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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 20, 2017 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

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this is bbc news. and martine croxall. the headlines at eight. jeremy corbyn has pledged to challenge what he called a "rigged system" and said the final result was not a ‘foregone conclusion‘. but of course they do not want us to win, because when we win it is the people, not the powerful, who win. the prime minister reiterates her commitment for net migration falling to the tens of thousands following britain leaving the eu. this follows speculation that goal might be scrapped. i believe sustainable net migration is in the tens of thousands, for people coming from the eu as well as people coming from the eu as well as people coming from outside the eu. nigel farage the leader of ukip says he will not stand in the election. also in this hour.... the final television pitch to voters
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in the french presidential election. 11 candidates are taking to the stage in a televised set—piece debate, ahead of the first round vote on sunday. scientists discover drugs which could slow down the progression of a range of degenerative brain diseases including dementia. an meet the author michele roberts and her new novel the walworth beauty which brings together contemporary and medieval london with ghostly presences in a tale of longing and desire. good evening and welcome to bbc news. in his first major speech of the election campaign the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has styled himself as the anti—establishment candidate taking on what he called a system rigged against working people. he told supporters that a labour government elected on 8th
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june would not play by the old rules, doffing its cap to the powerful. with theresa may promising strong leadership our political editor laura kuenssberg looks at their different messages and what they mean for the election. no one's going to say they're all the same. not in this election. and not the admirers of the labour leader, who queue round the block to hear him. we need something different, not more of the same. i really enjoy seeing him speak. this is a man who should be leading the country and should be our prime minister, because he's offering a real alternative. the left waited a long time for a leader likejeremy corbyn. but will the rest of the country rush towards him? he is their star. but what about you? the labour party that's standing up for working people to improve the lives of all. it's the establishment versus the people.
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it's our historic duty to make sure the people prevail. in practice, that means hikes to the minimum wage, bigger benefits for carers, higher taxes for some of the biggest businesses — who he said, proudly, should fear him. if i were southern rail, or if i were philip green, i'd be worried about a labour government, i really would. if i were mike ashley, or the ceo of a tax—avoiding multinational corporation, i'd want to see a tory victory, i really would. why? because those are the people who are monopolising the wealth that should be shared by each and every one of us in the whole country. applause. but it means more borrowing — and spending, too. ideas that at the last election didn't do labour many favours. what is it that you hope to show
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to voters in the next seven weeks, beyond this room, that they haven't seen in the last two years since you've been the party leader? our message is one of inclusion. and social justice. and we're going to get that message out across the whole country. and i'm very confident of that. this invited audience of loyalists leapt to their feet. this was a classicjeremy corbyn speech, the kind of speech that won him the labour leadership election. he spelt out in sky—high letters how he'll pitch this campaign — the people versus the powerful. he's obviously a man of principle. he's a man of integrity. we know that for a fact. can he step up to the plate at the next level? well, he's got 50 days to do that. i'm really impressed. jeremy has always said the right thing, he hasjust never had the opportunity. he is a decent man. maybe decent people don't get elected. but he's also... he's got an allotment, he makes his own jam. did you know that? i did know that.
