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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 27, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has accused jeremy corbyn of being a threat to the uk, calling the labour leader a "mutton—headed old mugwump" borisjohnson, has suggested that britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack it seems incredible when you have the threat of that kind from a if the americans were, once again, to be forced by the actions of the assad regime, and don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens with weapons which were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. jeremy corbyn is on the campaign trail and is due to speak in the next few minutes. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting today for final discussions about the eu's negotiating stance on brexit. figures released today show the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales in 2016 rose by 9% on the previous year.
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research suggests a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of glaucoma, a condition which causes irreversible sight loss. also... do you prefer to feel the pages of a book between your finger? 2016 was a record year for the publishing industry, as printed book sales went up by 8% compared to the previous year. good morning. it's thursday 27th april. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. borisjohnson has used his first intervention in the election borisjohnson has said it would be difficult for the uk to refuse the
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us if it asks for help on a strike on syria. borisjohnson has used his first intervention in the election campaign to mount the conservatives‘ most personal attack yet onjeremy corbyn. in an article published in the sun newspaper, the foreign secretary accused the labour leader of being a security threat to the uk. he accused mr corbyn of being reluctant to use lethal force, opposing nuclear weapons and campaigning against nato. he went on to describe the labour leader as a "mutton—headed, old mugwump". the shadow defence secretary has described his comments "crass and offensive". 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is watching from westminster for us. it is not often that you hear the term mugwump. is it backfiring on borisjohnson? it was his first intervention of the general election campaign. he is already making waves notjust further very colourful language and
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personal criticism ofjeremy corbyn but also because he has suggested britain could join in any future us strikes against president assad and that those strikes could take place without parliament necessarily getting a vote. that is something which is very starkly at odds with whatjeremy corbyn has said with regards to president assad. he has them and let —— vehemently opposed intervention and was critical of the previous air strikes but i suggest there are maybe other mps who are uneasy at the thought of going along with military action without parliamentary approval and others concerned we might be going along a bit too easily with presidentjohn. have a listen to what borisjohnson said on radio 4 this morning. if the americans were, once again, to be forced by the actions of the assad regime, and don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens with weapons which were banned almost 100 years
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ago, if the americans choose to act again and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. there has been a fairly strong reaction to mrjohnson‘s suggestion, including from the former liberal democrat leader paddy ashdown who said mrjohnson‘s remarks were foolish, errors to months will —— foolish, errors to months will —— foolish, irresponsible and dangerous. i put it to paddy ashdown that if there were another chemical attack by prisoners at the may be no time for the government to consult before joining time for the government to consult beforejoining in on air strikes. sometimes in rare exceptional circumstances that means they may have to go ahead without the backing of parliament. it is not the backing of parliament that is, to me, the most important thing, it is the complete fact that you part company with international law and, in many ways, with rational action as well.
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mrjohnson seems to make it up on the back of an envelope and then bought it out. i have to say, as an unguided missile, he seems to make the world's delicate situations far worse and if anyone wants to go it alone then perhaps they will send mrjohnson. it is not just it is notjust because of his remarks about possible air strikes against president assad that boris johnson is making waves but also because of his very personal criticism ofjeremy corbyn, describing him as a mutton—headed old mugwump, suggesting here is what he called a benign islington herbivore. behind that colourful depiction ofjeremy corbyn the political intent of borisjohnson is to try and pose jeremy political intent of borisjohnson is to try and posejeremy corbyn as a serious threat and suggest he would bea serious threat and suggest he would be a real danger to the british economy and british security but it
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does risk backfiring. already labour have described his remarks as demeaning, insulting, crass, insensitive, and there is a broader danger that it plays to the idea that this is rather arrogant public schoolboy stuff and it may even work tojeremy schoolboy stuff and it may even work to jeremy corbyn‘s schoolboy stuff and it may even work tojeremy corbyn‘s advantage as he seeks to position himself as the man standing upfor seeks to position himself as the man standing up for the underdog, taking on the political elite and the ruling establishment. we will see whetherjeremy corbyn makes any reference to those comments by boris johnson makes any reference to those comments by borisjohnson when he arrives in harlow in essex where he is due soon along with the shadow housing secretaryjohn healey to talk about housing. labour are saying they would build many more homes, 1 million in fact, half of them council houses, if they win the
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election. former london mayoral candidate zac goldsmith has been chosen by the conservatives to stand for parliament in his old constituency. mr goldsmith was ousted as mp by the liberal democrats during a by—election in december. he had previously left the conservative party in protest at the government's backing of a third heathrow runway. the liberal democrats have decided not to contest the brighton pavilion seat currently held by the only green party mp, caroline lucas. last week, ms lucas called for a so—called "progressive alliance" where parties did not put up candidates in some seats to avoid the vote against the conservatives being split. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting later for final discussions about the eu's negotiating stance on brexit. they're set to approve the draft negotiating guidelines for the uk's divorce from the eu and discuss the next steps in the process. speaking in the german parliament this morning angela merkel said the uk must fulfil all of its obligations to the eu. 0ur europe correspondent
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damian grammaticus is in luxembourg where the meeting will take place for us now. how much do those comments from angela merkel this morning informed the discussions that will take place their? though ministers here have arrived, they have all gone into the meeting andi they have all gone into the meeting and i think we will see a unity of purpose. what they were saying as they went in, the ministers, that they went in, the ministers, that they were totally united, with no divisions amongst them, and ready to sign off on those guidelines and quite a few specific demands or criteria that will be in them that the eu site say they will be demanding from the uk. we heard angela merkel addressing the
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parliament in berlin saying now is the time for the 27 other eu countries to defend their interests. she thought that some in the uk were still mistaken about what brexit would involved and there would be a dose of reality. similar sorts of words here, ministers going in saying there had clear priorities around citizens‘ writes, the money the uk is committed to pay, things like that. things they will be insisting on. angela merkel spoke about protecting eu citizens, avoiding damage to the eu, strengthening the cohesion of the 27. very much along those lines you have mentioned, presenting a united front, also warning britain against what she said was the illusion that it can have the same 01’ illusion that it can have the same or better rights than member states post brexit. pretty tough as this meeting begins. yes, i think what angela merkel would say and the ministers coming
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year would say is they would not describe it as tough as much but pretty logical. if the uk is inside the single market and the eu, it will have different right and access to benefits than if it is outside the eu. i had quick word with jean—claude juncker and he said there would be no difference made to there would be no difference made to the eu‘s position. i asked him if the eu‘s position. i asked him if the size of the mandate and the strength of the negotiation position, and he said from the eu point like —— from the eu‘s point of view, it was the 27 countries that would determine negotiating and not the outcome of the uk‘s election. 0nce the outcome of the uk‘s election.
