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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  April 28, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello it's friday, it's 9am, i'm joanna gosling, welcome to the programme. our top story: a woman is under police guard in hospital, after being shot during an anti—terror operation on a residential street in north—west london. she is in a serious condition. metropolitan police deputy assistant commissioner neil basu says six people have now been arrested. i wanted to reassure the public that this of terrorist activities are being matched by our action, the police and security services across the country and we are making arrests on a nearly daily basis. you saw some of that, yesterday. this is the scene live at new scotla nd this is the scene live at new scotland yard where the met police say they are hopeful they have contained the threat. also today: a huge waste of money. the billion pound cancer drugs fund that was set up to give patients expensive treatments not available on the nhs could even have caused unnecessary suffering. we will talk to a leading expert who looked into the fund and a mum who says it was lifesaving.
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life changing. plus, marine a is a free man. royal marine alexander blackman, who was jailed for shooting dead a wounded taliban fighter, has been released from prison. overnight. he received a life term in 2013 for murder, but his conviction was reduced to manslaughter. his wife spoke to this programme in march when she heard the news that he would be released. i spoke to him shortly afterwards and i think it took a little longer for the realisation to hit. i think he had worked very hard to prepare himself for not such good news, so once it had finally dawned on us that we were going to be together soon, we were very happy. we'll bring you all the details in the next half hour. hello, welcome to the programme, we're live until ”am this morning. so much to talk about today, please get in touch, please get in touch.
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porna bell was married to rob, a science journalist for three years before she discovered he was a secret heroin user. we have been speaking to her in her first television interview. the idea that the person i love most in the world, that i trusted most in the world, that i trusted most in the world would be using something like that not even periodically, but would be an addict was something absolutely unfathomable. i would never have made that connection if he hadn't have told me. you can hear that interview later on. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning, use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. the uk's counter—terrorism unit say they‘ re making arrests on a "near daily" basis.
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the unit's policing coordinator made the comments in the last half hour — saying six people have now been detained in connection with an anti—terror operation in willesden, north west london, during which a woman was shot and injured by police. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament. officers say the two incidents aren't connected. alexandra mckenzie reports. a residential street in willesden, in north—west london. several gunshots heard, yesterday evening. gunshots. as armed police raided a terraced house. a woman in her 20s was shot by police. four people were arrested. as darkness fell, a police presence remained. the woman who was shot was taken to hospital. she was in a serious but stable condition and is under police guard. a 16—year—old man and a woman aged 20 were arrested at the property. a 20—year—old man was arrested close by and a 43—year—old woman in kent, a short time later. all four on suspicion of the commission, preparation and instigation of terrorist acts. they are in custody in a police
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station inside london. police say this was an ongoing counterterrorism investigation. the house had been under observation, as had the people connected to it. as the search of the house continued into the night, other searches related to this incident were also being carried out at other properties across london. however, police say there is no connection between these arrests and the one in whitehall, yesterday. our correspondent, sara smith is at new scotland yard. what's the latest? what we've heard from police this morning is that this was an active terror plot that they believe they've boiled. this address in willesden was under observation by counterterrorism officers and the intelligence they received meant that last night they
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sent armed officers in. they used cs gas on the premises and during the raid was when this woman in her 20s was injured. this morning, the assista nt was injured. this morning, the assistant commissioner for the met, the national coordinator for counterterror tried to reassure the public that although terror activity might be on the rise, so is police activity in tackling that. he said that this woman was in a serious but sta ble that this woman was in a serious but stable condition in hospital and he also talked a bit more about the arrests made. given the horrors in london of a few short weeks ago and may i say our thoughts are still with the victims and survivors of that horrific day, i wanted to reassure the public that this increased level of terrorist activity is being matched by our actions, the police and security services across the country. we are making arrests on a near daily basis and you saw some of that, yesterday.
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i also wanted to pay tribute to the bravery of my uniformed colleagues, doing that work to keep us all safe. police say it was because of intelligence received which meant that they went in, warned last night. it is extremely rare for a woman to be shot by police in this country. people here with many years of experience can't remember the last time it happened. we are told she is in a serious but stable condition, still in hospital. she is yet to be arrested with six other arrests have been made in several addresses around the capital are being searched, today. thank you very much. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. the former royal marine alexander blackman — whose murder conviction for killing a taliban fighter in afghanistan was quashed — has been released from prison. sergeant blackman — known as "marine a" — during the case — had his conviction reduced to manslaughter on appeal last month. he has served more than three years of a seven—year sentence. a special fund set up to improve
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patient access to cancer drugs in england has been condemned as a "huge waste of money". the cancer drugs fund, which ran from 2010 until it was replaced last year, cost over £1 billion. 0ur medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. the cancer drugs fund was set up to pay for expensive medicines that the nhs was not funding. in part, it was a political response to repeated negative headlines about patients being denied treatment. nearly 100,000 patients received drugs, but the study in the journal annals of oncology found just one in five treatments delivered a significant benefit, extending life by an average of three months. researchers say it was an example of policy made on the hoof, and it failed. the cancer drugs fund was a major missed opportunity for the national health service
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and the cancer community to learn in the real world about the actual impact of new medicines. a great deal of money, over £1 billion, was expended on this. and we didn't collect the data to look at individual cancer patients. that's a missed opportunity. the study concludes many patients may have suffered unnecessary side—effects from drugs. but a leading breast cancer charity said the fund has had a totally transformational impact for many, offering precious extra time with loved ones for terminally ill patients. the fund was brought under the remit of the national institute for health and care excellence last year, so there is greater scrutiny over which treatments are approved. and we'll be speaking to some of those affected by this story in around ten minutes' time. president trump said there was a chance of what he called a "major, major conflict" with north korea over its nuclear and missile programmes. in a radio interview with the reuters news agency, mr trump said he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to persuade pyongyang to abandon the weapons.
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but he said that would be very difficult to achieve. well, there's a chance that we could have a major, a major, major conflict with north korea, absolutely. the royal bank of scotland has announced a profit of £259 million in the first three months of the year. this compares to a loss of almost a billion pounds in the same period a year ago. the bank is 72%—owned by the government. it hasn't made a full—year profit in nine years, as it battles restructuring costs and fines resulting from years of over—expansion before the financial crisis. the car maker, vauxhall, showed a wreckless disregard for safetyw a wreckless disregard for safetyw over the way it handled a series of fires on its zafira b model, according to mps. a report by the transport select committee found that the company was too slow to act, allowing people to drive in cars which were hazardous.
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the company says safety is its top priority and it has changed its procedures. the general election will be a tipping point for education, according to headteachers who warn the stability of the whole system is at risk. a survey by the national assocation of headteachers found that nearly three—quarters of heads say their budget will be untenable within two years. it comes as economists predict it would cost £2 billion to freeze school funding in real terms over the next five years. 0ur education correspondent marc ashdown reports. a 24—hour strike is underway on arriva rail north, as part of an ongoing dispute over the role of guards. it's the third time that members of the rail, maritime and transport union have walked out in a row over staffing for new trains, which are due to come into service in 2020. arriva rail north said it was disappointing that the union was unwilling to change its position during talks. that's a summary of the latest bbc news.
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more at 9:30am. thank you very much. alexander blackman, marine, released a overnight having his murder conviction overturned to manslaughter. we talk will to someone manslaughter. we talk will to someone who was with him in prison as he left, just after midnight last night. the man who managed the campaign to get him released, john davis, he willjoin us later. get in touch. use the hashtag victoria live. and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport with hugh. a big game in the premier league last night, but not exactly a classic? exactly. good morning. like me, if you watched the manchester derby last night, you will know it was a frenetic encounter, end to end play with all the passion you would expect, perhaps too much passion at times but the drs sides were lacking
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in composure and quality. it's best described as attritional and it ended goalless at the etihad stadium, leaving city in the all—important final champions league qualification spot but the main talking point was a straight red ca rd talking point was a straight red card for united midfielder marouane fellaini who was sent off for that headbutt on city striker sergio aguero. no hesitation from martin atkinson, the referee. a game of few chances. at the line by poor finishing sergio aguero, could have taken it at the death but couldn't control the finish. the hunt for the top four goes on for united. jose mourinho, their manager, after the game, explained what fellini had made of his red card. we think it is probably not a red card. cabrera was intelligent, the way he reacted. but he has to control. five games left for city
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and united and city hold on to fourth spot, one point ahead of their local rivals in the premier league. interestingly, they both have the chance to leapfrog third placed liverpool that they win all their remaining matches but still a lot to play for as we approach this final month of the season. a lot of excitement around a big boxing match tomorrow, anthonyjoshua in action. what a fight in the offing in london tomorrow night, 90,000 fans will pour into the stadium taking on a man who was world champion for over a decade in wladimir klitschko. so many questions and factors in an intriguing contest. at 41 years old, does wladimir klitschko have what it ta kes to ta ke does wladimir klitschko have what it takes to take onjoshua? it is joshua's 90th professional fight, does he have the experience to take a beat man —— to beat a man that reigned supreme for so long in the heavyweight division. answers tomorrow night. squaring up after their public work—out and press
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conference yesterday. the build—up has been pretty cordial between the two of them, no real predictions from either although wladimir klitschko has made one can he is keeping his memory cards close to his chest, take a look. on this usb stick i recorded a video last week. and the outcome of the fight. list stick is going to be integrated in my robe, which i'm going to wear this saturday night. sealed. do not ask me, after the fight, what is on this stick. i would be asking! the only person who will find out is the one who grabs that robe at an auction after the fight. wladimir klitschko says it is up to them if they want to reveal what the contents they want to reveal what the co nte nts of they want to reveal what the contents of the video are. it is tough. you will have much more on it in the programme throughout the morning but it will be a very tough one. interesting to see if anthony
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joshua can do it. i want to ask, that we are not allowed to ask! he seemed pretty serious, i wouldn't ask him! a special fund for cancer drugs set up to help give patients access to treatment not available on the nhs has been criticised for not giving good enough value. the nhs cancer drugs fund ran from 2010 to 2016, costing £1.27 billion. it was set—up to give quicker access to expensive drugs that hadn't yet been recommended by nice — the body in charge of the nhs‘s purse strings. among the drugs it's approved are perjeta and kadcyla for women with advanced breast cancer, which we've covered before on the programme. we'll be hearing shortly from one patient who benefitted from the fund and says it made a huge difference to her life. we'll also bejoined by one of the report's authors, who have described the programme as "a huge waste of money" and a "major policy error". but what else could £1.27 billion pay for in the health service? well, it could fund 10,000 nurses, or 2,500 hospital consultants.
