Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  April 21, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

9:00 am
hello, it's friday, it's 9am, i'm joanna gosling in for victoria. welcome to the programme. france under attack again — a gun man opens fire on a policeman on the historic champs—elysee in central paris, killing one and injuring others. authorities say he was known to them. translation: we are convinced that the investigations will show that this attack was terrorist in nature. we'll be bringing you live updates and analysis throughout the programme. also on today's programme — a clearer picture is emerging of young people who commit computer crimes, or hackers. a report by the national crime agency says that they do it to show off to other teenagers, not to make money. we are talking to a former hacker. hello, welcome to the programme, we're live until ”am this morning. we are going to talk about netflix series 13 reasons why. it's been criticised by some over its portrayal of suicide.
9:01 am
now the series writer has given his defence of the show in an open letter to a magazine. do you watch? what do you think? we are also talking to a dad about why his blogs on having testicular cancer have proved such a hit. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our main story today... the french authorities say they know the identity of the man who shot dead a policeman, and seriously wounded two others, on the champs—elysees in central paris last night. the gunman was killed when officers returned fire, but prosecutors say they won't release his name until they know whether or not he was working alone. the french president, francois hollande, has said he's convinced the motive is terrorism. the islamic state group has claimed responsibility. james reynolds reports from paris. you have to stay back, please. the area is dangerous because of shot gun.
9:02 am
please, stay back. in the minutes after the attack, the police in paris took every movement as a threat. at this stage officers didn't know if any other gunmen might still be at large. the shooting happened right in the centre of the city, as parisians and tourists were heading out to dinner. translation: i was walking on the pavement. there was a bus full of police. the man parked just in front of the bus and then he got out a kalashnikov and then he shot six times. i thought it was fireworks. then he went and hid behind a lorry. translation: we were moving towards a car and then i heard two or three shots, but i didn't realise they were shots to start with. and, well, then there was just panic all around. everyone started running down the champs—elysee. just by instinct, i didn't stop to work out what was going on, ijust ran too. the champs—elysee was already full of police officers guarding against an attack on civilians, but it seems that this shooting targeted officers themselves. translation: we are convinced
9:03 am
that the track the investigation is on will reveal that the event is of a terrorist nature. late into the night here the police are still stopping people from approaching the scene of the attack just a block or so away in the champs—elysee. and everyone around here wants to know exactly what happened. the police want to make sure that all nearby streets are now safe. officers kept their handguns drawn. they searched everyone coming out of a nearby building. this country will now investigate the shooting and make sure that its plans for sunday's presidential election are in place. the french prime minister has also been speaking about the attack this morning. bernard cazeneuve said that the attack would not stand in the way of the election taking place. translation: ladies and gentlemen,
9:04 am
the government is fully mobilised that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for oui’ fundamental democratic moment for our country from damning dead. on the eve of a major rendezvous, i call on everyone to show the spirit of responsibility and dignity. it is oui’ of responsibility and dignity. it is our duty to not give in to fear, intimidation, and manipulation. otherwise, this would only serve the gain is the enemies of the republic. also will, we should never succumb to division, and in tolerance, which must be fought. it is indeed unity more than ever that shall prevail. we will be talking much more about this throughout the programme, there was of course swift security reaction to this incident, as there was at the attack at the louvre recently, so we will be asking what lessons have been learned in france
9:05 am
after the terror attacks that have happened there in recent years. more than 230 people killed in france since january 2000 and 15. we will also talk about the impact this might have on the election as french voters go to the polls in the first round of the presidential election on sunday. if you have any thoughts on sunday. if you have any thoughts on that or anything else we are covering, do get in touch in the usual ways. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. german prosecutors have confirmed they have arrested a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing the borussia dortmund team bus last week. prosecutors say the man, who has german and russian nationality, was a market trader hoping to make money if the price of shares in the team fell. with us now is our berlin correspondent, jenny hill. in the immediate aftermath of the attack as people speculated what the
9:06 am
attack as people speculated what the attack might be —— what the motive of the attack might become this probably was not one of the things that came to mind. no, this has taken a bizarre twist. dortmund is one of germany's most beloved football teams and many people feared the country had once again been targeted by islamist extremists. instead, as you say, prosecutors have now arrested this man, in his late 20s, withjoint german and russian nationality. they said that prior to the attack he bought something like 15,000 stock market options which enable you to sell shares when they drop in value, so sell shares when they drop in value, so the idea, prosecutors believe, was that he was motivated by gaining significantly financially should the shares of the dortmund football club drop significantly. they believe thatis drop significantly. they believe that is his motive but they also say he was staying at the same hotel as the players, his hotel room had a line of sight to the site of the explosions. we have had more detail
9:07 am
about those explosions, you may have heard that three devices had been planted in a hedge along the roadside, two at ground level, one higher ups. they were packed with metal pins, one of which was found embedded in a headrest inside the players‘ coach as it passed. one of them was also found 250 metres from them was also found 250 metres from the original site of the explosive device, so a very nasty attack indeed. we also know that in the event just two people were indeed. we also know that in the eventjust two people were injured, a police man who suffered minor injuries and one of the players, who had to have surgery on his wrist following damage from broken glass from the back of the bus, we think. so the story has taken an odd turn but i think there will be many who are rather relieved this has not been another systematic is attack on german soil. nevertheless, this could have been a very deadly attack and prosecutors are planning a press
9:08 am
conference at around lunchtime today. just briefly, has there been any reaction to this particular development, this bizarre development, this bizarre development, as you describe it, from rusted dortmund or others? it isa from rusted dortmund or others? it is a little early in the day, prosecutors have onlyjust issued the statement so we are waiting for reaction to come through. i think you have to bear in mind that borussia dortmund is a very popular clu b borussia dortmund is a very popular club in germany, possibly one of its most well loved, there was a real sense of outrage that anyone would strike and strike in this way on a football team, germany‘s national game, there is such a passion here for football, this attack really struck a chord notjust with bands of the game but people here in germany and of course football fans all over the globe. 0k, jenny, thank you very much for that. government plans described by critics as a stealth death tax have been scrapped. the proposals involved increasing the fees paid by some people when a family member dies. the ministry ofjustice said there was now not enough time for the legislation to go through parliament.
9:09 am
prison authorities in the us state of arkansas have carried out their first execution for more than a decade. the lethal injection of ledell lee, who was convicted of murder, was given the go—ahead just 30 minutes before his death warrant expired. it‘s the first of several executions planned before supplies of one of the drugs used expires. the average cybercriminal investigated by the national crime agency is just 17—years—old and is motivated by showing off in front of friends, rather than money. that‘s the conclusion of a new report by the nca, which has been looking at ways to stop youngsters getting drawn into online crime. the internet is breeding a new kind of criminal who‘d never normally
9:10 am
break the law. they‘re young and tech savvy and sometimes don‘t even realise what they‘re doing is wrong. investigators questioned teenagers convicted of cyber crime and other young hackers. the report found financial gain wasn‘t a priority. but they did want to impress other hackers. and thought the risk of getting caught was low. the early motivations can be the challenge, can be proving to their peers online that they can complete the challenge or they can break into certain things, or find vulnerabilities. but we do see, if they are good at that and if they can build their reputations in forums and prove to their peers, we do see them then getting into this more for monetary reasons as well. this self—confessed hacker, now 16, claims he taught himself. ijust read about it on the news. i got interested, wanted to know how it worked and how this actually happens, how a website gets taken down. i researched it from there, really. i was 12, 13. i found it easy. you learn about the computer misuse
9:11 am
act, which is something you are likely to fall foul of if you go off and do cyber security without any guidance. the nca research also shows early intervention can stop criminal behaviour. here, teenagers take part in a tech competition, learning how to hack and stay on the right side of the law. and just after 10am, joanna will be speaking to a former teenage hacker about his motivations to get involved in cyber—crime. three purpose—built blocks are to open within high—security jails to hold the most dangerous extremist prisoners away from other inmates. the units will have their own facilities and be able to hold up to 28 people. ministers have said they wanted to isolate extremist inmates who seek to poison the minds of others. a ban on sugary drinks in hospitals in england is being proposed, unless suppliers cut their sales over the next year.
9:12 am
nhs england say it must set a healthy example to help combat obesity, diabetes and tooth decay, but the soft drinks industry says it shouldn‘t be singled out. simonjones reports. it‘s said that a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, but the country‘s sweet tooth is having a devastating impact on public health, according to nhs england. it insists suppliers must cut the sales of sugary drinks in hospital shops, restaurants and vending machines over the next year to under 10% of total drink sales. many retailers, including wh smith and marks & spencer, have signed up. nhs england say if all don‘t come on board, a ban will be introduced. as a nation we are consuming too much sugar which means more people are overweight, putting them at greater risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and common forms of cancer.
9:13 am
so this is the nhs taking a lead on an important health issue. to fight obesity, the who recommends a maximum of six teaspoons of sugar day. just one can of drink can take you over that limit. the idea of making hospitals healthier is aimed notjust at patients and their visitors, it is also sending a message out to staff. the nhs employs 1.3 million people but it is believed 700,000 of them are overweight or obese. in scotland, 70% of drinks must be sugarfree in hospital shops. wales and northern ireland have introduced their own eating and drinking initiatives. but the british soft drinks association says while it makes sense to promote sales of healthy options, soft drinks should not be singled out for a potential ban, particularly when companies have made great efforts to reduce calories. that is a summary of the main news.