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once these strategies are agreed, they are slightly put on ice until after the general election here. yes. the chief negotiator for the eu also came here this morning and as he walked in he had a cheery, "we are ready," for the regal shares —— for the negotiations. he is waiting for the negotiations. he is waiting for guidelines which will set out the parameters of what he can negotiate but as you say that will a lwa ys negotiate but as you say that will always until the uk general election. the eu are ready. 0n saturday the meeting is formalising its negotiation position and that is not going to shift whatever happens in the election, the negotiations will begin after. tensions are rising over north korea, as the us calls
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for more pressure to force the country to give up its nuclear weapons programmes. last night, president trump briefed all 100 members of the senate, revealing a strategy of economic sanctions and diplomacy. but washington also said they were prepared to defend themselves and their allies. laura bicker reports. the us is piling on the pressure. this is a military exercise just miles from the north korean border. a message for kim jong—un, that the us is ready if diplomatic efforts fail. this is how the head of the us pacific command put it to members of the house in washington. all options are on the table. we want to bring kim jong—un to his senses, not to his knees. later, all 100 senators were bussed to a briefing at the white house from their commander in chief. a highly unusual move to show politicians from both sides of the aisle just how serious the situation has become. north korea is the most dangerous spot on the planet right now, and kimjong—un is a dangerous
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and wildly unpredictable dictator. donald trump is hoping china will use its political and economic leverage over pyongyang to persuade kim jong—un to end his missile programme. other options include redesignating north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism, which will allow the us to impose greater sanctions. meanwhile, the us show of might continues. this is a missile defence system in south korea. the current goal is a path to peace through negotiations, but the trump administration said it is prepared to defend itself and its allies if necessary. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. we ta ke
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we take a message to the whole country that it doesn‘t have to be like this. we don‘t have to be so unequal and that doesn‘t have to be such property and such insecurity. things can be very different. here in harlow you have a labour council building council homes for the first time for a very first time we are getting new council housing here in harlow. i have just been to see an elderly couple that have been rehoused in a brown new council home, giving them peace, security, decent housing. something they have always wanted. we want that for everybody in this country. i tell you this. a labour government will not stand by and watch the housing crisis get worse. we will build 1 million homes over the period of a
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parliament, half of which will be council and housing association for rent, and be totally affordable, because that is the labour away. we wa nt because that is the labour away. we want our country properly housed, our young people growing up with security, so they can achieve more in school, college and go on to university. this election is about the future. but it is about the future and removing that sense of insecurity that so many face. is it right that 1 million insecurity that so many face. is it right that1 million people wake up every morning not knowing if they have got a day‘s work ahead of them are not? checking their phones every few minutes to see if there are zero hours contract is going to come up with a few hours‘ work? of course not. is it right that1 million people are waiting for social care, wondering if it is going to happen and their family wondering if it is going to happen and theirfamily are going through stress wondering if they will ever get the help they need? is it right that so many weight in a&e all over
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the country trying to get the care they desperately need? no. it is up to us to put it right and we do that by electing a labour government that invests for the future, a labour government that invests for our young people, that invests in an economy and jobs for the future, not one that gives tax breaks to the very rich and the biggest corporations. that is the labour offer to the people of this country. come with us on this journey. come with us on this journey to create a fairerand with us on this journey to create a fairer and more decent society for everyone, not just the few. fairer and more decent society for everyone, notjust the few. we are for the many, they are for the few. you know the difference, we know the difference, and we will take that message to difference, and we will take that m essa g e to every difference, and we will take that message to every town, city and village over the whole of this election campaign and we know we can
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do itand election campaign and we know we can do it and we are going to do it. do i have your support? cheering thank you very much indeed. jeremy corbyn speaking in essex. he was talking about housing but also touching on a broader theme and what is rapidly becoming labour‘s counterpoint to the conservatives‘ strong and stable government line, jeremy corbyn repeating that the conservatives would be strong against the weakest and weak against the strong, so the obligatory shot with baby that all politicians like to get, and we will hear much more about campaigning. let‘s find out what voters think aboutjeremy corbyn. so with six weeks to go until the general election, what do voters make of the campaign so far? 0ur west of england political editor paul barltrop
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is in gloucesterfor us. the biggest reaction we have had this morning from people in glass is one of cynicism, generally about politicians, specifically about politicians, specifically about politicians at election time, the pledges and promises made. 0ne person said they always offer so many things in the run—up to the general election and then do not deliver them. he said he probably wouldn‘t vote. when i asked about jeremy corbyn, quite a lot of cynicism. i spoke to two established labour voters who said on that jeremy corbyn is too radical and the other he was the answer. 0ne jeremy corbyn is too radical and the other he was the answer. one said that if all the bank holidays promised by labour were delivered them it would bankrupt britain in
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them it would bankrupt britain in the first year. i think the sort of thingsjeremy the first year. i think the sort of things jeremy corbyn the first year. i think the sort of thingsjeremy corbyn is saying here in these dumb act this key marginal seat is not shifting much opinion. do you think of the talk of housing and paying nhs workers more, are those policies getting through to voters ? both are key issues. if you look around the west country were there is huge demand for housing, prices have gone up, notjust in gloucester, cheltenham as well has seen gloucester, cheltenham as well has seen house prices soaring, another key marginal, but the problem is how to provide a solution. whilst voters accept there is a need for more housing they are perhaps not come to be sung by politicians promising to build them, not least because we hear it from parties of all persuasions. the nhs, the gloucestershire royal hospital has
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had difficulties overwinter, and in cheltenham as well, and funding for the nhs is generally a big issue and jeremy corbyn‘s promise of more money, especially pay rises, will go down well. i spoke to one woman who used to work nhs and feels it is a critical issue in the election but whether that will be enough to shift opinion we will have to wait and see. tim farron is out on the road also. here in cambridge, with julian and the team, you have the chance to change the future of britain. do not cry into your beer or your latte over what has happened. this is your moment to change britain for the good. just catching the end of what he had to say in cambridge but obviously talking about brexit and the nature of brexit for the uk,
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what that will look like, as he heads out to meet voters in cambridge. much more from ours on the campaign throughout the next hour and the campaign throughout the next hourand a the campaign throughout the next hour and a half. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. borisjohnson has suggested that britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting today for final discussions about the eu‘s negotiating stance on brexit. there‘s been a rise in the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales — with violent crimes increasing. and in this sport, maria sharapova has won her first competitive match after returning from a 15 month doping ban but is usually bouchard says she doesn‘t think she should be able to play the sport again.
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christian eriksen‘s fine goal got taught ina christian eriksen‘s fine goal got taught in a fine win at crystal palace. and the first of the semifinals in the world snooker championship is a repeat of last year‘s final. more just after 1130 am. new figures show the number of crimes recorded by police across england and wales last year went up by 9%. there were particularly sharp increases in offences of violence. it‘s the final set of crime statistics before the general election. with me is our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. we often hear that rises in crime figures are down to the way those crimes are recorded but can that
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really explain a rise of as much as 9%7 really explain a rise of as much as 996? it explains a substantial part of the increase. there is no doubt the police or recording crimes more effectively and consistently done before. they have recategorised some offences, particularly for violence, that will account for some of the increase, and more people are reporting offences, particularly sexual offences, we know there is more confidence in the police so that explains a substantial part of the increase in terms of sexual offences, but the experts, the 0ffice offences, but the experts, the office for national statistics, are saying that some of this increase appears to reflect a genuine rise particularly in crimes of the most serious types of violence, murders, there were 601 last year if you exclude the hillsborough cases which we re exclude the hillsborough cases which were included in official statistics, which is an increase from 576 the previous year. these
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are high levels we have not seen for some considerable time. there also appeared to be genuine rises in knife attacks. the overall violence figure is up 19%. the separate crime survey of england and wales which is an estimate of offending based on the survey of householders and includes offences which are not reported to police is showing increases in violence although they may not be statistically significant. what to police forces do with that information if they know certain types of crimes are more reported and others are underreported, do they focus on those areas to encourage people to report those kind of crimes?“ those areas to encourage people to report those kind of crimes? if that are particular concerns about a type of crime going up, we have seen in london the new met police commissioner is concerned about gun crime, there is an attempt to bear
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down on that offending. there has been a freedom of information attack request by bbc radio five about acid attacks. it is relatively recent phenomenon, we have seen a trebling of acid attacks between 2012 and last year, almost around two every single day. the lease are trying to bear down on that. there is a concern that some gangs or other people who want to conduct reprisal attacks are using acid or corrosive su bsta nces attacks are using acid or corrosive substances rather than other weapons because the sentences may not be as significant as they are caught. thank you. a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of a condition which causes irreversible sight loss, according to researchers from university college london. diagnosing glaucoma sooner would mean patients could start treatment before their vision deteriorates. our health correspondent jane dreaper has the details. francesca‘s eyesight is crucial for her work as an artist.
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glaucoma develops slowly over many years. there is no cure, but doctors in london believe this new injection will eventually help patients get diagnosed and treated much sooner. to lose one‘s eyesight early or later is devastating, really, especially if you have an artistic background. but this sort of gave you hope that they could monitor the condition and then, if need be, they could give you drops, which would slow it down slightly. glaucoma is more common as you get older. it affects 600,000 people in the uk. if left untreated, nerve cells in the retina die, leading to sight loss. the test uses a special fluorescent marker to highlight failings cells, potentially revolutionising treatment. we believe that, in glaucoma,
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it is ten years between a visual defect being identified and when the actual process starts. that ten—year delay could mean that you have delayed starting treatment at the time when it is most accessible to treatment, and when you could even prevent vision loss occurring in the first place. francesca wants to save her sight from deteriorating, and she is hopeful the new test will help many others too. 16 people have been involved in trials so far, so more research is needed. but the london team say these are promising results which could also perhaps be used to detect early signs of degenerative brain illnesses. it‘s been a record year for book sales, according to figures released by the publishing industry. children‘s books, non—fiction and academicjournals all did well, but sales of ebooks fell sharply. our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones reports.
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e—readers, tablets, smartphones, the story was that as we increasingly read on screens, these would spell doom for the good old—fashioned book but last year sales of e—books to consumers fell by 17%. meanwhile in a record year for the publishing industry, physical book sales rose by 8%. readers showed particular interest in nonfiction. everything from diet books to celebrity memoirs. sales of children‘s books rose by 16%. the bestseller of 2016 was harry potter and the cursed child and the overwhelming majority of buyers read it on paper, not on screen. in every aspect of our lives, we have screens in front of us, at work or home, and people are choosing to spend time away from them, actually in their leisure moments looking at a book, a printed version. but also equally really important, when parents want to spend time with their children, they also want to read to them themselves or they want their children to spend time away from the screen. the publishing industry is still making increasing amounts of money from online journals,
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digital academic titles and audio books but it seems the epic story of the printed book isn‘t over yet. a zoo in austria has shown off a litter of white tiger cubs to the public for the first time. falco, toto, mia and mautzi were born a month ago and weighed about a kilo each. as you can see from these pictures, they‘ve been eating well and have grown much heavier injust a few weeks. white tigers are very rare so the cubs are bound to be a big hit with visitors, before they‘re donated to other zoos around the world in about a year‘s time. let‘s look at the weather. quite a mixture of weather. there is sunshine around and it is quite warm
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but we are seeing a lot of cloud coming from the north and it is not dry everywhere. a frosty start this morning across the south of england, some sunshine is still here but the cloud is moving south bringing some showery rain with the wettest weather through the midlands, east anglia into northern england. the heavy showers developing into the afternoon. not many of those for northern ireland or scotland, some sunshine in the afternoon. a cool breeze will be blowing these bands of showers south across the eastern side of england and one or two light showers overnight for wales, the west country, western scotland. skies were clear across the east of the uk away from one or two coastal showers. some early sunshine for the east of the uk before the cloud appears. 0ne east of the uk before the cloud appears. one or two showers around although very light, a half decent day tomorrow, better than recently.
