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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  April 27, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's thursday april 27th, it's 9 o'clock, i'm chloe tilley, welcome to the programme. borisjohnson refuses to rule out military action against syria. the foreign secretary says another chemical attack could force the uk to act. if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help i think it would be very difficult to say no. we'll get reaction to those comments throughout the programme. should a student—led campaign against israel be banned from university campuses? as the charity commission investigates, we have an exclusive report and hear from jewish students who say they feel threatened. my my friends helped me to get out of the crowd, i felt claustrophobic, my friends helped me to get out of the crowd, ifelt claustrophobic, i had a panic attack, i couldn't breathe and i felt that my chest was tightening up. and should the government be allowed
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to to delay publication of its anti—pollution strategy until after the election? it's being argued over in court today. we'll have the details. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. we are also talking about designer cats. the gene that gives floppy ears can also cause arthritis. some vets say that can leave them in pain. if you have one let us know and to get in touch on all the stories we are talking about this morning. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... the foreign secretary has said that the government would be open to join strikes against syria without parliamentary approval. speaking this morning borisjohnson said it would be "very difficult for britain to say no" if us asks us tojoin in future military action in syria.
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let's speak to norman smith our political guru. norman, tell us more about what boris johnson has political guru. norman, tell us more about what borisjohnson has been saying. chloe, normally in general elections foreign policy doesn't get a lot in, it could be different this time after what borisjohnson said this morning. he suggested that if america decided to launch another attack on syria, remember 50 cruise missiles were fired just weeks ago. if donald trump decided to do that again and said that they would like britain to take part in according to borisjohnson it britain to take part in according to boris johnson it would britain to take part in according to borisjohnson it would be very hard for britain to say no. in other words we would almost certainly say, yes, we're in. importantly mr johnson suggested that we would give the go—ahead to taking part in you as action without parliament having as action without parliament having a say. in other words they would be no parliamentary vote to approve military strikes against syria. that would cause a huge row, i imagine,
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because convention has now built up that when we are engaged in military action that has to be some sort of parliamentary approval. it also contrasts markedly with the stands byjeremy corbyn where he has been highly critical with what he regards as reckless military intervention in the middle east. it also jars to some extent with what no 10 said after the cruise missile attacks, saying they were seeking a political solution, not a military one. this is what borisjohnson said on the today programme on radio 4 today. if the americans were forced again by the actions of the assad regime, don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens, weapons that were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help i think it will be very difficult to say no. what will
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cause concern among opposition mps and some tories is the idea that britain could take part in some sort of strike without parliamentary approval. so far, norman, in this general election campaign boris johnson has been quiet but this has changed, a scathing personal attack on thejeremy corbyn. changed, a scathing personal attack on the jeremy corbyn. very flamboyant, describing that jeremy corbyn, in his flamboyant style, as a mutton headed old mugwump, in a story for the sun newspaper. he says, do not think that he is a benign islington only in her before. behind that abusive language is a political purpose. as he sees it, he wa nts to political purpose. as he sees it, he wants to alert people to the risks of mr corbyn becoming prime minister. because there is a danger with the huge poll lead that the
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tories have, that people will think, there is no chance that he will become leader, tory voters will think they don't need to bother voting and those who don't like jeremy corbyn will say that it is ok to vote labour because he has no chance of becoming prime minister. this is quite inappropriate, it sounds like an arrogant public schoolboy sneering. and the risk is that when you use that language it backfires and plays tojeremy corbyn's strengths who is presenting himself as the man standing up to the ruling elite, the political establishment, standing at the little guys. in effect being the underdogs taking on the cosy clique at the top of society. thank you, norman. your thoughts will be welcome on that this morning. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. thank you, good morning.
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labour is promising to tackle the housing crisis by building a million homes — half of them council houses — if the party wins the general election. labour claims the number of affordable homes being built is at a 24—year low. but the conservatives say they have a clear plan to build more affordable housing — with the number of new homes under construction up three quarters since 2010. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting later for final discussions about the eu's negotiating stance on brexit. they're set to approve the draft negotiating guidelines for the uk's divorce from the eu and discuss the next steps in the process. speaking in the german parliament this morning angela merkel said the uk must fulfil all of its obligations to the eu. this programme has learned that the charity commission is investigating a number of student unions about their campaigns for a boycott against israel. seventeen student bodies have endorsed the pro—sanctions ‘boycott,
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divestment and sanctions' movement — known as bds — which calls for an international boycott of israel over the way it treats palestinians. somejewish students say growing support for bds has fuelled a rise in anti—semitism on campuses. tensions are rising over north korea, as the us calls for more pressure to force the country to give up its nuclear weapons programmes. last night, president trump briefed all one hundred members of the senate — revealing a strategy of economic sanctions and diplomacy. but washington also said they were prepared to defend themselves and their allies. laura bicker reports. the us is piling on the pressure. this is a military exercise just miles from the north korean border. a message for kim jong—un, that the us is ready if diplomatic efforts fail. this is how the head of the us pacific command put it to members of the house in washington. all options are on the table.
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we want to bring kim jong—un to his senses, not to his knees. later, all 100 senators were bussed to a briefing at the white house from their commander in chief. a highly unusual move to show politicians from both sides of the aisle just how serious the situation has become. north korea is the most dangerous spot on the planet right now, and kimjong—un is a dangerous and wildly unpredictable dictator. donald trump is hoping china will use its political and economic leverage over pyongyang to persuade kim jong—un to end his missile programme. other options include redesignating north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism, which will allow the us to impose greater sanctions. meanwhile, the us show of might continues. this is a missile defence system in south korea. the current goal is a path to peace through negotiations,
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but the trump administration said it is prepared to defend itself and its allies if necessary. laura beiker, bbc news, washington. some breaking news coming in from paris, the counterterrorism section has opened an investigation after two police officers were wounded this morning by an armed gunman on a french overseas territory, la reunion. this is all the information we have at the moment. there has been a large explosion near damascus international airport. the british—based syrian observatory for human rights said the blast was followed by a large fire. arabic media reports say it may have been an israeli air—strike targeting an arms supply hub operated by the militant group, hezbollah, but these claims have not been independently confirmed. lawyers are going to the high court
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this morning to explain why the government is planning to delay publication of its anti—pollution strategy. ministers claim they cannot abide by a court ruling to publish the consultation document because it would break so—called purdah rules in the run—up to the general election. but environmental campaigners say clean air is a public health issue and such rules should not apply. a new study suggests that a cheap and widely available drug could prevent one in three deaths among women who haemorrhage after giving birth. researchers at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine said evidence showed the dru, called t.x.a, had the potential to become a front—line treatment and change practice around the world. an illinois couple married for 69 years have died within an hour of each other. 91—year—old isaac vatkin was holding the hand of his wife, 89—year—old teresa, as she succumbed to alzheimer's disease on saturday.
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isaac died a0 minutes later. staff at the local highland park hospitalfound mr and mrs vatkin unresponsive and breathing shallowly on saturday and chose to place their beds side by side. family members said they took comfort in knowing they were together at the end. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 9:30am. chloe. thank you. now let's get some sport with hugh. maria sharapova has upset quite a few people in the tennis world with a return to the sport and it's not going away. she is back, although all the talking seemed to have stopped when she got back on court although it really hasn't. she played against roberta vinci in stuttgart and lost her first service game after that ban but eventually fought back to when a
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well contested match in straight sets in stuttgart. she didn't get a bad reception from the crowd but from the other players it's a different story. the latest comic eugenie bouchard has mentioned the strongest criticism yet of the formerfive—time grand strongest criticism yet of the former five—time grand slam strongest criticism yet of the formerfive—time grand slam him, this is what eugenie bouchard said. i don't think it's right. she is a cheater. and so, to me, i don't think a cheetah in any sport should be allowed to play that sport again. it's so unfair to the others who do it the right way and are true. i think it sends the wrong message to young kids, cheat and you will be welcomed back with open arms, i don't think that is right. the court of arbitration for sport in its original ruling said that maria sharapova should not be considered an intentional doper after it was
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revealed that she took meldonium after it had been put onto the wider banned list. maria sharapova has said in response to the criticism that she isn't angry or bitter. i let things go pretty quickly and i move on, she says. about returning to court eventually after all this time, this is what you had to say. it was a moment i had obviously been looking forward to for a very long time, training intensively for the past few month and visualising myself competing again. so in a way i was rusty but in so many other ways i felt i had and left. interesting to see what reception she will get on and off court later when she plays ekaterina makarova. we clear what she will do, moving forward , we clear what she will do, moving forward, play grand slams? that was originally the criticism because she was given wild cards to get back into the tournaments and her ranking isn't high enough to allow her to
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compete in these tournaments, players like caroline wozniacki and agnieszka radwa nska players like caroline wozniacki and agnieszka radwanska have said that the fact that she's getting wild cards is something that shouldn't be happening. she will not play at tournaments like wimbledon or the french open unless she gets a wild card, either into the main draw or into qualifying. she is the 2004 wimbledon champion, of course. would she get a wild card for wimbledon? it's up to the tournament to decide if you will get on at the french open. we will find out in may. she herself says she would play in the junior tournament just to get junior tournamentjust to get the chance to play in the grand slams. thank you, hugh. we'll catch up with you later. the charity commission is investigating concerns about 17 students' unions that campaign for a boycott of israel. support for the bds movement has been growing on british campuses. but critics accuse it of fuelling anti—semitism and attacks againstjewish students. john ironmonger has this exclusive story.
