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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 29, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with sally nugent and jon kay. calls for a public inquiry after a rogue breast surgeon is convicted of intentionally wounding his patients. ian paterson was accused of "playing god" by carrying out completely unnecessary operations. lawyers think he could have hundreds — or even thousands — of victims. good morning, it's saturday 29th april. also ahead. negotiating brexit. eu leaders meet in brussels to discuss how to tackle future talks. another north korean missile test. but the us military says the ballistic rocket blew up seconds after take—off. as he marks 100 days in office, donald trump becomes the first us president for more than three decades to address the american gun lobby. no longer will federal agencies be coming after law—abiding gun owners. in sport.
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it's the richest bout in british boxing history. the countdown is on for tonight's world heavyweight showdown, as anthonyjoshua meets former champion wladimir klitschko. and it's one of britain's oldest sports. assigned to fielding that will make her the pride of the school. rah—rah! i've been finding out why stool ball is making a comeback. and sarah has the weather. there will be some sunshine around, but some others will see some rain tomorrow. i will have the full forecast in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. there are growing calls for a public inquiry following the conviction of a breast surgeon who carried out a series of needless operations. ian paterson was found guilty of intentionally wounding his patients at two private hospitals in the west midlands. now solicitors working on the case say the true number of his victims
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could be in the hundreds — or even thousands. simon clemison reports. patients are meant to be able to trust their doctor, but ian paterson practiced at the exact opposite but ian paterson practised at the exact opposite and betrayed his patients on some scale. he told people they were at risk of cancer and operated on them unnecessarily. the breast surgeon worked in private and nhs hospitals in the west midlands, and while staff in the public sector now hold each other to account, lawyers representing some of the victims are today calling for a full, independent enquiry one senior surgeon says there is some way to go. no matter what the quality of surgery is in the private sector, there is much less observation going on and much less recording of detail than there is in the nhs. the private provider where paterson operated, spire healthcare, operated has told the bbc: shirley maroney‘s sister,
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marie, was one of ian paterson's nhs patients. the surgeon originally carried out an incomplete mastectomy, instead of the double mastectomy she'd asked for. she then had a further double mastectomy, which delayed her chemotherapy. my sister was a police officerfor 30 years, she believed in the justice system and she believed in fairness, and quite frankly this wasn't fair, this wasn'tjust what happened to her. marie died in 2008 of secondary cancer in her lungs. it's impossible to know the extent to which ian paterson's failures contributed to her death. the criminal case centred on the treatment of nine other women and one man, but solicitors say there are hundreds of patients now looking for compensation. ian paterson has been told he'll face prison when he's sentenced next month. simon clemison, bbc news. we will be speaking to one of the
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lawyers dealing with those victims injust over lawyers dealing with those victims in just over five minutes about the case. european union leaders are meeting in brussels today to formally agree their negotiating stance for brexit. it is expected the eu will insist the uk must arrange a divorce bill before agreeing any future deals. but how will this play out? we already know the areas the eu wants to sort out swiftly. they also say an agreement on the future uk—eu relationship "can only be concluded once the uk has become a third country" — in other words, once it has officially left the eu. chris morrisjoins us. i hope chris morris joins us. i hope you can make some sense of this. there is an awful lot to go through. essentially, today is about finalising the guidelines with which the other 27 countries will negotiate with us. they have to be turned into a legal document for the negotiating team. one thing that is
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striking is that for now the other 27 countries are surprisingly quite united in the way they are doing this. they want key issues solved to begin with. overall, sorting out the past before the future. it was striking talking to officials yesterday, the growing growing concern about... also, how the divorce settlement plays out will be absolutely key. and you very much indeed. —— thank you very much indeed. theresa may will campaign in scotland today for the first time since calling the general election. the conservatives currently hold one scottish seat at westminster — but opinion polls suggest support for the party in scotland is growing. meanwhile jeremy corbyn will urge
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young people to "claim their future" by voting labour in the election when he speaks in east london later. he will highlight figures that show 2.4 million young voters are missing from the electoral register. north korea has test fired a ballistic missile. according to south korean and american officials, it exploded shortly after take—off. the launch, from an airfield in pukchang, camejust hours after a session at the un security council in which the us pushed for tougher sanctions on the north korean regime. barbara plett—usher reports. after weeks of mounting concern in washington about north korea, the secretary of state arrived at the united nations to make his case. un sanctions aren't working, was the message. there needs to be a new campaign of pressure. and he clarified the stakes. ultimately this is being driven by america's own national security considerations, he said, so it's serious. with each successive detonation and missile test, north korea pushes north—east asia and the world closer to instability and broader conflict. the threat of a north korean nuclear attack on seoul or tokyo is real,
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and it is likely only a matter of time before north korea develops the capability to strike the us mainland. despite un pressure, north korea's been able to accelerate its weapons programme, and shortly after mr tillerson spoke, it fired another missile, although that test seems to have failed. the trump administration is keeping open the threat of military action in case of further provocations. the latest missile test probably won't be enough of a trigger for that, but it may help strengthen international resolve to put the economic squeeze on north korea's determined young leader. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, at the united nations in new york. president trump responded overnight to the missile launch. in a tweet he said "north korea disrespected the wishes of china and its highly respected president when it launched, though unsuccessfully, a missile today.