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some sunshine and temperatures possibly as high as 111—15 in the lighter winds. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11:30am: borisjohnson has suggested that britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack. if the americans choose to act again, and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. labour leaderjeremy corbyn is on the campaign trail in harlow in essex. he was speaking about labour‘s plan to build 1 million new homes if they win the election. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting today for final discussions about the eu‘s negotiating stance on brexit. there‘s been a rise in the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales, with violent crimes increasing. research suggests
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a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of glaucoma, a condition which causes irreversible sight loss. now for a look at the sport. the former wimbledon finalist eugenie bouchard has levelled the strongest criticism yet at maria sharapova, who has returned from a 15 month doping ban, calling her a ‘cheat‘ who shouldn‘t be allowed a route back into tennis. sharapova won her first match since the suspension at the stuttgart grand prix. beating roberta vinci in straight sets to reach the last 16, and was well—received by the crowd in germany. but she‘s hasn‘t been welcomed back by all of her fellow players, and bouchard is the latest. i don‘t think that is right. she is a cheater, and so to me i don‘t think a cheater in any sport should be allowed to play that sport again.
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it's be allowed to play that sport again. it‘s anfairto be allowed to play that sport again. it‘s an fair to all of the other players who do it the right way and true, so i think from the wta it sends the wrong message to young kids, cheat and we will welcome you back with open arms. i don‘t think thatis back with open arms. i don‘t think that is right. the court of arbitration for sport decided that shara popa should not be considered an intentional doper. britain‘sjohanna konta is also through to the last 16 in stuttgart she takes on anastasija sevastova this afternoon. there are only five games left, we need to keep close to chelsea to the chance. we can cross our fingers
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that they will lose some points. it is an asked to end better than we did last season, but also to give ourselves that extra boost to show what we are capable of. problem was macro next game is on sunday against arsenal. an own goal gave them a 1—0 win over leicester last night to boost their chances of finishing in the top four.|j last night to boost their chances of finishing in the top four. i think we we re finishing in the top four. i think we were focused, serious, hungry to win the game and we played against a game who is difficult to get out of position, to do stable eyes. we got the win we wanted. sunderland on the break of relegation after losing to middlesbrough. are are in deep trouble, but sunderland could be sent down as early as this weekend, but the manager says he will not resign. boxing promoter eddie hearn told the bbc there is no guarantee of a rematch dream anthonyjoshua and
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blood mix which go in spite of the result this saturday. they will meet the media at the pre—fight press conference in around an hour, before 90,000 pack that stadium. 0nly demand will determine whether they meet again. you can hear that commentary on radio 5 live. the snooker, the final is a repeat of last year. the five times champion insists he is unhappy place despite not winning a ranking competition this season. despite not winning a ranking competition this seasonlj despite not winning a ranking competition this season. i love what i‘m doing, so why would i get the hump because i‘m not winning? all the stuff that comes with snooker, thatis the stuff that comes with snooker, that is a bonus. the real love is
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getting that you out of your case. more in the next hour. the foreign secretary has said that the government would be open to join strikes against syria without parliamentary approval. speaking this morning, borisjohnson said it would be "very difficult for britain to say no" if the us asks us to join in future military action in syria. he was speaking to radio 4‘s today programme. if the americans were forced again by the actions of the assad regime... don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens, weapons that were banned almost 100 years ago. if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help, as i say, i think it will be very difficult to say no. with me now is our diplomatic editor, james landale. let‘s get beyond the titles, and
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talk about what boris johnson had to say. he has said this already, but we didn‘t notice because it was the day that theresa may and as the snap general election. exactly. he said this in the house of commons last tuesday, when there was a debate about the us military strike against the syrian government airbase that had allegedly been used for chemical wa rfa re had allegedly been used for chemical warfare attacks. sadly, as you say, the primers to announce the election so no one noticed. this is the established position that the foreign secretary has set out. it is significant for the following reasons. generally, the british have a lwa ys reasons. generally, the british have always gone along with the americans are always gone along with the americans a re lots of always gone along with the americans are lots of military action. i can remember ronald reagan asking margaret thatcher for the use of uk airbases to make strikes on libyan targets in 1986. john major and the first george bush in q8 in 1991, and
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tony blair and the next george bush in iraq later on. this is a trend, it is not surprising that the british say they will go along with the americans on this. what is interesting is that borisjohnson has made explicit what was implicit. if the americans say to the brits again, there has been a similar chemical attack, we need your support this time, borisjohnson made clear that the uk forces will join that if necessary. a keyword, or key phrase, without parliamentary approval, the government would be open tojoining those approval, the government would be open to joining those strikes without parliamentary approval. that would be a big line to cross, wouldn‘t it? would be a big line to cross, wouldn't it? famously, back in 2013, parliament had a big debate about whether or not uk military forces should strike syrian government targets after a similar chemical wa rfa re targets after a similar chemical warfare attack. parliament famously voted not to take part. that established, reinforced an existing
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convention, namely that the government should not take monetary action without asking parliament first man is there was an emergency decision that needed to be made. what boris johnson decision that needed to be made. what borisjohnson said was that in this circumstance, whether or not parliament would have to be asked would have to be tested. what was interesting was he was allowing for the possibility that mps would not be consulted, which is controversial in itself, and he was opening the way for some kind of monetary action in the next six weeks when there is no parliament. we often talk about boris johnson‘s colourful language, but beyond the headline, how careful was he in the choice of language? when he was talking about the uk joining us action, he was very careful, only after it was a similar chemical attack, if it was timely. he was giving himself a lot of wiggle room for the uk not to take action if it wanted. thank you.
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we can cross to westminster now. mrjohnson‘s remarks about backing any us strike against president assad has caused a lot of controversy. we have heard from labour sources who condemned his language, suggesting it could lead to escalating conflict in the middle east. jeremy corbyn has always long opposed military intervention in the middle east. a short time ago, tim farron also criticised mrjohnson‘s remarks. the idea that the conservatives are now increasingly beholden to donald trump is terrifying. i‘m somebody who felt that the strike against assad after the chemical weapons usage, that‘s disgraceful use of chemical weapons
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at the weeks ago, i can see that was proportionate and justified under law. what i will not do is thanks in the way it was done. unilateral, illegal intervention would be counter—productive. it seems to me that boris johnson counter—productive. it seems to me that borisjohnson is counter—productive. it seems to me that boris johnson is following counter—productive. it seems to me that borisjohnson is following tony blair in that respect. i enjoyed by the snp‘s foreign affairs presenter dave, alex salmond. is this significant? significant and dangerous. the president is clear, you have to go to parliament to get authority. the government has authority. the government has authority against daesh in syria and iraq, not for any other military and action. the course is clear, they should lay a motion before the house and get that military action. if they are not prepared to do so, they have no entitlement whatsoever to ta ke have no entitlement whatsoever to take military action without the consent of parliament, and certainly
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no right or entitlement or even sense to speculate on it, as the foreign secretary was doing this morning. if president assad launched another chemical attack and president trump felt there had to be a swift response, they would not be the time to consult parliament. but then what they need to do if that is what they are going to do, if they are going to play mini me for trump, then what you do is you get the authority from parliament to say, thatis authority from parliament to say, that is what we would do under these circumstances, not just we will do it anyway. there has to be a debate... the debate is now where there is any independent foreign policy. rogers and's reaction to every international situation is to do whatever the white house does. people will look askance at having
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that policy to president trump. in policy terms, if president assad was to launch another chemical attack, surely britain and other countries could not simply turn the other cheek again? unlike boris johnson, let's look at the circumstances. if the government wants to have parliamentary authority, they should ask for parliamentary authority, not speculate wildly and support america regardless without parliamentary consent. it is almost unbelievable stuff. they say that boris johnson isa stuff. they say that boris johnson is a loose cannon. i'm not even sure which direction his cannons are turned. in terms of the response to any further chemical attack, would you support some sort of retaliatory strikes against president assad or would that be a mistake? rather than speculate as to what might happen, let's take what has happened. when america responded to the chemical strike, the correct thing to have done would be establish through the
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united nations, either the security council or the general assembly if it was blocked, the responsible at the for the chemical attack. 0n it was blocked, the responsible at the for the chemical attack. on that responsibility has been established, then action can be taken as a result. the action you should take against anyone using weapons of mass destruction against a civilian population contrary to international law is to make sure that those responsible will be put before the international criminal court and held to account. that is the right and legal response. it is the sort of thing that stops it from happening again farther than shooting first and asking questions later. thank you. we have not heard from the labour leader himself, but given his stance on iraq and other interventions, i‘m sure he will also be bitterly opposed to what boris johnson said this morning. thank you. we are hearing that the queen will formally open the new session of parliament on the 19th ofjune,
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after the general election on the 8th ofjune. that is from a spokesman for the prime and a stop, theresa may. a lot of politics to get through before then. we will be with you all the way. a preliminary hearing has begun into the northern ireland renewable heat scheme which caused a political crisis at stormont. it was meant to increase the consumption of heat from renewable sources. flaws in setting the scheme‘s subsidy rate and the ensuing scandal resulted in the resignation of sinn fein‘s debuchy first minister, martin mcguinness. let‘s talk to chris who is outside stormont. this initiative definitely not the only thing that led to the downfall of the executive, but probably the straw that broke the camel ‘s back. what is this enquiry going to look at? it has a very wide free net, really.