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no—one protected us. no—one was there to keep us safe. no—one was there for the aftermath of it. no—one asked if we were ok. people breaking through windows, banging on the doors. chanting. i thought i was in the middle of a war between pro—israeli students and pro—palestinian students. it's probably fair to say that students are among the most politically engaged people in society. they are known for having strong opinions, for standing together on things like climate change, tuition fees, and civil rights. but there's one subject that ignites students and bitterly divides them and that is israel. thejewish state of israel
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is deeply controversial — accused of wide—ranging human rights abuses against the palestinian people and provoking anger around the world. so when you have these sort of situations... we've heard from jewish students here who claim they've become scapegoats for anti—israel hostility, subjected to verbal harassment, even physical attacks. and we found that some student bodies are now being investigated for ignoring a legal duty to protect them. devora khafi goes to queen mary university in london. she says she's been targeted time and again for having a connection with israel. have you ever taken any of these attacks personally? 100%. you know, it's not about political opinions any more, it's more about if i ever express a viewpoint in class or on social media, i get comments, in public or in private,
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saying, you know, that's thejewish girl, and pointing behind my back and whispering. she says the abuse turned physical at ucl in october when she attended a speech given by a former officer in the israeli defence force. this one girl used her back and pushed me against the doors and i was screaming for her to get off me. my friend helped me get out of the crowd. i felt very claustrophobic and outside i had a panic attack and i couldn't breathe, i felt like my chest was kind of tightening up. shouting. the event was hijacked by pro—palestinian students who claimed the speaker was complicit in human rights abuses. it was eventually moved to a secret location. we were running towards the room and my friends got inside, i saw protesters running around campus trying to look for us and one of my friends had
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a jewish skull cap on. i was about to tell him to take it off and i felt really disgusted at myself that that thought would even come into my head. so you felt you had to shield your identity? yes, definitely. and my grandparents were refugees, they left afghanistan because they were jewish and here i am, as a proud jewish student in the modern age at ucl and i still have to do this. police were called to prevent further clashes and the event was able to proceed but footage we have obtained shows protesters shouting "shame" atjewish students as they left the venue. how has this sort of thing effected your everyday life at university? it has been hard. it's been two years ofjust constant fighting for our freedom of speech,
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our rights, our well—being. it has been hard. it's been two years ofjust constant fighting for our freedom of speech, our rights, our well—being. i've definitely missed a lot of deadlines for example, i've got a few extensions. i've had counselling, i've had a few anxiety episode where it's been really hard. not alljewish students share the same views. sai englert is a member of the palestine society at soas. there's this kind of image that, you know, the palestine society is running wild, that it's very dangerous forjewish students etc and that is something that i don't recognise at all. when there are cases of unfair harassment, cases of racism, i actually think the palestine movement and its organisations and its kind of official representatives etc is actually very careful to acknowledge that, to condemn it, to distance itself from it.
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anti—semitism at british universities has doubled according to one charity. incidents like nazi graffiti, abuse and assaults increased from 21 in 2015 to 41 last year. but we've heard claims the bodies which represent students are part of the problem. students unions in increasing numbers have been voting to adopt strict anti—israel policies under the banner of a global movement called bds — boycott, divestment, sanctions. soas students union in london has been leading the charge. in 2015 they held a bds referendum. why are we allowing israel in the 21st century to get away with this crime? it's about ending israeli impunity and ending complicity of those institutes and bodies etc that we might be a part of that are also complicit. it's about ending our own complicity too. bds pressures israel to end the occupation of arab lands by calling for the boycott of israeli companies and institutions. i think soas in a lot of ways
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is a beacon actually for a lot of other universities. it is so important that we lead this movement. since the referendum at soas, many more students unions have signed up to the movement but some people claim that bds is threatening the welfare ofjewish students. so students unions talk a lot about safe space, and i think a space which is specifically, explicitly boycotting israel is not a safe space for israeli students or for many other students who have various kinds of links to israel, or for other students who simply are worried by the politics of the singling out of israel as a specific, unique evil on the planet. so do you think these students unions in question may be in danger of alienating their members that are jewish? i think it is profoundly alienating for mostjewish students. mostjewish students have as part of theirjewish identity some kind of attachment or a relationship to israel. in total we found 17 students unions
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who have endorsed bds and they include some of the largest in the uk like manchester and ucl. but are they doing anything wrong? since 2010, students unions have become registered charities and this means they now have a legal duty to act in the interests of their members. political campaigns must not become their focus and they are not allowed to comment publicly on issues that don't affect the welfare of their members as students. we raised these findings and the charity commission has confirmed it is now examining concerns about the involvement of a number of students union charities in the bds movement. it has said the concerns will be assessed consistently while taking into account the circumstances of each individual charity and that, where appropriate, they may need to take regulatory action. i went to an event at queen mary
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talking about bds and so on with a couple of friends. there was a lot of hate speech going on, basically against israel. as soon as we started asking questions they started saying, you were sent by the embassy, and everybody started booing at us. you're mossad agents. your state is a fantasy world forjews. it's all horrible. and next to us was a guy sitting and he started saying very intimidating stuff towards the girls that were with me, sexist stuff. and as we left the event, we thought we were being followed by this guy and we had to run to the station because we had heard about this guy being particularly hostile. ijust thought, this is not how i'm supposed to be feeling because i've asked questions here at a debate at a university. what is fuelling this anti—semitism, if you like, on campus? i think when institutions accept bds and when a students union accepts bds, when the national union of students accepts bds,
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when you have your own professors signing petitions to boycott israel, when you see the pro—palestinian cause kind of twisted into an anti—israel cause, and that is the problem with this, it's not pro—palestinian, it's anti—israel, when you see that happening, you understand this is what is fuelling anti—semitism. the nus, which is a confederation of 600 students unions, isaac isn't alone. the nus, which is a confederation of 600 students unions, held a survey this month of theirjewish members. the vast majority of respondents felt uncomfortable with their students union having a bds policy but the nus themselves backed bds in 2015. they refused to be interviewed for this programme and failed to provide us with a statement. a request for comment from the bds national committee was also declined and of the students unions we contacted that have passed boycott motions, only soas was prepared to talk to us. the idea that somehow supporting
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bds, supporting boycott, academic boycott etc, is a kind of blank boycott on individuals i think is very dangerous. it's not. it's about saying we don't want institutional links, economic links, political links with institutions, governments, companies that are complicit in the attacks on rights. the bds movement proposes referenda, it doesn't propose to shut down any political event. on the contrary, it proposes to open them and to involve as many people as possible. everybody, whatever their background and ideas, should be allowed to be involved in the union and take part in them. that shouldn't stop us from making decisions and from overturning those decisions. decisions that alienate certain students? i think all decisions... i mean national elections alienate everybody that votes for the losing party. but the government isn't a charity, though. sure, and maybe there is a question about whether students unions should be charities. i think when students unions
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encompass this one—sided view, it's kind of expressing to everyone as a fact that israelis are in the wrong, they are the enemy of human rights in the world, an enemy to peace in the region. if you look behind the bds lens, it calls for these things that are not peaceful, they harm jewish students and pro—israel students and they don't support a peaceful atmosphere on campus. and the government in court this morning to defend why they all delay publication of them are good clean air plans until after the election. we will hear from a leading doctor from the effects from pollution and the lawyers who have brought the proceedings. and how a cheap drug could save the lives of one in three mothers. we will hear from
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lives of one in three mothers. we will hearfrom a lives of one in three mothers. we will hear from a mother here lives of one in three mothers. we will hearfrom a mother here in lives of one in three mothers. we will hear from a mother here in the uk who nearly died. and a doctor treating people in pakistan. in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the foreign secretary has said the government would be open to join strikes against syria without parliamentary approval. speaking this morning, boris johnson parliamentary approval. speaking this morning, borisjohnson said it would be very difficult for britain to say no if the us asks us to join in future military action in syria. he was speaking to radio 4's today programme. if the americans were forced again by the actions of the assad regime, don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens, weapons that were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help, as i say, i think it will be very difficult to say no. labour is promising to tackle the
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housing crisis by building a million homes, half of them council houses, if they win the general election. they say that house—building is that a24 they say that house—building is that a 24 year low. the conservatives say they have a clear plan to build affordable housing with a number of new homes under construction since 2010. after days of military manoeuvres, the trump administration now seems to be reverted to the policy of past presidents, tighter sanctions, and diplomatic pressure to end north korea's nuclear and missile programmes. south korea and the usa have agreed to implement swift, punitive measures towards north korea in the event of what they call military provocation. an illinois couple married for sixty—nine years have died within an hour of each other. ninety—one—year—old isaac vatkin was holding the hand of his wife, eighty—nine—year—old teresa, as she succumbed to alzheimer's disease on saturday. isaac died 40 minutes later. staff at the local highland park hospitalfound mr and mrs vatkin