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well, there you go now! beyond the home crowd, in seats like luton, willjeremy corbyn and his team's campaign of us and them cut through? he hasn't got the oomph. he's a modern socialist, and i think, give him the chance and he will make changes. i don't think he is a coherent leader. and i've voted labour in the past, i'd never vote for him. inevitably, the prime minister claims he's not up to the job. she was on a low—key visit in marginal enfield. this election is about ensuring that we have strong and stable leadership in this country in the national interest. it's about strengthening our negotiating hand for brexit, and it's about sticking to our plan for a stronger britain, developing a more secure future for ordinary working people in this country. jeremy corbyn‘s a happy campaigner, comfortable with his fans. but he needs millions more. a brutal election beckons. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. let's speak to fabian hamilton, the shadow foreign minister. he joins me on webcam from leeds. he is the labour shadow minister for
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peace and disarmament. thank you for joining me. ithink peace and disarmament. thank you for joining me. i think a lot of the language mr corbyn used will have picked some interest. could we look at it with you? what does he mean by the rigged system ? at it with you? what does he mean by the rigged system?” at it with you? what does he mean by the rigged system? i think he means that the system that we have in this country, the fiscal and financial system allows some of the richest corporations and individuals to accumulate yet more wealth at the expense of many of the poorest, who are expense of many of the poorest, who a re often expense of many of the poorest, who are often penalised for working as ha rd are often penalised for working as hard as they can on national minimum wage that can barely keep up the cost of housing. how do you direct the system without alienating business and the wealth that we all rely on —— how de—rigged the system? the wealth creators need to realise it is in their own interest for wealth to be equal respect. i don't
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mean totally, we're not talking about a soviet state. we're talking about a soviet state. we're talking about closing the gap between the very wealthiest in the very poorest, allowing the opportunity both financially and in terms of education, health and housing the poorest in our society to do better. and those struggling at the moment like so many especially when they live in the biggest cities, they can barely keep up with the cost of housing. housing is one of the biggest crises and it is the nhs that will be starved of cash. that is already happening in the nhs is a real leveller for all the population of this country and we don't want to see and starved of cash. but that is not how you de—rig the system, saving the nhs, giving everyone money to live on, how do you de—rig acts of parliament? you need a
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change in the attitude that we have in society towards the very wealthy. we need people to understand when they are very wealthy that they have a duty to contribute more to society, to allow public services to be run efficiently and serve the people that need them. public services are the great leveller, and more importantly if you want to de—rig this system invest in public housing. we have been starved of decent quality and it is time we invested in houses that people can afford to rent that are well—managed, well built and environmentally friendly. that has been the case for a long time even when labour were in power, why did you not act them. we should have done and our last labour minister who is shadow minister for housing, john healey, he was only in office
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for months that he has some startling plans to make sure we address this. we should have done much more we did was bring up to standard some of the appalling homes by local authorities because of lack of investment through government funding. it was some achievement but not nearly enough, i think that housing will make a huge difference to the system and at the moment and will de—rig it to some extent because your home is such an important part of your life and such an important part of other people's lives. mr corbyn was keen to disassociate himself from the liberal elite which he claims has failed, how can anyone who becomes an mp claim they are not part of the liberal elite and part of the establishment as soon as they take their seat in the house of commons? there is some truth in that. remember thatjeremy has been a
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backbench mp for 30 years until he was elected as leader, you never took any front bench position, either in opposition or in government. this needs to be about much more than jeremy government. this needs to be about much more thanjeremy corbyn and his personality and what he will or won't do. the labour party is a party of hundreds of thousands of members. a party of deep rooted and deep—seated values in the importance of collective organisation and collective provision for all of us so collective provision for all of us so that we all benefit together. so that we all all stronger together than individually. the problem is that the tories want to fragment this society. mr corbyn said he did not like the fact that private companies can make a lot of money at the expense of the public, he mentioned southern rail in particular. how many utilities or transport franchises might have to be renationalised to make sure we all get a better service? there is a