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thejudge appointed it has a very wide free net, really. the judge appointed to head it has a very wide free net, really. thejudge appointed to head up it has a very wide free net, really. the judge appointed to head up the enquiry, which will be sitting here in the main building at stormont has said that he thinks that more than 100,000 documents will be involved, there will be public hearings which will be held in the senate chamber here at stormont. 0ne will be held in the senate chamber here at stormont. one of the chambers where it normally political business is done, but it isn‘t happening here at the moment because there has been no government in this pa rt there has been no government in this part of the uk for approaching four months now. the coalition collapsed in january. there months now. the coalition collapsed injanuary. there were various elements at play, one of the main issues was this very controversial green energy scheme, the renewable heat incentive. just to explain how it worked, it was designed to encourage businesses to switch from fossil fuels to encourage businesses to switch from fossilfuels to more encourage businesses to switch from fossil fuels to more environmentally friendly sources of energy. but, basically, it ran way over budget. for every £1 that users spent on
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energy, the government, the public purse, paid out £1 60. here, there was initially no upper limit on the amount of money which could be paid out. the more people burned, the more they earned, so this became known as the urn as you burn scandal, and the cash—for—crash affa i res. scandal, and the cash—for—crash affaires. —— cash for ash. arlene foster was in charge when the scheme was initially set up five years ago, so her role came under scrutiny. she did not step aside as first minister while the investigation is going on, saying she had done nothing wrong.
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she wanted to come up with a plan to put right everything that had gone wrong with the scheme, which was projected to go over half a billion over budget for the time it was in action. there has been an election here, negotiations, but there has been no resolution, so northern ireland remains without a government. the enquiry will try to get to the bottom of what went wrong with the incentive scheme, and will look in particular at a number of issues including the cost controls, wide there were no cost controls here, why it was designed in a particular way. he will look at the roles of ministers, civil servants, party officials, special advisers as they are known, they will all come underscrew need when the scheme has been investigated. he will be considering the accountability, how it was able to go along and become
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such a disaster. it will be a long affair but the effort had been announced, and we are connected to be getting under way in terms of public hearings in a few weeks. they have got a lot to get through! thank you. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: borisjohnson has suggested that britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting today for final discussions about the eu‘s negotiating stance on brexit. there has been a rise in the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales, with violent crime is increasing. in the business news: lloyds banking group has reported a rise in profits in the three months to the end of march, despite a "challenging" environment. it said pre—tax profits doubled from a year ago to £1.3 billion in the first quarter, although last year‘s figure included a hefty one—off cost.
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germany‘s deutsche bank could move up to 4,000 jobs out of the uk as a result of brexit — nearly half its uk workforce. the possibility was raised by the firm‘s chief regulatory officer, and is the latest warning from a financial firm since the uk voted to leave the european union. and readers appear to be switching back to paper. numbers out today show the publishing industry has had a record year, with a surge in sales of physical books. children‘s books, non—fiction, and academicjournals all did well, while there was a drop in ebook sales. let‘s return to our top business story now. lloyds banking group has almost doubled its pre—tax profit in the three months to march. boss antonio horta—0sorio said the bank had delivered "strong financial performance" after reporting profits of £1.3 billion. the bank, which was bailed out by the taxpayer, is expected to be fully returned to private ownership later this year.
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the government still has a 2% stake in the bank. joining us from the city is neil wilson, senior market analyst at etx capital. so this is good news for the taxpayer? absolutely. these are quite good impressive results, and with the government off—loading the remaining 2% stake over the coming weeks, it will get a bit more for its money now. the share price has risen after these results. however, the boss said it was a simple and low risk business that has helped weather the storm, of these difficult trading conditions. it seems as though the bank is being very risk averse, which is not necessarily great for an economy where companies need to borrow money to grow. absolutely. lending has dropped a little bit. we have seen the mortgage market is a bit
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subdued, the property market has come off a bit since brexit. 0verall, come off a bit since brexit. overall, the numbed as we have seen today from lloyds are quite strong, we have seen the net interest margin improved, and it has improved the guidance and that. it has seen it beat the expectations on that for the first time in a while. the profitability is there, it is generating a lot of cash, but there are risks as we head in throughout the rest of the year. lloyds is uniquely exposed to the uk economy. what was also interesting in his statement was he said that he expects interest rates to remain unchanged throughout 2017. that is not great news for banks, is it? no, banks prefer interest rates to be on the rise. however, although he may be thinks they will not increase, i don‘t think they will fall. globally, we are seeing interest
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rates tanking. they can look to 2018 or 2019 and expect some improvements in the interest margin. thank you. south korean giant samsung has reported its best quarterly for three years thanks to bumper sales of its memory chips and tvs. shares in the firm have climbed in recent months as rising expectations overcame last year‘s phone recall embarrassment and its vice—chairman going on trial for bribery. us carrier united airlines has announced big changes to the way it deals with passengers, after video of a man being dragged from a plane caused international outrage. it will offer bumped passengers up to $10,000 in compensation and reduce overbooking. and the weak pound has boosted the number foreign tourists booking holidays in britain, according to barclays. its survey also showed the uk‘s small screen drama exports has also driven the trend, with 44%
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of chinese tourists interested in visiting the uk saying tv programmes had sparked their interest. disappointment over the lack of details in president trump‘s us tax cut plans really having disappointed investors. there has been a hangover for european shares. you can see the ftse100 is down. taylor wimpey shares are up, after an outing it will set aside £130 million as part of plans to help customers trapped in those controversial leasehold contracts drawn up by the house—builder. here is where the lloyds share price is, it is up after it revealed a doubling profits for the first quarter. also some news in the last hour, amazon is creating 1200 permanent jobs news in the last hour, amazon is creating 1200 permanentjobs at a
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new warehouse in warrington in cheshire, but these are part of a 5000 jobs created in 2017, which they announced in february. they have been previously announced. that is all from me. a solid gold darth vader mask is going on sale injapan. the sculpture weighs 15 kilograms and has been commissioned to mark the 40th anniversary this year of the release of star wars, the perfect addition for any star wars fan! it will be available for purchase on may four, a date known among many fa ns may four, a date known among many fans as star wars day. you do know why, don‘t you? i hope you do. may the 11th be with you. ina you do. may the 11th be with you.