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bad!" well, last night, donald trump became the first us president in 30 years to address america's powerful gun lobby — the national rifle association. on the eve of his 100th day in office, he told a rally in georgia what his administration had achieved so far — and pledged to protect gun ownership. the eight—year assault on your second amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end. applause you have a true friend and champion in the white house. no longer will federal agencies be coming after law—abiding gun owners. applause a man is due to appear in court, charged with the murder of a former royal navy officer during a car theft in manchester. mike samwell was knocked down as he tried to stop thieves taking his car in chorlton last weekend. ryan gibbons — who's 29 —
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is also accused of burglary. two men and a 15—year—old boy arrested on suspicion of murder have been released on police bail, pending further inquiries. headteachers will today be asked to "vigorously oppose" the expansion of grammar schools in england. school leaders gathering at their annual conference are warning of a "perfect storm" of pressures which could have dire consequences for standards and pupils. the conservatives are planning a fresh wave of grammars, but labour and the lib dems are strongly against them. here's our education correspondent marc ashdown. this tuition centre in kent is popular with parents who hope it will help their children when a place at a local grammar school. a wave of new grammars in england is likely to be a key plank of the conservative manifesto, theresa may feel strongly they can boost social mobility. absolutely the mix and the demographic we have of children coming to any of our centres is not exclusively middle—class at all.
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i think it's aspirational parents, especially in areas where those opportunities are available. but today at their annual conference, head teachers will be asked to vote on a motion to vigorously oppose the expansion of selective schools — it is a policy, they'll be told, for the view at the expense of the many. —— for the few at the expense of the many. grammars might be the hot topic but heads say there are also facing increasing difficulties recruiting and retaining staff. brexit is a source of uncertainty and the debate continues overfunding. it is, heads claim, a perfect storm of pressures. a storm which it's feared will have dire consequences for standards and pupils. we've got new gcses and new a—levels that we can't afford to give them textbooks for, so teachers are constantly having to make up the things they're doing to make sure those students are still successful. the department of education maintains schools have had record levels of investment, but with labour and lib dems
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strongly opposing more grammars, it's likely to be a key policy battle in the run—up to the election. marc ashdown, bbc news. now, you can keep yourfancy sports cars — just look at this for a show—stopping mode of transport. i haven't got one! a british inventor has built an iron man—style suit and taken it for a spin — to the delight of crowds at a design convention in vancouver. richard browning said he's had a huge amount of interest since posting a video of its maiden flight. although here he's only a few feet off the ground for safety reasons, he says it's easily capable of flying at 200mph and at an altitude of a few thousand feet. we have a little more about this from the paper. he also says that maybe in the future flexible lcd screen might make this in turn
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invisible at the touch of a button! iam not invisible at the touch of a button! i am not sure! he says it is unlikely to become a mainstream method of transportation. probably right. coming up we will have mike busheu right. coming up we will have mike bushell looking ahead to the richest boxing match in british history. it is 13 minutes past eight. a man with a "god complex", that's how breast surgeon ian paterson has been described by one former patient. between 1997 and 2011 he told people they were at risk of cancer and carried out unnecessary life—changing operations on patients at two private hospitals in the midlands. yesterday he was found guilty of 17 counts of wounding with intent, relating to nine women and one man. in a moment we'll be speaking to a lawyer for some of the victims. first let's hear what happened to two of them.