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it could also fund a one—off pay rise for every member of nhs staff,or an extra 20 gp surgeries. the conservatives, who set up the fund, said it gave patients "precious extra time." let's speak now to bonnie fox, who has incurable cancer and takes one of the drugs approved by the cancer drugs fund. also here, professor richard sullivan, one of the authors of the report from the institute of cancer policy at king's college london. and mia rosenblatt, assistant director of policy and campaigns at the charity, breast cancer now. thank you all very much for coming in. bonnie, metellus first of all what you have been given as a result the fund. i have been on herceptin and perjeta combined. i have been
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able to carry on my life relatively normally since i was diagnosed in 2015. from that diagnosis i am functioning fairly normally. i have returned to work. i have eight to macro year old son and can perform my role as a busy month, a wife and a daughter. these drugs have enabled me to do that. the low side effects of the drugs mean i have not required any hospitalisation and do not have any side effects from them ican not have any side effects from them i can carry on relatively normally. without the fund he would not have had those drugs? i would not have had those drugs? i would not have had perjeta. the to macro drugs combined have meant i am still alive. you have been looking into what the fans were spending money on
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and the impact. you are not at all convinced. —— the fund was spending money on. there is this clinically meaningful benefit. there is nothing wrong with the cdf in principle for particularly expensive medicines which had not yet had nice approval. we could not follow what the outcomes. many patients do as we showed from the study, did not do well on those particular drugs but well on those particular drugs but we did not learn about that. what we are doing is pouring more and more money into giving patients drugs that we really were not learning from. i guess, at the end of the day, the general point with patient access schemes of fairness. in the future thinking of opening up beyond medicines to include surgery and
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radiotherapy. it is about making sure clinically meaningful drugs like this are used in the nhs. was ita like this are used in the nhs. was it a failure of the people running it? it was a failure of looking properly at the outcomes of the drugs being prescribed. that is basic, why did not happen? that is theissue, basic, why did not happen? that is the issue, finding out why it did happen. now the cdf has been incorporated into the nice process. you need to make sure you follow up patients very closely to see those who really benefit and to put more money into those. for those drugs which are not showing any benefit, to stop funding their eyes and put it into a different area. it is about research. the fund has gone. does that mean you will continue to get the treatment you have been having? i will continue with the treatment. my next drug is up for
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review. the initial decision is that it will not be funded. we're working really ha rd to it will not be funded. we're working really hard to try to reverse that decision. the problem with this report which has been released, it is generalising and making a sweeping statement that the cdf has not been working for some it is not looking at those individual drugs which are working. it is insulting for those of us who are doing so well on it. there are many of us who are doing well on them. it is damaging to ourcampaign are doing well on them. it is damaging to our campaign to try to save the drugs and make sure they are funded on the nhs. we do not know if future patients will be able to get perjeta. if you are on the treatment you will continue to get it that we do not know what will happen in the future. the fund was set up fora happen in the future. the fund was set up for a short amount of time very deliberate lead to try to get drugs through which were struggling
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to get through nice like perjeta. why were they struggling? it is part of the nice process. it takes into account different factors and comes up account different factors and comes up witha account different factors and comes up with a yes, or a no, as to whether the drugs were available. the drugs are available to people with incurable cancer. in the case of perjeta, it is a combination drug. whatever the manufacturer says, it is not cost—effective. that shows there is something not quite nice in the system. the process was going to be looked at more broadly. the wider reform did not come. the end of the life of the cancer drug fund came. now it has gone back into nice and does not exist in the same way. what we really need to look at is how we can more broadly reform the system so we are not costing the nhs more money but we're getting more drugs through. there is an
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opportunity through the agreement that pharmaceutical companies make with the department of health called the pharmaceutical pricing agreement, is where we could get drugs available with no extra cost. that will be renegotiated in the next year and that is where we should be focusing. it is a horrible debate when it centres on, what price do put on life? those are the fundamentals that get looked at. we are all in agreement. we want drugs which benefit all technologies to get into the nhs. this is about accommodation and solidarity. governments that are prepared to pay fair prices for the wealth of the country, for medicines and other technologies. you need companies setting their prices as well. part of this is negotiations around tax relief and negotiations in this country around the sort of prices they will offer. we are trying to
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get new drugs through and new technologies through for patients that will drive improvements in outcomes and be of really good value to society as a whole. we are all on the same page. at the beginning we outlined what the money going into the fund could have paid for in terms of staff within the nhs. that does not work right. it comes back to the point of how you trade of peoples lives. that is not fair. you cannot say we could have spent the money on this. the money was spent. some patients benefited fa nta stically some patients benefited fantastically but a lot did not. we have to learn from where we made mistakes with that particular access scheme and the way it was run and make sure that does not happen the future. when you had your criticisms of the fund, it was that money could be better spent. it is not that harm was done to anyone. it is the way we
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watched and reviewed patients who we re watched and reviewed patients who were treated with the drugs will do were treated with the drugs will do we could have learned much earlier which drugs are working and which we re which drugs are working and which were not. that was the issue at the end of the day. we have to properly audit these access schemes. patients expect that as well, to learn from out expect that as well, to learn from our clinical experience. when you talked about campaigning for drugs, you are in a situation where you have terminal cancer and you are fighting to try to get extra life, better quality of life. how does it feel to be fighting at the same time as living with what he while living with? it is fairly exhausting. it is a shame because i feel so well at the moment. a life with secondary breast cancer is full of anxiety and uncertainty. it is very stressful. having the additional worry of, will my next drug be in place? it is a huge worry. i want to enjoy my life.
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iam huge worry. i want to enjoy my life. i am feeling so well. i do not want to worry, it is the next drug there for me? thank you for coming in. we've had this statement from the conservative party, it says: that statement from the conservatives. coming up: we'll hear from a successful journalist who found out her husband was a heroin addict, she'd had no idea for three years. he later killed himself. poorna bell is now opening up about what happened to her husband rob, and is sharing her story with this programme. after serving more than three years into a seven—year prison sentence, the royal marine, sergeant alexander blackman, has been released from jail. his life term sentence for murder
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for shooting dead a wounded taliban fighter had been reduced to manslaughter. it followed a campaign led by his wife, claire blackman. in an exclusive interview in september 2015, claire told us about the moment her husband was arrested. the first we knew was the knock on the door, for him to be arrested. it was a huge shock. what happened ? it was a quiet weekend morning, and there was a knock on the door. i opened the door and invited the individuals in, who announced who they were. and as they came in my husband came downstairs and they read out the charge of breaches of the geneva convention, at that stage. and did you know what that meant, then? no, not at all. when did it become clear that he was going to be charged with murder? i think as the investigation
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continued, the charge changed a week or so after that first arrest. how did you react? shocked, completely shocked. it was something, as i said, it was totally out of the blue. last month, court martial appeal judges reduced his sentence after being told sergeant blackman had a recognised mental illness at the time of the killing in september 2011. thejudge's decision the judge's decision meant he would be released in a matter of weeks. claire blackman was in court and spoke to her husband via video link at his prison. i think it took a little longer for the realisation to hit. i think he'd worked very hard to prepare himself for not such good news, so once it had finally dawned on us that we were going to be together soon, we were very happy. and is it true, via video link, he managed to get in that he loved you, yesterday?