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unresponsive and breathing shallowly on saturday and chose to place their beds side by side. family members said they took comfort in knowing they were together at the end. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.00. let's get the sport with hugh. good morning again. maria sharapova has received the strongest criticism yet from another player. she won her first competitive match after returning from a 15 month doping ban, beating roberta vinci at the stuttgart open where she had a wild card. eugenie bouchard, the former wimbledon finalist, says she does not think a mutton headed should be allowed to play that sport again. not a great performance but a great movement took spurs back near to the top of the premier league, 1—0 they
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won, while middlesbrough's victory over sunderland means the black cats could be relegated on sunday. only one goal at the riverside, 12 points from safety, sunderland with only five games to go. and danger we faces defending champion mark selby in the first semifinal of the world snooker championship this afternoon. it's a repeat of last‘s final, ding junhui made it through with a victory of a good friend ronnie o'sullivan. much more sport later, chloe. thank you, hugh, we will speak to you then. we all breathe in pollutants. every one of us. campaigners estimate that the tiny particles in ourair are contributing to 40—thousand early deaths every year. nearly 40 million people in britain live in areas with illegal levels of air pollution and a cross—party committee of mps have called air pollution a "public health emergency". this morning, a bid by the government to delay publishing its plans to tackle illegal air pollution until after the general election is being heard by the high court. there's been speculation the clear
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air plan could include a crackdown on diesel vehicles. so let's remind ourselves what this draft legislation is all about: in 2011, the government was taken to court over its failure to tackle dangerously high levels of nitrogen dioxide in some uk cities. but in november of last year, it was told its latest proposals for tackling air pollution wouldn't work fast enough. the high court ordered it to publish a new plan by last monday. but late on friday, the government said it couldn't publish its new plan because it would breach election rules. his is how the environment secretary defended the delay to mp5. we now have entered a period of time will be strongly advised not to publish consultations. so what we're trying to do is a very short extension which we do not believe
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will make a difference to the implementation of our plans but at the same we are safeguarding our democracy. our environment analyst roger harrabin is here. explain exactly what is happening in court today, it's confusing. the question today is can the government delayed publishing their air pollution strategy because of these rules, they were invented so that governments couldn't capitalise on a giveaway before an election, for example, free jobless for everyone if you vote for us. this is what the purdah rules are for. they are a convention, not a law, the government is interpreting them to say that they can't publish the strategy because it is politically sensitive. their opponents say, you are allowed to publish them, the rules allow it to be published on public health issues, so this idea about trying to disbar it through
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the purdah rules are irrelevant. and some say, mischievous. we heard that a clamp—down on diesel is one possible thing that could be in the plan. if the government is forced to reveal the plan today what are we expecting to be in it? they will have to do something about diesel. it's major cause of urban pollution. previously the government has said it's too difficult and impractical to do anything about it and too expensive but the court haven't left them that option. the court says you have to obey the law. so if the court ruled today that they had to publish that is the plan we see. however the government has privately indicated that if they lose this case today and the purdah rules don't apply, get on and publish them, then the government will simply put in for an appeal. which in turn will delay it until after the election. pointless, isn't it? in the sense that nothing much is
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likely to happen today as long as the governor and appeals but from the governor and appeals but from the point of view of the campaign as they are winning an important point, that governments are not allowed to use purdah rules to put something like this. you talk about the 40,000 deaths, they point out the delay of three months, they say these fuzzy figures but could lead to contributing to another 10,000 deaths so they think that they have made a point either way. roger, thank you for coming in. let's look at why this clean air plan has become such a battle, what the various parties want and what it means for you. drjonathan grigg is the leading uk pediatrician on the effects of air pollution and the founder of doctors against diesel. simon alcock is from clientearth, the environmental laywers who have brought legal proceedings against the government. and .. richard burnett is the ceo of the road haulage association, who are worried about a blanket ban on diesel.
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i want to start with you, doctor greg, ifi i want to start with you, doctor greg, if i may, is there a proven link between diesel, air pollution and our ill health? step back a little, there is this association between pollution and deaths, we know far more about nitrogen dioxide and its effects on people, especially in children, and growth, asthma is associated with the after—effects, so that's related to nitrogen dioxide and particles, we know that diesel disproportionately contributes so i think diesel is a major toxic threat throughout the uk, to the publisher. simon, you are
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one of the lawyers to have brought this legal action today. what do you wa nt this legal action today. what do you want the government to say, a scrappage of all diesel cars? the government have been breaking the law on air pollution for seven years now and they've had five months to find a new plan and they are now trying to delay it at the last minute which we think is not acceptable. what we would like to see is a national network of cleaner air zones. that's quite a mouthful. that would mean taking the dirtiest parts below legal levels. we want to see a scheme of compensation, it is not people's fault that they are driving these vehicles, so we need a scrappage scheme. and to see the government stand up to the motor industry because they've helped us to get into this mess. we need compensation from the motor industry so compensation from the motor industry so that people are not penalised for switching to cleaner vehicles. richard, is diesel a problem and does it needs to be reduced on the
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roads? i would agree with everything discussed. we are equally concerned with people's health and the environment and from the perspective of the transport industry we want greener cleaner vehicles. euro six technology used on new tracks now is the cleanest, they emit the lowest level of moxie assumes. still diesel but they emit a lower level than diesel cars. so we've got 136,000 euros six technology tracks blush trucks on the road and we need to increase the number of euro six tracks on the road. what do you do with ones that don't have this cleaner diesel because presumably it's hugely expensive. this is the issue i want you to get into, it is hugely expensive, either with an old
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diesel car or a haulage company to clea n diesel car or a haulage company to clean up those vehicles. this is where we need a balanced approach. we need government to come up with a policy, an approach, to speed up the process but find a way of compensating both businesses and individuals that have to take these vehicles off the road. to replace one track costs £80,000. a haulier makes a profit every year, some less than three present pounds a year and when we talk about some of the fines being imposed in london, with the ultra low emission zones, in, in 2019 that is going to but businesses out of business. fines of £50,000 a year for one haulier and a profit of £3000 means that we won't be able to survive. by the government 's own estimate, it's a cost of £27 billion to the economy, tackling pollution,
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and rememberthe to the economy, tackling pollution, and remember the public health side that we've heard outlined, it is causing huge impact on health including that of the drivers driving these trucks. why should they be sick because of going to work? we need to get that balance right, it's not rocket science, we need to speed the process and the government needs to get on with it, they've had a long time to this.|j think they've had a long time to this.” think the issue is what emissions from what vehicles are the population being exposed to. there is an issue with trucks. a lot of emissions come from old diesel cars, diesel taxis, we have an ageing toxic fleet... diesel taxis, we have an ageing toxic fleet. .. sorry to interrupt, you say that there are viable
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alternatives that people driving older diesel vehicles are possibly the people who are not able to afford to get cleaner diesel or new ca rs. afford to get cleaner diesel or new cars. so how can we get those cars of the road, do you buy their car, give them a free pass, what do you do? we need government to tell us what to do, we are all in this together, drivers shouldn't be demonised, because we would all benefit from this. we are waiting expecta ntly for benefit from this. we are waiting expectantly for the benefit from this. we are waiting expecta ntly for the ambitious benefit from this. we are waiting expectantly for the ambitious plans from the government and it is puzzling why is being delayed, it is a government decision and i think the pain needs to be shared. it's pretty obvious what the government needs to do, there's a scrappage scheme, they do this in los angeles where the poorest people are given replacement vehicles for old cars, it's cheaper to run a diesel vehicle thana
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it's cheaper to run a diesel vehicle than a cleaner vehicle and that is madness, we need to change that and there has to be some compensation from the motor industry. they've allowed people to buy these cars that are emitting more than they said they were so there's got to be re call said they were so there's got to be recall and compensation so that people aren't penalised. £80,000 for one laurie! the government can't just go around handing out new lorries, can it? i think just go around handing out new lorries, can it? ithink there just go around handing out new lorries, can it? i think there has to bea lorries, can it? i think there has to be a proper compensation scheme. we are not going to click our fingers and it will change overnight but the technology is there. it isn't like we haven't got euro six lorries and we can't find them. lets not to delay it, it's been going on for seven years, it's just not to delay it, it's been going on for seven years, it'sjust not acceptable. the government needs to step up to the plate quickly. this is taken too long. from our perspective we are concerned about the future. and also very concerned,
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if that message has not come about, concerned about how we want cleaner trucks on the road. so it's critical to get euro six technology more broadly across the roads of the uk. you were coming in, doctor? the best way to think about the cost is if we had tap water which had these facts such as causing cancer and affecting growth and reducing lung growth and bringing forward deaths, we would invest a lot of money in cleaning and up. we are now in the position where we need to think about air in the same way as water, and invest in a healthy environment, because we will breathe it, and we don't want it to have the adverse effects of pollution on our own bodies. thank you all, gentlemen. we will keep an eye on what is happening at the high court today and bring it to everyone watching. some breaking crime figures, figures