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in a moment, we say goodbye to view was on bbc two. now over for the weather. we are seeing a fair and of cloud moving down. some pictures to start with. after the frosty start we had this morning, we have some sunshine across southern end. this is taunton in somerset, a lovely day here. more threatening cloud here in stirling in scotland, but also the hint of blue skies, and that is typical across the uk today. some breaks in the cloud, not just across the uk today. some breaks in the cloud, notjust here in the south. also areas of showery rain moving down, especially across north—east england, wales, the midlands and into east anglia. we will see some rain coming into southern england. the cloud bricking up southern england. the cloud bricking up in north—east scotland, the
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temperature is being boosted by that. maybe one or two light showers into the south—east of england, but most of those are in east wales, the midlands, east anglia, and some of those could be heavy. the small chance of a rumble of thunder. fewer showers for northern ireland, but more sunshine in the north—east of scotland. an edge to the breeze, but it will ease down as we head into tomorrow. bands of showers which could spread across the eastern side of the uk, leaving behind a legacy of the uk, leaving behind a legacy of showers for wales, northern ireland and western scotland. around about two or three degrees in the countryside overnight, and away from the coastal showers. the guy was in sunshine. further west, there is still some cloud of dover which might givea still some cloud of dover which might give a light show or two. it
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will feel warmer with the winds mightand will feel warmer with the winds might and temperatures higher. chilly are perhaps we have the onshore breezed on the east coast. temperatures lifting back to where they should be for the time of year. not a bad day on saturday, most bases drivers in sunshine, some few showers. things become more uncertain after that, though precious swelling to the south—west, which could throw up bands of rain and cloud. the headline for the bank on the weekend, we could be fairly confident that the bids will be picking up and will blow in some milder air. the uncertainties surround the rain, with bands pushing up from the south west. most of the wetter weather will be across the south—west, but some bright weather around as well. not wash out this weekend, and then next week it should turn dry and warm. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 12. the foreign secretary,
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boris johnson, suggests britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack. if the americans choose to act again and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. jeremy corbyn has responded to comments by boris johnson jeremy corbyn has responded to comments by borisjohnson saying britain does not need to get involved in military action in syria. we have to work with the un but we have to get a political settlement in syria. angela merkel warns britain not to have any illusions about life outside the european union, as ministers from the eu meet for discussions about their negotiating stance on brexit. a rise in the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales, with violent crimes increasing. research suggests a simple eye test
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could lead to much earlier detection of glaucoma, a condition which causes irreversible sight loss. also... do you prefer to feel the pages of a book between your finger? 2016 was a record year for the publishing industry, as printed book sales went up by 8% compared to the previous year. and pet owners are being urged to think twice before buying certain breeds, because of concerns over selective breeding. good morning. it‘s thursday 27th april. welcome to bbc newsroom live. borisjohnson, has said it would be very difficult for the uk to refuse
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the us if it asked for support in another military strike on syria has left open the possibility of taking action without a vote in parliament. jeremy corbyn responded this morning by saying a labour government would not take unilateral action in syria. the foreign secretary‘s comments on syria come as he used his first intervention in the election campaign to mount the conservatives‘ most personal attack yet on the labour leader. in an article published in the sun newspaper, the foreign secretary accused the labour leader of being a security threat to the uk. he accused mr corbyn of being reluctant to use lethal force, opposing nuclear weapons and campaigning against nato. he went on to describe the labour leader as a "mutton—headed, old mugwump". the shadow defence secretary has described his comments "crass and offensive". 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is watching
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from westminster for us. those syria comments by boris johnson, he is coming in for criticism for those. yes, because he effectively said that if president trump calls for more strikes against president assad in syria, we will be with them and we may be with them without necessarily parliament having been given a vote. that opens up a sharp dividing line, jeremy corbyn long opposing any form of intervention in the middle east, opposing the iraq warand the middle east, opposing the iraq war and was critical of the first cruise missile strikes against president assad last month but more broadly than that i think there will be disquiet amongst mps more broadly at the thought that britain might back america without there being a vote in parliament. there is a
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convention now that before britain engages in military action, parliament should be asked to give its approval but this morning boris johnson seems to raise a question about whether that would be necessary if we backed president trump over further missile strikes against president assad. if the americans were, once again, to be forced by the actions of the assad regime, and don‘t forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens with weapons which were banned almost 100 years ago, if the americans choose to act again and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. there is already serious criticism from opposition politicians over this stance. tim farron suggested that boris johnson‘s this stance. tim farron suggested that borisjohnson‘s remarks were terrifying and that he was following the example of tony blair. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn was very
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critical also. we do not need unilateral action, we need to work through the un but above all we need to bend ourselves totally to getting a political settle m e nt totally to getting a political settlement in and allow the inspectors space to work, allow them to make sure we know who did the terrible chemical weapons attack and also recognise that the inspectors there are already destroying stocks of chemical weapons that they find. the issue has to be finding a political solution so that the millions who have been forced to flee from syria are able to return home and the people of syria can look forward to a future, it is not easy i understand but there has to bea easy i understand but there has to be a political solution and that is what we should be looking for. government sources say mrjohnson was not ruling out giving parliament
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a boat but was saying we may need to move quickly. alex salmond told me that was unacceptable and that if the government wanted to be able to back the us then it should put down a motion now so mps could debate now ahead possible military action. unlike boris johnson, unlike borisjohnson, let‘s look at the circumstances and that the government wants to have parliamentary authority then they should ask for it, not speculate wildly and jump to what ever president trump doesn‘t support america regardless without parliamentary consent. this is almost unbelievable stuff. when they say that boris johnson is almost unbelievable stuff. when they say that borisjohnson is a loose cannon, we are not even sure which direction they are turned on. and there has been controversy about the personal criticism by boris johnson onjeremy corbyn, describing
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him asa johnson onjeremy corbyn, describing him as a mugwump, a benign islington herbivore. some might view that as knock—about politics but senior politicians have accused him of demeaning the office of foreign secretary and there is the danger it could actually rebound against him and played to mr corbyn‘s attempts to standing up for ordinary people against the establishment and the ruling elite. former london mayoral candidate zac goldsmith has been chosen by the conservatives to stand for parliament in his old constituency. mr goldsmith was ousted as mp by the liberal democrats during a by—election in december. he had previously left the conservative party in protest at the government‘s backing of a third heathrow runway. the liberal democrats have decided not to contest the brighton pavilion seat currently held by the only green party mp, caroline lucas. last week, ms lucas called for a so—called "progressive alliance" where parties did not put up candidates in some seats to avoid the vote against
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the conservatives being split. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting later for final discussions about the eu‘s negotiating stance on brexit. they‘re set to approve the draft negotiating guidelines for the uk‘s divorce from the eu and discuss the next steps in the process. speaking in the german parliament this morning angela merkel said the uk must fulfil all of its obligations to the eu. 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticas has been speaking to ministers as they arrived for the meeting. i think what we will see is a sort of unity of purpose, if you like. what they were saying as they went in, the ministers, is that they were totally united, there were no divisions amongst them, they seem ready to sign off on those guidelines and quite a few quite specific demands or criteria that are going to be in them that the eu side say they will be demanding of the uk. we heard angela merkel in berlin
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addressing the parliament there, saying that now is the time for the 27 other eu countries to defend their interests. she said she thought some in the uk were still mistaken about what brexit was going to involve and it could be some dose of reality. similar sorts of words here, the ministers going in saying they had clear priorities around citizens‘ rights, the money the uk is committed to pay, things like that, that they will be insisting on. angela merkel was talking about protecting eu citizens, avoiding damage to the eu, strengthening the cohesion of the 27. so very much along those lines you have just mentioned, presenting a united front, also warning britain against, in her words, the illusion that it can have the same or better rights than member states post—brexit. a pretty tough front as this meeting begins. yes, i think what angela merkel would say and the ministers coming
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here would say is they would not describe it as tough as much as simply logical. if the uk is inside the single market and the eu, it will have certain benefits, if it is outside, it will not have access to the same benefits. interestingly, the vice president of the eu commission, the deputy to jean—claude juncker, going in, i had a quick word with him and he said that the outcome of the uk general election would make no difference at all to the eu‘s position. i asked him what about the size of the mandate, does that affect the strength of the negotiating position? he said from the eu‘s point of view, the eu position will be determined by the interests of the 27 countries on its side of the table. that will not change, there will be no material difference to that whatever the outcome of the uk election. briefly, once these negotiating
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positions and strategies are agreed, they are slightly put on ice until after the general election here. yes. the chief negotiator for the eu also came here this morning and as he walked in he had a cheery, "we are ready," for the negotiations then disappeared into the building. he is waiting for guidelines which will set out the parameters of what he can negotiate but as you say that will all wait until the uk general election. the eu side clearly, today and then on saturday with the meeting of the eu‘s 27 other leaders, is formalising its negotiation position and they will lay that down very clearly and that is not going to shift. whatever happens in the election, the negotiations will begin after. labour has set out its plans to
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build 1 million more homes. 0ur political correspondent is in harlow we re political correspondent is in harlow werejeremy political correspondent is in harlow were jeremy corbyn political correspondent is in harlow werejeremy corbyn spoke earlier today. you have spoken tojeremy corbyn about his policy focus for today but also about syria as well, asking him about those comments by borisjohnson. asking him about those comments by boris johnson. yes, the park behind me is now deserted but about 30 minutes ago there were more than 100 labour supporters here to listen to jeremy corbyn‘s stump speech. labour are having a big week for policies. they have already announced they will keep the triple lock on pensions, more money for nurses, today‘s announcement was council housing and jeremy corbyn came to harlow to give attention to the fact that new research has shown labour councils have built more council houses than conservative councils
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and labour‘s new pledge is they will build 1 million homes in the course of the next parliament and have them will be low—cost or council homes. he was talking about that to his supporters today but it was also a general stump speech about a future labour government investing in the future, talking about tax breaks for the rich and creating a decent society for everyone notjust the rich and creating a decent society for everyone not just for the few. harlow is a marginal seat which in the past labour and the conservatives have fought over at general election time. the conservative majority here is over 8000 sole labour has a big fight on their hands butjeremy corbyn said he was confident that labour could win here. he was asked during his speech about syria and boris johnson‘s comments and his line was that more bombing would not help and should be more peace talks and if
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any military action took place he felt all the party leaders and parties would have to be consulted. did he have anything to say at or was he asked about those other comments by boris johnson was he asked about those other comments by borisjohnson were they described him as a mugwump? he was not and labour supporters have been playing it down today. we spoke to some people as they walked past the speech today and ask them what they thought of the comments. 0pinion was divided. this is quite a heavily conservative area. some people thought it was part of the rough—and—tumble of politics and jeremy corbyn should not worry about it and labour should not make a fuss. 0ther it and labour should not make a fuss. other people did feel that this do based —— debased politics and they didn‘t want to be going through this for the next six weeks. tensions are rising over
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north korea, as the us calls for more pressure to force the country to give up its nuclear weapons programmes. last night, president trump briefed all 100 members of the senate, revealing a strategy of economic sanctions and diplomacy. but washington also said they were prepared to defend themselves and their allies. laura bicker reports. the us is piling on the pressure. this is a military exercise just miles from the north korean border. a message for kim jong—un, that the us is ready if diplomatic efforts fail. this is how the head of the us pacific command put it to members of the house in washington. all options are on the table. we want to bring kim jong—un to his senses, not to his knees. later, all 100 senators were bussed to a briefing at the white house from their commander in chief. a highly unusual move to show politicians from both sides of the aisle just how serious the situation has become. north korea is the most dangerous spot on the planet right now,
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and kimjong—un is a dangerous and wildly unpredictable dictator. donald trump is hoping china will use its political and economic leverage over pyongyang to persuade kim jong—un to end his missile programme. other options include redesignating north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism, which will allow the us to impose greater sanctions. meanwhile, the us show of might continues. this is a missile defence system in south korea. the current goal is a path to peace through negotiations, but the trump administration said it is prepared to defend itself and its allies if necessary. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. borisjohnson has suggested that britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack. ministers from 27 european union
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countries are meeting today for final discussions about the eu‘s negotiating stance on brexit. there‘s been a rise in the number of crimes recorded by police in england and wales, with violent crimes increasing. let‘s get to the sport. the former wimbledon finalist eugenie bouchard has levelled the strongest criticism yet at maria sharapova, who has returned from a 15 month doping ban, calling her a ‘cheat‘ who shouldn‘t be allowed a route back into tennis. sharapova won her first match since the suspension at the stuttgart grand prix, beating roberta vinci in straight sets to reach the last 16... she was well—received by the crowd in germany...