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the court staff have been absolutely fantastic. we've been a regular appearance in court 4 and the staff have got to know us and look after us very well. and they allow us at the end of the video link to have a quick word with each other, on camera. i did warn him that the court had not yet cleared, but yes, he did tell me he loved me. the campaign to release sergeant blackman was managed by fellow royal marine john davies. he was at erlestoke prison in the early hours of this morning when he let out. we can speak to him now, live from bristol. thank you forjoining us. what was the moment like? good morning. it was absolutely fantastic. i was not actually outside the prison, i was with care when the police brought to clare the
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secret location they are staying at the moment. it was surreal to see them both relaxed. it was an amazing moment for what has been a very long three and a half years for everyone involved. it made it all worthwhile, without a shadow of a doubt. what did he say? he did not say a zero, to be fair. this is probably about half past to this morning. he just said it is very surreal really. he was commenting on the carjourney and the fact he has not been in a carfora and the fact he has not been in a carfor a few and the fact he has not been in a car for a few years will do that in itself was very strange. it will ta ke itself was very strange. it will take a bit of time to transition back into normality for him. were they emotional? 0f back into normality for him. were they emotional? of course they were. it has been the end to a very horrific period for them. i believe
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there will be an exclusive interview by the daily mail which will come out tomorrow, detailing all of this. why did it all happen in the early hours of the morning? it was to miss the unwanted media. it's very easy for us from a campaign perspective to understand how high profile this has been, how the media have been outside the courts outside parliament, outside birmingham. but al hasn't been subjected to any of this. to try and keep him away from a lot of that at this early stage, for us, for his wife and himself, it was very important. how and why did you get involved? more than anything else, obviously, he is a fellow royal marine. nobody else was doing anything. that's what really bugged me. it's not what we are about as royal marines, as service men. we
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look at each other. the more and more we looked into the gates, the more we looked into the gates, the more holes we could find in the court—martial —— looked into the case, the more. we reached just over 100,000 signatures, which secured the parliamentary debate which got an mp involved and frederick forsyth from the daily mail and the fantastic legal team. it's been an incredible journey and it couldn't have been done with —— without the amazing public support and the will marine ‘s family backing support. it's been amazing, the whole thing has been brilliant. as you say, it has been brilliant. as you say, it has unfolded over a long time and those on the outside have been well aware of what's been going on and experiencing it. he is going to face that onslaught. what will they do, now? now it will be a bit of a transition period. they will have a good few weeks to themselves. decide
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what he wants to do next. in the coming weeks, coming months. it must be such a strange feeling being able to plan your future whereas a month ago he thought he would have another four and ago he thought he would have another fourand a ago he thought he would have another four and a half to five and a half yea rs four and a half to five and a half years serving. it will take a bit of time to decide what his next steps are, really. thank you forjoining us. are, really. thank you forjoining us. my pleasure. as the uk's counter—terrorism unit say they're making arrests on a "near daily" basis, we'll be live at new scotland yard with the very latest. 0ne one of the biggest boxing fights on british soil as anthonyjoshua and wladimir klitschko meet in the ring. but who will be crowned heavyweight world champion? we will speak to a boxer who sparred with both fighters. when i was like 17, 18, it was about being cool, looking good. i'm 27, now. and now i'm fighting wlad,
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everything that i've done over the last three years, it's built me up to now. i found out what i need to do, what works, what don't work. ijust put it into action, now. it's 9:33am. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. good morning. the uk's counter—terrorism unit say they‘ re making arrests on a "near daily" basis. the unit's policing coordinator made the comments in the last hour — saying six people have now been detained in connection with an anti—terror operation in willesden, north—west london, during which a woman was shot and injured by police. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament. officers say the two incidents aren't connected. we will be live at scotland yard, soon. given the horrors in london of a few short weeks ago and may i say our thoughts are still with the victims and survivors of that horrific day, i wanted to reassure the public that this increased level
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of terrorist activity is being matched by our actions, the police and security services across the country. we are making arrests on a near daily basis and you saw some of that, yesterday. i also wanted to pay tribute to the bravery of my uniformed colleagues, doing that work to keep us all safe. we will be back at scotland yard in a moment. a fund set up to improve patient access to cancer drugs in england has been condemned by researchers as a "huge waste of money". the cancer drugs fund ran from 2010 until last year and cost nearly £1.3 billion, but a new study by king's college london claims most of the drugs failed to show clinical benefit, and many patients may have suffered unnecessary side effects. however, one leading breast cancer charity said the fund had transformed many lives. the former royal marine alexander blackman, whose murder conviction for killing a taliban fighter in afghanistan was quashed, has been released from prison. sergeant blackman, known as "marine a"
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during the case, had his conviction reduced to manslaughter on appeal last month. he has served more than three years of a seven—year sentence. the car maker vauxhall showed a "reckless disregard for safety" over the way it handled a series of fires on its zafira b model, according to mps. a report by the transport select committee found that the company was too slow to act, allowing people to drive in cars which were hazardous. the company says safety is its top priority and it has changed its procedures. it took them a long time to act. when they did act and said they'd put things right, cars were still bursting into flames. and even at that point, they didn't recall the cars fully. and this is totally unacceptable and is putting people's lives at risk. within the past few minutes, the office for national to statistics
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has released the latest gdp figures —— office for national statistics. the economy grew by 0.4% in the first quarter of this year. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.00. here's some sport now with hugh. it was all about the race for fourth champions league spot last night in the manchester derby but the match didn't live up to the hype. a moment of madness was the main talking point, united's marouane fellaini was sent off after headbutting city striker sergio aguero. that happened 1a seconds after he'd been booked for another foul on the argentine forward. the goalless draw meant city and united stay fourth and fifth in the table. former liverpool captain steven gerrard is to take charge of the club's under 18's side from next season. gerrard returned to liverpool's academy in february after he retired from playing. anthonyjoshua says he won't be affected by wladimir klitschko's mind games ahead of their heavyweight title fight at wembley stadium tomorrow. klitchscko says he's made a video prediction but won't reveal it.
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joshua says "he's heard it all before." and today is the first day of cycling's tour de yorkshire. the first stage goes from bridlington to scarborough. thomas voeckler is the men's defending champion while britain's lizzie deignan is hoping for victory in the women's race. something on thejoshua fightjust after 10am as well. do you think he is predicting he is going to lose?|j doubt is predicting he is going to lose?” doubt it very much! we will talk a bit more about that fight, later. let's get more on our top story, and police say they've foiled an active terrorist plot after carrying out an armed raid in north—west london. a female suspect was shot during the operation and is in a serious but stable condition in hospital. six people have been arrested. 0ur correspondent sara smith is at the metropolitan police headquarters at new scotland yard. what is the latest? within the last
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hour, police confirmed they believe they have foiled an active terror plot, planned for uk soil. anti—terrorist officers had this address in willesden in north london under surveillance and jude to intelligence they received, they tell us, they went in, armed last night, first of all firing cs gas into the premises. it was during this raid that this woman in her 20s was shot and injured and she remains in hospital in a serious but stable condition. the national coordinator for counterterror, said today that while terror activities may be on the rise, police activity was also going up to deal with it. in whitehall, a 27—year—old man was arrested. they stopped and searched him as part of an ongoing counterterrorism investigation. he remains in custody, having been arrested for terrorism act offences and possession of offensive weapons.
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there are two ongoing searches of addresses in london as part of that investigation. in our second and unrelated investigation, last night at approximately 7pm, our highly trained firearms officers carried out a specialist entry into an address in harlesden road. we have that under observation as part of a current counterterrorism investigation. the armed entry was necessary due to the nature of the intelligence we were dealing with and involved armed officers firing cs gas into the address. during the course of that operation, one of the subjects, a woman, was shot by police. she remains in hospital. i can say her condition is serious but it is stable. because of her condition, she has not yet been arrested and we are monitoring her condition closely. as is routine in these situations, we have informed
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these situations, we have informed the independent police complaints commission. in total, in that second operation, six people have now been arrested in connection with the investigation, five at or near the address in north london and one in kent. the two further arrests were made when a man and a woman, both aged 28, returned to the address later tonight last night. there are search is ongoing at three london addresses, including harlesden road as part of that investigation. —— returned to the address later that night. due to the arrests made yesterday, in both cases i believe we have contained the threats they have posed. with the attack in westminster on the 22nd of march so fresh in people's minds, i would like to reassure everyone that across the country, officers are working around the clock to identify those people who intend to commit acts of terror. to recap, six arrests in all, in connection with last night's raid, three of them men, three of them women. all still in custody. the
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woman who was shot is in hospital in a serious but stable condition and is under arrest. it is extremely rare for a woman to be shot by police in this country. in fact, nobody here can remember the last time it happened. searches are ongoing and three london addresses in connection with last night's raid and police say they believe they have contained the threat they posed. following the arrest in westminster yesterday where a man was arrested not far from here, westminster yesterday where a man was arrested not farfrom here, two addresses in london are also being searched. the deputy assistant commissioner neil basu, who we just heard from, he described it as being an extraordinary day in london. he also thanked the general public and said that with the best will in the world from police, it was communities and people getting in touch that would help him fight terrorism. thank you. amid the noise, news and occasional name—calling surrounding the general election, you might not have noticed that next week, for many of us, there's a local one too. all the council areas in scotland and wales,
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and many counties across england are upforgrabs. not only that but in six areas, greater manchester, liverpool, tees valley, cambridgeshire and peterborough, west of england and the west midlands, for the first time, they'll be electing a new "metro" mayor. that's a mayor that represents an area comprising a number of councils, a bit like in london. let's speak to some of our political correspondents across the nation now. in scotland, we've got brian taylor, in wales, tomos morgan and nina warhurst is in the north west of england, where they're voting for two of the metro mayors. brian, tell us about the picture in scotland. these elections matter in themselves, 1200 councillors in all 32 scottish local authorities, they run the schools, the social work, they take when the bin —— take away they take when the bin —— take away the bins and salt the roads. they are significant themselves but com pletely are significant themselves but completely subsumed within the uk general election. they will be
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looking for pointers from the scottish local elections as to how things might be at the uk general election in scotland. 2001, last time these councils were contested and the snp were narrowly in the lead both in terms of voting share and in councillors. labour actually ended up, because of the proportional voting system, you have to haggle as to who runs the councils, labour actually ended up in sole control of more councils than the snp. will that be repeated now? since then, the snp have surged in the uk general election and hollywood elections and there has now been a sign of a revival of the tories. the tories are keen to supplant labour as the second party. 0ne supplant labour as the second party. one big one to look out for would—be the great city of glasgow, a labour stronghold since everyone remembers but the snp took seats there from both westminster and holyrood. could they do that again at the council bubble? another thing to watch, the individual wards will give the individual wards will give the individual candidates pointers as to the way things are shifting. the
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trend of voting in scotland. that will be translated into endeavours and efforts for the uk general election itself. i stress that these elections matter in themselves. i hand over to my colleague in wales. 22 local elections in wales. 1200 seats and over 3400 and dates. the first minister said when theresa may announced the general election, that would have an impact on the local elections across the uk. labour has always been strong in wales, they hold a number of the councils across wales. in a way, they have the most to lose. i will run some of the key battle grounds through with you, cardiff, the capital, by far the biggest local authority. rabies control after taking it from the lib dem plaid cymru coalition —— labour is in control after taking. infighting in labour in the last few years, they have had a change of leadership so
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they will be under a three pronged attack from plaid cymru from the we st of attack from plaid cymru from the west of cardiff, the tories in the north and the lib dems in the central. they will battle to keep hold of this biggest council across wales. ten of the councillors quit the party in 2015. they'll be back in to ta ke party in 2015. they'll be back in to take it back as the tories worry battling to make some gains. another key area for them. in the west, a classic bike between plaid cymru and labour put labour were in control in the last election but labour will be trying to make some ground. that is the situation in wales. now to my colleague in the north west of england. the big two votes are the
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election of the metro mayor. the liverpool city region, plus merseyside and a borough of holton in cheshire. they will elect mayors for the first time was that this is history in the making. the powers that are being handed down from westminster are not significant. the mayor and the leader of the boroughs will take control of transport, housing, strategic planning. in greater manchester the mayor will become the head of the police service, the pcc, as well as becoming head of the fire and rescue services. when you go and speak to people, are they are where it is happening? not really. there is lots of confusion. people get it confused with the guy with the chain. when you explain it will be like boris johnson used to beat mckenna livingstone used to be, there is a bit of understanding but there is
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concern that turnout will be low for these elections. it is on a knife edge. it slips between the conservatives and the labour party. it has marginal labour control at the moment. within lancashire there are five marginal constituencies for the general election. that is often seen as a the general election. that is often seen as a bellwether area and could be seen as a prediction of how the general election will go. thank you all very much. listening in, tony travers, from the london school of economic and political science. let's talk about turnout in the local elections. so many elections at the moment. we have been bombarded. what does that do in terms of engagement and turnout? there is always a risk that when you get a lot of election in the country, be polite to vote in britain. it is a mature democracy.