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how can somebody do that and say things that he did knowing that you didn't need these operations? how can anybody in their right mind to do that to people? ijust can anybody in their right mind to do that to people? i just find can anybody in their right mind to do that to people? ijust find it unbelievable. how he's made us all suffer, and people as well who have lost their lives. that is pure evil, to me. pure evil. i actually stopped and thought, oh, my god. this is all adding up and making a bit of sense, the difference between the truth and what i was led to believe from 2002
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to 2011 was a pack of lies. for more on this we can speak to emma doughty, head of clinical negligence at slater gordon lawyers. she represents a number of ian paterson's victims. thank you forjoining us. stopped two voices we heard there. two victim stories. you have heard many more. can we get a sense of numbers? some people say potentially hundreds, and some paper suggesting maybe a couple of thousand. have you got any sense of how many people he mistreated? we got any sense of how many people he mistreated ? we certainly got any sense of how many people he mistreated? we certainly know there are hundreds, and potentially thousands. if we think how many people suffer from breast cancer every year and how many years he was practising for, we suspect there may be many more to come forward. can you explain, what was it that he was doing? i know that every case is different. but what was the general strategy he had, the general crime
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he has been convicted of? as you say, he was doing a lot. he was doing unnecessary surgeries in the private sector, he was doing unnecessary lumpectomy operations. for example where an initial assessment would be sufficient. instead of full mistake to me as he was leaving potential cancerous tissue. he was acting of his own accord. and nobody seems to be able to explain why. some people say it was evil, incompetence, but have you got a sense of what this was about for him? having spoken to so many people, one theory is money because obviously there was an incentive for him to do more operations. but a lot of the patients i have spoken to think it might be more to do with
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power. he wanted his patients to come back to him, he wanted to be known as the person to go to when you have these problems. to a certain extent, he wanted people going back to him as often as he could, and some sort of power trip, i suppose. the god complex we have heard referred to, you would agree with that? a lot of my clients have described him in that way. they thought he was god, and they were absolutely shocked and devastated to realise that he was not at all. what about those clients of yours, the victims of his, what do they want to come from this? i think most of them arejust come from this? i think most of them are just relieved that this part of things is over, they have had a small piece ofjustice. of course, we are now looking towards the civil litigation and trying to investigate and find out what how this has happened. how he has been allowed to
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practice in this way for so many yea rs. practice in this way for so many years. they are just keen for a nswe i’s. years. they are just keen for answers. this has been ongoing for so answers. this has been ongoing for so many years. some of our first clients quinto as in 2011, so you can imagine theyjust want this to be over. —— ourfirst can imagine theyjust want this to be over. —— our first clients first came to us in 2011. would a public enquiry be some way of getting a nswers ? enquiry be some way of getting answers? i think so, enquiry be some way of getting answers? ithink so, it enquiry be some way of getting answers? i think so, it has to be. this is on such a huge scale, and certainly the civil litigation, we are acting for victims and trying to make things right for them. but i think, you know, going forward, i think, you know, going forward, i think a full independent enquiry is what is needed to ensure this does not happen again. there have already been enquiries, there has also been a court case. would a public enquiry actually change anything, would it lead to anything that is not already
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in place? well, i think in respect of the private sector health care, a full independent enquiry should be made. i do not want to comment too much on the review which was put forward , much on the review which was put forward, but from my reading of it they certainly did not go back as far as they certainly did not go back as farasi they certainly did not go back as far as i would have expected they would have done. they on the looked at 2007 onwards, but he has been practising in the private sector for a long time before that. so i do think that there's more to be done, and certainly think, i have been shocked at the lack of regulation in the private sector, and they think only a full independent enquiry will bring about the changes needed. do you think ian paterson was a one—off, orders they are the potential that there is anybody else doing this on this kind of scale still out there, in the public or private sector? i could not comment