9:14 am
let‘s go to sport, some sad news this morning. extremely sad news, in the last few moments we have found out that former england international hugo ek york has passed away. a statement came this morning from spurs, where he had been working as a coach. if you are not familiar with the career of ugo ehiogu, he made over 200 appearances for aston villa between 1991 and 2000. he then spent seven between 1991 and 2000. he then spent seve n years between 1991 and 2000. he then spent seven years with middlesbrough, when the league cup, as you can see there, with villa in 1996 and also with middlesbrough in 200a. he was
9:15 am
capped four times by england and also played for a number of clubs up and down the country including west bromwich albion, leeds, rangers and sheffield united before he retired in 2009. this will be devastating news for everyone concerned with all of those clubs. he was seen as one of those clubs. he was seen as one of football cosma good guys, a fantastic personality on and off the pitch. his work with spurs will have made him one of the highest position and black coaches in english football so it will be devastating news for many concerned with the game. very sad, just 44 years old. we will be talking more about him and hear more tributes to him throughout the programme. let‘s turn to what was happening in terms of football last night. marcus rashford putting in a great performance for manchester united ? another good night for wonderkid marcus rashford. the 19—year—old manchester united forward added to his goal against chelsea last weekend with the winner in their europa
9:16 am
league quarter—final against belgian side anderlecht at old trafford. it‘s been somewhat of a disappointing season personally for rashford, only scoring 10 in 49 appearances in all competitions, but this was a vital one. just like the first—leg, it ended 1—1 on the night which meant extra time but with a penalty shootout looming rashford showed neat footwork to quell any anxiety from the home crowd. there were some very concerned faces though as united lost two of their most influential players to knee injuries. defender marcos rojo and top scorer zlatan ibrahimovic could have played their last matches this season. managerjose mourinho says he isn‘t optimistic after early news on his players. that will be a big concern with a place in the top four and the europa league to fight for. and a terrific night for two more britons? well what a fantastic performance from 17—year—old ellie downie. she has become the first british gymnast to reach every individualfinal at the european gymnastics championships. she also topped the all around
9:17 am
standings, and the vault and floor standings in romania and also qualified for the beam and bars. her older sister becky joins her in those two finals with 16—year—old alice kinsella going in the all around. claudia fragapane will go in the floor final. so much to look forward to in cluj. ellie downie saying she is delighted with her performances so far. there is still room for improvement. we will find out about that later today. there is really much room for improvement when it comes to swimming. duncan scott hailed a phenomenal day as he‘s become the first briton to swim under 48 seconds in the 100 metres freestyle. scott broke his own national record, clocking 47.9 seconds to win gold at the british swimming championships in sheffield. that also gave him a place at this summer‘s world championships. scott won two olympic relay silver medals at last year‘s olympic games in rio. very good news for him. just to
9:18 am
recap before we go, that devastatingly sad news that we have heard this morning. ugo ehiogu has passed away at the age of 44, due to a cardiac arrest. we will hear more tributes to ugo ehiogu throughout the programme. we can bring you this from the official fa twitter account. we are devastated to hear the news that ugo ehiogu has passed away. described as one of football‘s good guys. just 44 yea rs one of football‘s good guys. just 44 years old. he was the under 23 coach at tottenham. he collapsed at the training ground yesterday after suffering a cardiac arrest. very sadly, tottenham announced his death this morning. they have put out a statement, with immense sadness we announce the passing of ugo ehiogu. he had a great playing career, playing for england, beginning his career as a trainee at west brom
9:19 am
before he went to aston villa. he played more than 300 matches for aston villa and played in the fa cup final defeat against chelsea in 2000. he scored a club record fee when hejoined 2000. he scored a club record fee when he joined middlesbrough 2000. he scored a club record fee when hejoined middlesbrough for £8 million. in 2001 he scored his only goalfor england million. in 2001 he scored his only goal for england in million. in 2001 he scored his only goalfor england in sven—goran eriksson‘s first game in charge, a 3-0 eriksson‘s first game in charge, a 3—0 friendly against spain. he had four england caps. the fa saying this morning that they are devastated to hear the news that ugo ehiogu has passed away. we will bring you more tributes to him throughout the programme. last night, as the 11 french presidential election candidates appeared on television for their chance to pitch for the top job, a terror attack was unfolding in central paris. a gunman — known to the security services it has since been learnt — opened fire on a bus with police inside killing one and injuring others. the gunman was later shot dead.
9:20 am
it comes with just two days to go before the first round of the french presidential election on sunday. this is what marine le pen of the far right front national and emmanuel macron, head of the political movement en marche, said when they heard about the attack. translation: i left the set earlier and i heard that the nightmare is starting again. i was gripped by feelings i felt before, of sadness and dull anger at the same time. feelings of sadness, of course, for the law—enforcement officers who are once more paying a heavy price in the fight against islamic fundamentalism. translation: tonight, while we have been talking, we know that at least one police officer has been killed. this threat is incalculable and it is going to be a part of our daily lives for years to come. the latest of elements are coming through, marine le pen is speaking right now. let‘s hear what she‘s saying. —— developments.
9:21 am
translation: we should fight those that provoke people and promote terrorism. the sympathisers of islamists should be fought. for ten yea rs, islamists should be fought. for ten yea rs , we islamists should be fought. for ten yea rs, we have islamists should be fought. for ten years, we have seen this happening. in respect of the state of law, the penal code should be applied to those people, while people are being judged and being held in detention. the universities and france have become the fiefdom ofjihadism. we should have fundamental reforms for the establishment, like immigration, asylum or access to citizenship. the war can only be one
9:22 am
by coherence, and ourfight citizenship. the war can only be one by coherence, and our fight against islamism, so that they cannot escape from this. we cannot win this war if we do not put an end to those who have allowed the criminals to carry out their fourth assassination attempt against a policeman, and he was sentenced to prison in the past. his liberation by prosecutors, he will now become the symbol of the failure of the politics in the country, because it is not protecting the french people. it allows people to hurt our people. we should re—establish a double penalty, double punishment,
9:23 am
sentences, all of these measures are urgently needed now. i will take the reverse decision, compared to the two governments of the left that we have seen in the past years, and the president of the republic, if elected as president of the republic, i will put in place a plan to fight islamist and, to protect the french, so that we can live in the french, so that we can live in the republic. long live the republic, long live france. thank you. marine le pen, speaking there about reports that the man, believed to have carried out the terror attack in paris, had previously been sentenced to 15 years in prison for attempted to kill a police officer. he has still not been formally named. in belgium, they are saying
9:24 am
he isa named. in belgium, they are saying he is a french citizen. there was some spec elation he may have come from belgium. we still do not have formal identification from the authorities. they say they do not wa nt to authorities. they say they do not want to formally identify the attacker, although they know who he is, until they can be certain there was not a second attack. let‘s go live to paris, and our correspondent there. what is the latest on the investigation, karin? in the last hour, we have learned that three people close to the attacker have been held in custody, and one man in belgium turned himself in to authorities. he was a suspect. the authorities. he was a suspect. the authorities are not telling us to much more about the attacker until they work out whether he was acting alone or as part of a wider network. we heard marie le pen, very much still on the campaign trail, saying what she believes should have been done because this man was already
9:25 am
known to authorities. very much criticising governments of recent yea rs, criticising governments of recent years, saying what she would do, alternatively, as president, were she to be elected. 15, the far right national front is anti—immigration. she wants to close france‘s borders, pull—out of the schengen zone, with free movement in europe, completely. how much is her message resonating? france has suffered repeatedly with attacks over the last couple of yea rs or attacks over the last couple of years or so. within the polls, she is not the front runner. the latest ones have her sliding further back? yes, they are really interesting. although some people are saying that the attacks of last night could mean a swing to the right, a swing towards those candidates, francois fillon and marine le pen, who are perhaps considered to be stronger and tougher on law and order, but in the past we have to remember that, after the shootings at the bataclan,
9:26 am
the socialist president, his ratings actually went up. it is much more complicated to see the political picture. it was already very complicated in the first place, the four leading candidates within a hair‘s four leading candidates within a hair ‘s breadth of each other, and 20%, all around the margin of error. the election has been completely predictable, even more so now. thank you. let‘s talk more about the reaction to the attack and the potential impact on the presidential election, the first round of voting is on sunday. the candidates were speaking ina is on sunday. the candidates were speaking in a debate last night. thank you both forjoining us. what
9:27 am
is the reaction to the latest attack? well, the atmosphere is subdued. on the other hand, it is something that the french have become accustomed to. we know we‘re here for a long haul. these are likely to repeat themselves. here for a long haul. these are likely to repeat themselvesm it might have a slight impact on how people will vote on sunday. but i would not say massively. you know, not as if it had happened for the first time. other subjects, not as if it had happened for the first time. othersubjects, like not as if it had happened for the first time. other subjects, like the economy, loom larger than terrorism. that is really the feeling in france. it is a global issue. radical islamism is here to stay. what about the charge that in this attack, and in previous ones, the perpetrator was known to the
9:28 am
authorities? it is a theme that keeps coming back. we heard from marine le pen, saying that the government must immediately expel foreigners monitored by intelligence services. how do people react, each time, when it emerges some body was on the radar? well, you must give credit to the people in the intelligence agencies. it is not just a question of closing borders. they know that very well. the situation is quite complicated. again, it goes far beyond the french borders. it is perhaps something we have to deal with in belgium, for instance. it is also about cooperation between the intelligence services. actually, a few days ago, you might remember that two islamist radicals were arrested in marseille,
9:29 am
thanks to rate from british intelligence services. again, marine le pen is extremely vocal, she is very vocal about every single subject. it will appeal to some french voters. but i think being so vocal has a limited appeal. there was a swift reaction from the authorities to this attack. it was over quickly. the same happened at the louvre, when there was an attempted attack. what have the security services learned as a result of what has been happening in the country? there are some things we don‘t know. we also know that there have been a lot of foiled attacks. recently, as i said, two people were arrested in marseille. because of the first and second round, it is a very sensitive period for france and attacks are being devised. imagine yesterday, the
9:30 am
attacker had a kalashnikov, he did notaim at attacker had a kalashnikov, he did not aim at the many civilians and tourists walking down the champs elysees, but targeted the security forces. it could have been much more dramatic yesterday. you know, we have to be careful. yesterday was a terrible blow. but we‘re not talking about massive numbers of casualties, like we had in november 20 15. about massive numbers of casualties, like we had in november 2015. what about the psychological and also economic impact? well, one attack after the other means that, of course, tourism is on the decline in paris, which is one of the first capital cities visited