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they do not like to vote too often. we have had a sequence in scotland, northern ireland and england and wales. in the big city regions, with the metro mayors, in most of those places, there are no other election is going on. as it is a new post covering a big geography around the city centre, there is some concern as to whether the turnout will be anything like as big as we have seen in the london mayoral election. last time the turnout was 45%. the fear is the turnout will be lower as when the police and crime commission elections took place. general elections took place. general elections 65—70%. 45% for local elections 65—70%. 45% for local elections is generally considered pretty good. in your average, metropolitan district, london or shy elections, you would be expecting to get results having between ——
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averaging between 35 and 40%. we will see less than that in the new mayoral elections. these elections do matter in themselves. we're all looking at them and thinking about how much they will indicate on what we can expect in a general election not that long after. what would you say on that front? they are local elections. everyone who goes out to vote is voting on the quality of services. standing back from it, these elections are five weeks before a general election and they are bound to be viewed as a way of trying to understand the way real votes are being cast. with local elections, they are real votes. with that in mind, when we distil the results nationally, people will be saying, are the conservatives doing quite as well in these real results as they are in the polls quest to our labour doing as badly? so on. as
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we heard in the packages earlier on, there are real elections where we can see whether the conservatives can see whether the conservatives can win control of lancashire, derbyshire, nottinghamshire. terrible results for labour should that happen and good for the conservatives. will the liberal democrats the resurgent in the west of england? it is a big test of opinion locally and nationally. thank you very much. and you can find out more about the local and mayoral elections in your area (gfx) 0n the bbc news website — at bbc.co.uk/news. and you can watch mp for a day, who ca res and you can watch mp for a day, who cares about politics? victoria derbyshire documentary on the bbc i player. britain's world heavyweight champion anthony joshua is preparing for the biggest fight of his career tomorrow night when he steps into the ring to face ukranian wladimir klitschko. 90,000 people are expected to fill wembley to watch the bout, which will see the winner become the "unified" heavyweight
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world champion. anthony joshua is looking to maintain his perfect unbeaten professional record. wladimir klitschko is aiming to reclaim the international boxing federation and world boxing association titles that he lost to tyson fury. let's take a look at this clip ofjoshua in action. this is from a bbc three documentary looking ahead to this weekend's fight. i like my rest but i need to start earlier so i can get back earlier. every morning when you wake up you have to give a bit of yourself to the gym. no one tells me what i have to do. no one puts a gun to my head and says, you have to be a boxer. when i was like 17, 18, it was about being cool, looking good. i'm 27, now. and now i'm fighting wlad,
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everything that i've done over the last three years, it's built me up to now. i found out what i need to do, what works, what don't work. ijust put it into action, now. joining us now is rob madden, anthony joshua's physiotherapist, dillian whyte, who shared a battle with anthonyjoshua and has also sparred with wladimir klitschko, and olympic bronze medalist anthony 0gogo. thank you all forjoining us. rob, he said the last 13 weeks of preparation are tougher than any time. what has he been doing to prepare? building on previous training camps. preparing very hard. he is running into a lot of hard sparring, pad work. putting his body through a gruelling schedule. it is a serious fight. it had to be done. how is he? he is happy physically
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and ina how is he? he is happy physically and in a great place. the mind games, we heard wladimir klitschko playing the tape predicting the outcome. how much is that a factor, keeping focused mentally? he is relaxed. i cannot see the usb stick having much effect on him. he has eight tougher skin than that. anthony, you have known him for ten yea rs. anthony, you have known him for ten years. he is such an interesting character. he still lives at home with his mum. he said had he not gone into boxing, he would be in jail. he had difficult times earlier in his life. tell me more about him. i have trained alongside him for the last seven, eight years. the use of the decayed person. he trained very hard. he is very confident. —— he is
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a dedicated person. he backed himself. he trained hard as his confidence comes with how he trains. i trained with him for a long time. we have raced together, hit the bag together. he trained very hard. he deserves his success. a really good fighter and a massive challenge for him. clitch coe has been a tremendous champion for the last few yea rs. tremendous champion for the last few years. —— wladimir klitschko.” tremendous champion for the last few years. -- wladimir klitschko. i have fought anthony twice and wladimir klitschko a few times. it is one of those fights which is tricky at the moment. it depends how much wladimir klitschko attacks and how much anthonyjoshua is klitschko attacks and how much anthony joshua is challenge. klitschko attacks and how much anthonyjoshua is challenge. it is difficult to pick a winner. we will
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see how heavy joshua difficult to pick a winner. we will see how heavyjoshua comes in and how heavy that it clitch coe is. wladimir klitschko has been to mendis champion. —— a tremendous champion. joshua is young, hungry and fast. he is a fast fighter. a lot of guys that size can punch hard. his speed is to mendis factor. wladimir klitschko had that speed backin wladimir klitschko had that speed back in the day. —— a tremendous factor. it is how much anthony joshua can take him out of his stride and let his bath and go. if he does that, i think he will win.
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—— let his bath and go. it takes it out of you. i thinkjoshua is younger, fresher, faster. that will be the difference in winning the fight. in terms of preparation when he says he does not worry about getting injured in the ring because he tests everything before he goes in. talk through what it is like being there when he is training and how he is approaching it. it is about teamwork around him and balancing his training loads and his recovery. he is training hard and put ina recovery. he is training hard and put in a lot of stress on his body for the utilising the strength and conditioning and physiotherapy. this week is about being quiet on that front. addressing the tight spots. his muscles are feeling really fresh for tomorrow night. i am really happy with where he is at. everyone is. i hope wladimir klitschko is in
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the same position. both are coming in strong and healthy and it will be a good fight. people see the physicality of boxing. it is a mental sport as well, isn't it? people watch boxing and see two, big, muscular guys throwing punches and they think that is it. it is so technical. every game plan has been sorted out. it is not about doing press ups, bicep curling was he has spent 13 weeks going over game plans. doing one thing and then the next week doing another thing. it is a hard business. both guys can punch very hard. if you make one mistake, you are knocked out. you have lost the credibility you have built up. thank you. we are looking forward to the fight tomorrow. thank you very
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much forjoining us. if you're watching on bbc two, in a moment coverage of the snooker. to continue watching our programme turn over to the bbc news channel, where coming up in the next half hour. a successful journalist found out her husband was a heroin addict. she'd had no idea for three years. he later killed himself. poorna bell is now opening up about what happened to her husband rob, and is sharing her story with this programme just after 10. let's catch up with the weather. largely fine, dry day out there and this was the scene taken by our weather watchers in broadstairs. as weather watchers in broadstairs. as we head through the bank holiday weekend, the quiet theme continues at least for a while. a bit warmer than they have been, turning quite breezy and at times, there's a chance of rain, particularly on sunday. 0ne
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chance of rain, particularly on sunday. one or two showers across scotland, northern england, wales and southern england but either side of that line of cloud, dry and brighter stop decent sunshine. lighter winds and recent days and temperatures at around 15 degrees. saturday, the driest day of the weekend. quite a bit of sunshine. the chance of the rogue shower. temperatures around 16. windy in the west. sunday, some rain in the south—west of england. wales as well, going north—east but some uncertainty on sunday. looks like northern and north—eastern part of the country should stay dry and breezy. most of the rain clears through bank holiday monday. a return to some sunshine, 12 showers but it should feel pleasant with lighter winds and temperatures up to 16 degrees. it's friday, ten o'clock and i am
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joanna gosling, thanks for your company. if a woman has been shot during an anti—terror operation on a residential street in north—west london. neil basu said six people have now been arrested. i wanted to reassure the public that this increased level of terrorist activity is being matched by our actions, the police and security services across the country. we are making arrests on a near daily basis and you saw some of that, yesterday. we will have the latest in willesden junction shortly. a successful journalist only found out after three years that her husband was a heroin addict. he sought help but later relapsed and killed himself. poorna bell is here to share her story with this programme. the idea that the person i loved most in the world, that i trusted most in the world would be using something like that not even periodically, but would be an addict, it was absolutely unfathomable. i would never have made that connection if he hadn't have told me.