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simple way to do this. gordon brown ironically showed the way. when the national express franchise on the east coast was given back to the government we had east coast mainline run effectively like a private company but 100% owned by the government with all the prophets, £200 million a year, going back to the treasury. for me that isn't modern way to nationalise, wait for the franchises to expire, do not read franchise, take them into public ownership. i think that would be enormously popular with the public because after all that investment can go back into the ra i lwa ys investment can go back into the railways and not into the hands of private investors and not into the hands of private investors all the profits of company shareholders. i'm sure we will return to some of these themes in the next few weeks. thank you forjoining us. thank you. the former ukip leader nigel farage has told the bbc he will not be standing as a candidate in forthcoming general election. mr farage has failed
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in seven attempts to get elected to westminster. ukip currently have no mps after douglas carswell quit the party last month. today he said he would stand down at the forthcoming election. let's get more from our chief political correspondent vicki young in westminster. so nigel farage is not going to try this time. he isn't although he seems confident that he could have won the seat in clacton in essex which douglas carswell is now standing down from. he says he feels he can have much more influence because he is an mep in brussels and strasbourg, says if he compares the influence he can have there in the next few years compared to being a commons backbencher he says there's no comparison. he says it would have been a vindication for him if he could have won seat, eighth time lucky, but that is not to be, for him. he says it would have been a very easy win after all those years
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he would have relished the idea, having failed so many times. i think it is going to be a real challenge for ukip. the broader point about how they will do at this general election, paul nuttall is now the party leader but they have been riven by arguments, they were only just starting to rebuild and this snap election has probably come very soon for them. and there's the broader question of what is the point of ukip now. that is what their opponents say, now that we have voted to leave the european union, the reason the party came into existence. of course the way that nigel farage campaigned for that nigel farage campaigned for that decision but now what will their pitch be to voters? they say they will make sure there is no backsliding on brexit and it won't be watered down in any way but i think in many seats they will struggle, certainly anecdotally that many ukip voters who say that they will vote conservative time. this
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could be a problem for ukip, and also a big help to theresa may as she tries to increase a majority in the house of commons. vicki young, thank you, for the moment. the green party has launched what it calls its ‘boldest‘ election campaign ever. the party set out its goals in bristol, where it hopes to take the bristol west seat from labour. it wants the voting age to be lowered to 16. co—leader caroline lucas, the party's only mp, said the greens would continue to tackle brexit, the environment and affordable housing. if you are a young person trying to get your foot if you are a young person trying to get yourfoot on if you are a young person trying to get your foot on the ladder is special in bristol it's a nightmare. we have to change the definition —— we have to have a party that delivers affordable housing instead of just changing delivers affordable housing instead ofjust changing the definition of affordable. the need for this party has never been greater, if you want to vote against an extreme brexit,
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to vote against an extreme brexit, to stand up for public interest in a more equal society and one that will a lwa ys more equal society and one that will always put climate change at the heart of all policy is the only way to do it nationally is heard green, the only way to do it in bristol west is to vote for the wonderful molly. the man challenging len mccluskey‘s position as head of the unite union — gerard coyne — has been suspended from his post as the union's west midlands regional secretary. the decision was announced as counting is about to get under way in the leadership ballot. no official reason has been given for his suspension. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages. at 10:40 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are david wooding, political editor of the sun on sunday and henry mance, political correspondent at the financial times. the headlines on bbc news. jeremy corbyn has pledged to challenge what he called a rig system and said the election result
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was not a foregone conclusion. the prime minister reiterates commitment to reduce net migration for tens of thousands following speculation that the goal might be scrapped. the former ukip leader nigel farage has said he will not stand in the forthcoming general election. now the sport, a full round—up from the bbc sports centre. good evening. they have kicked off at old trafford, it is the second leg of manchester united's europa league quarterfinal against anderlecht. jose mourinho criticised his strikers after the first leg last week which finished i—i strikers after the first leg last week which finished 1—1 in belgium. rashford and slattern ibrahimovic start. wayne rooney is on the bench, anderlecht threatened early but henrikh mkhitaryan has made it 1—0 to manchester united, inside ten minutes. they are leading 2—1 on aggregate. they've got that important away goal from last week.