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on what other people are doing, but i suspect it might happen again, it could happen again. until we know the appropriate checks and balances are in place in the private sector, we would have to be concerned it may happen again. thank you very much indeed forjoining us this morning. spire have given us a statement saying they have carried out an independent enquiry, or one was carried out for them, so they can lend from these events. they have implemented the recommendations from that report. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. we have a bit of a mixed bag through the bank holiday weekend. today will be mixed, with dry weather and sunshine, and a bit of rain on the wafer some of us over the next few days. is the view in devon. the cloud is thinning and breaking,
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allowing sunshine. it will feel a bit warmer than it has done over the last week. it is also turning breezy over the next few days with a chance of rain. but we will not all see it, so of rain. but we will not all see it, so do not write off the bank holiday weekend. it is a weather front approaching today, but the high pressure through europe is the main driving force today. as we head into the afternoon, any of the showers in the afternoon, any of the showers in the west ease off, so it is generally drive. temperatures up to 1617 at four o'clock this afternoon. a light breeze towards the east. a bit of patchy cloud here and there. there could be the odd shower lingering into the afternoon across northern ireland and scotland. but most northern ireland and scotland. but m ost pla ces northern ireland and scotland. but most places fine drive. the southerly breeze will be noticeable in the west as we head into the afternoon. severely breezy but dry, as we head into this evening and overnight. sunday morning, cloud
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increases from the south—west ahead of the weather front living in. breezy as well, with temperatures remaining frost free. during sunday, another largely dry day for the good pa rt another largely dry day for the good part of the uk. back towards the south—west, things turning increasingly wet and windy. if you're camping across the south—west of england and wales, you are in for a damp day. further north and east, 18 degrees, but it will feel windy. here are some blustery conditions as we move into bank holiday monday. there will still be a few showers around on monday, across parts of northern england and further south across england and wales. across scotla nd across england and wales. across scotland and northern ireland it is dry, with temperatures up to around 14 to 16 dry, with temperatures up to around 1a to 16 degrees. all in all, a bit
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of rain during sunday and monday but greater and drier weather in between. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. simon fanshawe as well as. how are you today? i think it is too early to tell! my inner soul is sparkling. what have you got for us? a man got as far as downing street with a bag of knives. it was interesting about this. the first thing, that picture, you may remember years ago, when there was a
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group of people tried to take a load of stuff to gaza, and he was on that ship which got captured and they got taken to turkey and brought back, so there was a whole thing around that. it is arguable that that was the moment he started on this path. but what i thought was interesting about this was the people who tipped off the police that they thought he was about to do something really dangerous was his family. and i think it is often painted that these people are kind of crazy, and all muslims are somehow off on the warpath. but clearly he was a very conscientious family, what is he doing? at this point he's simply a suspect. yes, but he was caught with a bag of knives, we do not know why or what he was doing, but it is
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interesting what set him off on this route, but also the fact his family reported him. after the westminster bridge attack, police are specific about this, saying that if you were concerned about anyone in your family, please let us know. a story here in the mirror, a tory mp who will not be in the election, when he said ina will not be in the election, when he said in a school visit, he was the isle of wight member of parliament, and was asked if he was going to go on the gay pride march. he said he was not, and when asked why, he said he thought homosexuality is wrong and a danger to society. i'm sure there will be people reading this and going, hang on a second, hejust thinks that, why is he not able to say that? there are two reasons people put forward for him not being able to see that. loads of people in the isle of wight are saying that is