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we will hear from her at ten past. imagine buying a new home, but finding that the cost to rent the ground the property is on is doubling every few years. that's what happened to some leasehold homeowners. but now one developer, taylor wimpey, has set aside a fund of £130 million to help reduce these costs after the scandal emerged. it just seems immoral and completely unethical. and you read the contract as much as... i think i probably read the contract about 50 times. certainly, after i realised. and it didn't matter how many times i read the one paragraph in which this clause is contained, i still can't read it. a teenage boy, whose brother was killed in a taliban massacre at his school in peshawar, is now in birmingham, teaching children about the dangers of extremism. we bring you the story. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. thank you, good morning.
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the uk's counter—terrorism unit says it's making arrests on a "near daily" basis. the unit's policing coordinator made the comments this morning — saying six people have now been detained in connection with an anti—terror operation in willesden, north—west london, during which a woman was shot and injured by police. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament. officers say the two incidents aren't connected. given the horrors in london of a few short weeks ago, and may i say our thoughts are still with the victims and survivors of that horrific day, i wanted to reassure the public that this increased level of terrorist activity is being matched by our actions, the police and security services across the country. we are making arrests on a near daily basis and you saw some of that, yesterday. i also wanted to pay tribute to the bravery and detective colleagues, doing that work to keep us all safe. 0ur correspondent, andy moore
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is at willesden green. good morning, is any more detail a margin about what went on? —— detail emerging. we had that update from scotland yard. they called it an extraordinary day yesterday, two separate ongoing terror investigations. this house behind me was raided at about 7pm last night. if we just push into the house, it's the one with the satellite dish. you may be able to see in the top right—hand window on the top floor, there is a broken window. we know from police that a cs gas was used here. police said they had to make an armed entry, which was necessary because of intelligence. we don't know precisely what that intelligence was that this house had been under surveillance for some time. —— but this house. it would
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have six people had been arrested in connection with this incident. a 16—year—old boy was arrested here. a man and a woman both aged 20 and a separate arrest last night of a 43—year—old woman in kent. four rests with europe last night and we heard this morning of an additional two arrests made at this property when two people returned to this address. a man and a woman aged 28. obviously, the police investigation carrying on here. we understand that there are investigations at linked addresses. we don't know where they are. at other locations in london. the ibc say, the independent watchdog, will be investigating this case “— watchdog, will be investigating this case —— ipc. when firearms are charged, they investigate. a woman in her205 is in a charged, they investigate. a woman in her 205 is in a serious condition in hospital, under watch by officers but she has not been arrested because of her condition. andy, thank you. a fund set up to improve patient access to cancer drugs in england
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has been condemned by researchers as a "huge waste of money". the cancer drugs fund ran from 2010 until last year and cost nearly £1.3 billion. but a new study by king's college london says most of the drugs failed to show clinical benefit, and many patients may have suffered unnecessary side effects. a breast cancer charity has responded, saying the fund transformed many lives. a former royal marine who shot dead an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan has been released from prison. sergeant alexander blackman was originally found guilty of murder. last month that conviction was quashed and replaced with manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility. official figures show the economy grew by 0.3% in the first quarter of the year. economists had been expecting a slowdown, but the results are slightly worse than predicted. the office for national statistics said rising prices and a fall in spending were partly to blame. that's a summary of the latest bbc news.
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more at 10:30am. here's some sport now with hugh. we will keep talking about that huge fight. all eyes will be on wembley tomorrow evening for what could be another memorable fight for british fight fans and anthonyjoshua takes a step up in class to defend his world title against dr steelhammer himself wladimir klitschko. both characters are really intriguing, there's no malice, no bad blood. let's speak now to boxing commentator ronald mcintosh, who will take us through the action on bbc radio 5live tomorrow night. you were at the press conference yesterday, what was the mood like of the two fighters? the mood in the pre55 the two fighters? the mood in the press conference at the sky centre wa5 press conference at the sky centre was as it has been throughout the entire build—up, to this contest.
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epic heavyweight showdown but both guys very surreal, very professional, very calm, very composed, they know one another very well. anthony joshua composed, they know one another very well. anthonyjoshua was hired as a sparring partner by wladimir klitschko added his title defence backin klitschko added his title defence back in 2014. there has almost been an element of anthonyjoshua being expected to be the anointed one, the next one. i don't think they anticipated they would meet bob wladimir klitschko lost the title to funerary. heavyweight showdown taking place at wembley on sunday. lots of questions going into this fight, mainly the age of wladimir klitschko, how long he has been out of the ring and that perceived inexperience from anthonyjoshua. how will they cope with their respective challenges? that is a classic philosophical conundrum which is more valuable, the energy of youth, the wisdom of experience? wladimir klitschko is 41, he has beenin wladimir klitschko is 41, he has been in boxing, taking into account his glittering amateur career, when he won the olympics civil
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heavyweight title in 1996, through to the imperious rain, none and a half year, second rain as a heavyweight champion, he has been in boxing for 27 years —— nine and a half years, his second time as a heavyweight champion. but it could go's boxing experience and the totality of anthony joshua's go's boxing experience and the totality of anthonyjoshua's time on earth. hugely powerful individuals, 18 five, 18 winds, 18 knockouts but make no mistake, this is a huge step up. he has faced anybody as remotely as good as bad make it go. we are assuming that it could go is the fighter that he was in the past. if we go on the evidence of his last performance against tyson fury, that was an absolute aberration. was it a significant decline or a one off? the answers will —— the questions will be answered on saturday night. there's coverage of the fight on radio 5live with ron and the team from 9 o'clock tomorrow evening — not to be missed! writer poorna bell had been married to rob, a successful journalist for three years before he admitted
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he was addicted to heroin. she was completely blind—sided. whilst rob had been open about his battle with depression, which was often severe, she had no idea that he was using heroin to self—medicate his mental health issues. the pair tried to work through his problems together — rob joined narcotics anonymous and poorna went to a support group for loved ones. but eventually rob relapsed and on a trip to see relatives in new zealand he tragically took his own life. after losing her husband, poorna opened up about their struggles with a blog and in a new book, she describes what it was like to live with a something she kept a secret for many years. he mastered at this by saying it was depression. but i knew there wasn't something quite right, there was something quite right, there was something he wasn't telling me that i assumed he wasn't comfortable talking about how he felt. when he told me it was an awful moment but
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at the same time, i felt i had a bit of my sanity back. because i actually knew what was going on. had you literally no idea? no idea. when you literally no idea? no idea. when you are married and you trust the other person implicitly, you just expect them to tell you the truth, you don't think for one minute they might not be telling you the truth. the idea of something like heroin, which is an extreme drug in modern society, so taboo, the idea that the person i loved most in the world, that i trusted most in the world would be using something like that not even periodically, but be an addict, it was absolutely unfathomable. i would never have made that connection if he hadn't have told me. how open was he with you at that point? once he had told me, everything came out. all of these stories, everything that i thought was one type of a reality, but actually, he then told me the truth about what was going on. he was very open with his feelings and
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his thoughts immediately afterwards. with addiction it's not as simple as among confessing and they're going to recovery. and then they are keen for the rest of their lives. there we re for the rest of their lives. there were periods of relapse and recovery. every time he led up to a relapse it would be punctuated by the same kind of behaviour. he wouldn't talk about how he was feeling, be closed off and eventually he was confessing tammy what was going on. why did he tell you? i asked him that question. -- he was confessing and then tell me. he said he was caught at the right moment. in some measures that is quite worrying because what if i hadn't? what if he hadn't had told me at that point in time? because we kick—started his recovery almost immediately after that, two days after that. he was just fed up with lying and with having to carry all of that on his own, which is what addiction is. especially when you can't tell your loved ones about it. had he been on heroin the whole time
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you had known him? in other words, you had known him? in other words, you wouldn't have noticed any particular change? no. about 18 months of our relationship, he wasn't. for the first 18 months. i'd definitely, looking back on it retrospectively, i know when his behaviour started changing. but it coincided when i moved into living with him. ijust thought maybe this is what it was like when i'm not around. ididn't is what it was like when i'm not around. i didn't put two and two together. he was an addict for about three years from that point onwards. i would probably venture maybe three, three and a half, actually. in the book, you talk about tell—tale signs that when you looked back with knowledge, you saw in a different way things like tinfoil, using opt in for quite quickly in the house, which at the time you hadn't thought much about —— using it up quite quickly in the house. in the book, it's quite a comical mind
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that i throw out there but i was, like, my god, there was no tinfoil for us to grilled chicken on! it's something as mundane as that, sandwiched with something so extreme as the fact that he had been using it to smoke heroin in the toilet. i has to re—evaluate every single thing that i thought i knew. things like going to the shops leyton aspal cigarette —— i has to re—evaluate. why he may have been late to meet me for something —— shops late at night to buy cigarettes. that was something extremely hard to reconcile. how was he funding it? he wasn't. he got himself into thousands of pounds of debt. he jointly owned a house and use the equity for that to pay of some of his debt. unfortunately, he got back into debt again. on a side note, it leads you to wonder about people, creditors, having known someone had a problem with debt, are very happy to lend to them again, u nfortu nately. to lend to them again, unfortunately. in terms of actually getting the heroine, coming into
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contact with the people that you had no idea that your husband was in any sort of contact with? even though he would tell these people please don't call me, i am trying to recover, every time they would get a new phone they were text him and say, by the way, this is the new number, if you need anything, let me know. he would give me the phone and i would delete the text for him. you discovered all of this and went into firefighting mode? to look after your husband, to try to sort it out. but you didn't tell anybody else, why did you decide to try to manage it on your own. it must have been a huge burden on you? it was an immense burden. but when you go through something fairly traumatic, you have to prioritise what you are going to deal with. but you are not capable of dealing with in your current sphere at the time. when he