9:31 am
in the world, and in france, on the other hand, like as you said in the loop attack, orfor other hand, like as you said in the loop attack, or for that matter yesterday, the police reaction is now extremely swift, and attackers are shot dead immediately. sorry to interrupt, i was going to say, let‘s talk more about the election because we we re talk more about the election because we were intending to speak to you about that, obviously, because of the fact that we are just two gave away from france coming to the goals on sunday in the first round of the presidential vote —— going to the polls on sunday. we talked about marine le pen, she was speaking live as we came to you. what about the other candidates now, is it looking like it will be emmanuel macron and marine le pen in the final two,
9:32 am
because that is what the polls have been indicating? that is what the polls say. of course now, who knows, after brexit and trump being elected, and also francois fillon, french pollsters are usually extremely reliable but they did not see francois fillon coming fast at the top of the primary is on the french right. so, i mean, it is very likely that emmanuel macron will face of marine le pen on sunday. however, there are six possible scenarios and one of them is the ha rd left scenarios and one of them is the hard leftjean—luc melenchon on facing the hard right marine le pen, thatis facing the hard right marine le pen, that is a possibility that we are all bracing to see on sunday, so i wouldn‘t put all my bets on emmanuel macron and marine le pen. and you said that with so many terror attacks obviously it is high on the
9:33 am
agenda, but also the economy, what has been dominating the political debate there? well, basically marine le pen and jean—luc melenchon on, who have enjoyed really dynamic in the polls, especially jean—luc melenchon on, if you look at their economic programme, it is all about spending, spending, spending. created massive public debt, which is already quite high in france. it is already quite high in france. it is about giving away benefits. marine le pen has a national socialist sort of programme and both of them meet on the economic ground. fillon and macron, and to aid certain degree the socialist candidate, have a much more restrained programme so i think people should look carefully at those programmes to see whether
9:34 am
france can afford a populist candidate like marine le pen and jean—luc melenchon. candidate like marine le pen and jean-luc melenchon. thank you very much. still to come... why do young people get into hacking? more than 60% of hackers start before they are 16. we will speak to one former hacker, a so—called good hacker, who was investigated by police at school because of a piece of software he had written all about what is behind it. if you have any thoughts, get in touch in the usual ways. also in the programme, we‘ll go to an indonesian island where people live with their dead relatives. here‘s anita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today‘s news. the french authorities say they know the identity of the man who shot dead a policeman, and seriously wounded two others, on the champs—elysees in central paris last night. three people said to be close to the
9:35 am
attacker have now been detained. the gunman was killed when officers returned fire but prosecutors say they won‘t release his name until they know whether or not he was working alone. the french prime minister, bernard cazeneuve, said the attack won‘t stand in the way of the french election taking place this sunday. translation: ladies and gentlemen, the government is fully mobilised that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead. on the eve of a major rendezvous, i call on everyone to show the spirit of responsibility and dignity. it is our duty to not give in to fear, intimidation, and manipulation. otherwise, this would only serve the gain of the enemies of the republic. also, we should never succumb to division, excess obscurantism, and intolerance, which must be fought. it is indeed unity more than ever that should prevail. the former aston villa and england
9:36 am
defender ugo ehiogu has died at the age of 1m. he suffered a cardiac arrest at tottenham‘s training centre yesterday, where he worked as the coach of the under—23s. ehiogu was capped four times for his country and won the league cup with both aston villa and middlesbrough. german prosecutors have confirmed they have arrested a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing the borussia dortmund team bus last week. prosecutors say the man, who has german and russian nationality, was a market trader hoping to make money if the price of shares in the team fell. government plans described by critics as a stealth death tax have been scrapped. the proposals involved increasing the legalfees paid by some people when a family member dies. the ministry ofjustice said there was now not enough time for the legislation to go through parliament. the average cybercriminal investigated by the national crime agency is just 17—years—old and is motivated by showing off in front of friends,
9:37 am
rather than money. that‘s the conclusion of a new report by the nca, which has been looking at ways to stop youngsters getting drawn into online crime. it says hacking tools have become too easy to use. and just after 10am, joanna will be speaking to a former teenage hacker about his motivations for getting involved in cyber—crime. three purpose—built blocks are to open within high—security jails to hold the most dangerous extremist prisoners away from other inmates. the units will have their own facilities and be able to hold up to 28 people. ministers have said they wanted to isolate extremist inmates who seek to poison the minds of others. a ban on sugary drinks in hospitals in england is being proposed, unless suppliers cut their sales over the next year. nhs england say it must set a healthy example to help combat obesity, diabetes and tooth decay, but the soft drinks industry says it shouldn‘t be singled out. that is a summary of the latest bbc
9:38 am
news, moore at 10am. let‘s catch up with the sport with hugh, more tributes pour ugo ehiogu. yes, and outpouring of emotion already for the former defender ugo ehiogu, he has died at the age of 1:4. ehiogu, he has died at the age of 44. he was under 23s coach at spurs, they announced the news this morning, with immense sadness, he collapsed at their training centre yesterday after suffering a cardiac arrest. he won the league cup with aston villa in 1996 and in 2004 with middlesbrough and was capped four times by england. manchester united are into the europa league semi—finals, after beating anderlecht. it took until the second half of extra time to win it, though — teenager marcus rashford got the decisive goal before a penalty shoot—out.
9:39 am
tiger woods has had yet another operation on his back to try to cure the pain that‘s plagued his career over the last few years — it‘s his third surgery in 19 months, and he‘s likely to be out of action for six months. ellie downie is on the verge of becoming the first british gymnast to win the all—around title at the european championships. the 17—year—old was top in qualifying for tonight‘s final in romania. she‘s also through to every individual apparatus final — a first for any british gymnast at a major international competition. more sportjust after more sport just after 10am. plans to raise the amount of money some families have to pay after a family member dies have been dropped. the ministry ofjustice blamed lack of parliamentary time before the general election. that speak to our political correspondent ross hawkins. is this the first parliamentary business casualty as a result of the election?
9:40 am
it is probably one of many. there was a big hike in the fees, what happened is if someone dies and you have to sort out their will, you have to sort out their will, you have to sort out their will, you have to pay a fee, about £150 if you do it through your solicitor. there was a big change in that announced earlier in the year where it would be nothing for a smaller state with not a lot to inherit but for the biggest it would go up to a five figure sum and plenty of conservatives, among others, was saying, this is not a fee, this is a tax, how could the justice secretary not a fee, this is a tax, how could thejustice secretary liz not a fee, this is a tax, how could the justice secretary liz truss not a fee, this is a tax, how could thejustice secretary liz truss have thejustice secretary liz truss have the authority to do this? opposition from them and from labour in the house of lords, where it would have to be debated. what the ministry of justice are saying is not that they
9:41 am
have got it wrong, they said it is down to time, but the reality is if they had pushed on with this they would face pressure to get it through, and i am told privately that some senior lawyers were looking into a legal challenge if it came about to say she did not have the authority to do this, so they backed away and we need to work out if this is going to be in any ma nifesto to if this is going to be in any manifesto to do it again after the general election. there is every chance this is notjust a casualty ofan chance this is notjust a casualty of an early general election but in reality quite a big u—turn. potential handicapper there was something that could have been difficult. —— potential handy cover. you said it is one of many potential items that may not get through because of the timing, what else, how much business was due to happen? one of the big stories of the election, the first few weeks, might not just be election, the first few weeks, might notjust be what politicians promise they are going to do, it might be what they decide they don‘t have time to do that they promised us before, for example we won‘t hear big announcement on plans for grammar schools, on new school funding formula, and what is coming on at the moment, there are debates going on in private, behind closed doors, between the government and opposition about what happens to the laws that are in parliament at the
9:42 am
moment, and that could have a real practical effect. labour expect to get serious concessions on a bill that deals with some digital services, there are measures that relate to the bbc, they think they will manage to get a concession on that, and on higher education plans, how universities are assessed, a big part of the government‘s programme, they think they will get changes there as well as we rush to the point where, much earlier than expected, this parliament will have to finish its work. so there is real debate going on in parliament that will have practical impact and is likely to sue the government‘s plans change as they try to get everything put to bed so parliament can stop, the mps can go relate and campaigning probable the general election. .so we probable the general election. . so we have to be eagle eyed as to what is in those manifestos. at the end of the week in which an election —— and election was unexpected record, give us a summary of how the land lies now. we are seeing a clear impression of
9:43 am
how they are going to fight the election. the prime minister making the case about brexit, ironically the case about brexit, ironically the conservatives and liberal democrats talking about brexit, they know they can enter use their supporters, the tories think they can still plenty of ukip supporters. labour are trying to change the conversation, define what the conversation, define what the conversation is about. this morning they are talking about school class sizes, jeremy corbyn putting himself forward as an antiestablishment figure, and when you talk in private to senior labour people supported jeremy corbyn, and of course many are not, they honestly sincerely believe the sort of exposure he will get now, the way they will manage to get now, the way they will manage to get their policies out, because the broadcast media will have to focus on their policies and give them equal billing in the presentation, they think that they can turn around they think that they can turn around the polls, which look pretty dire. one other thing going on at the moment which could define the future of the labour party, though it is not much talked about, as we speak counting is taking place in the
9:44 am
election to decide who runs the biggest union in the country, unite, is hugely important powerful union in the labour party and the big question there, afan in a fan in the past ofjeremy corbyn, len mccluskey, whether he wins or someone who takes a different view as to whether the union should be involved in labour politics, gerard coyne. nothing definitive, one person saying it is neck and neck, another says len mccluskey is head—to—head. it sounds pretty archaic, it is not what we discuss day—to—day, but the result will have a massive impact on power politics inside labour and who controls the influence on key committees and the purse strings of the country‘s most important union. when should we get those results? it may depend on legal challenges, i am told there is a possibility they could come out by the end of the day, it could be the afternoon, the evening, later, buti day, it could be the afternoon, the evening, later, but i think news will get out one way or another, officially or unofficially, before too long. thank you. coming up...
