of the tories yesterday. you know the lobby i mean. it was the one with turkeys and christmas risen above it. the idea that labour is going to
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replace the tories is frankly pie in the sky. the issue and the threat that the selection is that due to labour's complete an electability, we labour's complete an electability, we face an unfettered, out—of—control tory government. we know that the prime minister wants to silence opposition, so the question for scotland as this. if you want a strong opposition to the tories, if you want mps who will stand up and be a voice of scotland, we are stand up and be a voice of scotland, we are the only party to support at the election, the snp. nicola sturgeon, ruth davidson and kezia dugdale all speaking there out of holyrood at first minister's questions. nicola sturgeon open to questions by saying the key issue in the forthcoming general election is who is going to stand up for scotla nd who is going to stand up for scotland in what she called, against what she called, this hardline conservative government. theresa may has been holding
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talks with the president of the european parliament in downing street this morning. the prime minister greeted antonio tajani with a handshake on the doorstep of number ten. the pair have much to talk about — earlier this month, the european parliament agreed a ha rd—line negotiating position over brexit — including demands for the uk to meets its financial obligations to the eu an update from the metropolitan police regarding an incident at a nightclub in hackney at which a noxious substance was sprayed inside the club. detectives investigating say they have carried out three arrest wa rra nts say they have carried out three arrest warrants at addresses in the hertfordshire area. amongst those other 33—year—old woman arrested at one of the addresses on suspicion of firearms offences. detectives continue to appeal for an information to trace a man wanted the questioning in connection with the questioning in connection with
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the incident, 25—year—old arthur collins of hertfordshire. anyone with any information is urged to contact the investigators. the file up, grow service —— fire the fire service have updated saying one woman the fire service have updated saying one woman has left with burns and up to 20 people have been taken to hospital with burns and injuries as a result of the noxious acidic spray in the nightclub. the culture secretary karen bradley has strongly defended the conservatives' commitment to foreign aid spending. her comments come as the microsoft founder bill gates urged the uk to retain its pledge to spend 0.7% of gdp on international aid, saying it was proof of its goodwill and humanity. there has been speculation the pledge could be dropped in the tory manifesto, but ms bradley said she was proud of the government's record. the manifesto will be published
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in due course and we can debate what is in the manifesto at the point. i'm not to speculate on what may or may not be in the manifesto. i voted for the act of parliament that put them up at 0.7% in parliamentary legislation, and am very proud of the record of this government in delivering for those most in need across the world, and britain will always be a leading force in that. the former ukip leader nigel farage has hinted he would stand in the general election, saying he will decide in the next few days. he told the bbc radio 4's today programme he believes he would win if he did stand, despite seven previous unsuccessful bids. i haven't decided yet. i have to weigh it up. i am still leading a group in the european parliament where ultimately there will be a veto on the brexit deal and whether negotiations will take place. i have a to weigh up,
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where are my best to be in terms of having an impact on brexit, and warning the british public where it's going, am to westminster? for ukip, it's perfectly clear what you're better off doing, that is staying or returning to this country, and standing in a by—election, a general election, which you yourself have said you would win. i think i would. i would not have in that constituency. you lost it last time? perhaps in last time it wasn't in fair circumstances, but the crown prosecution can decide that. i think i would. i also feel the fear factor, the snp fear factor, had a big dent in the ukip vote in 2015. you can see theresa may trying to play the same game the progressive alliance stopping brexit. but that will with over the course of the next few weeks, i will make my mind up over
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the next few days. this just thisjust in. douglas this just in. douglas carswell, the mps are cracked and says he would not stand for election and will support the tories. an interesting trajectory for mr carswell, former tory mp who defected to ukip. he announced he was saying is snick staying as an independent mp but now says he will not re—election and will support the tories in the general election. that is coming from andrew sinclair, our political correspondent at bbc east. a statement has appeared from douglas ca rswell. statement has appeared from douglas carswell. he says i have done everything possible to make sure we won everything possible to make sure we won the eu referendum, even changing parties and triggering a by—election to help nudge things along. last
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summer we won to help nudge things along. last summer we won the referendum. i have decided that i will not seek re—election and will vote conservative, and will offer my support to the clacton conservative candidate. he says it is sometimes said all political careers end in failure, it doesn't feel like that for me today. i have stood five times, one for mike wood times, and helped win the westland last year. job done, i'm delighted. the statement ends. that is the statement ends. that is the statement from douglas carswell who says he will not seek re—election as an independent mp on the 8th of june. to wales where the first minister ca rwyn to wales where the first minister carwyn jones says there to wales where the first minister carwynjones says there is a tough mountain to climb. he said the polymath —— party must campaign. he
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was asked just how tough the election will be for labour. we have to work hard. as we did last year in the assembly election. we are offering a fair dealfor the assembly election. we are offering a fair deal for the people offering a fair deal for the people of wales and to stand up for wales, because if the tories have a large majority they will run all over and ta ke majority they will run all over and take powers away from wales. you have never abilities yesterday about jeremy corbyn in the past, can you honestly see him at number ten?” can. i think people are looking for an alternative who want to different from the same old, same old. there was no sign of anything getting better. austerity is a political choice, not an economic necessity. they want to, don't have to. we offer an alternative. can austerity, which is what labour wants to talk about. but it's going to be about brexit? we had a referendum on brexit. i get accused of the same.