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told me, our world dwindled to a very small point and a small focus in terms of the absolute demerit urgent —— most urgent thing to do was get him in recovery, engaging with services. making sure i was at home oh on hand to help him with whatever he needed. beyond that. there was one person i told about it. in my own mind, that point, i knew so very little about addiction. i was not just i was notjust battling with what rob was going through, trying to keep him safe and healthy, but i was also struggling with what i thought addiction was, what i had been brought up to believe it was and my ownjudgments brought up to believe it was and my own judgments about it. the lying, the behaviours and reconciling some of that. i thought, if i am struggling with it, how will my loved ones feel about it? they know
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even less. rob is my husband, my loved one. they do love him as well. it isa loved one. they do love him as well. it is a different kind of relationship. i was trying to sort through the mass of my own mindful that because i needed rob to have a sta ble that because i needed rob to have a stable environment, i just that because i needed rob to have a stable environment, ijust thought the risk was 2— stop if i told them what was going on and the reaction was anything other than, we love you, we are really sorry, i could not deal with it, i could not handle it. i was not ashamed of rob but i was ashamed of the situation we found ourselves in and the debt we we re found ourselves in and the debt we were in and that things had got to this point. i did not know this was happening to someone i was living with. all of that combined meant i could not really speak about it. in society we do not have a very benign, understanding, or
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intelligent view of what addiction is in society. how could anyone else appreciate it when i did not myself? prior to being in that situation what was he like? from the beginning and through that time as well? as you would have gathered, he was incredibly complicated. you had the struggles he was going through. he struggled with depression and addiction. he was open about the depression? he was. he was this incredible man, the most intelligent person i had met. he worked as a science journalist but he was a voracious reader. you would always find him reading, whether it was news or books. he had an insane
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knowledge about nature. it is a thing. you could be walking through a small park, going to a reservoir or woodland, and he would just know what species that tree was or what species that plant was. he would spot birds. he really opened up your knowledge of the environment you we re knowledge of the environment you were in. now we look at things and think, i really wish that rob were around to tell us that. he was incredibly generous and kind. if there were someone incredibly generous and kind. if there were someone stuck in a country who did not know anyone he would find a friend of a friend of a friend who would knows and in that place and connect to say you did not have to have dinner alone. you might wa nt to have to have dinner alone. you might want to have a coffey with them. he had a very big heart. someone who had a very big heart. someone who had so much to give. it must have been so frustrating for you, being
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up been so frustrating for you, being up close and seeing the demons that word tormenting him. his capacity to help others was infinite. his capacity to help himself, narrow, aeons narrow. “— capacity to help himself, narrow, aeons narrow. —— aeons narrow. capacity to help himself, narrow, aeons narrow. “ aeons narrow. when you try to help him through quickly got to a point where you believed he was sober. he said he was sober and you discovered he was not. what happened at that point?” you discovered he was not. what happened at that point? i thought addiction meant when you went into recovery did not touch the drug again, especially feels boustead, i do not think i can do with it if you continue to use drugs. —— if your spouse said. that is not how addiction works it is not as clean cut as that. if someone relapses, it means the journey is a lot more complicated. when he relapsed, he
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relapsed three times before he passed away. each relapse was accompanied by about three weeks of, i don't feel well. honestly, i am fine. i have not relapsed. this insistence that everything was fine with him. eventually the breaking point that i would keep asking the questions over and again. he would say, you are right. it was always punctuated with me feeling like i did not know what to believe. you cannot tell them what to do. you cannot tell them what to do. you cannot force the truth out of them if they are not willing to relinquish it. not even about the relapse, but about the behaviour around the relapse. it is about not feeling confident enough to come forward with the truth. you got to
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the point where you decided there should be a three—month separation? yes. if he gets through six months of recovery, we would try for children. i think he made it as far as about five and a half months. the last few weeks of that he relapsed. there were different circumstances and why that was the case. he was insisting, iam and why that was the case. he was insisting, i am still sober and ready to start trying for a family. when i've figured out he had relapsed, and he confessed, i thought, i cannot really do this. if you were a drug addict continually going through relapse that is thing i could deal with. i could not deal with the lying. the children added an extra dimensional to it. ijust thought, i don't know if we can actually have children. that was a very painful realisation for him as well. being someone who is extremely compassionate and did want to do the
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right thing, i think he realised he could not be the kind of father he wa nted could not be the kind of father he wanted to be because he would... there would always be the risk he would be subjecting them to his addiction or his depression. with the children, i'vejust addiction or his depression. with the children, i've just thought, addiction or his depression. with the children, i'vejust thought, if i continue going down this line with you and you cannot do recovery for yourself because you are scared to lose me, i am going to stop respecting myself in this situation and stop respecting you. i loved him so and stop respecting you. i loved him so much i did not want to get to the point where i did not want the best for him or i did not love him. the idea was he was going to go to new zealand for the period of our separation. at the end of that period we would work out where he was in terms of that recovery and figure out whether or not we could reconcile things. and while he was there you had a particular day where there you had a particular day where
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there was a terrible worry. you had had texts from him. we were text doing. we were in regular contact while he was in new zealand. we did have an exchange. i could not understand the language of what he was saying. it was similar to the language he had used in the past. we should probably talk for one last time. i do not know if i can do this any more. it took on a tone and events unfolded. we could not get hold of him and we could not hear from him. ithought, i bet he will show up and he did not. you talk about the fact he felt a level of responsibility towards him as your husband but the man he loved. you did everything he possibly could to get him through. sadly he took his own life when he was in new zealand.
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how did you learn what had happened? his mother called me. the police found me and his mother called me. that is how i found out. yes. and then i think i booked a flight. those 24 hours were a complete blur andi those 24 hours were a complete blur and i booked a flight and i was pretty much in new zealand in the space of two days, i think. he had written an e—mail in which he had described how painful it was for him to live because of his depression. he said regardless of whether things are going well or badly, and regardless of my absolutely and amazing wife, he clearly found life very difficult. how did you feel when you knew he had written that down, paying tribute to you but bitter— sweet? it sounds really odd about that note. that note through difficult. it was a note to his
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doctor and was just explaining very clearly what was in his mind and how ha rd clearly what was in his mind and how hard he had found it. only about 30% of people leave a suicide note. even then, people that do, that note could be written in a very particularframe of could be written in a very particular frame of mind. could be written in a very particularframe of mind. i think a lot of importance is attributed to it. actually, a lot of people talk to themselves based on what was left behind on someone post back suicide note. it is not necessarily them. it was written by them when they were ina very was written by them when they were in a very particular frame of was written by them when they were in a very particularframe of mind. i don't think people like you and me can necessarily even begin to understand what it must feel to feel like that. when i read his note, it isa like that. when i read his note, it is a weird sense of absolution. i think with suicide, i don't think i know anyone who does not feel like this. whether you are a spouse or a parent, if there is something you
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feel you should have done, anything is better than what the outcome ended up being. that puts so much pressure on any individual, even if you are as close to him as i was, or his parents were. you are not responsible for someone else's live. any more than someone else is responsible for yours. that note an insight into reading him saying something like, i hope that my friends and family would understand that even a day or two feeling like this is utterly unbearable, that they would be able to understand. i think that gives such a startlingly honest insight into how he was feeling. we have this idea that suicide is selfish. it means someone does not care about you. that is not true. he cared about all of us. he loved all of us. other people are
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out there, who have taken their own lives. they have not done it to spite someone. they have people they love and have left behind. it is not about that. being able to understand that liberates you from the idea that liberates you from the idea that you are responsible for them. poorna bell there. now, if you're feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations which offer advice and support, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information — 0800 066 066. now for a news update. police say they've foiled an active terrorist plot after carrying out an armed raid in north—west london. a female suspect was shot during the operation and is in a serious but stable condition in hospital. six people have been arrested. the independent police complaints commission is investigating. it happened hours after a man
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was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament. a study has concluded that a special cancer fund set up to give patients in england access to expensive drugs was a waste of money. the cancer drugs fund ran from 2010 until last year and cost nearly £1.3 billion. the study, by king's college london, says most of the drugs failed to show clinical benefit. the former royal marine alexander blackman — whose murder conviction for killing a taliban fighter in afghanistan was quashed — has been released from prison. sergeant blackman — known as "marine a" — during the case — had his conviction reduced to manslaughter on appeal last month. he has served more than three years of a seven—year sentence. the general election will be a tipping point for education, according to headteachers who warn the stability of the whole system is at risk. a survey by the national assocation of headteachers found that nearly three—quarters of heads say their budget will be
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untenable within two years. it comes as economists predict it would cost £2 billion to freeze school funding in real terms over the next five years. the department for education says school funding is at record levels. that's a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. now for the sport. it was all about the race for the fourth and final champions league spot last night in the manchester derby. the match did not live up to expectation. a moment of madness was the talking point when marouane fellaini were sent off for head—butting sergio aguero. he had already been booked for another foul on the argentine forward. that means city and united stay fourth and fifth in the table. third spot is still possible for arsenal. they have a big north london derby
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against second—place spurs on sunday. anthony joshua against second—place spurs on sunday. anthonyjoshua says he will not be affected by wladimir klitschko's mind games. he says he has made a video prediction but will not reveal what is on it. joshua says he has heard it all before. the first day of the toured of yorkshire. the men's defending champion will be there. more at 11 o'clock. you may remember earlier this year we told you about a new trend for developers to sell new homes as leasehold, rather than freehold, and then sell off the freehold, that's the ground the property is on, to investment companies meaning higher charges for homeowners. one of these charges is ground rent and some home owners have found this charge doubling every few years. they say it's an unfair cost and also makes it difficult for them to sell their properties. now, one of the home builders in our film, taylor wimpey, has set aside a fund of £130 million to help reduce these costs.