9:45 am
as investigations get under way into last night‘s attack in paris, we‘ll be bringing you the latest — and asking what this means for sunday‘s presidential election. we have heard from one of the candidates this morning, saying that there needs to be a security crackdown and anyone on a terror watch list should be deported. that is marine le pen. it is anticipated that she will be one of the final two, according to the polling. it is still very unpredictable. you can‘t a lwa ys still very unpredictable. you can‘t always rely on the polls. the country is going to the polling booths on sunday, as the country digests the news there has been another terrorist attack. let‘s talk more about ugo ehiogu, who has died at the age of 44. he suffered a cardiac arrest yesterday while working at eight tottenham
9:46 am
training centre. he spent several yea rs training centre. he spent several years at middlesbrough. tottenham training centre. he spent several yea rs training centre. he spent several years at middlesbrough. tottenham training centre. he spent several yea rs training centre. he spent several years at middlesbrough. a player who played with him at middlesbrough. thank you forjoining bristol stop terrible news? absolutely awful. the first thing that springs to mind when you speak about ugo is that he was an absolute gentleman. a really generous person, and a funny guy. so sad. a player with a great career. he played more than 300 times for aston villa, and he had four england caps? an outstanding player. you look at centre halves and he was right up there. very quick, very good on tackles, good in the air. as a midfielder, you knew he would win all of his headers, his tackles, kept on top. he was a model
9:47 am
professional. tell us more about him. the words that immediately came to your mind in talking about him, gentlemen, kind, considerate, generous. tell us more about the man that you knew? as i said, just such a kind... didn‘t speak badly of anyone, just took life happily, ate all of the right food, not really drinking, he looked after himself really well. he was a model professional. if you look at the modern—day professional, going back 20 years, it was a drinking culture. he was not like that, he was a model professional. he would look after himself. he was a total on and off
9:48 am
the pitch. neil maddison, thank you very much, former middlesbrough player, remembering ugo ehiogu. we will have more tributes throughout the programme. now we are going to show you a film in a minute which some of you may find distressing, as it shows dead bodies. if you have young children with you, you might not want them to see this. the film lasts about 10 minutes. most of us don‘t like to talk, or even think about death, and as modern medicine helps us push the boundary back it becomes more and more remote. but on the indonesian island of sulawesi, death — or more specifically the dead — are a constant presence. centuries old traditions mean the dead share space with the living. reporter sahar zand has been finding out. the dead are a constant presence in indonesia‘s island of sulawesi. for centuries, the dead have been sharing space with the living. after someone dies, it can take months, sometimes even years, before a funeral takes place.
9:49 am
here, even funerals are not goodbye. is this a morbid obsession, or could it be a healthier way of dealing with the grief of losing a loved one? it‘s a great unspoken, a taboo. something we keep away from us. something i have had to face recently, when i lost my dad, but i don‘t know how to deal with. most of us don‘t know how to think or talk about death. but there are some people who d0 think they know. in the toraja region of sulawesi, in indonesia, centuries—old customs make the dead a constant part of day—to—day life. this is danduro — he‘s 86 years old, and died over two years ago.
9:50 am
ancient animist beliefs intertwine with newer religions, resulting in unique rituals. here, funerals take place months, and sometimes even years, after somebody passes away. in the meantime, the deceased is kept in the house and cared for as if he‘s sick, not dead. to preserve corpses, formalin is often injected into the body.
9:51 am
my dad died three years ago, and we buried him in two days, it was all very sudden, it was all very bam bam. and to be honest with you, a few years on, i still feel like i haven‘t adjusted, it was just too sudden, i‘m still in a bit of a shock. what‘s really incredible is that none of these kids seem to be fazed by the fact that there is a dead person lying here, and everybody‘s so calm. like many people, i‘ve never really liked the idea of being around corpses.
9:52 am
so much so that when my own father passed away, i refused to go and see his body one last time before his burial — something i still feel guilty about. this is paolo sirinda. he died over 12 years ago, and his daughter looks after him. this process, having him in the house, well, in your case, for 12 years —
9:53 am
do you think this helps you deal with the grief? i wish i had that kind of opportunity to adjust to my dad‘s death. i mean, would i have his body in my house a few years after his death? i‘m not sure. but i sure would have liked the opportunity, and time to adjust, so it wasn‘t all so sudden, so it wasn‘t like, one minute he‘s there, and the next, he‘s gone for ever. cirinda will stay lying here until his family have saved up enough money for a grand funeral.
9:54 am
this is a traditional torajan funeral. they often last for days, and dozens of pigs and buffaloes get sacrificed. funerals are important, because this is where the deceased is finally interred and considered dead. but even this is not goodbye. the physical relationship between the dead and the living continues long after death, even after burials. once every couple of years, families bring the coffins of long—departed relatives out of their graves and open them up
9:55 am
for a big family reunion. the ritual is called ma‘nene, or cleansing of the corpse. from the sociological perspective, that‘s a kind of keeping social interaction between those who are still alive and those who already died. the coffin is finally open... this is maria solo, and she‘s covered in her most treasured belongings. thank you. they want me to show what she looked like before and what she looks like now. she died three years ago, and got buried two years ago. they kept her in the house for one year. how do you think ma‘nene helps you deal with the grief? all of this is so different to how i dealt with my father‘s
9:56 am
death — or so i thought. what did you to with your father? we buried him. buried him, yeah, and then until now? i visit his grave sometimes. you visit his grave sometimes. you did actually ma‘nene. in a different way. how? yeah. because you visit the grave of your father because you still remember him as your father, and you still have emotional relationship with him. you loved your father. never—ending. right? mmm. and that‘s the principle of ma‘nene. so, perhaps the principles behind the rituals here are not very different from most other cultures. remembering our dead is something most of us try to do.
9:57 am
but torajans don‘t leave that to chance. and for them, there certainly appears to be great comfort from their rituals around death. our world: living with the dead will be shown over the weekend on the bbc news channel and will be available on the iplayer. it‘s part of the bbc world service life stories season. if you‘re watching on bbc two, in a moment coverage of the snooker world championship so to continue watching our programme turn over to the bbc news channel — where coming up in the next half hour... his story has been shared thousands of times on facebook. we will talk toa man of times on facebook. we will talk to a man with testicular cancer who has been raising awareness of the disease. that is coming up after ten. let‘s catch up with the weather. we got used acquired weather over
9:58 am
recent days and weeks and that is not going to change. a decent enough start for many of us. this is the scene in county durham. some sunny spells to be had. through the rest of today, across the southern half of today, across the southern half of the country, it stays largely dry. some spells of sunshine. for northern ireland, north—west england, southern scotland, a band of rain sinking southwards. to the north of that, pretty chilly whether developing this afternoon with some sunshine and a few showers. this evening and overnight, this band of cloud and some patchy rain sinks southwards across england and wales. the cloud hanging around for northern ireland as well. scotland, with clear skies, will get very cold. a widespread frost to take us into tomorrow morning. wintry showers in the north—east. the best of the brightness for western fringes, although northern ireland will stay disappointingly cloudy. highs of 15 in the south. a largely dry bay on sunday, but it will turn
9:59 am
much colderfor the start dry bay on sunday, but it will turn much colder for the start of next week. hello, it‘s friday, it‘s 10am, i‘m joanna gosling. france mobilises its security services after last night‘s shooting in paris. the government says the attack won‘t affect sunday‘s presidential election. translation: the government is fully mobilised that nothing will stop this democratic moment for our country from going ahead. the authorities in paris are treating the shooting as a terror attack. we‘ll be live in french capital shortly and get the insights of our security correspondent. also, it is believed more than 60 gay men have fled the russian republic of chechnya, following what they describe as an ongoing campaign of persecution by the security forces. one man tells us he was detained and beaten. and how one man shared his battle with testicular
10:00 am
cancer on social media. we‘ll be asking him about raising awareness for the disease. here‘s annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today‘s news. the french prime minister said everything will be done to protect this sunday‘s first round of the presidential election following last night‘s suspected terror attack in central paris. french authorities said they know the identity of the man who shot dead a police man and seriously wounded two others on the shamsi said. —— on the champs—elysees. the gunman was killed when officers returned fire but prosecutors say they won‘t release his name until they know whether or not he was working alone. the french president, francois hollande, has said he‘s convinced the motive is terrorism. the far right candidate marine le
10:01 am
pen says france should immediately reinstate border checks. james reynolds reports from paris. mesdames and messieurs you have to stay back, please! the area is dangerous because of a shot gun. please, stay back! in the minutes after the attack, the police in paris took every movement as a threat. at this stage officers didn‘t know if any of the gunman —— any other gunmen might still be at large. the shooting happened right in the centre of the city as parisiennes and tourists were heading out to dinner. translation: i was walking on the pavement, there was a bus full of police, the man parked just in front of the bus and then he got out a kalashnikov and then he shot six times, i thought it was fireworks, then he went and hid behind a lorry. translation: we were moving towards a car and then i heard two or three shots, but to start with i did not realise they were shots. then there was panic all around, everyone started running down the champs—elysees by instinct. i did not stop to find out what was going on, ijust ran as well.