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this is not in the national interest, she is trying to silence dissent. nationalists want to leave the eu tomorrow, and then people who wa nt the eu tomorrow, and then people who want a sensible soft brexit, she clue want a sensible soft brexit, she clu e wa nts want a sensible soft brexit, she clue wants to make sure that one side of the other. who knows what? it is difficult to know what she's thinking. so many people in the labour heartland areas vote for brighton. she is going insane she is going to do what those voted for brexit. we are not going to make sure the brexit doesn't happen. there's been a referendum. same with that devolution. now there are people demanding a hard brexit. they can choose the referendum. for me, there's been a referendum, it's done, we are leaving, we need a sensible brexit. carwyn jones, thank
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you very much. the headlines. jeremy corbyn uses his first major speech of the election campaign to insist the result of the bolt isn't a foregone conclusion and will put the interests of the majority first. scientists welcomed the discovery of drugs with their same may be able to stop a range of degenerative brain diseases. senior police figures say officers may have to shoot terrorists at the wheel of moving vehicles to stop being in attacks. time for sport with you. good afternoon. after dylan hartley missed out on the lions, the captain will read eddie jones's missed out on the lions, the captain will read eddiejones's squad in argentina. i will also be 15 new caps alongside. jones says it is a rare opportunity for him and his players. it's exciting, a great
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opportunity for us. you don't usually get this opportunity where you can bring a bunch of young, enthusiastic and potentially good players into the squad at one time. sol players into the squad at one time. so i see this as an opportunity to ta ke so i see this as an opportunity to take the side forward. if i can develop three or four of these guys to be better, ryan's guys, it will be an enormously successful tour. i think we can. andy murray has attempted to come post and three struggles in the third round of the monte—carlo masters. it is his first tournament... he took the second set 6-2. it is tournament... he took the second set 6—2. it is now back on serve, for games all in that one. sooner it —— serena williams has announced she is pregnant with her first child. she
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posted this on social media saying 20 weeks. she will next miss the next three grand slams but may return for the french open in 2018, before she turns 37. manchester united can secure place in the semifinals of the europa league. they play anderlecht at old trafford building on 01— one draw. wayne rooney looks set return an injury. that would guarantee manchester united a place in the champions league next year even if they finish outside the top four in the premier league. when you get to this level, the situation has to be very high. we must equalise anderlecht‘s motivation and dream. it is a motivational question because i think we showed in brussels that we area think we showed in brussels that we are a stronger team. liverpool manager klopp has ruled
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out signing joe hart from torino. klopp insists he is happy with his current keeper and is not pursuing a £20 million deal with joe current keeper and is not pursuing a £20 million deal withjoe hart, now or in the future. that's all your sport for now, more in the next hour. scientists have discovered drugs which may be able to stop alzheimer's, parkinson's and a wide range of degenerative brain diseases. one of them is already safely given to people with depression. clinical trials are planned, but the findings so far have been described as exciting, important and potentially a major step forward. earlier run our health correspondent james gallagher told it would treat a whole range of brain diseases. these haven't been trialled in any human being.