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for england and wales show the number of crimes recorded by police in 2016 was up by 9% on the previous year. police recorded 4.8 million offences in all. the office for national statistics said the large volume increase is driving this trend, thought to reflect changes in recording processes rather than crime. so more crimes are being reported. it said there appeared to be smaller yet generally increases in homicide and knife crime. and smaller increases in some offences we re smaller increases in some offences were recording practice is likely to have been a driving factor including burglary and robbery. and a survey of england and wales showed no significant statistical change compared to 2015. those figures just coming into us from our home affairs
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correspondent danny shaw. coming up. borisjohnson warns syria that any further chemical attacks could prompt military action. we get labour's reaction to those comments. severe bleeding after childbirth kills more than a hundred thousand women worldwide every year. postpartum haemorrhage can be experienced by any woman but it's in the poorest countries where it most often ends up being fatal. now the trial of an inexpensive and widely available drug in 21 countries has proved so successful experts think it could stop more than a quarter of deaths. the bbc‘s global health correspondent tulip mazumdar reports. having a baby can be extremely dangerous here in pakistan. for every 100,000 births in the country in 2015, 178 mothers died. in the uk, that figure was nine. the leading cause of death — severe blood loss. nasheen gave birth to a little girl two weeks ago. she is lucky to be alive. translation: i was bleeding so much
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i felt like i was going to die. i was given 41 bottles of blood. the doctor had to remove my uterus to save my life. but there could be another lifeline to mothers like nasheen. this hospital was part of a major international study which found that the cheap and easily accessible drug, tranexamic acid, which helps with blood clotting, could prevent a third of deaths from what is called postpartum haemorrhage. tranexamic acid is being used for, say, heavy menstrual bleeding. it is being used for surgeries where bleeding is a little more. it is being used for trauma patients but it is not really being used for postpartum haemorrhage. any drug which can reduce it to 5%, 10%, 20%, whatever, would be very, very welcome. let's speak now to ursula brunetti
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who suffered from postpartum haemorrhage when she gave birth to twins two years ago, haleema shakur, associate professor at the london school of hygiene & tropical medicine which led the trial, and professor rizwana chaudhry, head of obstetrics and gynaecology at a free government hospital in pakistan, who we just saw in tulip's film. ursula, it sounds like you had a horrendous experience. what happened? i had a very easy pregnancy. but my labour was traumatic. i lost four litres of blood. i had a transfusion. i was lucky not to lose my womb. it happened after i had an appeasing to me to deliver my son. the panic
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button was pressed because the sheets were drenched with blood. i ended up having to go to theatre. my daughter was delivered. i didn't stop bleeding, basically. at what point did you realise something is going very badly wrong? when the room filled with people and i was told i needed to go to theatre. that is when i started to realise it was very serious. when i could feel myself losing consciousness and effectively nearly dying i remember the room just vanishing and everything fading to black and feeling panicked i couldn't stay conscious. my twins at that point we re conscious. my twins at that point were being delivered. they were in the corner of the room with my husband. i felt very isolated and it was just a nightmare, husband. i felt very isolated and it wasjust a nightmare, really. did you have any idea that this was an issue before you gave birth? no, i
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think for me that was part of the shock afterwards, but i hadn't really heard about postpartum haemorrhage. women dying in childbirth, for me, is something that happened in the victorian age, you don't hear about it in today's world. i was aware that in other countries there are more risks because the facilities and hospitals are not readily available. but it is something i hadn't come across. in all of the classes i went to it was never discussed. let's get a perspective from pakistan. how common is this kind of story in the hospital where you work? since i work in an important government hospital where there are about 20,000 deliveries per year, since it isa 20,000 deliveries per year, since it is a government hospital it is free.
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so we see this very often in pakistan. there are lots of cases of postpartum haemorrhage where somebody has given birth outside of the hospital and then they are brought to the hospital in a terrible state. sometimes they have given birth in hospital and they are already suffering from malnutrition. once they deliver they going to postpartum haemorrhage. this can become very difficult to control. the majority of the deaths which occur in pakistan are as a result of postpartum haemorrhage. sorry for interrupting. i was going to ask, if this is happening to a woman in your hospital what options are there right now to help them? before and after the trial we are going to see the difference now with the tranexamic acid, but we started off, imean, we tranexamic acid, but we started off, i mean, we were willing to take part in the trial because we wanted to help the patients in whatever way we
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can. there is a drug which is very easily available. and it is a cheap drug. so the majority of the people over here can afford it, or the hospitals can. since the results show that there has been a reduction of one third in the deaths due to bleeding in the group which received the tranexamic acid, compared to the group which didn't, i think this should be a very important drug for all cases of maternity is wherever there is a suspicion inaudible you were involved in this trial. it sounds like a wonder drug. and a cheap drug, which is always welcome. yes, fantastic news, because this has been over ten years of work. the idea that the trial did not come from us. it came from doctors in nigeria. we were doing another trial in emergency departments. and they
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we re in emergency departments. and they were saying, why are you only doing a trial in men? we see women dying every day in the emergency departments from postpartum haemorrhage. as ursula said, it isn't something that is talked about here, so it was really something i knew nothing about. initially i thought it was something totally unimportant. it is only after the doctors kept pushing us eventually we decided to look and see whether the tranexamic acid might be useful or not. we started the trial back in 2010. we engaged over 200 hospitals in 21 countries. most importantly, women and their families, 20,000 women, and theirfamilies, gave freely to this trial because without them there would be no new knowledge. this was at the point, as you described, ursula, it is a really life threatening point. to be making dishes and —— to be making
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decisions at this moment is really important. the women and the families were making these decisions but they didn't know if it would help or not. they were deciding because they felt something needed to be done. and if it was to help anybody it would help women in the future. does this help women in the uk? would ursula have had this used on her? at the time probably not. i don't know what drugs were administered during my haemorrhage. but i had lots of trips, injections, and everything else, but the hospital was well prepared with blood before i even got the pushing stage of my labour. they made sure they had my blood type available should there be a problem. hospitals in london and in the uk are equipped to deal with all sorts of complications. i feel passionately that this drug is going to be able to help women all over the world. you were lucky to have blood available. as rizwana said, in
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pakistan, nigeria, countries like that, the availability of blood is very difficult. the reason why these doctors really wanted more treatments available to them was because getting blood from the population can be difficult. its availability, electricity to store it, etc. so having a heat stable drug, which is relatively cheap, and can be easily administered, that is all really important factors about the treatment. professor choudhury, after this trial you were saying it is great you can now use this drug. how much is the pakistan government able to pay for it? will it be available to all women in your hospital should they need it? what i think is that it should be on the essential drug list. if it reduces
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mortality by one third it should be one of the essential drugs. this is the first time ever that it is evidence —based that 20,000 women suffered from postpartum haemorrhage we re suffered from postpartum haemorrhage were ta ken suffered from postpartum haemorrhage were taken into the trial and this drug was tested against a placebo. there is no doubting that that about one third of the bleeding women were relieved of death, at least. a hysterectomy had to be preceded, there were multiple reasons for that, but the deaths were definitely due to bleeding. —— a hysterectomy had to be proceded. the most important thing about the drug is that it important thing about the drug is thatitis important thing about the drug is that it is readily available. it was always being used already, but there
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should now be guidelines regarding its use in pakistan. you went to nigeria and you saw how first—hand it really can work. yes. i was doing a little film in nigeria. we saw in front of us a woman starting to bleed. the family kindly agreed for us bleed. the family kindly agreed for us to film. i am a nurse by background. i went to see what i could do to help. the only thing i could do to help. the only thing i could do to help. the only thing i could do in that situation was hold her hand. she said to me, please don't let me die. and i couldn't actually say to her she wasn't going to die because women in nigeria die all the time from postpartum haemorrhage. they are aware that women died. to promise her that she wouldn't was something that really was very traumatic for me, because at the time i said i would do everything i can, but i was so fearful she was going to die. next
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morning, when i went to see her, and she was alive, that was the best moment of my life. i've never seen a smile so huge on a human being in my life, the fact she was alive. she had twins. throughout all of that all she kept saying also was, my babies alive? —— are my babies alive? this is what doctors and midwives around the world are dealing with all the time. thank you all for speaking to us. this morning we are talking about design the cats, —— this morning we are talking
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about designer cat breeding. do let us about designer cat breeding. do let us know what you think. these cats let's get the latest weather update. it has been a chilly start of the day for most of us and a cloudy one for others. this is an image from cumbria. there is quite a bit of cloud around today. more than we have seen of late. after that bright sunny start in the south it'll cloud over. showers dotted around. in between all of that we will see some sunny brea ks