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it applies to customers who bought homes between 2007 and 2011, the developer refuses to say how many people are affected. other developers also took part in the practice, and the move by taylor wimpey is being seen as the first recognition by a housebuilder that the practise was wrong. here's a reminder of our film with james longman. luke bought his flat three years ago for £150,000. he'd fallen in love with this victorian building in tunbridge wells. little did he know he had also fallen victim to a growing trend for clauses that hike up ground rent. that's the yearly fee a leaseholder pays to live on a freeholder‘s land. luke thought he'd pay £250 a year, which is roughly what most people pay. but six months after he moved in, he got a bill for £8,000 instead. a small, but important clause had been written into his contract by his freeholder potentially designed to be overlooked by his solicitor. on the face of it, it
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just seems immoral and completely unethical. and you read the contract as much as you... i think i probably read it 50 times. certainly after i realised and it did not matter how many times i read the one paragraph in which this clause is contained, i still can't read it. "the tenant shall be required to pay such annual rent as shall be two thirds less than two thirds of the rentable value of the premises. that was the line. that's the key bit. no idea what that means at all. luke's freeholder is martin payne. he's certainly not the only person to do this but we have been told about at least 20 similar cases where he's involved. he's even been criticised in parliament. one crook, whether it's criminal or not is not for me tojudge, is martin payne. with an e in the end of the pain. luke's solicitor had to pay martin payne £7,000 to remove the clause, but it did not end there. luke was left with a doubling clause, something that has
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become increasingly common in the industry. it states ground rent is £250 a year, backdated to 1990. which does not sound too bad, but it also says that that figure will double every ten years. so by 2020 he'd be paying £2,000 a year, and it keeps doubling. by 2070 he'd be paying £64,000 a year and by the end of the 190 year lease there'd be over £65 million every year to pay in ground rent. in total, over the course of the lease, ground rent would have cost more than £1.3 billion on a flat costing just £150,000. what's your feeling towards martin payne now? it's not great, to be honest. he's caused me quite a lot of stress. i don't deal with him directly because everything goes through my solicitor, but i'm very aware that this clause was inserted
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into the contract when they extended the lease for no other reason than his financial gain. there'd be no reason he needs to do this. look at the wording of the clause. it is clearly constructed to deceive. what we say to all members of the conveyancing association is, make sure that if you are advising client on these clauses, because they can be so tricky, that you run the calculation and that you are entirely sure as to what that calculation is, as to what that calculation is. because when you sit down with that and spend some time looking at it, it becomes clear that this isjust an attempt to dupe people into a very uncomfortable position. what we have seen in a lot of these leases and contracts is this doubling clause. doubling of ground rent. is that something you see a lot of? again, this is a new thing. if you think what doubling the rent every ten years actually means in investment terms, it means that the rent will be going up by 7% a year, a guaranteed 7% return is pretty good in this market.
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and so this is what has created these new investment vehicles that are so interesting to, say, pension funds and other financial investors. people like luke freely entered into these contracts people like luke freely enter into these contracts and it's not unlawful. the allegation is not that martin payne expects people to pay these ridiculous sums, it's that he's banking on solicitors to miss the clauses and pay him to remove them. we asked him for comment. let's talk to joanne darbyshire, who is a leaseholder who bought her
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home from taylor wimpey and then discovered that her ground rent will double regularly. we're alsojoined by sebastian o'kelly from leasehold knowledge partnership, who has been campaigning against leaseholder fees. and sir peter bottomley, a conservative mp and chairman of the cross—party mps' group on leaseholder reform. bringing it up in the commons next week. thank you all forjoining us. taylor wimpey putting aside £130 million, what is the money for? and how significant is it? it's a very good question. if a significant sign of contrition, something went very seriously wrong, here. but what is the money for? with leasehold house owners, we would like to see them using the money to offer the freehold back to the original buyers at the price that was originally offered. u nfortu nately taylor at the price that was originally offered. unfortunately taylor wimpey sold these freeholds off to some of
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the most ha rd—nosed sold these freeholds off to some of the most hard—nosed sharks in the property game. how they get them off them is an open question. with flat owners, there will have to be a deal of variation to reduce the ground rents. i would suggest they reduce it to zero, what is ground rent for? it goes straight into the pockets... t.i.n.a. of the it goes straight into the pockets... t. i. n.a. of the freeholders for it goes straight into the pockets... t.i.n.a. of the freeholders for no service whatsoever. —— straight into the hands of freeholders. joanna, you bought a leasehold flat with a doubling ground red arrangement, when did it become clear to you that the ground rent would double? -- ground rent. it was clear but we always intended to buy the freehold. at the point of sale we were told it would be about £5,000 — £6,000. neither taylor wimpey nor the conveyancing solicitor that they recommended we use informed us that there was freeholds would be sold on to investment companies who would then want thousands and thousands of pounds to buy them. the situation you find yourself in now is what?
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it's more on clear after yesterday but it's fair to say that had we purchased the freehold from taylor wimpey when we bought a house in december 2010, we would have paid them just less than £6,000 for it. our best option now is to use a process called enfranchisement to agree a fair price with the current freeholder. that's likely to be anything in the region from £11,000 - £26,000 anything in the region from £11,000 — £26,000 plus costs. anything in the region from £11,000 - £26,000 plus costs. you know someone - £26,000 plus costs. you know someone who actually tried to sell their house and that sale fell through because of the situation with the ground rents, tell us what happened. that was one of my neighbours, claire. the house sale fell through on the actual day and she had already completed on her new property and the house sale fell through because the purchaser' solicitors identified the doubling ground red claws and advised them to pull out of the sale. sir peter bottomley, it is an issue you are bringing up in the commons. what can
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be done to control what is going on here? first of all, we need to distinguish between the martin payne character and the developers including taylor wimpey. i welcome taylor wimpey doing something about this. the modern painting i will return to some other time, probably in parliament. the pension fund to invest in the freehold companies, the adriatic saw this world, we need to say to them, don't act in a socially irresponsible and corporately irresponsible way, we don't want it. the people who are active in the freehold companies like adriatic ought to say how on earth can we multiply the value of the freeholds we bought at sa 5000 up the freeholds we bought at sa 5000 up to 40000 and then try to in screw ordinary it leasehold is —— up to 5000. the government needs to act. the lawyers need to confess to all the mistakes they have made. and we need to abolish new leasehold and the want of commonhold so none of this can happen either by accident
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or design. it has been a total mess, a swamp. the metaphors fail me. or very people having their life savings ta ken away very people having their life savings taken away by unfair and abusive terms —— it is ordinary people having their life savings. abusive terms —— it is ordinary people having their life savings]! the only way to get everybody to act correctly to legislate? legislation will help to make commonhold better than leasehold. but some of the other abuses, the competition market authority ought to look at some of these terms on a super complaint, perhaps from the consumers association and avoid them because they are abusive. anyone who thinks you can get to a ground rent of tens of thousands of pounds let alone £1 million on a small flat needs to realise that what is being done is so wrong, realise that what is being done is so wrong, whether criminal or not, it should be unenforceable, it is unfair. what would you say to somebody, don't pay the ground rent? no, you've got to bed the ground re nt no, you've got to bed the ground rent otherwise you are evicted. other people around in the leasehold
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fore st other people around in the leasehold forest to mix metaphors again who i'm evicting, trying to evict some of my constituents through other little stratagems. for not paying ground rent? it's too conjugated to explain. it isa park it's too conjugated to explain. it is a park home issue. —— it is too complicated. you don't want to get evicted but you need to say to people come and defend in public what you are doing. taylor with the got involved in public discussion and they have made their decision and they have made their decision andl and they have made their decision and i hope their directors are glad that i intervenes —— taylor wimpey got involved. bell we haven't. a numberof other got involved. bell we haven't. a number of other companies need to do what they are doing. —— . taylor wimpey haven't completely solve the problem. sebastian coe kelly has explained it. sebastian coe kelly and martin boyd together at the charity leasehold knowledge partnership have done more than 650 mp5 and more than 45 governments. it
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isa mp5 and more than 45 governments. it is a nonparty issue and we need to work together to solve it. it is no doubt a subject we will return to. thank you very much. we asked taylor wimpey to come on the programme, they declined. in a statement, the chief executive pete redfern said: "we've listened to the concerns and difficulties that some of our customers have faced as a result of their doubling lease and taken action to put it right. we are sorry for the worry this has caused them." and they go on to say: "we have recently decided that all future sales of taylor wimpey houses on new developments commencing from 1january 2017 will be on a freehold basis — except where we don't own the freehold." our next report contains some graphic descriptions and pictures that you may not want your children to see. december 2014 changed the life of one young teenage boy forever. ahmad nawaz went to school as he did every day with his brother harris in peshawar in pakistan and whilst he was practicing first aid
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with his class friends, the taliban entered his school and murdered 141 people, 132 of which where children including his brother. today, ahmad who now lives in birmingham has started a education campaign to help steer some school children away from a life of violence and radicalisation. our reporter emb hashmi has been to look at his anti—extremism work. it started as a normal school day but it turned into a massacre. taliban gunmen stormed the school. many students are the children of the pakistani military. a normal schoolboy‘s life is changed for ever on the 16th of december 2014. the army public schools in peshawar in pakistan was attacked by the taliban, killing 141 people, 132 of which were children. ahmad is one of the survivors and came to birmingham for treatment. he now uses his experience as a tool to educate students in the uk and deter some from being radicalised. i have no words to
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explain that moment. i really felt upset and shocking, because he lost his brother. he's been brave and courageous. he thinks that the best method to challenge an ideology is through people to be educated. let me introduce myself. my name is ahmad nawaz and i'm 16 years old. ahmed now speaks at a variety of schools up and down the country to help young people steer away from a life of violence and radicalisation. today, he is speaking at rockwood academy, formerly known as park view school in birmingham, that was part of the trojan horse inquiry where it was claimed a group of conservative muslims were taking over a number
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of schools in the city. i'm a victim of terrorism. i have lost my younger brother and 132 friends in an attack on my school in pakistan. it was the 16th of december 2014. an unforgettable day of my life. i have no words to describe the experience through which i went on that day. i have no words to describe the experience through which i went on that day. i was in first aid training with my schoolmates. those happy moments of laughing, joking and talking to my friends did not last for long. a group of men with guns and bombs in their hands entered our school and started firing, one after another. it was the most astonishing moment of my life because i always thought that school is a safe place, not a place where children would be brutally massacred.