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a good start for manchester united. the former aston villa and england defender ugo ehiogu is in hospital after collapsing at the tottenham training centre. ehiogu, seen here winning the league cup with villa in 1996, coaches totenham's under 23's side. spurs say the 44—year—old received immediate treatment on site from their medical staff before being transferred to hospital by ambulance. andy murray says he's been pleased with his progress over the past few weeks, even though he was knocked out of the monte carlo masters in the third round today. it was his first tournament back after over a month out with an elbow injury. he lost in three sets to the spaniard albert ramos—vinolas. drew savage reports . he is on the way back but the world number one is not where he wants to be just yet. his serve wasn't working perfectly on the day of his comeback but he was good enough to win a set
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against albert fenners remoaners. the spaniard showed why when he took the second set —— albert ramos—vinolas. murray went 4—1 up in the decider. what happened next was a surprise, andy murray feels he is not 100% yet that credit to the man from barcelona, a late developer aged 29 and stays like this make it worthwhile, it isn't often that you come back from 4—0 in the final set against the world number one, even at 4-4 against the world number one, even at 4—1; you would normally back murray but ramos—vinolas had the momentum and wasn't going to let go. the biggest win of his career and murray with room to improve. england rugby union coach eddiejones has named his squad to face argentina in two tests this summer. he has lost 16 of his players to lions duty and almost half his touring party is
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uncapped. exciting, a great opportunity for us. you don't normally get this opportunity where you can bring a bunch of young enthusiastic and potentially good players into the squad at one time soi players into the squad at one time so i see this as an opportunity to ta ke so i see this as an opportunity to take the side forward and what i wa nt take the side forward and what i want these guys, if i can develop three orfour of them want these guys, if i can develop three or four of them to be better than the lions guys, it will have been an enormously successful tour and that is what we're looking for and that is what we're looking for andi and that is what we're looking for and i think we can. day six of the world snooker championship at the crucible theatre in sheffield. a big second—round match tonight between two former champions, ronnie 0'sullivan ticking on shaun murphy. ronnie 0'sullivan took first frame with a break of 91, murphy responded with brilliant potting. five—time champion ronnie 0'sullivan, often controversial, took the next two, winning the one
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before the mid—session interval with a 128 break. great britain's 0lympic medallist germaine mason has been killed in a motorcycle accident in jamaica. he won silver in the high jump jamaica. he won silver in the high jump at the 2008 games in beijing. he was born injamaica, qualified to represent britain to his father and switched allegiance in 2006. his friend usain bolt was among several athletes to attend the scene of the accident in the early hours. 0ne uk athletics coach who worked with him in beijing describes him as an outstanding athlete and a truly lovely man, a great ambassador of british high jumping. he lovely man, a great ambassador of british highjumping. he was lovely man, a great ambassador of british high jumping. he was 34. that's all the sport for mall. much more in the next hour. thank you very much, zero later. some breaking news from france. two police officers are reported to have been shot, according to news agencies, it happened in paris, the details are coming in but the
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authorities have ordered the evacuation of areas close to the champs—elysees, a central part of the city, very popular with visitors. two police officers reported to have been shot. details still coming in about the extent of their injuries. this weekend is the first round of the french election and the latest polls suggest it's a tight race. all eleven candidates are being grilled this evening on french television. each contender is getting fifteen minutes to convince french voters they should be in the second round run off. christian fraser is in paris this evening. the histories of france and america have often followed a similar path. the american revolution that ended in 1783 was quickly followed by the french revolution of 1789. the question is whether history is about to repeat itself this coming fortnight. there are obvious
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similarities between donald trump and marine le pen. nationalism, populism, protectionism, support for brexit, a hatred of the mainstream media and both cast by the people as revolutionaries in the battle against the establishment. there are many things besides marine le pen that we regard as quintessentially french, chanel, the food, the fine wines, the smell of burnt rubber in the paris metro. and equally distinctive is the french style of thinking. translation: the programme of mr melenchon goes a long way to changing capitalism. i am for emmanuel macron, i would changing capitalism. i am for emmanuel macron, iwould not changing capitalism. i am for emmanuel macron, i would not vote for marine le pen. yet these days france's increasingly inward looking, farfrom france's increasingly inward looking, far from the fashion boutiques of the left bank, chronic and deployment. worst in the city suburbs and the young and the ethnic
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minorities, there is a slow growth and debt, amid all this doubt a feeling that french culture is itself in crisis. since charles de gaulle airport and the fifth republic in 1958 the french political system has been dominated by the system. now the socialists and the republicans. but this weekend three of the four main candidates, marine le pen, emmanuel macron and melenchon are considered outsiders and it is possible that the second round will pit the far right against the far left. imagine the consequences, not only for france, but for europe as well. traditionally the french is the first round of the presidential election to vote for the politician they want and the second round to vote for the politician they fear. the odds are still stacked against marine le pen but to predict the outcome this weekend would be foolhardy in the extreme. given how wrong we all were over brexit and trump. christian fraser reporting