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all of that we will see some sunny breaks developing. into the afternoon we will still have a fair bit of cloud around. and also some showers across east anglia, the midlands, heading down towards the south. we will see the sunny breaks develop. south—west england holding onto a lot of dry weather as we go through the day. after a sunny start dwellers, cloud will build, introducing showers. —— after a sunny start over wales. limited sunshine over northern ireland. for scotland, the west has the thick of cloud and showers. any sunshine in the east, could introduce temperatures as high as 14. over the east of england, back into the showers, a fair bit of cloud, but we will still see some brightness. overnight, the weather front producing the showers is here and it will continue to push cloud and the odd shower. but there are clear
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skies in its wake. that means the countryside will have lower temperatures and we will have some frost around. tomorrow, we start with sunshine after the chilly start. towards the west, cloudy start, but we will see the holes in the cloud developed. some showers here and there. it will not feel as cold as today. a wind changing direction to wind more south—easterly one. to the weekend, fine and dry on saturday, breezy day. but on sunday, this low pressure is coming our way and it'll bring rain with it. you can tell that it bring rain with it. you can tell thatitis bring rain with it. you can tell that it is also going to be pretty windy. saturday, we start on a cloudy note. some brightness developing. if you showers. highs up to 15. and sunday, this area of low pressure bringing in the rain from the south—west. progressing north—eastwards. windy but drier with a few showers ahead of it. hello, it's thursday april
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27th, i'm chloe tilley. borisjohnson warns syria that any further chemical attack could result in uk military action against the regime. if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help i think it would be very difficult to say no. should a student—led campaign against israel be banned from university campuses? some students say it's increasing anti—semitism. chanting i thought i was in the middle of a war between pro—israeli students and pro—palestinian students. war between pro—israeli students and pro-palestinian students. we will hear from both pro-palestinian students. we will hearfrom both sides pro-palestinian students. we will hear from both sides of the debate. "i'm not a thug who's been harassing people —" the words of the ‘songs of praise' presenter who tells us it's been three years of hell trying to clear her name, after her son—in—law‘s new girlfriend made
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up lies about her. i thought in this country would all innocent until proved guilty but in that instance i was clearly guilty until proved innocent innocent! let's get the news now at ten o'clock. thank you, good morning. the foreign secretary has said that the government would be open to join strikes against syria without parliamentary approval. speaking this morning borisjohnson said it would be "very difficult for britain to say "no" if the us asks us to join in future military action in syria. he was speaking to radio 4's today programme. if the americans were forced once again by the actions of the assad regime and don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens, weapons that were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help i think it would be very difficult to save no. figures just released show
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the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales in 2016 rose by 9% on the previous year. the police recorded a total of 4.8 million offences. the office for national statistics said the increase reflected changes in recording processes and practices rather than crime. but it said there appeared to be "smaller but genuine increases" in homicide and knife crime. labour is promising to tackle the housing crisis by building a million homes — half of them council houses — if the party wins the general election. labour claims the number of affordable homes being built is at a 24—year low. but the conservatives say they have a clear plan to build more affordable housing — with the number of new homes under construction up three quarters since 2010. after days of military manoeuvres, the trump administration now seems to be reverting to the policy of past presidents — tighter sanctions and diplomatic pressure — to end north korea's nuclear and missile programmes. south korea has also agreed to implement swift punitive measures against north korea in the event of what it caled a further
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military provocation. the trump administration has also said they were prepared to defend themselves and their allies. a new study suggests that a cheap and widely available drug could prevent one in three deaths among women who haemorrhage after giving birth. researchers at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine said evidence showed the drug —— called t.x.a —— had the potential to become a front—line treatment and change practice around the world. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. thanks, let's get the sport with hugh. former wimbledon finalist eugenie bouchard has levelled the strongest criticism yet at maria sharapova, back from a 15 month doping ban calling her if g2 should not be allowed back into tennis. maria sharapova won herfirst not be allowed back into tennis. maria sharapova won her first match since suspension at the stuttgart open, beating roberta vinci to reach
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the last 16. she was well received by the crowd but hasn't been welcomed back in the same way by all her fellow players and eugenie bouchard is the latest.” her fellow players and eugenie bouchard is the latest. i don't think that's right. she is a cheater, and i don't think a cheater in any sport should be allowed to play that sport again. it is so unfairto all play that sport again. it is so unfair to all the other players who do it the right way and are true. so yeah, ithink do it the right way and are true. so yeah, i think from the wta it sends the wrong message to young kids, cheat and you will be welcomed back with open arms. i don't think that is right. eight straight premier league wins for spurs, they've reduced jerseys lead to four points at the top of the premier league, christian eriksen scoring the only goal of the game, what a great goal, there is less than a month to go of there is less than a month to go of the season and they still in touch with the leaders. five games left and we need to keep close to chelsea do have a chance. we can cross our
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fingers that they will lose points and try to end better than we did last season, give ourselves that extra boost to show what we are capable of. spurs's next game is on sunday against north london rivals arsenal, they won 1—0 last night to boost their chances of finishing in the premier league top four. sunderland on the brink of relegation however after losing to middlesbrough, marten de roon scoring the only goal of game. middlesbrough in trouble themselves but sunderland could be sent down as early as this weekend. the first world snooker semifinals afternoon isa world snooker semifinals afternoon is a repeat of the final last year, mark selby against ding junhui. ding junhui made it two by beating heart champion ronnie o'sullivan, ronnie insists he's in a good place even though he hasn't won ranking tournament all season.” though he hasn't won ranking tournament all season. i love what i do. so why would i not do it because
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i'm not winning tournaments or get the hump because i'm not winning. when you love what you do, it's like all the stuff that comes with snooker is a bonus. the real love is just getting your snooker cue out of your case. if you could play as good as me, mate, you would love it well! is probably right. the headlines at 1030. that's all for now. let's go to westminster for news about boris johnson and the comments he's been making about syria. norman smith is there. what exactly has he been saying? with his first intervention in the election campaign he has caused waves, not only because of the flamboyant language with which he described jeremy corbyn but babs because he suggested that if donald trump launches another missile strike against president assad,
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britain would probablyjoin in as well if asked. and also leaving open the option that britain mightjoin in without necessarily getting the backing of mps because there's now a well—established convention that when we get involved in military action it needs to be approved by mps unless it is a pressing emergency. of course it matters because jeremy corbyn emergency. of course it matters becausejeremy corbyn has a very different approach on this issue. he was highly critical of the last christmas strike. he has opposed intervention in the middle east. it matters as well because some people will perhaps be wa ry because some people will perhaps be wary about whether we are just going along to easily with donald trump and it matters as well because they will be conservative mps and easy at the prospect that we might somehow get involved in military action without the approval of the houses of parliament. this is what boris johnson said on the today programme on radio 4. if the americans were forced again by the actions of the assad regime, don't forget it was assad
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who unleashed murder upon his own citizens, weapons that were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help, as i say, i think it will be very difficult to say no. it wasn't just mrjohnson's it wasn'tjust mrjohnson's remarks about syria, it was a very personal attack launched on jeremy about syria, it was a very personal attack launched onjeremy corbyn this morning in the sun newspaper we re this morning in the sun newspaper were mrjohnson described him as an old mutton—headed mugwump. and he urged people not to discount mr corbyn and feel him, i am quoting borisjohnson, as a benign islington herbivore. —— and think of him like that. behind that flamboyant language mrjohnson is trying to as it were raised the prospect of mr corbyn possibly becoming prime minister, he says it would be a real
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dangerfor britain minister, he says it would be a real danger for britain in terms of the economy and security. inevitably, there are those who take the view that this was inappropriate language to use in a general election campaign. and it demeans politics. already the labour party has said that it demeans the office of foreign secretary. so there is a danger that it will backfire and enable mr corbyn to portray himself as the man standing up against the old —style as the man standing up against the old—style political establishment. i'm joined by the former lib dem leader, paddy ashdown. let'sjust think about that. the syria issue. how do you react to mrjohnson ‘s remarks this morning? nine how do you react to such a foolish thing? the world has been brought to the edge of nuclear catastrophe by two mavericks, kim jong—il and donald trump. muggy our blizzard foreign secretary seems to want to join the
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party! there's no mention of international law. the new law seems to be that whatever america does we follow. this is dangerous. and for a foreign secretary to do something with no connection to international law except that the americans go ahead is not in the tradition of this country, i think. ahead is not in the tradition of this country, ithink. mrjohnson left open the option of other parliament would be consulted. he said it would have to be tested. is it possible that of mr trump said they had to strike again that we would get involved without parliament? sometimes a parliament has to act quickly and sometimes it means they have to go ahead without the backing of parliament. it's not the backing of parliament. it's not the backing of parliament. it's not the backing of parliament that is, to me, the main thing, it's the fact that you part company with international law and in many ways with rational action. mrjohnson seems to make it up on the back of an envelope and blurt it out! as an