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all i could see was blood and killing and soon i realised i was hit by a bullet, too. i was laying on the ground, bleeding heavily. i was surrounded by the dead bodies of my dearest friends with whom i was laughing and talking and joking a few minutes ago. bombing and firing did not stop for long and i thought i could be the next one to be killed. i saw my teacher burned alive but i couldn't help her because my wounds did not let me help her. the terrorists were merciless, they would shoot children until they died. my school uniform was red in blood so i pretended to be dead so the terrorists did not notice i was alive, otherwise they would have shot me until i died. two hours later, the rescuers came and
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threw me into an ambulance full of dead bodies. they brought me to a hospital. this gave me hope that i may survive. in that tragic situation, i had forgotten about my brother, harris. after 15 days, ifound out from my friend that harris was killed. i have decided not to be afraid and step back. i will continue to speak and share mine and my friends' stories, to tell the world that the future generation of this world can only have a better world if they are educated. my survival in that massacre is a miracle. that's why i have started a campaign. i want to continue spreading this great message throughout the world. i want to say this to those students who are inspired by the terrorist ideologies and are running towards different countries like syria and iraq. i'm a victim of those terrorists. they are not the right people and they do not belong to any religion.
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i'm a proud muslim and a humanitarian. i know that islam doesn't teach us about brutality, it teaches about love and peace. in fact, no religion teaches about brutality or killing innocent people. he's a survivor of an attack in his home country of pakistan. donna from the anne frank trust helps ahmad get his message out to schools. he's been in to excess of ten schools just with me. probably at each reception having 400 pupils, seeing him speak every time. so, what did the kids think? he's been brave and courageous as he's able to speak in front of all these people and tell them what he's been through. the people of lockwood learned that you should appreciate your education here because, if you don't appreciate it, you should think about the people of pakistan who don't even get an education. nelson mandela said education is the most
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powerful weapon you can use to change the world. i was a bit fatter at that time. one thing that helps ahmad focus on his education campaign is remembering the happier times with his brother, harris, and how happy he was at school. that's my birthday, my dad was giving me the cake and harris was jealous. the scars of the 16th of december 2014 will live with this family forever. i have no words to explain that moment. still, we are pained. it is a very bad incident and we can't... we want to get off this but we can't. this was specially sent by theresa may's office, 10 downing street.
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but educating ahmad gives them hope. when we can educate them, we can finish the ideology of terrorism. i want this message to be spread throughout the world, as much as i can. i think i have stopped students from being radicalised and going towards these terrorist activities. i am proud of myself, as i did that by going to schools and talking to children. i think this is a great success for me. i dream of peace, safety and education for every child. i dream no child has feel of being killed for learning. i dream every school stays safe. i dream of love, peace and harmony in this world. the general election didn'tjust take the media
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and the public by surprise. it caught politicians unaware, too. so some of them are finding new ways to raise money, by online crowdfunding. there've been plenty of scandals in recent years involving politicians and the people they receive money from, so could this be a new way of funding politics, and reducing the influence of big money? let's talk now to paul hilder, founder of a "political matchmaker" website which lets you fund causes close to your heart that you agree with. and joining us isjohn mills, a more traditional sort of donor, he gave almost £2 million to the labour party. bess mayhew is crowdfunding what she says is a new generation of mps to fight for a more united britain. we arejoined by we are joined by all of them now. how many people are actually getting involved in this way? how much activity are you seeing on your
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sites? we have tens of thousands of people using our site every day to try to find the candidate or party closest to them because you have never had a more volatile moment. dozens of candidates who are either live crowdfunding on the platform now or talking to us about getting their pages up fast. dozens of candidates coming forward. still quite small in terms of the overall picture? still quite small. the election was only called ten days ago. people have been opening their offices. we have 80,000 supporters so offices. we have 80,000 supporters so farand offices. we have 80,000 supporters so far and have raised a huge chunk of money. it puts us to the top three donors in the hole politics in the uk. that is incredible for those 80,000 supporters are going to be selecting candidates we think agree with our values regardless of the party they are from but it is giving people a way to influence politics or do not currently have without
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having to go through a party route. it is about good people getting into parliament regardless of the party they are from. you are a traditional kind of donor. you opened your cheque book and wrote a hefty cheque to the labour party. what do you think about this way of funding? whether it will produce enough extra funds to pay the wake of —— pave the way politics is paid for is a question. last summer i was involved with the campaign in connection with the brexit vote. we raised about 10% of the total funds deployed out of crowdfunding. it is not enough to change the world. when you look at the united states, which is several steps ahead of us, bernie sanders raised $200 million from individual donations. do think it will go that
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way here? orare donations. do think it will go that way here? or are we not used to it and it will take time to change? we are and it will take time to change? we a re less and it will take time to change? we are less used to it than them. i spent time with the bernie campaign. they raised all their money through small donations he could not have been competitive had that not happened. trump raised a greater source of his donations from smaller sources than obama did. we saw the doctor declared against a republican congressman and she raised half $1 million in two weeks. then republican congressmen announced he was standing down. what does this do in terms of empowering people who might not traditionally be going into politics? it is significant. from a more united point of view, we are about people and not parties. we are about people and not parties. we are about people and not parties. we are about getting the best people elected to parliament, regardless of what party they are from. most
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people are turned off by the party syste m people are turned off by the party system and do not want to sign up lock, stock and barrel will stop if you are told a candidate might be a good person to elect a connection they are electing people who agree with their values rather than putting everything behind one party. people are crying out for something to get involved. they need to be given that confidence that they feel comfortable doing so. overall, is it a good thing for politics if it does work? i think it does. there has a lwa ys work? i think it does. there has always been huge controversy about how politics should be funded. there are various different ways. you can have donors and parties funded out of taxation, or you can go for things like crowdfunding. there are disadvantages with all of these. there is a lot of logic in a way about having parties funded partly
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by taxation. there is a huge amount of opposition to this. i'm not sure it will happen. why did you decide to give a large sum of money to a political party? people think, is it for influence, for prestige? what is it? i have been involved with the labour party for years and years. i have been lucky enough to build up a business that has been successful. i thought that was a way to pay back some of the debts built up over the yea rs. some of the debts built up over the years. possibly to gain influence. it was relatively netherlands. a lot of big donors do have benevolent principles. —— of big donors do have benevolent principles. — — benevolence. of big donors do have benevolent principles. —— benevolence. labour is partly funded by its membership, which is good, but also by the unions. the conservative party historically over the past five years has primarily been funded by
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hedge fund is. i think it is possible to make the case that a lot of the existing institutions in politics and the parties are slightly rotting and slightly broken in terms of how they operate. what we are trying to do is to provide an open platform where you can do it in a different way. one thing you can do is nominate anybody you think should have a particular office. if you want them to be your local labourmp, though ukip you want them to be your local labour mp, though ukip mp, or whatever. you can nominate them on our side and start gathering pledges of support for them before they have agreed to be a candidate. what crowdfunding lets you do is replace that big money with little money. my £5 quite your £10, it all adds up together for them if enough £5 quite your £10, it all adds up togetherfor them if enough people do it they can start to make a difference. i agree with that. it does balance things out a bit. that isa very does balance things out a bit. that is a very helpful development. it'll
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be interesting to see where it goes. coming up in around an hour on the bbc news channel... we'll be putting your questions to the ukip leader paul nuttall. you can get in touch via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this or text your questions to 61124 and you can email us as well at askthis@bbc.co.uk. i will see very soon. have a lovely weekend. goodbye. hello. good morning. bank holiday weekend around the corner and it looks like it will be turning a bit warmer today we have lighter winds across the uk. sunshine in eastern areas. more clout developing in the west. there are one or two showers dotting about especially in wales, the west country and western scotland. temperatures look like this. could be as high as 14, 15. a
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decent day to come for the start of the weekend. saturday is the rest of the weekend. saturday is the rest of the next few could have very few showers around at all. temperatures beginning to rise. it will be windy by the time you get to sunday. we will start to see rain in south—west england and south wales although not far away from northern ireland. temperatures 17, maybe even 18 degrees. heading into monday, as the rain pushes its way northwards and eastwards a cross rain pushes its way northwards and eastwards across england and wales it will become light and patchy. we are it will become light and patchy. we a re left it will become light and patchy. we are left with one or two showers. in the sunshine and mitre wins, it should feel quite warm. —— lighter winds. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am.
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police say they've foiled a terrorist plot as six people are arrested after a raid in north—west london in which a woman was shot by officers. the armed entry was necessary due to the nature of our intelligence and it involved officers firing cs gas into the address. the economy slowed sharply in the first three months of the year — official figures show gdp grew by 0.3%. a huge waste of money — a special fund set up to improve access to cancer drugs in england is condemned by researchers. also, ukip's leader is launching his campaign for the general election. paul nuttall will be speaking in the next few minutes — we'll bring you his speech live. and car firm vauxhall is accused by mps of showing a reckless

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