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from paris. let me remind you of the breaking news who brought you. we are hearing reports that two police officers have been shot in central paris. we can speak to our correspondent, james reynolds, in paris. what are you hearing, james? there is certainly a security incident going on in the centre of paris. i was walking on a street close to the champs—elysees about 20 minutes ago and we saw a group of people running towards us, young women who looked panicking, they said they had seen someone panicking, they said they had seen someone with a gun. we cannot verify what they were saying but they were certainly running away. a few minutes later armed police on that street next to the champs—elysees shouted to people to move back. like
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eve ryo ne shouted to people to move back. like everyone else would you treated to safety a nd everyone else would you treated to safety and looked from a safe position and saw that people were still being told to stay back by the police, by two armed policemen on the street. we can hear a helicopter overhead at the moment. we also hearing reports that there may have been fatalities in some form. hearing reports that there may have been fatalities in some formlj cannot confirm that at the moment, we are still working out exactly what happened but given what i have seen what happened but given what i have seenin what happened but given what i have seen in this street i imagine the police are still trying to work out themselves what has happened. certainly the tone of voice of the two armed officers in this street and no doubt in other nearby streets gives some idea of what from their point of view is the extreme urgency of the situation. james, for the moment, thank you very much. just to remind you of what we have heard, two police officers have been reported to have been shot in central paris, the details are still coming in. police still trying to get a clear picture of what happened. the authorities have
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ordered the evacuation of areas close to the champs—elysees which is main road through the centre of paris. there is a report, we only haveit paris. there is a report, we only have it through the reuters news agency quoted a police source that the person who fired at the police in paris has now been killed. that is only coming through to reuters and we do like to confirm these things ourselves but that is the report that we are hearing. more about that as we get the details. more now on the labour leader jeremy corbyn first major speech of the election campaign. mr corbyn rejected the idea that labour could not win the general election onjune 8th. match of the media and the establishment are saying, this election is a foregone conclusion. they think there are rules in politics which, if you don't follow by and doffing your cap to powerful
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people, accepting that things cannot really change, you can't win. but of course they do not want us to win because when we win it is the people, not a powerful, who win! jeremy corbyn speaking earlier today. i'm joined by stephen bush, special correspondent at the new statesman. what did you make of his speech?m was definitely his best performance since he became labour leader. it felt they have worked out a way of being authenticallyjeremy corbyn with a strategy that makes sense into ‘s of maximising what they see as their path to victory. he was kind of channelling phot leave, talking about helping the powerless. it was an effective way of getting their vote out. why would phot leave be an appealing model to him? their vote out. why would phot leave be an appealing model to him7m
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spoke effectively to people who felt that they were powerless and did not have a connection, they wanted big and fairly. and melenchon did not have many popular politicians at its head apart from boris johnson. have many popular politicians at its head apart from borisjohnson. mr corbyn isn't that popular at the moment so they think they can blend that model, vote leave had higher public spending at one end and anger at the elite at the other into an intellectually successful force. how important will other labour mps be in this campaign if mr corbyn is not to your taste but you are tempted to vote labour. for individual people that will be important. people will be tempted to go back to their homes, bunker down, and fight the same election that they did in 2010, although i don't like jeremy same election that they did in 2010, although i don't likejeremy corbyn, i would say, we've got to have a strong opposition to the tories.
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they think that will see them through in their own seats. the latest opinion polls are not good for labour. really what is the prospect of mr corbyn becoming the next prime minister, even in a big coalition. they look slim, on the face of it. the big shifts are if the tv debates happen, we have seen in france with the surge of the other candidate, the tv debates give impetus. and when the voters see jeremy in question time arena which he does well in, that could change their minds. he defied the odds to become leader of the party when many people said he never would. exactly. when party members turned around it was the first newsnight hustings when he was impressive, fluent, he knows what he believes. particularly that panel format which he has been doing for 30 years. yet today we've already heard that idea of maybe
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renationalising parts of the transport network or utilities that aren't doing right by us. us, the paying public. is that a return to old labour ideas that will play well with an electorate in 2017?|j old labour ideas that will play well with an electorate in 2017? i think that's what a lot of people in westminster and if you look at the polls, a lot of people will say, it won't work. their argument was not the triumph of trump, the triumph of brexit, the success of marine le pen shows them that they are entering the end of the liberal consensus of the end of the liberal consensus of the past 40 years and we are in a new political era when the old rules to apply. if the old rules don't apply could we afford to go all out and returned to the labour party that we knew before tony blair? that is what this campaign waterproof. do