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unguided missile he seems to make the world's delicate situation far worse, and if anyone wants it to go it alone perhaps mrjohnson will be sent. what if we say, president assad is getting away with atrocities, we cannot just assad is getting away with atrocities, we cannotjust turn away. action was taken, we went back to the 1920s, he was not to be allowed to part company from that, has a commons voted against it 18 months ago and it was right to act but this is totally different. this simply says if mr trump wants to do something in my view dangerous and probably unnecessary in the syria, whatever the rest of the world says and what of international law says, we will assist them. that is not
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international diplomacy, that is making yourself the playboy of the united states. mrjohnson described mr corbyn as a mutton—headed mugwump and a benign islington only herbivore. he cannot resist a phrase like this. without wanting to sound too pompous, the national dialogue in terms of an election... what would the rest of the world think about a foreign secretary who uses language like that. mrjohnson is a highly effective clown but the right place for a clown is in the circus, not in the government. thank you, paddy ashdown. it will be interesting to hear if we have more outings from mrjohnson, the word was that he would be sidelined in the campaign, his people replied that he would have a major role. you do wonder because the language that uses doesn't really fit in with theresa may's style and perhaps they fear that he is getting the sort of
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headlines that they really don't want. plenty of time, norman! am sure we will talk about it in the next few weeks. coming up, how an administrative has led to hundreds of refugee children being prevented from coming to the uk. we will get more on this. the charity commission is investigating concerns about 17 students' unions that campaign for a boycott of israel. support for the bds movement has been growing on british campuses. it stands for boycott divestment and sanctions movement. but critics accuse it of fuelling anti—semitism and attacks againstjewish students. john ironmonger has this exclusive story no one protected us. people banging
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on the windows, breaking through doors. i thought i was in the middle ofa war doors. i thought i was in the middle of a war between pro—israeli students and pro—palestinian students. it is fair to say that students. it is fair to say that students are among the most politically engaged people in society, known for having strong opinions, for standing together on things like climate change, tuition fees and civil rights but there is one subject that unites students and bitterly divides them and that is israel. the jewish state thejewish state of israel is deeply controversial, accused of wide ranging human rights abuses against the palestinian people, and provoking anger around the world. the palestinian people, and
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provoking anger around the worldm when you have these situations... we have heard from jewish students who claim they have become scapegoats for anti—israel hostility. subjected to verbal harassment, even physical attacks. and we found that some student bodies are now being investigated for ignoring a legal duty to protect them. devora khafi goes to queen mary university in london. she says she's been targeted time and again for having a connection with israel. have you ever taken any of these attacks personally? 100%. you know, it's not about political opinions any more, it's more about if i ever express a viewpoint in class or on social media, i get comments, in public or in private, saying, you know, that's thejewish girl, and pointing behind my back and whispering. she says the abuse turned physical
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at ucl in october when she attended a speech given by a former officer in the israeli defence force. this one girl used her back and pushed me against the doors and i was screaming for her to get off me. my friend helped me get out of the crowd. i felt very claustrophobic and outside i had a panic attack and i couldn't breathe, i felt like my chest for was kind of tightening up. a shouting. the event was hijacked by pro—palestinian students who claimed the speaker was complicit in human rights abuses. it was eventually moved to a secret location. we were running towards the room and my friends got inside, i saw protesters running around campus trying to look for us and one of my friends had a jewish skull cap on. i was about to tell him to take it off and i felt really disgusted at myself that that thought would even come into my head. so you felt you had to shield your identity? yes, definitely. and my grandparents were refugees, they left afghanistan
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because they were jewish and here i am, as a proud jewish student in the modern age at ucl and i still have to do this. police were called to prevent further clashes and the event was able to proceed but footage we have obtained shows protesters shouting "shame" atjewish students as they left the venue. how has this sort of thing effected your everyday life at university? it has been hard. it's been two years ofjust constant fighting for our freedom of speech, our rights, our well—being. i've definitely missed a lot of deadlines for example, i've got a few extensions. i've had counselling, i've had a few anxiety episode where it's been really hard. not alljewish students share the same views.
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sai englert is a member of the palestine society at soas. there's this kind of image that, you know, the palestine society is running wild, that it's very dangerous forjewish students etc and that is something that i don't recognise at all. when there are cases of unfair harassment, cases of racism, i actually think the palestine movement and its organisations and its kind of official representatives etc is actually very careful to acknowledge that, to condemn it, to distance itself from it. anti—semitism at british universities has doubled according to one charity. incidents like nazi graffiti, abuse and assaults increased from 21 in 2015 to 41 last year. but we've heard claims the bodies which represent students are part of the problem. students unions in increasing numbers have been voting to adopt strict anti—israel policies under the banner of a global movement called bds — boycott, divestment, sanctions.
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soas students union in london has been leading the charge. in 2015 they held a bds referendum. why are we allowing israel in the 21st century to get away with this crime? it's about ending israeli impunity and ending complicity of those institutes and bodies etc that we might be a part of that are also complicit. it's about ending our own complicity too. bds pressures israel to end the occupation of arab lands by calling for the boycott of israeli companies and institutions. i think soas in a lot of ways is a beacon actually for a lot of other universities. it is so important that we lead this movement. since the referendum at soas, many more students unions have signed up to the movement but some people claim that bds is threatening the welfare ofjewish students. so students unions talk a lot
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about safe space, and i think a space which is specifically, explicitly boycotting israel is not a safe space for israeli students or for many other students who have various kinds of links to israel, or for other students who simply are worried by the politics of the singling out of israel as a specific, unique evil on the planet. so do you think these students unions in question may be in danger of alienating their members that are jewish? i think it is profoundly alienating for mostjewish students. mostjewish students have as part of theirjewish identity some kind of attachment or a relationship to israel. in total we found 17 students unions who have endorsed bds and they include some of the largest in the uk like manchester and ucl. but are they doing anything wrong? since 2010, students unions have become registered charities and this means they now have a legal duty to act in the interests
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of their members. political campaigns must not become their focus and they are not allowed to comment publicly on issues that don't affect the welfare of their members as students. we raised these findings and the charity commission has confirmed it is now examining concerns about the involvement of a number of students union charities in the bds movement. it has said the concerns will be assessed consistently while taking into account the circumstances of each individual charity and that, where appropriate, they may need to take regulatory action. i went to an event at queen mary talking about bds and so on with a couple of friends. there was a lot of hate speech going on, basically against israel. as soon as we started asking questions they started saying, you were sent by the embassy, and everybody started booing at us. you're mossad agents. your state is a fantasy
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world forjews. it's all horrible. and next to us was a guy sitting and he started saying very intimidating stuff towards the girls that were with me, sexist stuff. and as we left the event, we thought we were being followed by this guy and we had to run to the station because we had heard about this guy being particularly hostile. ijust thought, this is not how i'm supposed to be feeling because i've asked questions here at a debate at a university. what is fuelling this anti—semitism, if you like, on campus? i think when institutions accept bds and when a students union accepts bds, when the national union of students accepts bds, when you have your own professors signing petitions to boycott israel, when you see the pro—palestinian cause kind of twisted into an anti—israel cause, and that is the problem with this, it's not pro—palestinian, it's anti—israel, when you see that happening, you understand this is what is fuelling anti—semitism. isaac isn't alone.
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the nus, which is a confederation of 600 students unions, held a survey this month of theirjewish members. the vast majority of respondents felt uncomfortable with their students union having a bds policy but the nus themselves backed bds in 2015. they refused to be interviewed for this programme and failed to provide us with a statement. a request for comment from the bds national committee was also declined and of the students unions we contacted that have passed boycott motions, only soas was prepared to talk to us. the idea that somehow supporting bds, supporting boycott, academic boycott etc, is a kind of blank boycott on individuals i think is very dangerous. it's not. it's about saying we don't want institutional links, economic links, political links with institutions, governments, companies that are complicit in the attacks on rights. the bds movement proposes referenda,
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it doesn't propose to shut down any political event. on the contrary, it proposes to open them and to involve as many people as possible. everybody, whatever their background and ideas, should be allowed to be involved in the union and take part in them. that shouldn't stop us from making decisions and from overturning those decisions. decisions that alienate certain students? i think all decisions... i mean national elections alienate everybody that votes for the losing party. but the government isn't a charity, though. sure, and maybe there is a question about whether students unions should be charities. i think when students unions encompass this one—sided view, it's kind of expressing to everyone as a fact that israelis are in the wrong, they are the enemy of human rights in the world, an enemy to peace in the region. if you look behind the bds lens, it calls for these things that are not peaceful,
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they harm jewish students and pro—israel students and they don't support a peaceful atmosphere on campus. let's talk now to jonathan rosenhead, he's an emeritus professor at london school of economics and he's a member of the bds movement. josh seitler is the president of the union ofjewish students. ariol and 30 has been treated differently. —— ariol says he has been treated differently because of his religion. and michael deas is a masters student at the university of sussex and a bds activist. do you recognise the criticisms from the film? i recognise them, but i