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not what i think, that does not represent my views. also, he said it ona represent my views. also, he said it on a school visit. we know that suicides among young lesbian and gay kids is very high, and that is partly because the are very unsure and uncertain and isolated, so to see that to a bunch of kids is clearly dangerous. the third interesting thing was that the conservative party basically said, actually, we do not want you. imagine mac ten or 15 years ago, not about the conservative party, but how things have changed. we do not know exactly what has been happened, to be fair. we know that a tory party insider said he jumped to be fair. we know that a tory party insider said hejumped before he was pushed. it was interesting that it was one of the people in the classroom that put this out on the internet and publicised it. some politicians have to be careful even when they think they are behind closed or is, that teenagers do not
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have the vote, but they have influence. i do not know what other people feel, i am not a defender of hate speech. i think you should be able to say what you want, if you wa nt to able to say what you want, if you want to say something you should say it. but not when you are an mp and speaking to kids, they deserve the extra responsibility. here, bars of gold. yes, facebook, amazon, netflix, google. in the 19th century, i would netflix, google. in the 19th century, iwould be netflix, google. in the 19th century, i would be saying, netflix, google. in the 19th century, iwould be saying, here netflix, google. in the 19th century, i would be saying, here is an extraordinary story, the stock in railways, mining, steel manufacturer. these are the kerney dees and rockefellers of the modern era. “—
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dees and rockefellers of the modern era. —— carnegies. they'd is rumoured to be a tax holiday for assets stored overseas because donald trump was my view is you should bring them back to america. what is interesting is if you offer a holiday for overseas assets, people hold them overseas until you have the holiday, so they will them up have the holiday, so they will them up more and more have the holiday, so they will them up more and more overseas. have the holiday, so they will them up more and more overseas. but what is interesting is the sheer volume of the money, and the other thing is, how are they making it? these people do not make anything. we make the content, we are the steelmakers, they just use the content, we are the steelmakers, theyjust use our content. this is mass surveillance. that is how they make their money. if you listen to people like tim berners—lee, who invented the internet, they are seeing, people be to start to work on the ship of our information, we
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should not be giving it for free to these people. we are in the middle ofa these people. we are in the middle of a revolution, and that is the comment. weird in the middle of a revolution. who knew? see you later. coming up, a tiny geology centre is vying with the mighty tate modern to be museum of the year. the others also in the race. we will have a look at the runners and riders. stay with us, the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with sally nugent and jon kay. coming up before nine, sarah will have the weekend's weather forecast for you. and we will have all the sport ahead of the big fight. but first a summary of this
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morning's main news. there are growing calls for a public inquiry following the conviction of a breast surgeon who carried out a series of needless operations. ian paterson was found guilty of intentionally wounding his patients at two private hospitals in the west midlands. now solicitors working on the case say the true number of his victims could be in the hundreds or even thousands. and that regulation and private health care has to be looked at. and that regulation and private health care has to be looked atlj think health care has to be looked at.|j think there is more to be done and i think, i have been shocked by the lack of regulation in the private sector and i suspect that only a full independent enquiry will bring about the changes that are needed. european union leaders are meeting in brussels today to formally agree their negotiating stance for brexit. president of the european council donald tusk has said the eu won't discuss its future relationship with the uk until it's happy that enough progress has been made on settling past issues. those include the so—called divorce settlement which is the money the eu believes it would still be owed by the uk. north korea has test fired
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a ballistic missile. according to south korean and american officials it exploded shortly after take—off. the launch, from an airfield in pukchang, camejust hours after a special session at the un security council in which the us pushed for tougher sanctions on the pyongyang regime. president trump says north korea's latest missile test disrespects china's wishes. well, last night, donald trump became the first us president in 30 years to address america's powerful gun lobby, the national rifle association. on the eve of his 100th day in office, he told a rally in georgia what his administration had achieved so far and pledged to protect gun ownership. the eight—year assault on your second amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end. applause you have a true friend and champion in the white house.