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you get a better result or a supercharged version of defeat? we will talk about at length between now and then. a quick update, we understand police are evacuating the streets around the shops all use following reports of shooting. two police officers are said to be shot in central paris. a helicopter reported to be flying low over central paris tonight. there is a reporter ‘s well that the person who fired on police has also been shot. a police source said that person has been killed. a lot of questions still about what has been going on here but the police authority is calling on the public to avoid this area because the police are armed
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and out on the street, involved in a follow—up operation. there was more cloud across the country today but we managed some sunshine. it is here where we have the highest temperatures, up to 19 degrees. you can see the cloud, it has been lumpy, but again, predominantly dry and it will stay that way to this evening and overnight. temperatures will fall away. in the north, where we have the next weather front lining up, it will notjust bring a strain but also strong gale force winds. behind that weather front hides the colder air. it will be significantly cooler across the far north of scotland and the northern isles. the most of us, dry, fairly
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cloudy and bright with some sunshine. the cold air is lurking across northern scotland and through the weekend, it will make its way southwards. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: two policemen are reported to have been shot in central paris. the area around the champs elysees has been evacuated. jeremy corbyn's cast himself as the anti—establishment candidate of the general election, promising to change what he called a rigged system set up by the powerful and wealthy. but, of course, they do not want us to win because, when we win, it is the people, not the powerful, who win. theresa may sticks to her pledge to reduce annual net migration to below 100,000 a year after britain leaves the eu. the former ukip leader, nigel farage, says he will not be
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standing in the general election on the 8th ofjune. 11 candidates are taking to the stage in a televised set—piece debate ahead of the first—round vote on sunday. that will take place across the backdrop of the shooting. two police officers had been shot in central paris in the central boulevard. these are live pictures coming to us from the centre of the french capital. there is another police operation underway following up from what has happened in the last half hour or what has happened in the last half hourorso, and armed what has happened in the last half hour or so, and armed police are out on the street. james, we are hearing reports that two police officers
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have been shot? yes. the reuters news agency, which takes time to check its reports and sources, is saying on twitter, one policeman killed, another wounded in paris shooting. the shooter has also been killed. that is what a police source told the reuters news agency. the bbc is unable to confirm that independently, but nevertheless that is the latest information coming out the news agencies here in paris. i was out on the streets with my collea g u es was out on the streets with my colleagues earlier on and we did see one colleagues earlier on and we did see u colleagues earlier on and we did see one group of young women run away from a side street, looking terrified. after that, police on the road we were told everybody to get back. they have continued to do so, looking tense and urgent. we continue to hear a helicopter in the air. we are seeing pictures of a great deal of activity near the arctic triomphe. a number of police
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ca i’s arctic triomphe. a number of police cars with blue lights flashing and sirens sounding, making their way along that broad central street. we are now hearing that the shooting was very probably a terrorist act. that is a police was being quoted again. what has happened in this pa rt again. what has happened in this part of the city in response to the shooting? we, like almost everybody else in this central area of paris, are restricted for our movements, particularly given the history of the paris is had to live through in recent yea rs the paris is had to live through in recent years of one attack followed by another. a lot of people have decided to stay indoors and away from windows. but from the small advantage point we have had, we can see two police officers patrolling
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one side rd. when i was out beforehand with my colleagues, what things were going on or shortly afterwards, i could already see police. it was notable there was a very heavy police presence there anyway. how much of that is down towards what france have been to in the last few years and also the fact we are heading towards a french presidential election? both. france has had a history of a number of attacks, the charlie hebdo attack and the batter plan attack, which is made this country nervous. there is also an election, and that will come as no surprise to anybody here in paris. this part of paris is where
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you are automatically drawn to the visiting the city. i am sure a lot of people watching will no the champs elysees. very many people when they come to paris, you cannot visit paris without visiting the tenth two. one side, you get the arc de triomphe, and the other side, the louvre museum. it is the centre of the city. that has been a particular worry for the authorities in recent yea rs, worry for the authorities in recent years, bearing this may be a target. there were so many police when i was out earlier on the street. one thing we will have to look at in the next few minutes and hours when we get the timetable, chronology, is to see how quickly police might have been able to respond because they would have been very close by and indeed might have been targeted because they were on the street. you mention how many police were on the street.