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don't see them as a reality. i have spoken a dozens of different meetings and there has never been any violence. any obstructions have been by those trying to interrupt proceedings locally. there has never been any violence. you have chosen a tip of the exception of the rule. there were other examples, a girl said she was jostled, another man said she was jostled, another man said he has been followed. these are not isolated incidents. do you think tactics are being used which are not appropriate? nobody can give a blanket statement. but the general picture we have is of rational debate, raising issues which many jewish students do find uncomfortable. that is the word one of your students used. there is no law against making people feel uncomfortable in politics. there is no law against feeling offended. this isn't anti—semitic, it is
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talking about israel and what they do.josh, talking about israel and what they do. josh, talk to us about the situation on campuses. what do you hear? dude us students tell you they feel intimidated by the existence of bds? -- do feel intimidated by the existence of bds? —— do jewish feel intimidated by the existence of bds? —— dojewish students tell you they feel intimidated. not all jewish students are anti—bds. we know some who are involved in the movement against israel, as well. we see jewish students constantly standing up. we saw that student who felt intimidated by the tactics of the bds movement. they don't feel that the conversation being stifled by one side of the debate demonising one side, and oppressors on the other side, being a solution. 68% of
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jewish students at student unions who have active bds policy feel uncomfortable with their mac reunion. that says a lot. michael, speak to josh. —— reunion. that says a lot. michael, speak tojosh. —— with their union. i wanted to talk about the lawfulness of bds. organisations have been trying to shut down the debate and change the topic of the conversation for more than three years now by bombarding the charity commission with complaints about student unions. there has not been any action. i don't think they will ta ke any action. i don't think they will take action. they know student unions have a legal right to bring up unions have a legal right to bring up issues students care passionately about. but they also have to protect all students. if some jewish stu d e nts all students. if some jewish students on campuses are feeling threatened by the bds movement don't student unions have a responsibility
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to protect them, as well? it is important to underline the fact there are lots ofjewish students involved in the movement. there is also a lot of misrepresentation going on. a lot of what is being reacted to is that. bds is widely supported. israel has been oppressing palestinians... we're not here to have a conversation about that. this conversation is about what is happening in campuses up and down the country across the uk. when people are telling us on this programme that they feel threatened by the bds movement and the tactics being used at times. ariol, i could see you trying to talk. for me, the bds movement, i largely agree with it in principle, especially with the settlement boycotts. i think most people could get on board. even
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people could get on board. even people who identify as zionist could get on board. i think some of the tactics bds use and the manner in which they treat, particularly on campuses, jewish students, it somewhat alienates people who would ordinarily be quite keen to get on board with the principles and aims of the bds movement. but because of the tactics feel uncomfortable with associated with it. josh, your cat in the background is somewhat stealing the show, i must say. it has gone now but that was a beautiful moment! if we want to talk about the tactics, a useful thing would be to talk about the campaigns of the bds movement, one has been
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against the british security company g4s which until recently helped israel's brand the prisons where political prisoners are... bds are not here to defend themselves, we are not here to talk about what the ariel movement is trying to achieve, it is what the students are saying. it is not necessarily forjewish students to support the actions of ariel. it is whenjewish students are being picked out because they are being picked out because they are wearing a star or they are singled out as targets, we should not let this abuse happen and this is why people find the tactics of bds difficult because they feel jewish students are victimised for being jewish and feel they have to stand up for israel. of course they don't always have to stand up for it but they are being forced to consistently defend themselves against attacks that are not acceptable. jonathan? i think anyone
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who confuses the idea of someone being jewish and the actions of israel is making a big mistake. israel is making a big mistake. israel is making a big mistake. israel is a state. jews are a religion, and ethnicity and culture. what about this idea that some jewish students are being threatened by the behaviour and the tactics. you are changing the language i'm not. the survey said that jewish stu d e nts not. the survey said that jewish students felt uncomfortable, not threatened. ariel and josh have both said that they are threatened. i am reflecting their points of view. theyit reflecting their points of view. they it up. a moral panic has made jewish students sensitive to issues so they feel that there is anti—semitism whereas there is pungent criticism of the dreadful things israel does in the middle east and that is what you don't want michael to talk about. firstly,
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east and that is what you don't want michaelto talk about. firstly, i never accused the bds movement of being anti—semitic. i don't think thatis being anti—semitic. i don't think that is something we have said. i think some actions that have supported bds have been anti—semitic in the past. i thinkjewish students are feeling uncomfortable and this needs to be addressed. thank you all for speaking to us and thank you for the cat, very entertaining as well. still to come. how the songs of praise presenter, diane louise jordan, has had to fight to clear her name. in the national newspapers, the first thing you read about me is that i am this bug that has been intimidating people! the foreign secretary has said that the government would be open to join strikes against syria without parliamentary approval. borisjohnson said it would be "very difficult for britain to say no" if the us asks us to join in future military action in syria.
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he was speaking to radio 4's today programme. if the americans were forced again by the actions of the assad regime, don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens, weapons that were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help, as i say, i think it will be very difficult to say no. labour is promising to tackle the housing crisis by building a million homes — half of them council houses — if the party wins the general election. labour claims the number of affordable homes being built is at a 24—year low. but the conservatives say they have a clear plan to build more affordable housing — with the number of new homes under construction up three quarters since 2010. united states now seems to be favouring the use of tighter sanctions and diplomatic pressure to end north korea's nuclear missile
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programmes. south korea and the united states have agreed to implement swift punitive measures against north korea in the event of what the court further military provocation. the trump administration has also said they would be ready to defend themselves and their allies. an illinois couple married for 69 years have died within an hour of each other. 91—year—old isaac vatkin was holding the hand of his wife, 89—year—old teresa, as she succumbed to alzheimer's disease on saturday. isaac died 40 minutes later. staff at the local highland park hospitalfound mr and mrs vatkin unresponsive and breathing shallowly on saturday and chose to place their beds side by side. family members said they took comfort in knowing they were together at the end. it's 1035. it's1035. amazon hasjust said it's1035. amazon has just said they are creating 1200 jobs at a new warehouse in warrington. more about that later. let's go to the sport now with hugh.
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i lost you! i will wait, i am nothing if not a gentleman! good morning again. maria sharapova has received her strongest criticism yet from a fellow player. she won her first competitive match since returning from her 15 month doping ban beating roberta vinci of italy at the stuttgart grand prix. one sensed she was relieved and delighted after receiving a wild ca rd into delighted after receiving a wild card into the tournament. former wimbledon finalist eugenie bouchard says she does not believe a cheater in any sport should be allowed to play that sport again. it wasn't a great performance that it was a great performance that it was a great moment that took spurs to within four points of chelsea's lead in the premier league, christian eriksen from a good distance, scoring to give spurs the win,1—0 at crystal palace last night. middlesbrough's win over sunderland, also 1—0 means the black cats could be relegated as early as this weekend. marten de roon scored the
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only goal of the game. sunderland 12 points from safety with just five games to go. ding junhui plays mark selby in the first semifinal at the world snooker championship later. a repeat of last‘s final at the crucial ball, which selby won. ding junhui made it through by beating friend and five—time champion ronnie o'sullivan. that's it for me, i'll be back later. thanks, hugh, lots of comments about the discussion we've just had, lynn says, i've been watching a programme on anti—semitic actions at top universities, as an educator it makes me sad that we are not teaching people to see black and white issues in more complex terms. one tweet says that sadly bds to not see that their cause is not advanced by bullying tactics. sarah says, what about palestinian students, how will they feel if we fail to condemn the abuses on them? and bill says,
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i'm hugely against the government of israel bosman policies and do not blame british jews for those policies, if some people choose to attack alljews because of this policy that is despicable. keep your thoughts coming in. three years ago diane louisejordan, former blue peter presenter and presenter of songs of praise was issued with —— was accused of harassment, and wants to stay away —— want to stay away from her supposed victims. the woman who harassed has now pleaded guilty to making false charges.” harassed has now pleaded guilty to making false charges. i was issued with a complaint, three years ago, and then another one, from the same woman saying that i physically and verbally abused her which we now know is completely untrue. she
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admitted in court yesterday that everything that she said was alive. how did you find out what had happened? did the police come to you? what was the chain of events? literally i knew nothing about whatever plans she had against me until three years ago when there was a knock on my front door. two policemen, now for me when i see two policeman at the door i think, somebody has been in an accident, or someone has been hurt, because you know that you haven't done anything illegal yourself but the izzy and this notice to me. i had no idea what it was. —— they issued this notice. they said someone had reported that i had been abusive to them. it wasn't a criminal notice but it was a warning, notice, to say that it had been reported to the police and that if i did it again more serious action could be taken.