10:02 am
the champs—elysees was already full of police officers guarding against attack on civilians, but it seems that this shooting targeted officers themselves. translation: we are convinced that the track that the investigation is on will reveal that the event is of a terrorist nature. late into the night here, the police are still stopping people from approaching the scene of the attack just a block or so away of the champs—elysees. everyone around here wants to know exactly what happened, the police want to make sure that all nearby streets are now safe. officers kept their handguns drawn, they searched everyone coming out of a nearby building. this country will now investigate the shooting and make sure that its plans for sunday‘s presidential election are now in place. james reynolds, bbc news, paris. the former aston villa and england defende ugo ehiogu has
10:03 am
died at the age of 44. he suffered a cardiac arrest at tottenham‘s training centre on thursday, where he worked as the coach of the under—23s. ehiogu was capped four times for his country and won the league cup with both aston villa and middlesbrough. german prosecutors have confirmed they have arrested a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing the borussia dortmund team bus last week. prosecutors say the man, who has german and russian nationality, was a market trader hoping to make money if the price of shares in the team fell. our berlin correspondent said bomber‘s motives may come as some surprise to people in germany. many people here in germany feared the country had once again been targeted by islamist extremists. instead, as you say, prosecutors have now arrested this man, in his late 20s, with joint nationality, russian and german. they said that prior to the attack he bought
10:04 am
something like 15,000 stock market devices which enable you to sell shares would they dropped in value, so the idea, prosecutors believe, is the man was motivated by the idea of gaining significantly financially, should the shares of the dortmund football clu b should the shares of the dortmund football club drop significantly. that, they believe, was his motive. they also say he was staying at the same hotel as the players, in fact his room had a line of sight to the site of the explosions. we have had a little more detail about those explosions themselves, you may have heard three devices had been planted in a hedge along the roadside, two at ground level, one
10:05 am
slightly higher up. they were packed with metal pins, one of which was found embedded in a headrest inside the team players‘ code as it passed. one was also found 250 metres from the original site of the explosive device, so a very nasty attack indeed. government plans described by critics as a ‘stealth death tax‘ have been scrapped. the proposals involved increasing the legalfees paid by some people when a family member dies. the ministry ofjustice said there was now not enough time for the legislation to go through parliament. the average cyber—criminal investigated by the national crime agency is just 17—years—old and is motivated by showing off in front of friends, rather than money. that‘s the conclusion of a new report by the nca, which has been looking at ways to stop youngsters getting into online crime. it says hacking tools have become too easy to use. and in a short while, joanna will be speaking to a former teenage hacker about his motivations for getting involved in cyber—crime. that is in about ten minutes time. three purpose—built blocks are to open within high—security jails to hold the most dangerous extremist prisoners away from other inmates. the units will have their own facilities and be able to hold up to 28 people. ministers have said they wanted to isolate extremist inmates who "seek to poison
10:06 am
the minds of others". a ban on sugary drinks in hospitals in england is being proposed, unless suppliers cut their sales over the next year. nhs england say it must set a healthy example to help combat obesity, diabetes and tooth decay, but the soft drinks industry says it shouldn‘t be singled out. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — we are talking about what has been happening in paris, the latest terror attack, one police officer killed and just two days before france goes to the goals on sunday for the first round in the presidential elections. let us know your thoughts on that and everything else —— goes to the polls on sunday. also the very sad death of ugo ehiogu. we can nowjoin hugh for more tributes. tributes have poured
10:07 am
in for the former england defender ugo ehiogu, who has died at the age of 44 after collapsing at tottenham‘s training ground yesterday. he had suffered a cardiac arrest. ehiogu won the league cup with aston villa in 1996, and was a coach the under—23s at spurs. he also won the league cup with middlesbrough in a 20—year career that saw him play for west brom, leeds, rangers and sheffield united, before retiring in 2009. he began coaching at tottenham in 2014. his former team—mate andy townsend has been speaking about his time with ugo ehiogu in the last hour. he was a fantastic lad, fantastic team—mate. i had seen him quite a lot recently in his new situation at totte n ha m lot recently in his new situation at tottenham where he had been coaching the younger boys. absolute picture of health, that is why i am so shocked. ugo was an incredibly fit man as a player and certainly looked absolutely on top form, so this has, such a shock and it is incredibly sad news.
10:08 am
there have been a huge number of tributes paid today, especially on social media. former england and manchester united captain rio ferdinand said, i cannot believe the news that ugo ehiogu has passed away. calm and warming company, my heart goes out to his family. rachel yankee say she is devastated to hear the news of the passing of ugo ehiogu, such a lovely kind band, my thoughts are with his family and close friends. paul mcgraw is another of his former aston villa team—mates. he says, devastated bob ugo, a great friend, my heart goes out to his family and friends, rest in peace. current manchester united and england midfielder michael carrick says, tragic news about ugo ehiogu, so sad, thoughts with his family and friends. a very difficult day for eve ryo ne friends. a very difficult day for everyone involved in football, but there is some news to talk about on there is some news to talk about on the pitch. manchester united are into the europa league semi—finals but they needed an extra—time winner to beat anderlecht. henrik mikhitaryan put
10:09 am
united ahead early on but the belgian side equalised — and there was real concern for united when zlatan ibrahimovic fell awkwardly and hurt his knee. eventually, teenager marcus rashford scored the winner that took them through 2—1 on the night, 3—2 overall. duncan scott has become the first briton to swim under 48 seconds in the 100m freestyle. scott won two olympic relay silver medals in rio last year. last night he broke his own national record, clocking 47.9 to win gold at the british swimming championships in sheffield. that also gave him a place at this summer‘s world championships. i‘m absolutely delighted with that, it isa i‘m absolutely delighted with that, it is a bonus on top of winning. it isa it is a bonus on top of winning. it is a good field, it is a field that has lacked in previous years but is coming through to show force, and to
10:10 am
share the field of two scott as well, delighted with that, most of the browser there should be proud of their efforts —— boast of the boys there. with two days to go before the french presidential elections, the country‘s prime minister has said nothing must be allowed to impede democracy, after a suspected terror attack in paris. bernard cazeneuve urged citizens not to to give in to fear and intimidation. one policeman was killed and another two injured in the attack last night on the champs—elysees, before the gunman was shot dead. three of the main presidential candidates have called off rallies on what would have been the final day of campaigning. one of them, the far—right candidate marine le pen, called for france‘s border controls to be reinstated immediately, and for foreigners on security watch lists to be expelled. translation: i would like to restore the borders at schengen and to start
10:11 am
checking for every people so that we can find the enemy. soon we should put in place the expulsion of the foreigners who have no identity, especially who failed in nationality test. and to send them to their countries of origin and also to share information about enemies, a global response should require the recruitment of 15,000 further policemen and also international cooperation to enforce our military capacity and use it effectively, and also to use our diplomacy. marine le pen. our security correspondent, frank gardner is here in the studio. and we can also speak to stefan de vries, a journalist based in paris. frank, marine le pen saying people on security watch lists should just be deported now, but it is a recurring theme, people who are on
10:12 am
the radar and attacks being carried out. it would be very unusual for an attack like this to involve somebody who is a complete clean skin that the police and authorities did not know about. the problem is it comes down to numbers and resources. france has got an enormous number of people on terror watch list, one figure i saw quoted was more than 10,000. britain has over 3000. they cannot go around arresting all of these people because there is not the evidence, they are aware they have shown an interest in ices and so—called islamic state, in extremist propaganda, but until they start plotting a crime and cross that line into criminal activity, it is very hard for them to do something about it. what tabs can they keep on that number of people? it is very resource intensive, they can spend two months throwing everything at someone, tap their phones, put watches on them, different people changing identities and stop. it is enormously intensive
10:13 am
and stop. it is enormously intensive and if nothing is shown in that time they simply cannot afford to keep those resources on that target, they will switch to somebody else. it may well be that person simply has not shown their hand, that is what happened with 7/7, the london bombings, mohammad sidique khan, the ringleader, had not shown his hand at the time they were aware of him, they switched to other targets, and then of course he went into action. what really matters, i think, is whether the right decisions are taken at the right time. they are never going to have all the resources , never going to have all the resources, the french, the british, the germans, anyone, because the numbers are so huge. stefan, how do people react when there is an attack and it emerges the person who carried it out was on a watchlist? of course the people in paris unfortunately after reduced to attacks, also reduced the fact that thousands of police officers even soldiers are patrolling in the street of the city. whenever there isa street of the city. whenever there
10:14 am
is a new attack, people are, well, they are not surprised any more and wonder how it is possible in such a heavily guarded city that attacks are still possible, and also the fa ct are still possible, and also the fact that, well, how is it possible that this criminal who was not on the watchlist, contrary to earlier reports, he was a known criminal but was not on the terror watchlist, he was not on the terror watchlist, he was on parole, he did not respect his conditions of parole, so people are asking how is it possible that this person was able to shoot, to attack police officers, something he already was convicted for, because he attacked three police officers in 2001, he was sentenced to 15 years imprisonment and he was released about a year ago, so these are the questions the police forces in france have to answer, and also the political parties, but it shows that the attack, the terrorist threat, is
10:15 am
still very serious in the city.l different set of questions that you describe there for what gets looked at in the aftermath of this attack. in terms of security and how it has changed, you said that paris is a heavily guarded city, describe what it is like. i live in the heart of the city, a residential neighbourhood, and every morning when i open my windows, icy four soldiers patrolling. when i have my lunch, i see another patrol. these soldiers, not the police. they are walking in fours. this is a strange sight, in eight peaceful city, when you see soldiers on the streets. there was a quick reaction by the security services to this attack. a quick reaction when there was an attack at the louvre, underlining how things have changed? yes, france has experienced an
10:16 am
extended period of emergency. they have the terrible attacks in 2015, first against charlie hebdo, the newspaper, in january. first against charlie hebdo, the newspaper, injanuary. then they have the bataclan attacks, the theatre siege, "the shoot outs between the police and people determined to go down fighting to the last bullet. then they had the nice attack, when the truck drove through and killed more than 80 people. france, they have had murders in the church in normandy, it has been one thing after another for france. it is right up there as the top target forjihadists, for a number of reasons. france has been very active abroad, it turned back al-qaeda‘s conquest of mali, it has been active in afghanistan, the middle east, at home, there has been a controversial burqa van, you have far right politicians talking about