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no longer will federal agencies be coming after law—abiding gun owners. applause a man is due to appear in court, charged with the murder of a former royal navy officer during a car theft in manchester. mike samwell was knocked down as he tried to stop thieves taking his car in chorlton last weekend. ryan gibbons, who's 29, is also accused of burglary. two men and a 15—year—old boy arrested on suspicion of murder have been released on police bail, pending further inquiries. the "dominance" of big home—building firms must end in order to fix the "broken" housing market, according to a group of mps. the home builders federation says only big firms can spread the risks large—scale projects pose. but the communities and local government committee is calling on the government to do more for smaller builders who don't have the scale to bid for large projects. those are the main stories this morning. there is one big sports store in
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town and mike has the latest on the preparations for the fight tonight. in front of 90,000 fans at wembley with zayn post—war record for boxing at wembley. anthony joshua with zayn post—war record for boxing at wembley. anthonyjoshua and wladimir klitschko have been best of mates all week. —— with a post—war record crowd. they genuinely apt and admiration for each other. but it is admiration for each other. but it is a fight that contrasts, a27 —year—old former bricklayer against one of the legends of the ring, a1, klitschko. when he won his olympic gold medal anthonyjoshua klitschko. when he won his olympic gold medal anthony joshua was just six years old. the countdown is on then for tonight's world heavyweight title fight, as anthonyjoshua, meets former champion wladimir klitshcko at wembley. the fighters weighed in, withjoshua ten pounds heavier than his ukrainian opponent. klitschko weighed in at 17 stone 2 pounds.
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it's his his first fight since losing his belts to britain's tyson fury in 2015. but this is klitschko's 69th professional fight, joshua has had just 18. eye to eye, six foot six apiece, the good fight but one that will have to come up against myself and we'll get it on. i'm ready to go as far as i need to go to get the win. i've shown it before and that's all it is i have got the skill and determination but i'm willing to dig deep. now is the right time, the opportunity is there. opportunities are not come every day, the opportunity is there. i have one of the rising stars in anthonyjoshua, it's perfect. who else would i have fought ifjosh it's perfect. who else would i have fought if josh law it's perfect. who else would i have fought ifjosh law wouldn't be there? nobody. a strange old week for newcastle in which they were promoted
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to the premier league, and raided as part of a fraud investigation, ended with victory. they beat cardiff 2—0 thanks to a brilliant free kick from christian atsu. isaac hayden added the second, as they close in on leaders, brighton, but brighton will still win the title if they beat bristol city today. in the scottish premiership, liam boyce scored all four goals as ross county beat inverness in the highland derby. boyce scored twice from open play and twice from the penalty spot to keep inverness bottom by five points. dan walker is here ahead of football focus and sunderland could be relegated today. good morning. now sunderland could be relegated today. it has been a sorry old season for them and it could come to an end mathematically if hull do what they need to and sunderland got more points. we have an interesting programme today, a lot of healthy stuff to debate. we
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have an interview with james maclean who was a pretty controversial character, he was the guy who refused to wear a poppy on several occasions, chose to play for the republic of ireland rather than northern ireland but he holds his opinions and he is a man of conviction as well. we have already been criticised for even interviewing him on the programme and he has been criticised himself both for the decisions he has made and the opinions he expresses and not just criticism, much and the opinions he expresses and notjust criticism, much worse, as you can see. since you came over here you have a death threats, people wanting a career threatening injuries to happen to you.|j people wanting a career threatening injuries to happen to you. i have a death threats and all that people see me as anti—british. i want to go on record as saying that i've never been anti—british. there are certain things i don't agree with in my beliefs, i've made that very clear in the past, but i'd take the bull at face value. i treat people how they treat me. —— i take people at
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face value for that i have a death threats, they started when i declared for the republic of ireland. it is well worth watching the full 11 minutes. normally our interviews are three or four units with this longer interview and he talks about some of the things he has been through, the death of a good friend of theirs who played for derry city and whatever you think of him, just watch it, and see him describe what he has been through. as well as that we have mark noble who has been west ham captain for so many years, talking about the best players he has played with after a00 appearances at the club. leon brittan swansea, they are also in trouble, he had been giving his team is dvds to try to drum up support. james ward—prowse at southampton talking about the academy, and leon
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osman and the option would be looking at chelsea away at the top of the table and the last north london derby at white hart lane. we don't have any insight into what will happen in line of duty you have adrian dunbar doing premier league predictions. he is a big ask forfun and he will tell you which football managers he has —based superintendent hastings on!|j managers he has —based superintendent hastings on! i can't wait. midday today. he is too powerful for mark lawrenson! midday today. thank you. andy murray is through to the semi—final of the barcelona open after a hard —fought victory against albert ramos—vinolas. the spaniard knocked murray out of the monte carlo masters last week and took the first set here, but the world number one fought back to take the match two sets to one.