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but what they are doing is incredibly ambitious and quite exciting. the aim is not a single drug that will cure or treat alzheimer's disease, orjust a treat parkinson's disease, it work across a whole range of diseases. the way it should work in theory is, there is something quite common to these diseases. they gunk up brain cells with defective proteins which cause brain cells to starve and die. what the research team did was about four years ago, they discovered a drug that stopped brain cells dying despitejunk macro building up. but you couldn't give that to human beings as it was toxic. then they found to drugs that were already given safely to human beings and at the same protective effect on the brain, at least mouse experiment. so when will people be able to use, when will human trials begin?
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very quickly. we know that these drugs are safe to give to people. you know we say it will take ten years, but we are talking that these trials could start within a year and we could get results within three years. we will know whether the drugs could save the brain. it could happen incredibly quickly. to see the effect in mice will be replicated in humans. i saw an interesting quote from the lead researcher i think, earlier, saying, you change a disease rather than cure it, the same way that hiv has been changed, it's that's a really interesting analogies. the people with diseases like alzheimer's but stopping it from becoming debilitated. hiv has been a success story. people who have therapy, they have a normal life expectancy as if they didn't have the disease. but the idea here is not that you can use the new drugs if they work to
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magically restore brain functions, but it would act like a pause button. the day you enter the doctor surgery and they say you have dementia, they put you on the drugs and the brain would stop declining. if you're diagnosed when you live at home with early—stage dementia, you talk about stopping them being completely debilitating, needed constant care home support, it could radical, crow radically changed people's life to pause it if not cure it. police may now have to shoot at terrorists who use cars as weapons, a senior officer has said. the national lead for armed policing simon chesterman, said the tactics of armed officers will have to change following a string of attacks involving vehicles. in the past, police have been told not to shoot drivers of moving vehicles because it's too dangerous. a little earlier i asked roy ramm — a former commander of special operations at scotland yard — why those rules were
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initially put in place. if you shoot at a moving removing vehicle and incapacitate the driver then that vehicle could career into innocent people, kill pedestrians, cause a significant road traffic accident. the vehicle is perhaps escaping the scene of crime being used for crime, and not being used for a weapon. what we are seeing is a different situation where the vehicle is a weapon. as i said to begin this interview, it is a case of needs must. if police believe that someone is going to use the vehicle as a weapon, it may be the lesser of two evils to try and stop that first. how is training being adapted then, to allow police officers to tackle the threat? what we are seeing from the national college of policing and today in the announcement, is the training is being upgraded. we are going to see this
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counterterrorist specialist firearms officers receiving a high level of training, similar to what the military received. we already have extremely high levels of training and that is one of the reasons that many senior police officers do not want to see a wholly armed police force. to train everyone to that level will be difficult. we have cadres, well—trained officers and that training will be improved again. these officers can be deployed with counterterrorism colleagues to deal with really serious crime and really serious incidents, and be placed in a position where, if necessary, they can be authorised to take a shot at the driver of a moving vehicle. but all the time, the assessment will have to be, what is the risk of either shooting the driver now, or letting it continue? it's about trying to protect the public at every stage. to decide what the optimum point may
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be at which to take that decision to fire at what is clearly a highly pressurised and dangerous situation? very much so. this is a decision that has to be made between the incident commander who will be in possession of a lot more knowledge about the incident, perhaps can't convey all that knowledge to the file on solid, —— firearms officers on the ground. the commander can authorise a shot but not direct the officer to take the shot. they can authorise it. that implies there is enough information here that this vehicle is being used as a terrorist weapon. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather
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forecast. we have some sunshine for you today, the best of that across eastern scotland and north east england. a mixture across the board, where we have some areas of cloud. thinning in areas, but thickening up enough to give some rain in places. still a little sunshine in kent, more cloud moving into the london area. temperatures 16 or 17 degrees, under the cloud, 13 or 1a. rain in northern scotland, that will sink its way southwards and become more widespread. the lowest temperatures will be towards the south—west, where we will sea mist and fog patches. drizzle coming into the