10:17 am
banning immigration, a lot of which is feeding into islamophobia. then you have the suburbs, areas of hopelessness, socially, in the suburbs of some french cities, where whole communities feel completely disconnected from the french state. is there a sense that the political leaders, authorities are getting to grips with how to handle the persistent threat? it is a paradox. france has probably never been so safe, yet there are still new attacks. although they are on a smaller scale than the attacks we saw in november 2015, with the bataclan, it shows that the terrorist threat is still real. the profile of terrorists, it is almost always the same. they start out as a petty criminals, they are radicalised in prison and when they get out they attack a target. the la st get out they attack a target. the
10:18 am
last couple of attacks we have seen in france have been very targeted attacks on police officers or soldiers. people in france are unfortunately getting used to these kinds of attacks. the government says we are at war, people get used toa war says we are at war, people get used to a war rhetoric. unfortunately, it is something that the french will have to deal with. we have just seen a clip of marine le pen, when she spoke only an hour ago, about the fa ct spoke only an hour ago, about the fact that she wants to close borders, she wants to deport foreigners on terror watch lists. this rhetoric, the war rhetoric, it goes well with her electorate. in general, the french do not really believe in tougher security measures. what do people believe is the answer and what has the government been doing in trying to tackle radicalisation? one of the things that should be tackled is the root of the problem. i think your
10:19 am
guestsjust mentioned root of the problem. i think your guests just mentioned that, root of the problem. i think your guestsjust mentioned that, the very bad economical situation, there are ghettos in the country where people do not have the feeling that they belong to the french republic. basically, they are saying we never hear of the state, why should the state here something from us? they are disconnected. in some areas, unemployment is about 35%, youth unemployment is about 35%, youth unemployment above 50%. these people do not have any hope any more. they don't believe in the french state. they start out as petty criminals, drug dealers, and then slowly some of them get radicalised in prison. they become terrorists. it is not a very... it is a very complicated issue and the solutions are never simple. at the bad economic situation is one of the roots of the reason why france is such a
10:20 am
high—profile target. reason why france is such a high-profile target. france, as we have said, goes to the polls on sunday, the first round of the presidential election. do you expect this to have an impact? absolutely, security measures will be very serious. there are over 60,000 polling stations in the country. there are 50,000 police officers patrolling the streets, as well as many thousands of soldiers. physically, it is impossible to protect all of these polling stations. there is another problem, the fact that if you let armed police officers into a polling station, that is a very bad sign for democracy. the french will try to do anything to make sure there will not be any attacks this sunday. at the same time, we see the tension between security and liberty on the other side, or democracy. it is a very, very difficult problem. i think most of the french will go to the polling stations this sunday feeling secure. but it may be a reason for some people to stay at home. thank you both very much.
10:21 am
still to come... beaten and tortured because he was gay — the bbc speaks to one man who describes his experience in chechnya. cyber—crime is becoming increasingly easy, according to new research on the young people accused of it. the national crime agency interviewed 80 teenagers that had been investigated by the police for offences such as hacking. it found that more than half of them had first got involved before their 16th birthdays, and they generally believed they wouldn‘t be caught. a hacker that was interviewed for the research said he didn‘t consider victims because he didn‘t see the real people he was affecting. let‘s talk to jake davis, who became involved with hacktivist movement anonymous when he was a teenager, and was given a prison sentence for being a member of luleec — a group that hacked several organisations including the sun newspaper. and mike godfrey, an online security expert and "good hacker" who was investigated by the police when he was at school for a piece of software he‘d written. they concluded there was no crime.
10:22 am
tell me what it was that made you start hacking as a teenager?” tell me what it was that made you start hacking as a teenager? i grew up start hacking as a teenager? i grew up in start hacking as a teenager? i grew upina start hacking as a teenager? i grew up in a remote location, the shetland islands, with very little to do. i saw this thing, the computer, this amazing window into another world. i wanted to know why it did the things that it did. why, when opening a piece of software, it connects with other pieces of software, what made the mouse move? deconstructing it. that curiosity. i think that is what drives a lot of young hackers, and led to me becoming part of the hacker subculture. what was the first thing you hacked? i suppose like most kids do, i messed with the school computer network. i didn‘t get in trouble for that i helped them fix it. in terms of the anonymous collective, which i was arrested for
10:23 am
being involved with, in 2011 we would to face government websites, especially countries such as libya, zimbabwe, egypt, during the arab spring, in support of protests, against dictators, we would replace the with messages of support from anonymous. where their political reasons to do that? that is different from hacking a school computer system. of course. was literally going back to the first one. there was no financial gain, it was politically motivated. the report, which i think is very accurate, there is very little financial motivation in the black hat hacking world. a lot of it is politically motivated or, more commonly, kudos from other hackers. often they forget the website itself has been hacked, it isjust a mechanism to impress other hackers. it is almost like it is not real? you become desensitised to the very
10:24 am
nature of the website being taken out. ironically, it is the last thing you are thinking about. out. ironically, it is the last thing you are thinking aboutm that how you see it? teenagers think it is effectively a game, a challenge? definitely. ithink that is why a lot of young people get into hacking, it is a challenge. as jake said, kudos is a huge thing. a lot of the time, it is for kudos. it is more about that, showing off to other people. who were the kids that get into this? for me, when i first got involved in hacking, it was purely because of an interest in computers and how they work. you find that some of the best hackers just want to see how things work, understand them. a lot of them come from the gaming culture, games can be modified or hacked. once you get onto that track, it is a very quick succession into cyber—crime and hacking. what proportion of kids who are hacking. what proportion of kids who a re really into hacking. what proportion of kids who
10:25 am
are really into computer games and stuff, that really understand the technical aspect of computers, might be tempted to go down that path? technical aspect of computers, might be tempted to go down that path7m is very difficult. when you are involved in computer games, you want to find ways to make yourself better at that, increase your score, everybody aims to be at the top of their game. once you have done that, you have modified games, you want to look at other things to explore. looking at remote access trudy —— trojans, they can view webcams, they can key log, all stuff that is attractive to kids. if you go down the wrong path, it can have pretty bad consequences as well. is it lucrative? these are highly technical skills to have. it can be lucrative, if it is done the right way. we find that people are more interested in the kudos, one—upmanship, than the financial
10:26 am
gain. it is actually difficult to earn money on things like credit ca rd earn money on things like credit card fraud. until you get yourself up card fraud. until you get yourself up to card fraud. until you get yourself uptoa card fraud. until you get yourself up to a really high technical ability, that is where you can really start earning some serious money. that generally is not your 15—year—old kid. money. that generally is not your 15-year-old kid. where have you gone, 15-year-old kid. where have you o . 15-year-old kid. where have you gone, in terms of what you do now?|j gone, in terms of what you do now?” was arrested at the age of 18, six years ago now. i do some legitimate security work now, and consultation around that. i am mostly focused on assisting the next generation of ethical hackers, good hackers. describe what a good hacker does?” guess it is all about motivations. i don't think breaking into a system, wanted to take it apart and understand how it works, is necessarily a bad thing. there are systems out there in place now, such as bug bounties. companies say, we
10:27 am
recognise there are hackers out there, if you find vulnerabilities, tell us about them. vocabulary high, i saw one for $100,000? the other day, somebody was paid £7,500. twitter have paid out $800,000 to freelance hackers. you make an account, you say, i have found a problem with your website, this is the damage it can cause and this is how to fix it. you also get the kudos, you might get put into a leaderboa rd, kudos, you might get put into a leaderboard, you get points and you are this level of hacker, then you get a are this level of hacker, then you geta certain are this level of hacker, then you get a certain amount of points, you get a certain amount of points, you get put on to a programme where you are a trusted hacker, and you might get to tinker with networks that are not yet public. that is how it is going. when i was 15, there was no term ethical hacker, it was purely hacker, criminal. the fact we are seeing these programmes, job titles and proper systems, that is a good
10:28 am
thing. anybody that has a computer system is very vulnerable to a bad attack. if they can unleash the talents of young kids to actually help them, you can see why that is a good thing? there was an interesting case, a hacker was told by a judge that if he used his powers for good, he would be a real asset to a company. the penetration testing we carry out, we attack companies in the same way as a hacker would, carrying out a remote attack against a server, trying to extract goods. we do that in the same way a nefarious hacker would. at the end of it, we provide a report and don‘t run away with stuff. good to talk to you. his story has been shared 25 thousand times on facebook. we‘ll be talking to a man with testicular cancer used social media to raise awareness of the disease. it‘s the hit drama on netflix. but 13 reasons why has caused
10:29 am
controversy over its portrayal of a woman‘s suicide. now the writer gives his side of the story. here‘s annita in the bbc newsroom. the french authorities say they know the identity of the man who shot dead a policeman and seriously wounded two others on the champs—elysees in central paris last night. three people said to be close to the attacker have now been detained. the gunman was killed when officers returned fire but prosecutors say they won‘t release his name until they know whether or not he was acting alone. one of the leading presidential candidates, far right leader marine le pen, has demanded that immediate reinstatement of border checks. the french prime minister bernard cazeneuve said the attack —— said this week and‘s election will be fully protected. translation: ladies and gentlemen, the government is fully mobilised that nothing will stop this
10:30 am
fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead. on the eve of a major rendezvous, i call on everyone to show the spirit of responsibility and dignity. it is our duty to not give in to fear, intimidation, and manipulation. otherwise, this would only serve the gain of the enemies of the republic. also, we should never succumb to division, excess obscurantism, and intolerance, which must be fought. it is indeed unity more than ever that should prevail. the former aston villa and england defender ugo ehiogu has died at the age of 44. he suffered a cardiac arrest at tottenham‘s training centre on thursday, where he worked as the coach of the under—23s. ehiogu was capped four times for his country and won the league cup with both aston villa and middlesbrough. german prosecutors have confirmed they have arrested a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing the borussia dortmund team bus last week.