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meanwhile, maria sharapova is through to the semi—final of stuttgart‘s wta tournament as she continues her comeback from a doping ban. sharapova saw off estonian qualifier anett kontaveit for her third straight win after 15 months out of the game. sebastian vettel looks determined to increase his lead in the formula 1 drivers‘ championship after topping the timesheets in friday's practice ahead of this weekend's russian grand prix. the ferrari driver was a quarter of a second ahead of his team—mate, kimi raikkonen, and more than half a second ahead of the mercedes of valtteri bottas and championship rival lewis hamilton. final practice gets underway at 10am with qualifying from 1pm. in rugby union's premiership, harlequins beat top of the table wasps. even though their captain, england scrum—half danny care, went off early, with a stomach muscle injury.
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nick evans, who's due to retire at the end of the season, kicked 22 points in his last home game, as quins won 32—13. newcastle beat worcester 16—1a in last night's other match. in the pro 12 a last—minute try from captain grant gilchrist gave edinburgh a 2a—20 win over newport gwent dragons. there were also wins for cardiff and leinster. hull fc have gone top of rugby league's superleague after a convincing victory, over warrington wolves. twenty unanswered second—half points including this try from jamie shaul, helped them to a 3a—10 win. elsewhere st helens beat leigh 28—6. you just can't separate them in the semi—finals, at the world snooker in sheffield. after two sessions it's neck and neck between defending champion mark selby and ding junhui — the man he beat in last year's final. but ding came back from 10—7 down, clearing up with a break of 135 in the last frame, to draw level at 12—12. they'll resume at 2.30pm.
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in the other semi—final, john higgins is 10—6 up against barry hawkins after winning a marathon final frame in yesterday afternoon's session. they start again at ten o'clock this morning. in the week that england's cricketers starve their summer with a one—day international against ireland, the sport that gave the world its first wicket is water into its new season having been played since the 15th century and as i found out, stoolball has been enjoying a resurgence recently. old father time on the clubhouse and the familiar sound of bat on ball in the evening sunshine. but this isn't cricket. this is a sport that dates back even further. and in stoolball, the wicket is up in the air. yeah, cricket in the air because basically when you bowl, the ball leaves the bowler‘s hand, it doesn't touch the ground. your actual batting strip doesn't need to be as well prepared as a cricket strip.
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it's thought the game was originally played in churchyards back in the 15th century by people who just wanted to throw a stone or a ball at a tree stump, another name for which is a stool. trouble is with tree stumps, you can't move them anywhere. so stoolball players then started using church gates, also known as wicket gates, they could be lifted off and played with, and this is where it's believed the word wicket comes from. the sport was flourishing at the turn of last century when keeping your top hat on was an extra challenge for the batsmen and women running between the wickets, which, by now, were solid boards attached to the top of posts. archive: and here it is in progress in the kentish village green. by the 19a05 and ‘50s when there were 3,000 stoolball clubs competing in leagues and schools, the attire was much more suitable for batters and fielders alike. archive: oh, well caught, miss. a fine bit of fielding that
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will make her the pride of the school, rah rah. good luck, shirley. shirley was starting to play back in those days and she still is, now aged 80, as the new season starts for dozens of teams, mostly across the south of the uk, and in birmingham. ijust love having a team that plays, there are balls and bats and you just catch it and, oh, it's a wonderful game. when it first started it was just a case of defending the wicket with your hand but now, luckily, there are these frying pan—type bats. it has so much in common with cricket except there are eight balls per over, not six, and bowling is underarm. but because it's a forerunner of baseball and rounders, the ball is surprisingly small and hard. it so hard, especially when your hands are sort of cold as well. but as you warm up and through the season your hands get used to it. being accessible to beginners and also being one of the country's