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but she‘s hasn‘t been welcomed back by all of her fellow players... bouchard is the latest... ido i do not think a cheater should be allowed to play that sport again. it is an —— it is unfair. i think it sends the wrong message to young kids. cheat and we will welcome you back with open arms. the court of arbitration for sport said it should not —— said maria sharapova should not be considered an intentional doper. britain‘s johanna konta is due to start her match against anastasija sevastova in the next hour — they‘re playing for a place in the quarter—finals. their arrival in manchester was supposed to herald a fight between them for the premier league title. but tonight pep guardiola andjose mourinho
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meet with qualification for the champions league the potential prize on offer. but neither thinks the second league manchester derby of the season will settle the matter. every game is so important but it is going to happen until the last game. crystal palace has to come here. able to win at stamford bridge, and field, at home against arsenal. midfield will be difficult with what they play and of course all the other ones, crystal palace and west brom, watford. try to win the points and get the champions league next season. if you finished fifth and they finished sixth we are above them but it means nothing. if we finished third and they finished fourth, they are above us but it means a lot. it is not about pep guardiola or city or objectives and fighting for objectives, we want to try to play
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champions league football and we still have two doors open. 8pm kick off tonight. that‘s all the sport for now. more in the next hour. new figures show the number of crimes recorded by police across england and wales last year went up by 9%. there were particularly sharp increases in offences of violence. it‘s the final set of crime statistics before the general election. there is no doubt that the police are recording crimes more effectively and consistently than they were before. they have recategorised some offences, particularly for violence, that will encounter for some particularly for violence, that will encounterfor some of particularly for violence, that will encounter for some of the increase. more people are coming forward to report offences, particularly sexual offences, we know they have confidence in the police, so that
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explains a substantial part of the increase in terms of sexual offences, but the experts, the office for national statistics, are saying that some of this increase appears to reflect a genuine rise, particularly in crimes of the most serious types of violence, murder. there were 601 murders last year if you exclude the hillsborough cases which were included in the official statistics. it is an increase from 576 the previous year. these are very high levels we have not seen for some considerable time. they‘re also appear to be genuine rises the knife attacks. the overall violence figure is up 19%. they separate crime survey of england and wales, an estimate of offending based on a survey of householders, including offences which are not reported to police, is also showing slight increases in violence although those rises may not be statistically
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significant. what do police forces do with this information if they know that certain types of crimes are more reported and others are under reported? to the focus on those areas to encourage more people to report those crimes? if there are particular concerns about a type of crime going up, we have seen in london venue met police commissioner being concerned about rising gun and knife crime, there is a focus on trying to bear down on that kind of offending. today we have seen the results of the freedom of information act request by bbc radio five live about acid attacks, a relatively recent phenomenon. we have seen an almost trebling in the number of acid attacks across england and wales and northern ireland between 2012 and last year, almost around two every single day. the police are trying to bear down on that and there is a concern that some gangs and other people that
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wa nt to ta ke some gangs and other people that want to take out rival gang members or conduct reprisal attacks are using acid or corrosive substances rather than other weapons because the sentences may not be as significant if they are caught. government lawyers are at the high court explaining why the... lawyers are going to the high court this morning to explain why the government is planning to delay publication of its anti—pollution strategy. ministers claim they cannot abide by a court ruling to publish the consultation document because it would break so—called purdah rules in the run—up to the general election. but environmental campaigners say clean air is a public health issue and such rules should not apply. patients are still struggling to get gp appointments and many surgeries are closed during core opening hours according to mps. a report from the public accounts committee says the government‘s drive to force surgeries to open longer risks duplicating services. they also warn "no credible plan" is in place to recruit more doctors. the government has pledged an extra £500 million per year in funding by 2020 to operate a seven—day service. a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of a condition
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which causes irreversible sight loss, according to researchers from university college london. diagnosing glaucoma sooner would mean patients could start treatment before their vision deteriorates. our health correspondent jane dreaper has the details. francesca‘s eyesight is crucial for her work as an artist. glaucoma develops slowly over many years. there is no cure, but doctors in london believe this new injection will eventually help patients get diagnosed and treated much sooner. to lose one‘s eyesight early or later is devastating, really, especially if you have an artistic background. but this sort of gave you hope that they could monitor the condition and then, if need be, they could give you drops, which would slow it down slightly. glaucoma is more common as you get older. it affects 600,000 people in the uk.
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if left untreated, nerve cells in the retina die, leading to sight loss. the test uses a special fluorescent marker to highlight failings cells, potentially revolutionising treatment. we believe that, in glaucoma, it is ten years between a visual defect being identified and when the actual process starts. that ten—year delay could mean that you have delayed starting treatment at the time when it is most accessible to treatment, and when you could even prevent vision loss occurring in the first place. francesca wants to save her sight from deteriorating, and she is hopeful the new test will help many others too. 16 people have been involved in trials so far, so more research is needed. but the london team say these are promising results which could also perhaps be used to detect early signs of degenerative brain illnesses. jane dreaper, bbc news.