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what i found shocking at that moment was, i thought, what i found shocking at that moment was, ithought, in what i found shocking at that moment was, i thought, in this country, we we re was, i thought, in this country, we were all innocent until proved guilty but in that instance i was clearly guilty until proved innocent. i was told that i had no option but to sign this notice. being law—abiding i signed it and that started a series of events. talk to us about those events. what did it lead on to. you don't have a criminal record as such but it does go on some sort of record. and for me it meant that if you go for any sort of enhanced checking likes eib or anything like that it will come up or anything like that it will come up and so because i work with children's charities and those sort organisations i'm always being checked in that way. it was obviously going to have a
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detrimental effect on me. they say that these notices last for about one year. so as long as you keep your nose clean in that year, a p pa re ntly your nose clean in that year, apparently they are supposed to go although i have found out that they stay on your record longer than that. with me, it was almost to the day that the first one, it was its sell by date, i was issued with another one. and at this stage, i told the police, i think i know what this is about, let me have some time to work out what i was doing on the data that i was supposed to have been intimidating this lady. sadly, i don't know why, the police did not wait, the notice was issued, and the newspapers got hold of it, they got hold of it both times around, the first time i was in a national newspaper and the second time on the
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front page of a national newspaper. and some of the charities i was working with, i haven't heard from them since. it has been a tough three years. really hard trying to clear my name. having said that, i went back to the police and asked them to really investigate and they have been utterly brilliant. one officer in particular, ruth craig, i must praise her because she has been amazing in her diligence in clearing my name. you say that it has affected you work— wise. emotionally, just as a human being? it must have been very difficult to cope. to tell you the truth, chloe, iam cope. to tell you the truth, chloe, i am still reeling from it now. i feel as if i've been on the most horrible three roller coasters. my integrity has been questioned. my
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sense of trust feels as if it has flown out of the window. i just don't know who is going to come out of the woodwork to perhaps say something about me that is not true. and also that thought, the fact that now, in the national newspapers and online, wherever you go, the first thing that you probably read about me is that i am this sort of thug who has been intimidating people. that is the furthest from what i am. and i did not know until yesterday if my name would be cleared and i would be vindicated. i walked around for a few years having to feel that this was how i would be viewed from now in and it is hard to live with an untruth. how hard is it for police to issue these notices? how
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much evidence do they need to see them? much evidence do they need to see them ? presumably that much evidence do they need to see them? presumably that is your worry. i was led to believe that you just need to be in the same place as the person making this allegation against you. i wasn't in the same place. it just seems against you. i wasn't in the same place. itjust seems to me that they really, really to issue. my understanding of these notices is, if somebody, for what ever reason, ta kes a if somebody, for what ever reason, takes a dislike you are, they can walk into any police station, make an allegation, and before you know it, the innocent person can be slapped with one of these notices. my slapped with one of these notices. my understanding also is that the police are aware that they are less than perfect. and two years ago i was led to believe that they were going to look in to changing them
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somewhat, and to date, i don't think anything has been done. so as we speak right now, there are people who are, i say less fortunate than me because they don't have a platform like this to speak about it, and they may not have their names cleared the way i did but there are people right now who are being issued with these notices and have no way of addressing that. the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales last year are police in england and wales last yearare up on police in england and wales last year are up on the previous year. danny is here to tell us more. these figures are for 2016 compared with the previous year. they cover england and wales. they are offences recorded by police, which are up 9%. there were increases in virtually every category of crime. that is something we haven't seen before. particularly notable are the fact
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there are increases in car crime. that's the first time since 2002 when new recording processes were introduced that we seen an increase in carcrime. introduced that we seen an increase in car crime. burglary, where there have been significant falls over the past 20 years, we are seeing an increase there, as well. violent crime is up by 19%. we should add a word of caution. some of these increases are due to more effective and efficient waste police are counting crimes, recording crimes, different categorisations of some crime. some of it isn't genuine increases. by the office of national statistics, which has released the data, have said they're genuine increases in and killings will stop there were 601 last year compared with 576 the previous year. that is if you take away the hillsborough deaths, which have been included, as well. there are genuine increases in knife crime and gun crime as well as
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some other offences. concerning statistics. confusingly we have other stats, as well, released. that is in the crime survey. this includes offences which are not reported to police. figures there are broadly stable. that is confusing. it is but you can say that police are recording more offences and there are some genuine increases that may not yet be picked up increases that may not yet be picked up by increases that may not yet be picked up by the crime survey. also out, new figures on assault and self harm in prisons in england and wales. not surprising that we are seeing increases overall in society that we are seeing a rise of assaults in custody in england and wales. they are up 27% to a record 26,000 attacks on staff and prisoners. the assaults on staff were up 38%. that isa assaults on staff were up 38%. that is a record high of 26,000 plus. some really concerning figures in
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terms of prison violence. deaths in custody. this is to the period to the end of march, self—inflicted we re the end of march, self—inflicted were 113, near record levels in that particular category. some people say thatis particular category. some people say that is linked to numbers of prison officers. we have seen over the past few years a significant fall in the number of prison staff. people say thatis number of prison staff. people say that is making jails less safe. officers are unable to respond to the incidents as quickly. that is certainly a factor. also, the former legal highs like spice which are available injails. thank you very much. a mistake has led to 113 refugee children being delayed coming into the uk. we will speak to a charity helps these children. donald trump's election was a celebration for some, a calamity for others, and now nearly 100 days into
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the trump presidency it is still dividing one couple. i'm gretchen, i voted for hillary clinton. i'm told, i voted for donald trump. we just got married. —— i'm tom. i voted for donald trump. we just got married. -- i'm tom. there were a couple of days where we couldn't even talk to each other. it was difficult because we didn't know what to say to each other. they were engaged in a lot of heated political discussions when i first met them. don't talk over me yet.” discussions when i first met them. don't talk over me yet. i caught up with them again six weeks into their marriage. and 100 days into the trump presidency. i never thought i would hear anybody say i would be living under a trump presidency. every day i wake up with a stomach ache and wonder what happened overnight. i tell her she should be happy because our honeymoon was paid
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for by an increase in the stock market because of tram.” for by an increase in the stock market because of tram. i think the travel ban was ill—conceived, it was a racist ban which would never pass constitutional law. it was a quick roll out. that was the problem. the roll—out was poor but the policy was fine. the president totally flopped on health care reform. it really was amazing that he didn't have a plan in place when he finally got the white house. he tried to roll it out too quickly. it's going on right now. there is always an albatross around every president's neck. it takes a long time. i supported the strike on syria. i think a measured response to the atrocities that occurred in syria was long overdue. it was a well done, well orchestrated strike which i was very proud of the president of. the president promised to come to washington and drain the swan. instead of that he dredged it and he filled it with nepotism. except for
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steve bannon, ithink filled it with nepotism. except for steve bannon, i think the staff has been terrific. the staff on national security is one of the best. you might wonder how they make their marriage work with these differences, but they do. we have had disagreements about this our entire relationship. we can have discussions and argue and disagree without disrespecting each other. it's not an election vote any more. now we have a president. until he is impeached, because i think that is coming very soon, but i still love you. i like that film. an administrative error has led to 130 refugee children being delayed from coming to the uk. the government says it miscalculated how many places were available. in february the home office said 350 would be taken under the amendment. that is well below the 3000 figure campaigners had called for. the labour peer, lord dubs, who initiated the scheme, has called the
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ever shocking and disgusting. he came to britain as a refugee from nazis at the age of six. last year this programme was given exclusive access this programme was given exclusive a ccess as this programme was given exclusive access as he and rabbi harryjacobi visited the calais camp known as the jungle to meet refugee children.” ama jungle to meet refugee children.” am a refugee. i came to england at the age of six. he is complaining that it has been eight months now. he is very upset nobody has bothered or asked us how we are. we are children. that's why we are here to ask you. he is very sad. have you anyfamily in ask you. he is very sad. have you any family in the afghanistan? the taliban killed his father. a bomb from the taliban. it is so dangerous. right here we've
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had a couple of children killed by moving traffic when attempting to get in the ovaries. we try to encourage people to claim asylum in france. —— in the lorries. because it is too dangerous to attempt the crossing. none of these children are willing to make this choice. they are too young. they've been told by family at home to go to the uk. i'm far more determined than ever to push the british government to say that these are young, unaccompanied refugee children here. in 1938, 1939, britain took10,000 unaccompanied refugees from germany, austria and czechoslovakia. it wasn't our problem then. but we were the only country to do it. even the american said no. in humanitarian terms we have a responsibility for other human beings who are vulnerable. we were hoping to speak to someone from a charity that helps
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children who are alone. u nfortu nately children who are alone. unfortunately they haven't arrived yet. we will talk to them if we can. lots of people getting in touch about the conversation we had about the bds, that is a group on university campuses across the uk. somejewish student university campuses across the uk. some jewish student saying they feel threatened by their tactics. olivia says there is a difference between critical and political decisions being made by the israel government and anti—semitism. i can criticise trump and not be anti—american. i'll be interested to read the investigation and what drew the complaints. richard says a difference must be made between the criticisms of the actions of israel and its political leaders and the jewish actions of israel and its political leaders and thejewish and israeli people. one of my best friends is israeli but is completely against the actions of the israeli state against the palestinian people. however the idea of bds is wrong. it's wrong to boycott israel as the impact of this would hit the ordinary low paid workers of israel. it is not a way to build unity. it
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is wrong to harass anyjewish student at any university but it is also necessary that those students should speak out against the crimes of the israeli state against the poor and ordinary people of palestine. another tweet, we need to remember that the purpose of bds is to help the occupation in a peaceful way. homosexual couples can get married under australian law but hundreds of weddings have taken place since 2014 using british law with the help of the british high commissioner. more comments coming in on that discussion we were having about bds, the anti—israel group, which is on campuses across the uk. chris on facebook says there is no doubt that universities are being used to promote and justify anti—semitism encouraged by the current hard left.
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ifind them as encouraged by the current hard left. i find them as dangerous and insidious as the hard right. in fa ct, insidious as the hard right. in fact, they are a court, a crossover that connects a hard left and right in their anti—semitism and hate. james says thank you for using a programme to unravel the threat jewish students face in british universities. you can carry on getting in touch with the contact details below. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. if you would like to see any of our films out the website and you can see some of those beautifully crafted films there. —— on the website and you can see some of those beautifully created films there. most of us will be around 11—12. tracking southwards across the country. clearer skies should follow
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these areas. some early sunshine, one or two like coastal showers will seek cloud bubbling up through the day and might be... most places will be dry and bright. some sunshine at times. temperatures getting as high as 15. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has accused jeremy corbyn of being a threat to the uk, calling the labour leader a "mutton—headed old mugwump" borisjohnson, has suggested that
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britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack it seems incredible when you have the threat of that kind from a if the americans were, once again, to be forced by the actions of the assad regime, and don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens with weapons which were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. jeremy corbyn is on the campaign trail and is due to speak in the next few minutes.
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