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there are even more on the champs elysees and around the ark to triomphe. we can see the in the protective clothing, they are armed, a great deal of activity, police vehicles coming and going. police sources also telling reuters that at least two attackers were involved in this paris shooting, and as we are hearing, one of them has been killed. james, on a normal day, how visible is the security presence in paris another big cities?|j visible is the security presence in paris another big cities? i visit paris another big cities? i visit paris periodically as part of the job of the bbc correspondent based in europe and i know the levels of security. this was as big as i have seen security. this was as big as i have seen for some time. when i came a couple of months ago, security was not noticeable. i remember seeing soldiers in camouflage uniforms,
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making a note to myself that that was not even strange, to see soldiers dressed as they were in war zone. the people of paris have got used to seeing such a security presence. it might be very different a few years ago when the security situation was not scary, but now they have got used to sing notjust police officers but soldiers on the streets and particularly among the main boulevard of the champs elysees. we are still looking at these live pictures, police vans and ca rs these live pictures, police vans and cars coming and going around the arc de triomphe. there is other traffic managing to get through. we can see ca rs managing to get through. we can see cars and coaches. but it is much quieter in terms of people and pedestrians out on the street because this area has been evacuated. how concerned are the authorities, as far as you are aware, about the planning of an
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attack to coincide with the presidential election? they will be extremely concerned. earlier this week, there was news of two men arrested on suspicion of making advanced plans to carry out an attack. the worry tonight will be not just that one attacker attack. the worry tonight will be notjust that one attacker may have been taken down and killed but there might be another one out there, and it is dangerous to speculate, but the same time it is important to look at history of recent attacks. if you look at the history of recent attacks, that explains the behaviour of the police tonight, trying to ensure that everyone is indoors. and just to narrow down the vocabulary. you talked about evacuating areas. what i've seen to be more precise in this particular street, they are not evacuating buildings, they are simply telling people to stay inside, to get off the street. i had not been able to go out for 20
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minutes, but you do see people indoors and out windows, but i have not seen movement on the streets because that would replace all people on danger. i did see one car reverse down this road and the police man shone his flashlight on the car, looking very urgent in his response. that gives you an indication of the mood and tension there is here while police try to work out exactly what is going on, is the attack finished? how many attackers were the? let's recap on what we are seeing here in these live pictures. there is a police van was parked in the centre of the champs elysees in central paris, not far away from the arc de triomphe. we have seen reporters at the street as but as james was saying, a lot of people are being told, avoid open spaces, stay indoors if you can stop
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reports of a helicopter flying low over central paris. this incident is said to have taken place in the central boulevard of the champs elysees, ordinarily a very busy, popular destination for visitors as well as people who live in paris. the reports we are hearing via the reuters news agency is that at least two attackers have been involved in this shooting and one of them is reported to have been killed. there are two police officers who have been shot, one of them we understand has died and the other has been wounded. again, these reports coming to us from reuters and the afp news agency is also reporting some of these details. very probably a terrorist act, is what police sources have said the reuters. as
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james was saying, because of the history of recent attacks, that may be why they are so clear about that so be why they are so clear about that so early. they seem to be able to decide so quickly, the nature of these attacks? yes, although, to put these attacks? yes, although, to put the opposite point of view, if someone the opposite point of view, if someone has fired deliberate shots towards police officers, it would seem towards police officers, it would seem there is no other motivation all plausible motivation than some sort of terror or political act. that is almost the definition of an attack on policeman, if indeed this assailant or assailants frydek policeman. we do know from a number of reports, the suggestion that one policeman has been killed and another injured, but trying to pause and take in the information, we need to be very careful to work out, were
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the targeted? did they stumble upon the targeted? did they stumble upon the attack? and how did that mesh in with what we saw when we were out near the champs elysees, when we saw a group of young women running towards us? one woman at the time said, there was a man with a gun. i did not have a chance to ask if she saw him, if she heard a shot. she was not an indication of some of the mood in paris tonight. they're in mind, a lot of people would know to stay indoors. it is notjust pretty ands, there are almost as many tourists as parisiens who will be trying to find out whether they can get to the lobby of the hotel, at the same? these people may feel as

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