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north west onto the pennines. 18 degrees possible in the south—east of england, turning very much colder in scotland. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: labour leader jeremy corbyn says a conservative victory on eighthjune is not a "foregone conclusion". mr corbyn vows to put the interests of the majority first. scientists say they are excited about the discovery of drugs which may be able to stop a range of degenerative brain diseases. two drugs have been found that stop brain cells dying and are being safely used in people. new guidance for police says officers may now have to shoot terrorists at the wheel of vehicles to stop them being used in attacks. the new guidance changes a previous policy, in light of recent terror attacks in europe. detectives investigating an attack
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ata detectives investigating an attack at a nightclub have issued three arrest warrants. more now on our top story — labour leaderjeremy corbyn has said a conservative victory on 8thjune is not a "foregone conclusion", in his first big general election campaign speech. mr corbyn vowed to change the direction of the election by "putting the interests of the majority first". let's hear an extract from that speech. the dividing lines in this election could not be cleaver from the outset. it's the conservatives, the party of privilege and the richest, versus party of privilege and the richest, versus the labour party. applause
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the labour party that is standing up for working people to improve the lives of everyone. it is the establishment versus the people. lives of everyone. it is the establishment versus the peoplem is our historic duty to make sure the people prevail. applause and as ian explained, and duty from all of us here today, the duty of every labour mp, all of us here today, the duty of every labourmp, a all of us here today, the duty of every labour mp, a duty of our half a million members, including, and i welcome them, the 2500 to have joined in the last 2a hours. applause much of the media and the establishment are saying this
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election is a foregone conclusion. they think there are rules and politics, which if you don't follow, like doffing your cap to the powerful people, accepting that things can really change, then you can't win. but of course, they do not want us to win, because when we win, it is the people, not the powerful hirwaun. —— not that powerful hirwaun. —— not that powerful people, you win. the nurse, the teacher, the small trader, the carer, the builder, the frosts that office worker, we all win. it is the establishment to complaints i don't play by the rules, by which they mean, their rules. we cannot win, they say, when we rules. we cannot win, they say, when we do not play their game. we do not
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fit in the cosy club. we are not obsessed with the tittle tattle of westminster or brussels. we don't accept that it is natural for britain to be governed by a ruling elite, the city and the tax dodgers. we don't accept that the british people applause we don't accept that the british people just have to take what they are given and that they don't deserve better. and in this sense, the establishment and the cap followers in the media are quite right, we don't play by their rules. and if a labour government is elected on the 8th of june, we would play by their rules either. jeremy corbyn speaking in central london earlier today. the us and south korea are taking part in a joint military exercise involving aircraft carriers
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and fighter jets — an action which pyongyang has called "a provocation". washington says the 11—day exercises — which take place every year — were planned months ago, but tensions are currently especially high on the korean peninsula. steve evans reports from a us airforce base in south korea. 80 aircraft flying from this base in south korea and bases injapan. practising air to air combat and bombing targets on the ground. us planes and south korean planes integrating as one strikeforce is the idea. i do think it's any different than anyone else in the world, what we do every day is designed to prepare us for any kind of threat might encounter. so if the timer to come, ifeel like of threat might encounter. so if the timer to come, i feel like anyone of us, including myself, are prepared to execute. i'm excited to excited to execute. i'm excited to excited to get to work with accordion pilots. this is my first time to get
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to work with pilots from another country, so it has been very enlightening to me to see they have very similar aircraft but sometimes very similar aircraft but sometimes very different tactics and it's a fabulous learning experience. they don't say this about north korea, but it's the only country on anyone's mind. this exercise involves about 80 aircraft, 1000 american personnel and about 500 south korean. there are also bases injapan south korean. there are also bases in japan involved. south korean. there are also bases injapan involved. it happens every single year. but this year is different. the atmosphere is heightened, because president trump says he is different from past presidents. he'll stop north korea having nuclear weapons by force if necessary. the aircraft carrier is now necessary. the aircraft carrier is now heading to korea, according to us military. it was said to be ten days ago, but heading in a different