10:31 am
prosecutors say the man, who has german and russian nationality, was a market trader hoping to make money if the price of shares in the team fell. british retailers have posted the biggest quarterly sales fall in seven years during the first three months of this year. it‘s being put down to rising prices since last year‘s brexit vote beginning to put pressure on consumers. prices have been rising across a range of sectors. the average cyber—criminal investigated by the national crime agency is just 17—years—old and is motivated by showing off in front of friends, rather than money. that‘s the conclusion of a new report by the nca, which has been looking at ways to stop youngsters getting into online crime. it says hacking tools have become too easy to use. a ban on sugary drinks in hospitals in england is being proposed, unless suppliers cut their sales over the next year. nhs england says it must set a healthy example
10:32 am
to help combat obesity, diabetes and tooth decay, but the soft drinks industry says it shouldn‘t be singled out. that‘s a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. see you then. let‘s join see you then. let‘sjoin hugh see you then. let‘s join hugh for the sport. there has been an outpouring of tributes to you go at would like a father figure to us all, the words of words of one of his young protege at spurs. the former england defender died at the age of 44 after a cardiac arrest yesterday. his former coach said, thank you for everything you have taught us on and off the pitch. he won the league cup with villa in 1996 and also with middlesbrough in 2004 and was capped four times by england. manchester united are into the europa league semi—finals, after beating anderlecht. it took until the second half of extra time to win it — teenager marcus rashford
10:33 am
got the decisive goal. tiger woods has had yet another operation on his back to try to cure the pain that‘s plagued his career over the last few years. it‘s his third surgery in 19 months and he‘s likely to be out of action for six months. ellie downie is on the verge of becoming the first british gymnast to win the all—around title at the european championships. the 17—year—old was top in qualifying for tonight‘s final in romania. she‘s also through to every individual aparatus final — a first for any british gymnast at a major international competition. still to come... his story has been shared 25,000 times on facebook. we‘ll be talking to a man with testicular cancer used social
10:34 am
media to raise awareness of the disease. over the past few weeks on this programme, we‘ve followed events in the chechen republic where it‘s claimed gay people are being targetted and tortured in prison camps. we‘ve heard from a human rights advisor to the government there, we‘ve spoken with a journalist who says she was forced into hiding in fear of her life after making the revelations. the chechen leader ramzan kadyrov has denied the allegations, despite strong testimony from members of the lgbt community who claim they are being targeted by the authorities and their own families. the bbc‘s sarah rainsford has met one gay man who‘s that was one man who says he was forced to leave chechnya because of his sexuality, talking to sarah raynsford. let‘s get more on the former aston villa and england footballer ugo ehiogu, who has died at the age of 44. he suffered a cardiac arrest yesterday while working as coach at tottenham‘s training centre. we arejoined by mark bosnich, who played alongside ugo ehiogu in 1996. thank you for
10:35 am
joining us, such terribly sad news. yes, terribly sad news. i‘m really shocked, i got in late last night, obviously in australia we are a little bit ahead, and i saw the news on social media that he had collapsed at the training ground but obviously was shocked at that, then saw literally about one and a half hours ago i had a call from somebody in the uk that he passed away. words really cannot justify how sad in the uk that he passed away. words really cannotjustify how sad i am, it isa really cannotjustify how sad i am, it is a really big shock, especially after graham taylor, there has not been much good news, my sincerest condolences go out to his daughter, who we knew from way back in the 90s, and his family and close friends. what was he like on the pitch? ugo was a tremendous player.
10:36 am
vastly underrated, in my opinion. i would call him a rock, really. i a lwa ys would call him a rock, really. i always remember playing a friendly match against belgrade in 1995 and their players commented that they ran into ugo and he was an absolute rock. he did not play as many times as he perhaps should of but we had great success, you mentioned the league cup, he was part of the squat in 94 and in 96 we had a tremendous side that won the league cup and got to the any final —— the semifinal of the fa cup, he was an integral part of that. as a man, i have brought him over here to australia on a few occasions, my parents are extremely sad as well, he was an even better man. in terms of being fit, there we re man. in terms of being fit, there were few fitter than ugo, he was an absolutely superb condition. you said he was an even better man than
10:37 am
a player on the pitch, tell us more about the person that you knew. he was somebody was very, very strong but very, very kind, always knew the difference between and wrong, dwight yorke and myself were very close, we came out to australia on end of season trips together. 99.9% of the time he knew what was right and what was wrong. that old saying, only the good die young, it could not be more true in this case. thank you very much, mark bosnich, forjoining us with your memories of ugo ehiogu, who has died at the age of 44. a new super—low mortgage deal has been launched with what‘s thought to be one of the lowest rates ever seen, than 1%. the two—year discounted rate is available for those looking
10:38 am
to buy or remortgage a home, but they will need to have a hefty deposit of at least 35%. a recent survey by the bank of england found that lenders expect the availability of mortgages to increase byjune — which some claim has sparked a ‘home loans price war‘. tell us more about why we are seeing an offer like this. there is lots of competition, partly because although the housing market is ok, it is a similar amount of purchases being made every month, about 100,000, at a time when lenders are bringing more and more money to the table. they are all biting chunks of the market off of each other by putting out lower and lower deals, and at the same time you have some new players coming into the market, notjust building societies and banks. for instant,
10:39 am
there are banks just based on your mobile phone at the moment, and one of those came out with some very low offers recently, 1.29% for five yea rs offers recently, 1.29% for five years fixed, in a way even better than this one. it disappeared after seven days so people who are thinking of moving have to be quite fleet of foot to take advantage. i assumed everybody knows you as well as i do so i did not say your name, simon! bac duong, with the five—year fix so you see what you we re five—year fix so you see what you were getting, but it disappeared quickly, how easy is it to gauge what is coming along? this one, which is 0.89%, well under 196, it this one, which is 0.89%, well under 1%, it is a discounted variable rate, so it could go up, even still having the discount, and that is just for two years, so it is not going to be for everyone. as you said, it has a 35% deposit. typical house prices nowadays, that is likely to be around £70,000 or more, soa likely to be around £70,000 or more, so a first—time buyer is going to find that a bit out of reach. like a lot of these deals, there are fees
10:40 am
attached, this one is nearly £1500 just for getting the offer. that is like 1%, 1.5% on your mortgage rate for the first year. after the two yea rs of for the first year. after the two years of the offer it reverts to a much higher rate of nearly 5%, so people have to negotiate this is very complicated, tricky world quite carefully to make sure they are not tripped up by an offer that is not suitable for them. where are we in terms of the mortgage market, having seen tighter controls, more stringent controls brought in to make sure that borrowers can afford to pay back their mortgages and now it seems there are lenders out there really trying to court business? it is definitely much harder to get a mortgage because the regime now looks very closely at your household bills to see whether you have a gym membership that will be too expensive, for instance, or whether your energy bills are high, and therefore can you afford the mortgage, so it is harder. that is partly behind this competitive environment where lenders are trying to find customers. but for people thinking of buying for the first
10:41 am
time, all moving, the big worry is what will happen to house prices, you don‘t want to buy when they are about to drop, and what is going to happen to interest rates. on house prices, the market has remained quite robust. on interest rates, the bank of england seems to be sticking to its very low interest rate policy for the moment, so there doesn‘t seem to be concerned in the next few months that interest rates will rise. so for some people a longer term fixed rate might be more suitable, locking into a lower rate for a longer time. thank you, simon gumpert. it‘s the hit drama on netflix and is executive produced by the most followed celebrity on instagram, selena gomez. let‘s see a quick clip. this is 13 reasons why. hey. hannah, i'm not going. not now, not ever. why didn‘t you say this to me when i was alive? my husband and i, we never got a note. hey.