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it‘s been a record year for book sales, according to figures released by the publishing industry. children‘s books, non—fiction and academicjournals all did well, but sales of ebooks fell sharply. our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones reports. e—readers, tablets, smartphones, the story was that as we increasingly read on screens, these would spell doom for the good old—fashioned book but last year sales of e—books to consumers fell by 17%. meanwhile in a record year for the publishing industry, physical book sales rose by 8%. readers showed particular interest in nonfiction. everything from diet books to celebrity memoirs. sales of children‘s books rose by 16%. the bestseller of 2016 was harry potter and the cursed child and the overwhelming majority of buyers read it on paper, not on screen. in every aspect of our lives, we have screens in front of us,
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at work or home, and people are choosing to spend time away from them, actually in their leisure moments looking at a book, a printed version. but also equally really important, when parents want to spend time with their children, they also want to read to them themselves or they want their children to spend time away from the screen. the publishing industry is still making increasing amounts of money from online journals, digital academic titles and audio books but it seems the epic story of the printed book isn‘t over yet. some breaking news about arrests made by greater manchester police investigating the murder of mike samwell, the 35—year—old who died after being hit by his own car on sunday morning. police say they have
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arrested a 29—year—old man and a 15—year—old boy from south manchester on suspicion of murder and burglary. two other men, aged 20 and burglary. two other men, aged 20 and 21, has been arrested on suspicion of murder but bailed pending further enquiries. that is the latest from greater manchester police on that investigation into the murder of mike samwell. time for a look at the weather with darren bett. —— with matt taylor. temperatures are going up over the next few days. dry weather towards the weekend but we have some cloud and rain at the moment. the clodius conditions are not in wales, england and east anglia. —— midlands and east anglia. the south coast of england stays dry, the best of the sunshine in the channel islands and some well broken cloud in scotland and northern ireland with showers few and far between. temperatures
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lower than they should be for the time of year. another cool night. showers spreading south across mainly england and wales. clearer skies following them. towards the west of the country they will hold on. there could be a frost in the countryside, particularly in the hills of eastern scotland and northern england. a chilly start but a reasonably bright start. showers on the east coast few or far between. cloudier skies and showers on the west side of the country. starting to feel a little warmer. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: borisjohnson has suggested that britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack. if the americans choose to act again, and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. labour leaderjeremy corbyn
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is on the campaign trail in harlow in essex, making a speech about labour‘s plans to build a million new homes if it wins the general election. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting today for final discussions about the eu‘s negotiating stance on brexit. the latest crime figures show an overall rise in england and wales last year. police recorded 4.8 million offences — up 9% on 2015. research suggests a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of glaucoma, a condition which causes irreversible sight loss. let‘s get more on the foreign secretary saying that the government would be open to joining strikes against syria, without parliamentary approval. borisjohnson said it would be "very difficult for britain to say no" if the us asks us to join in future military action in syria, when he was speaking
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to radio 4‘s today programme. if the americans were forced again by the actions of the assad regime... don't forget it was assad who unleashed murder upon his own citizens, weapons that were banned almost 100 years ago. if the americans choose to act again and ask us to help, as i say, i think it will be very difficult to say no. jeremy corbyn said he would not take unilateral action if he was elected as prime minister. we don‘t need unilateral action, we need to work through the un, but above all we need to bend ourselves totally to getting a political settle m e nt totally to getting a political settlement in syria and allow the inspectors space to work, allow them to make sure we know who did that terrible chemical weapons attack and
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also recognise that inspectors there are already destroying any stocks of chemical weapons that they find. the issue has to be finding a political solution so that the millions who have been forced to flee from syria are able to return home, and the people of syria are able to look forward to a future. it is not easy, but there has to be a political solution. that is what we are looking for. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale, told me that this is not the first time boris johnson has made these comments on syria. he said this in the house of commons last tuesday, when there was a debate about the us military strike against the syrian government air base that had allegedly been used for chemical warfare attacks. sadly, as you say, the prime and is the announced the election, so nobody noticed the announcement. this is the stance that the foreign secretary has set out. it is
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significant for the following reasons. generally, the british have a lwa ys reasons. generally, the british have always gone along with the americans on military action. i can remember ronald reagan asking margaret thatcher for the use of uk airbases to make strikes and libyan targets in19 66 to make strikes and libyan targets in 19 g6 stopjohn major and the first george bush in kuwait in 1991. and famously tony blair and the next george bush in iraq later on. this isa george bush in iraq later on. this is a trend, and it is not surprising that the british will go along with the americans on this. what is interesting is that borisjohnson has made explicit what was implicit, namely that if the americans say to the brits again, there has been a similar chemical attack and will be need your support this time, boris johnson made clear that the uk forces willjoin johnson made clear that the uk forces will join that johnson made clear that the uk forces willjoin that if miss airey. a key word, a key phrase, the government would be open to join the
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strike about parliamentary approval. that would be a big like across, wouldn‘t it? that would be a big like across, wouldn't it? famously in 2013, pilot had a big debate about whether uk military forces should strike syrian in placements after a similar chemical attack. parliament voted not to take part. it enforced an existing stance, that the uk should not take that decision without parliamentary consent, unless it was an emergency. he said that in this circumstance whether or not parliament would have to be consulted would have to be tested. what was interesting was he was allowing for the fact that mps would not be consulted, which is controversial, and he was opening the way for some kind of military action in the next six weeks, when there is no parliament. we often talk about borisjohnson‘s colourful language. beyond the headline, how kettle was he in his
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choice of language? when he was talking about maybe the ukjoining the when he was talking about maybe the uk joining the us when he was talking about maybe the ukjoining the us action, you was worried cattle. you said, it was only after a similar attack, if it was timely, you has given himself a lot of wiggle room for the uk not to ta ke lot of wiggle room for the uk not to take action. let‘s find out what the electorate are thinking in gloucester. paul ba rltrop are thinking in gloucester. paul barltrop is there. this is another one of those marginal constituencies, isn‘t it? a very key seat indeed. during the later years, from 1997 until 2010, gloucester was held by labour. down the road, so was stroud, and the forest of dean was taken in the 1997 landslide as well. things have gone badly for labour here since then. they lost the forest of dean a while
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ago, stroud and gloucester in 2010, and failed to take it back in 2015. jeremy corbyn knows that if he is going to make it into number ten, he has to make it into the hearts and minds of gloucester. we got a flavour of what people think of the election. undoubtedly be biggest single sentiment we are hearing from people is cynicism. i think peoplejust people is cynicism. i think people just put down they will say that, and then they get into power, they do not do what they say. nobody impresses me, i do not know what to believe. 0ne party says, if you vote for us, we will do this in schools or for the health service. i used to work for the health service, so that is close to my heart. but i don't know. as to the labour leader himself, we came across a lot of labour voters here, rather mixed views as to what they make ofjeremy rather mixed views as to what they make of jeremy corbyn rather mixed views as to what they make ofjeremy corbyn right now. one woman said she was not excited by
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him but she would vote for labour. another traditional labour voters says jeremy corbyn another traditional labour voters sasteremy corbyn is what another traditional labour voters says jeremy corbyn is what they need. one woman said she had voted labour all her life, she would not be voting for them, she would vote for theresa may city because of jeremy corbyn. for labour, they have a lot of work to do to win over gloucester and other seats in the west country. thank you. nasa‘s cassini spacecraft is sending data back to earth after diving in between saturn‘s rings and cloudtops. the probe executed the daredevil manoeuvre while out of radio contact — the first of 22 plunges planned over the next five months. these are the latest pictures taken by the probe.
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at their best resolution, pictures of the rings should be able to pick out features as small as 150m across. joining me via webcam is professor andrew coates from the mullard space science laboratory at university college london and who worked on the cassini project. u nfortu nately, unfortunately, it doesn‘t look like he isjoining me. we will try to re—establish contact. there was a lot of breath holding before the senior re—established contact with mission control. —— before cassini re—established contact. we had to wait until this morning, around 8am uk time, to actually know that the signal had come back again. remarkably, it did. without contact, for that reason you mentioned, because the antenna, the shield effectively that was shielding
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cassini from the dust particles, is the communication antenna with her. that was pointed in such a way that it was protecting the spacecraft, and also taking images and so on and taking all of the data which is being sent back. the first images you showed there are fantastic. so it looks real promising for the grand finale mission, but there was a lot of nail—biting and hope that it would work. that's nail-biting all coming good, and the images starting to be sent back from cassini. take us through those first images and what they show. one of the images shows a large swirl of staff, and this is actually a vortex in saturn‘s atmosphere, and that is a spectacular feature. it is a six
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sided hexagon, which is one of the things that cassini with respect to see, it had been seen in images before, but this is the closest ever view we have had. we‘re beginning to see a lot of detail in the atmospheric structure. this is really just the first of the data that will be coming back, there is so much more detailed data coming back as well. the images are relatively easy to understand, but comparing that putting into understanding of models will take some time. there is more competitive data, so it will be possible to measure cassini‘s velocity to something like 20 mu. per second. that is amazing considering the rotary speed is actually about dirty, this per second with respect to saturn. —— is actually about 30 kilometres per second. that will
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allow us to measure the rings. you can also look at the interior structure of saturn with gravity and magnetometer data. there are fantastic observations to be made. cassini itself has been going for... i started working on it 28 years ago when he proposed the instrument, got the money and build it, and tested it. we have now got lots more to look forward to up until the 15th of september. to anyone marbling at these images and the information we are getting back from cassini, why does this matter? it is aborted to understand saturn as part of the solar system. we are a dressed real planet, the outer solar system planets are gas giants with moons as
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well. we have looked at moons like tyton, which are right for exploration because they harbour the right conditions for life. it looks like with the latest results, which came about two weeks ago, there is hydrogen coming up in the plumes coming from one of the moons, from an ocean under the surface. some of those could be habitable. itjoins planets like mars, where we could have had habitability billions years ago. also your europa has oceans under the surface, and other missions will be going there. they are great places to look in future for life beyond earth. at
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the moment, we only know of life on earth. it helps to put our own planet in perspective. we are tiny compared to these very large objects like saturn and jupiter and these moon systems. space is enormous. we are the only spec, and it is remarkable to look back at earth, it isa remarkable to look back at earth, it is a pixel, but all life as we know it is included on that. you see. another mission landed a probe on titan a few years ago as well. thank you for sharing your expertise with us. a cheap and widely available drug has been shown to cut the number of women bleeding to death after giving birth,
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by about a third, according to new research. 100,000 women die this way every year. the study — led by the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine, and published in the lancetjournal — involved 20,000 women in more than 20 countries. our global health correspondent, tulip mazumdar, reports. having a baby can be extremely dangerous here in pakistan. for every 100,000 births in the country in 2015, 178 mothers died. in the uk, that figure was nine. the leading cause of death — severe blood loss. this lady gave birth to a little girl two weeks ago. she is lucky to be alive. translation: i was bleeding so much i felt like i was going to die. 41 bottles of blood. the doctor had to remove my uterus to save my life. but there could be another lifeline
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to mothers like her. this hospital was part of a major international study which found that the cheap and easily accessible drug tranexamic acid, which helps with blood clotting, could prevent a third of deaths from what is called postpartum haemorrhage. tranexamic acid is being used for heavy menstrual bleeding, surgeries were bleeding is a little more, from our patients, but it was not really being used for postpartum. any drug which can reduce it 5%, 10%, 20%, whatever, would be very, very welcome. hundreds of women die from preventable causes in pregnancy and childbirth every day around the world. sierra leone has the highest maternal mortality rate, more than 1,300 mothers died per 100,000 births in 2015. that compares with countries like
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columbia where it was 64 deaths. and in parts of europe, including greece, poland and finland, it was three deaths. researchers hope this drug could now be used more widely to help stop so many women dying in childbirth. nobody should bleed to death after childbirth in the 21st century. tranexamic acid, it is a cheap, safe, effective treatment and it could save thousands of lives worldwide. txa is sometimes used as a last resort for new mothers who are haemorrhaging. the world health organisation says it is now updating that advice. but this discovery could easily not have happened. txa was actually invented 50 years ago by the husband and wife duo shosuke and utako 0kamoto in post—warjapan. but they couldn‘t convince local doctors to perform a clinical trial for postpartum haemorrhage.