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direction. but the current build—up, north korea said there was a risk of nuclear war. tough words from both sides, but nobody knows what they add up to. just words? or much, much worse. test results on victims of an attack in syria should have the nerve gas sad was used. the sitting government has denied using chemical weapons. the us secretary of state has accused iran of alarming provocations, and destabilising the middle east. earlier, president trump ordered a review of the iran nuclear deal. ten iran has repeatedly denied it was ever trying to develop nuclear weapons. the bbc
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spring watch presenter chris back and says he has been cleared of assault as he filmed a documentary on illegal bird strapping in malta. he appeared in a magistrates court on the maltese are the causal, where the case was thrown out. he was making an independent programme on the island, when he claimed his team and tim were shouted at and shocked. and tim were shouted at and shoved. cycling to work could halve the risk of developing heart disease and cancer, according to new research published today in the british medicaljournal. scientists at the university of glasgow, who analysed data from more than 250,000 people, said walking reduced the risk of the same conditions by a quarter. our reporter vishala sri—pathma has more. the commute to work, for some, is the only exercise they get all day. well, for those of us that cycle to the office, there's some good news. experts from the university of glasgow say that it reduces the risk of developing cancer and heart disease. in fact, cycling to work is linked to a 45% lower risk of developing cancer,
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and a 46% lower threat of cardiovascular disease. that compares to driving, or even taking public transport. it also means you're less likely to die younger. walking has its benefits, too, although it's not as effective as cycling. you have to walk a total of two hours a week at an average speed of 3mph for the health benefits to kick in. so, we need to make it easier for people to cycle. so, we need to increase cycle lanes, we need to have cycle — city hire schemes, subsidised bike schemes, have people have showers at work, so they don't feel sweaty when they get to work. there's a whole host of things to make it easier for the average person to cycle. and if we can do that, we get more people on our bikes, and then we're going to improve public health, just like places like amsterdam and copenhagen have done. charities have welcomed the findings. cancer research uk says it's evidence that you don't need tojoin a gym or run the marathon, and that anything that gets you hot and out of breath can help make a difference. vishala sri—pathma, bbc news.
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all this week prince harry and harry have spoken about their heads together campaign, in a bid to encourage people to have conversations about mental health. this year they're the official charity of the virgin money london marathon. tonight, a bbc programme follows a group of ten runners affected by mental health issues as they prepare for sunday's big race. my colleaguejoanna gosling spoke to two women who will be taking part in the marathon. it's actually quite hard to see where i was, the position i was in, i tried to kill myself, but where i'm at now, and a police officer, there are a lot of barriers and stigma around mental health. and for me, no, it's really important to
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say, yes, i'm a police officer and i suffer from say, yes, i'm a police officer and i sufferfrom depression. that's what i want to do. people need to speak, whatever they do or whoever they work for, it is getting it out there thatis work for, it is getting it out there that is help. you spoke with william? i spoke with catherine. she was absolutely lovely, very down to earth, very supportive. what the royals have done around mental health is absolutely fantastic and i echo what paula norman has said regarding that. what have you been through? iam regarding that. what have you been through? i am the parent of a daughter who suffers from psychosis. when your child is diagnosed with men will illness, i had no idea. where do i go? how do i get help? i felt helpless and i still do, to this day, in knowing how to help her, how to look forward and encourage her when things are so
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desperate and she is so desperate and gloom. doing the marathon is all about talking about mental illness, but it's also enabling people to know how to talk to people with a mental illness. when you saw your daughter was struggling, how difficult was it to reach her? was she willing to talk? did she have to be drawn out? when we knew something was seriously wrong, she'd actually stopped talking. we had people come in who were trained to talk to her and it was only when she was admitted into hospital and we got an understanding of what was going on, then we started reading up and trying to understand what she was experiencing. still to this day, i battle to try and get a complete grasp of living with what she lives with her. the only way i can see of trying to make her life easier is to