10:42 am
it‘s hannah. hannah baker. settle in, because i‘m about to tell you the story of my life. more specifically, why my life ended. and if you‘re listening to this tape... you‘re one of the reasons why. that‘s 13 reasons why. but the show‘s writer has been defending it after criticism from charities who say it is glamourising revenge suicide. our entertainment reporter chi chi izundu has more on this. a lot of people probably will not
10:43 am
have heard about that before, but it is massive amongst a certain demographic, isn‘t it? without spoiling it for people that are big fa ns spoiling it for people that are big fans and have not seen the whole thing, tell us more about it. massive amongst teenagers, but it is being watched by everybody. netflix, it is one of their biggest shows. it is helmed by selena gomez. she was supposed to play the lead. this is about a teenage suicide, a young girl called hannah, who takes her own life. then she leaves 13 tapes, each season, depicting who and why they have hurt, the people she blames for why she has taken her life have to pass the tapes on. it has had a lot of criticism. people say it kind of glamorises suicide, or taking your own life, and also it glamorises other things as well, because they quite graphically show
10:44 am
how hannah took her own life. some charities are saying it is a how—to guide, some are saying that, actually, it doesn‘t address depression as it should. covers a lot of issues, suicide, rape, abuse, self harm, drugs? does indeed. the uk charity, papyrus, the national charity aimed at preventing suicides, has issued a warning to young people saying that the danger of this programme is that it romanticises and sensationalises taking your own life. they don‘t wa nt taking your own life. they don‘t want people to do that, and they said if you feel, if you are vulnerable or not, that you need help, to contact them. what has the writer been saying? he has written an open letter, depicting how we felt it was actually going to help people to show how painful it is to ta ke people to show how painful it is to take your own life. he says, having
10:45 am
gone through that, in an attempt to ta ke gone through that, in an attempt to take his own life at one point, he wa nted take his own life at one point, he wanted to show that it is not a painless thing, that revenge suicide is not a final treatment to something. he hopes that it will save lives. talking about these things openly, that will bring teen issues to the fore, he says, and then people can deal with them in appropriate ways. if you are feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations which offer advice and support, go online to... oryou can offer advice and support, go online to... or you can call forfree to hear recorded information on... testicular cancer is one of the most common cancers in young men. as long as it is diagnosed early it‘s highly treatable. our next guest was 38 when he was told he had the disease earlier this month. he wants to raise awareness of the importance of early diagnosis, and so he‘s been writing a blog, which been shared more than 25,000 times.
10:46 am
andrew lowden realised he had a lump on his testicles and tried to ignore it for about six weeks. but once he finally decided to see his doctor things moved very quickly. two days later the dad of two was told he had cancer — and then in another week, in his words "the nhs kicked into overdrive" and he had the tumour removed. now he wants other men to check themselves out. tell us more about what happened when you discovered a lump. did you immediately think cancer? how did you react? i reacted like a lot of blokes do, i thought it is probably nothing. iam blokes do, i thought it is probably nothing. i am sure it isjust my imagination. i continued having a feel of the lump for the next six weeks. i didn‘t really know what i was feeling for. i went on the internet and thought, is this how i should be checking myself? after six weeks, i was not sure. i went to the authority on most things in life, my
10:47 am
wife, and said, can you check? she said she didn‘t really know what she was looking for either. we both agreed it was probably time to go to my gp. how big was it? was it obvious? a small ridge going all the way around the testicle, which is not normal. lovely men have two, so we have want to compare two. the left was very different to the right. then most men would say, let‘s get a medical professional to check us out. you said you didn't know what to look for. women know about checking their breasts, and there was a lot of advice on what to look for. it is not the same for men? there are a lot of charities around there about testicular cancer and what to check for. was it on your radar? not at all, i thought it was not something i needed to worry about, something i had not
10:48 am
considered. having had it and looked into it, i realised that men in my age group, 15—40, they are the ones it affects the most. and you are kind of invincible at that age, you don‘t think anything is going to get you. picking it up early is so key to beating this cancer. it is one of the cancers that is curable, not just treatable, but curable. what are the rates? like 97%. as just treatable, but curable. what are the rates? like 9796. as long as you get it early? as long as you get it early. i say the beautiful thing about this cancer, there is nothing beautiful about cancer, but this is one where we are actually winning against it. even if it has spread, it can still be cured. the sooner you pick it up, the easier it is to treat, the less invasive procedures you have to have. if you think you have a lump,
10:49 am
get it checked out. the sooner it is picked up, the better it is for you and everybody around you. it is the uncertainty that is the worst. once you do decide he would go to the doctor, it took six weeks. but then everything happened quickly? so fast. i saw my gp, they made the referral the same day. they filled out a form in front of me and centred off. i got a phone call the same day from the hospital that said they could see me two days later. i work at a hospital, as a physio. i just assumed i was getting red—carpet treatment. it turns out not. that is how the nhs rolls. it is just what they do. they get you m, is just what they do. they get you in, get you seen, i have a chat with a doctor. he said, surgery next week. it was a whirlwind. is this really happening? i thought a minute my family really happening? i thought a minute myfamily and really happening? i thought a minute my family and friends. i let them know. i thought, my family and friends. i let them know. ithought, i‘ve my family and friends. i let them know. i thought, i‘ve got a lot of fringe friends, and i would like them to know my news. one of my
10:50 am
friends said, do you mind if i share this? isaid, absolutely. he said, you need to make it public. i wasn‘t a big facebook user, i did know how to do that, i made it public and he shared it with a few people. the numbers kept climbing and climbing. by numbers kept climbing and climbing. by the time i got to the surgery, it had 800 shares. i thought that was amazing. icame had 800 shares. i thought that was amazing. i came out of surgery and it had rocketed, into the tens of thousands. the last time i looked at it, 26,000 shares, canada, america, kazakhstan, germany, crazy how much it spread. that is what i want. i wa nt it spread. that is what i want. i want men to know it is ok to check yourself, it is ok to see if anything is wrong. if there is, get down the doctors. what is the best guidance on how frequently you should check? i started an initiative, i called it testicle tuesday. there has been a logo designed by my good friend. she has been really kind, to let me use it.
10:51 am
every tuesday, we put it on been really kind, to let me use it. every tuesday, we put it on the facebook profile and it spreads across facebook as a reminder to men, it is tuesday, check yourself. i think the guidelines say once a month is sufficient. we don‘t want men getting obsessed with it. feeling things that are not there, wondering what if. at the same time, asa wondering what if. at the same time, as a bloke, i need people to remind me to do things, i need my wife to tell me what we are doing at the weekend, what i am supposed to get from the shops. to put trousers on, when visitors are coming around. keep things simple! absolutely, being reminded helps us to do things. a reminder on your facebook profile twitter feed, pops up, things. a reminder on your facebook profile twitterfeed, pops up, oh, it is testicle tuesday, i will check myself today, in the shower or the bat. it is really to raise awareness. i am bat. it is really to raise awareness. iam not bat. it is really to raise awareness. i am not pushing it as a charity or looking to make money out of it, it is not myjob. i thought it was my duty to fellow testicle owners out there to look after
10:52 am
yourselves and make sure things are 0k. yourselves and make sure things are ok. if they are not, please see your doctor. what is the situation for you now? is that it? i am in a period of uncertainty. i am waiting for the histology to come back from the tumour that was removed, and they will know exactly what kind of cells i had inside me, then plans and treatment. if i need chemotherapy, i will take it. the incidence of recurrence with chemotherapy drugs from 20% or 30% if you do nothing, down to 2% or 3%. it isa if you do nothing, down to 2% or 3%. it is a no—brainerfor me. because we are young men, they can afford to use strong chemotherapy to get the cells. it might be that they say we don‘t need to do anything further. we feel we have dealt with your problem, and that is fantastic. the hospital have been tremendous throughout this. absolutely phenomenal. i cannot fault them one moment. my colleagues have really pulled through for me. it turns out it is not special to me, it is men with testicular cancer, it is how it
10:53 am
gets treated. it is one of those things that is a bit taboo. why? i think it is the same situation that breast cancer have a while ago, it was not talked about. now it is ok to talk about breast cancer. i want to talk about breast cancer. i want to get to that point with testicular cancer. there is nothing to be ashamed of. it is part of your body. things can go wrong with it, if they do, you need to get checked out and treated as soon as possible. then you can be cured and live a happy, normal life. it sounds like the treatment was quite straightforward? donein treatment was quite straightforward? done in one day. i came in in the morning, had a pre—assessments can, spoke to the doctor, into surgery, and out of that evening. it is very quick, then the recovery as your body heals. very simple. good for you. it is absolutely great to hear your passion in terms of making a
10:54 am
difference? that is what i think i can do from here on in. spread that awareness, make people interested in their own bodies. it is not up to their own bodies. it is not up to the hospital, your doctor, it is not up the hospital, your doctor, it is not up to your wife. as a bloke, it is up up to your wife. as a bloke, it is up to your wife. as a bloke, it is up to your wife. as a bloke, it is up to you to look after your own body. take that time to check the simple things that can be checked. it can be the difference between life and death. i think that is the message that i want to get out there. thank you for talking to us. and thank you very much for your company today. much more coming up on the bbc news channel on the french elections, the french terror attack in paris. have a lovely weekend. i will see you soon. goodbye. hello. good morning. the weather has
10:55 am
been pretty quiet of late. that is not going to change very much as we head into the weekend. a lovely start of the day in scarborough. a beautiful sunrise. it wasn‘t like that everywhere. northern scotland was very that everywhere. northern scotland was very cloudy. there have been outbreaks of rain. that is because we have a weather front sinking southwards. the area of cloud, outbreaks of rain, sinking sideways across scotland. extra cloud in northern ireland and north—west england. spells of sunshine, lifting temperatures to 7 degrees. across the far north, pretty cold air diving in as we go through the afternoon. this evening and overnight, a band of cloud and outbreaks of rain continuing to work southwards. a cold front, introducing cold air. a chilly night with a touch of frost, wintry showers across the far north—east of scotland. showers and some others
10:56 am
could also be wintry. temperatures 11 or 15 degrees. sunday, dry with spells of sunshine. next week, things will turn much colder. this is bbc news. i‘m karin gianonne live in paris, where the city is in shock after last night‘s suspected terror attack, which left a policeman dead and two others seriously injured. the headlines at 11: the attack in the heart of the capital saw people fleeing the main boulevard — police shot the gunman dead. the prime minister has urged citizens not to give in to intimidation ahead of sunday‘s election. translation: the government is fully mobilised that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead.
10:57 am
as prosecutors are searching the paris suburbs, the government is reinforcing security ahead of the election and campaigning has been paused — although some of the main players have been speaking this morning. i‘m annita mcveigh — also this hour: german prosecutors arrest a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing
10:58 am
10:59 am
11:00 am

66 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on