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it is only now after their deaths that their life—saving theory has been proven and their hopes that more mothers will live to see their babies grow because of their drug may finally be realised. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: borisjohnson has suggested that britain could help america take further action against the syrian regime in the event of another chemical weapons attack. ministers from 27 european union countries are meeting today for final discussions about the eu‘s negotiating stance on brexit. there‘s been a rise in the number of crimes recorded by police pet owners are being urged to think twice before buying certain breeds,
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because of concerns over selective breeding. the british veterinary association warns irresponsible breeding to create so—called "designer pets" should be banned. holly hamilton has been to see some of the animals concerned to find out more. from pugs to french bulldogs, britain has fallen for flat—faced breeds. we just can‘t get enough of them. they‘re on instagram, tea towels and even beauty products. but why would somebody want pug lip balm? michelle began selling pug merchandise over a year ago inspired by her own pug, teddy. the breed is very popular at the moment. because of their personalities, their character, they‘re like little clowns. and, obviously, they‘re cute, as well. but, as their popularity rises, so, too have concerns over health problems. high—five. good boy. while many like teddy are healthy, their flat faces developed through years of selective breeding means some suffer with a range of health problems from eye ulcers to severe breathing difficulties. and it seems the issue of subjective
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breeding isn‘t limited to dogs. with their famous owners like taylor swift and ed sheeran, the scottish fold cat with their unique flat ears has been growing in popularity. i think it's their look and the temperament. they have a lovely temperament. dee has been breeding scottish folds for over ten years, even providing ed sheeran with his beloved cats. but the breed suffers with a genetic mutation that makes them prone to severe health problems, including arthritis. they do have a particular problem with the folding gene. it can cause stiffening of other cartilage within the body. it appears to be a progressive gene. so, you haven't got any way of knowing what's going to happen as they age. it‘s becoming such a problem that the british veterinary association says any further breeding of the scottish fold should be banned. these cats have serious health and welfare problems. they have uncurable chronic, painful conditions that they will develop and that‘s not fair on the cat,
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that‘s a real health and welfare problem, so we shouldn‘t be breeding cats that have a known problem. the issue of designer pets has become a growing concern for vets. just last month, the industry‘s leading journal declared it would no longer publish adverts featuring certain flat—faced dogs due to concerns over their health. now it says they would be reviewing the use of the scottish fold cat. there is really something, you know, wrong, i suppose in the way that we, as a society, believe that it's right to breed animals for their looks. there is something that perhaps we should question about that. the government says there are no current plans to ban specific breeding of cats in the uk while breeders themselves argue there is simply not enough evidence. considering some of the problems these cats are more susceptible to, would you consider not breeding them ? if i had discovered there would have been a significant problem, i would have certainly stopped breeding them, but when you balance that against the number of other health issues that
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occur in other breeds, you could argue that for most pedigree breeds. whether they‘re bred to have a flat face or flat ears, the fad for designer pets isn‘t going anywhere. but potential owners have been asked to think about their health before their appearance. a solid gold darth vader mask is going on sale injapan, with a price tag of just over £1 million. the mask is said to be a one—of—a—kind likeness of science fiction‘s most famous villain. the sculpture weighs 15 kilograms and has been commissioned to mark the 40th anniversary this year of the release of star wars. the mask will be available for purchase on may the 4th — a date known among fans as star wars day. donald trump‘s election was a celebration for some, a calamity for others. and now, nearly 100 days in to the trump presidency,
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it‘s still dividing one couple. tom voted trump, gretchen for clinton, and they got married after the election. i‘m gretchen and i voted for hillary clinton. i'm tom and i voted for donald trump. both: and we just got married! we did have a couple of days after the election where i said, i can‘t even talk to you. and for you? it was only difficult because i didn't know what to say to her! i first met gretchen and tom at their home during the election. they were engaged, in a lot of heated political discussions. whoa, whoa, whoa. don't talk over me yet. i caught up with them again six weeks into their marriage. this is the room you got married in. and 100 days into the trump presidency. i never thought anyone would ever say that i‘d be living under a trump presidency. every day i wake up with a stomach ache and wonder what happened overnight that i‘m not aware of. i've told her she should be very happy because our wedding and our honeymoon was paid for by the donald trump increase in the stock market.
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i think the travel ban was an ill—conceived, racist ban that was never going to pass constitutional muster. the travel ban was just too quick a roll—out and that was the problem with it. the philosophy was fine, the roll—out was poor. the president totally flopped on health care reform and it really was amazing that he didn‘t have a plan in place when he finally got to the white house. no, he tried to roll it out too quickly. it's going on right now. always it's an albatross around every president's neck, it takes a long time. i did support the strike in syria, i think a measured response to the atrocities that occurred in syria was long overdue. it was a well done, well—orchestrated strike that i was very proud of the president on. the president promised to come to washington and drain the swamp and instead of draining the swamp he dredged it to fill it with nepotism and kleptocracy.
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except for steve bannon, i think the staff has been terrific and his staff on national security is one of the best. you might wonder how gretchen and tom make their marriage work with these political differences, but they do. we‘ve had disagreements about this our entire relationship but we can have discussions and argue and disagree without disrespecting each other. we're not in election mode any more and now we have a president. until he‘s impeached! i think that‘s coming very soon, but i still love you! in a moment the news at one with ben brown. first, the weather. every more cloud around generally today, especially across england and wales. it has been edging southwards through the day today, started of frosty and sunny, but some cloud moving into southern counties. what
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we are seeing is a bit of rain as well. we will start the season showers turning up in the south side on. holding onto the sunniest weather for longest will be the south coast. especially the channel islands, lovely day here, but not especially warm in the breese was up but it will feel nice enough in the sunshine. cloning of a further north, with some sunny breaks through it, but generally cloudy with some showers around will stop for the east of the country, some heavy showers with the trouble of thunder. kabul broken in scotland to allow some sunshine through. into the night, the heavy showers for the east of england will push southwards, fading a little bit. keeping the cloud into the morning, keeping the temperatures up. in the east, there could be a touch of frost in some rural areas, the
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sickly on the hills. by and large, bright day. one of two isolated showers close to the north sea coast. always a bit more cloud around for the south—west and west of the country. most of you will have a dry day on friday, the winds are lighter and it will start to feel a touch warmer. milder still as we go into the bag, they weekend. tempered by more of the breeze. while there will be a lot of dry weather around, rain is in the forecast. the convocation is around how quickly that comes towards us and how far north it goes. that is due to this developing every of low pressure. there will be some light showers across the west, and one or two to was the east of scotland and north—eastern england. elsewhere, temperatures getting into the teens for many. the breeze picks up further on sunday, many fine and
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dry, but the rain is inspected in the south—west, which steadily pushes north and east later on sunday. goodbye. the foreign secretary says britain could take military action against the syrian regime without a vote in parliament. if the americans choose to act again and they ask us to help, as i say, i think it would be very difficult to say no. mrjohnson has also waded into the election campaign with a personal attack onjeremy corbyn, calling him a "mutton headed old mugwump". labour say it‘s the language of the eton playground and will concentrate on housing policy. new figures show a big rise in violent crime in england and wales.
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