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trying to make her life easier is to try and educate everybody and everyone around her on how to top two are and how to make her life easier, because how life is hard. it's really hard. it's easier to tell someone when you're physically sick. and then people worry about saying the wrong thing, they think people are going to hurt themselves because of said the wrong thing. but all people need is someone just to listen. who did you talk to? i was lucky enough to speak to prince harry when i went to the training day in newcastle. and i spoke with ca ke day in newcastle. and i spoke with cake yesterday, who was just lovely. and what impact do you think their involvement in this is going to have? if your daughter had heard them talking all that time go, do you think it would have made a difference? i think it would've made a difference. it would've been ok
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for her to say, mum, i don't know what is going on in my head, i a voice. good luck to them in the marathon this sunday. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: jeremy corbyn uses his first major speech of the election campaign to insist the result of the poll isn't a ‘foregone conclusion' and says he will put the interests of the majority first. scientists welcome the discovery of drugs which they say may be able to stop a range of degenerative brain diseases. senior police figures say officers may now have to shoot terrorists at the wheel of moving vehicles to stop them being used in attacks. as we've been hearing, theresa may has been holding talks with the president of the european parliament in downing street this morning. a short while ago — antonio tajani held a news conference at europe house in central london — he said his meeting
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with the prime minister was a positive one over the issue of protection of european citizens rights. for the huge european parliament, this is the most important thing, to strongly defend the citizens, the european citizens' right, those living in the uk. and to have a clear framework in the next month. this is very important for us. and also theresa may is in favour. plus, it's important, the text of communication, to defend the same rights for the uk citizens in the
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european union. this is a good start in my opinion. on this in principle, we in my opinion. on this in principle, we have the same position. also for mrs may, the citizen ‘s rights are a priority. the chief inspector of constabulary for england and wales says the inadequacy of mental health provision means police forces are dealing with problems that should be handled by other agencies. in the police watchdog's annual report, sir tom winsor says officers are often left acting as first responders when no ambulances are available — or keeping mentally ill people in cells because of a lack of health care beds. sir tom winsorjoins me now from our westminster studio. the report is in annual report.
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there are many demands on the police and if the other agencies of the state were to do theirjobs well and ina timely state were to do theirjobs well and in a timely manner in relation to mental ill—health, then the police would have more time to do other things. yes, because you saying that the police are having to deal with people who are mentally ill, then clearly many opportunities have been missed. but i'm sure you would it accept that in many of those cases it is because of lack of funding and resources that these jobs fault of police officers. there are many reasons why these situations turn into a crisis. and the crisis is when somebody standing on a motorway bridge and threatening to throw themselves off, or they've got a
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knife that somebody‘s throat. these are people who are ill, they are in crisis, and it would be better if the agencies of the state were to be able to prevent these crises archiving, in the case of mental ill—health, by having early intervention, early diagnosis and early and adequate treatment, so that these crises never occur in the first place. prevention is better than cure. it's cheaper, but it's also the trauma that the people who are affected also the trauma that the people who a re affected by also the trauma that the people who are affected by these crises, this trauma could be avoided. are you saying that public safety is being placed at risk, because police officers become tied up dealing with these geezers when they should be doing something else? not only that, but these people are in a state of acute crisis, some public safety is at risk because they may be violent or reckless or they may try to kill themselves in all sorts of other
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ways. for example, on the real reason number of years ago, a man decided to commit suicide. he parked his car on decided to commit suicide. he parked his carona decided to commit suicide. he parked his car on a level crossing and seven his car on a level crossing and seven people were killed on the train crash as a result. that is an illustration. if batman had had adequate and early treatment, perhaps those lives would never have been lost. i'd like to get your reaction to the new guidance that says officers may now have to shoot terrorists at the wheel of vehicles, obviously in response to a spate of attacks using vehicles across europe and most recently in westminster. the police must take every possible measure to make sure people's lives are saved. if that means shooting someone at the wheel, in appropriate circumstances and with trained police officers, that is what should happen. thank you very much.
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the mp for clacton, douglas ca rswell, has announced the mp for clacton, douglas carswell, has announced he will not seek the election. he defected to ukip from the conservatives before becoming an independent mp, and says he will support the conservatives at the upcoming general election. let's totter andrew sinclair, who is in norwich for us. an interesting trajectory for mr carswell, who only recently, is easy to lose track of political developments, only recently said he was leaving ukip to stand as an independent. why has in our apparently changes mind and decided to stand down? it's all was ha rd to decided to stand down? it's all was hard to keep up with douglas ca rswell, hard to keep up with douglas carswell, who once again, finds himself making political headlines today. the conservative mp who dramatically defected to yougov in 2014, he insisted on fighting his seat as the ukip candidate, which he
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won. seat as the ukip candidate, which he won. winning back seat is credited with making sure that the eu referendum took place, because david cameron saw that and thought he couldn't refuse. douglas carswell was constantly in the news because of his rows with nidal barrage and then last month, he decided he would sit as an independent. now he has said he will not contest the forthcoming election as an independent mp. he said, i have done everything possible in my life to make sure we got a referendum on the european union. we won that. it's sometimes said that all political careers end in failure, but it doesn't feel it back to me. job done. i'm delighted. what will he do now? he says he looks forward to reading newspapers rather than reading newspapers rather than reading about himself in newspapers.
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he's a man who enjoys blue sky thinking. he is very easy article about politics and public participation in politics. i don't think this'll be the last we will hear of think this'll be the last we will hearof him. think this'll be the last we will hear of him. thank you very much. the australian prime minster has announced sweeping changes to the country's citizenship laws — declaring that new arrivals must prize "australian values" and prove their commitment to the nation. it follows a move earlier this week to scrap the current four year to scrap the current four—year skilled—migrant visas and adopt more stringent tests for applicants. from sydney, hywel griffith has more. this raft of changes has won the message at its core, that the australian government wants tighter control, not just of australian government wants tighter control, notjust of the people who come here, but those who get to stay here. at the centre of that busy new citizenship test. we're told it will be more stringent on english proficiency, people needing to show they can read and write and
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understand english. also, they will be asked questions about what the prime minister calls australian values. we are told it will include more questions on issues like domestic violence and freedom of religion. the prime minister says australia will remain on immigration nation, but it wants much better control of the people who can stay here and make sure the lead australian lives. they need to show they are integrated into society, so doing things like joining sporting clu bs. doing things like joining sporting clubs. this is being seen as pandering to the right wing within australian politics. it follows changes to the visas issued to foreign workers this week. they were scrapped and replaced by a new system. we are told that fewer people will be able to enter the country as foreign workers. this mean potentially fewer people being able to stay here, unless they meet this new criteria.
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in a moment the news at one. first the weather. we have a lot of cloud around, but still quite bright in scotland and the north east of england. a lot of dry weather through the day and where the sun comes out, it will feel quite warm as well. a lot of cloud from the south—west and into lincolnshire. but spilling into london as well, but some sunshine possible into kent. maybe a little sunshine in eastern parts of northern ireland. eastern scotland, some sunshine and temperatures up to 16 or 17 degrees. similar temperatures in north—east england. overnight tonight, we'll find the
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rain that's in scotland slipping further south. generally dry for england and wales. lowest temperatures will be in the south west, a little bit of minced and fog around. —— a little bit of mist and fog around. this rain and drizzle moving southwards across scotland and northern ireland, if you shower is coming into north—west england. south of fact, we have warmer air, but turning very much colder in scotland. quite a change in eastern scotla nd scotland. quite a change in eastern scotland in the afternoon, compared with today. warmer air ahead of that front, but for many it will be equally feel particularly in north east scotland and north east england. high pressure is dominating
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the uk as we head into sunday, exceptin the uk as we head into sunday, except in the north, where we will find an area of low pressure. northern and western areas where and windier. away from there, it will be drier and warmer. but things are going to change early next week, because we going to draw down some very much colder air. all on these northerly winds, with some wintry showers in the mix. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn promises to stand up for ordinary working people, as his election campaign gets underway. it was to be a fight between the "establishment and the people" he said — and said the result is not a foregone conclusion. but of course they do not want us to win, because when we win, it is the people not the powerful who win.
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former ukip mp douglas carswell says he won't stand for re—election in clacton and will back the tories. we'll bring you all the latest as campaigning gets underway. also this lunchtime. theresa may holds brexit talks with the european parliament president — he says his priority is the status of eu citizens here. a major breakthrough in the treatment of dementia — a drug for depression could help protect the brain from degeneration.
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