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oldest sports, two reasons why stoolball is enjoying a revival. unlucky! if you fancy a go, you can go to the bbc website for details of your local club. so back to the main event and we're in for one of the biggest nights in british boxing history as anthonyjoshua takes on a legend of the ring, wladimir klitschko. but how do these heavyweights stack up against each other? anthonyjoshua is just 27 years old, and klitschko is now a1 so it's being seen as a battle between youth and experience. the british boxer won his olympic gold medal at london 2012, but when klitschko won his in 1996, joshua was just six years old. joshua has had only 18 professional fights but klitchko has experience from 68 contests. but whoever wins they'll both receive an huge pay packet — expected to be £15 million each, meaning this fight could be the richest in uk history. joining us from our london newsroom is the boxing journalist steve bunce. in all youryears,
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in all your years, have you ever known a build—up as friendly and courteous with even one newspaper suggesting these two would elope together? i'm not bothered by the fa ct together? i'm not bothered by the fact they liked each other and that they're friendly, i liked it because i been they're friendly, i liked it because ibeen up they're friendly, i liked it because i been up close to them this week andi i been up close to them this week and i have seen from five and six feet there is enough anger and intensity, you have to be close enough. they have a very clever thing with shaking hands and cuddling and smiling but behind all that, there is an awful lot of anger and hate. as you said, it is a fight of contrasts. is klitschko too old, can he come back after that defeat to tyson fury? we will find out at some point in the first round and the defeat to tyson fury was not because he became an old man overnight, he was 39 then, but tyson
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fury had a brilliant strategy and he beat klitschko in the ring and in the head. klitschko had a bad night and tyson fury had a great night. we will find out this evening at 10:01pm if, at a1, after 28 years of boxing if he has become an older man. an hour ago we heard from kid galahad who man. an hour ago we heard from kid gala had who is man. an hour ago we heard from kid galahad who is a big make a tyson fury saying that he got into klitschko's head and wound him up. canjosh klitschko's head and wound him up. can josh wood do klitschko's head and wound him up. canjosh wood do the same? klitschko's head and wound him up. can josh wood do the same? no and he's not tried it. -- josh yorwerth. ——joshua. -- joshua. i thought he might do, talk about his old age but they said they would not do anything. i was shocked as well because what tyson fury did with the got in his face every second and annoyed him and after six weeks wladimir didn't know if he was coming or going! you have
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seen if he was coming or going! you have seen them up close, trying to get a sense of what makes them tick, who wa nts sense of what makes them tick, who wants more? they will both claim that but i will give it to wladimir because after all of those years, 68 fights, trying to win the title back for the third time that he knows that a defeat puts a bit of an asterix on his fantastic reputation and in ten years we will look back and in ten years we will look back and say that at a1, having not boxed for 18 months, he should be at home with his slippers on and not challenging a27 —year—old kid. with his slippers on and not challenging a27 -year-old kid. that would not be the end of things. not for anthonyjoshua, he is a big star. anthony joshua can lose tonight no problem and leave the ring with his head held high because i think it is a 50—50 fight. a lot of my colleagues disagree. there is no shame in joshua, of my colleagues disagree. there is no shame injoshua, who is a boxing baby, a big baby but a boxing
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novice. it is only his 19th fight. wladimir klitschko can't even remember his 19th fight! he would have to watch it on vhs! we will have to watch it on vhs! we will have to watch it on vhs! we will have to leave it there, thank you for joining have to leave it there, thank you forjoining us and enjoy its tonight. and you can hear live radio commentary of the fight on bbc radio 5 live from 9pm this evening. i'm trying to imagine steve bunce doing stoolball commentary! he could doing stoolball commentary! he could do anything. let's get the weather now. we have a decent day ahead, a little bit of mixed weather in the next couple of days and some rain for some of us but this is how things are looking, this was near twickenham. heading through the remainder of the weekend, things feel warmer than in the past week and it will turn quite breezy at times, particularly in the
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west, and a chance of some rain on sunday and monday. useful rain in parts of the south but we will not all have the wet weather. this front is approaching from the west but before it comes, high pressure is the driving force and today we have a few isolated showers in parts of wales and northern ireland and southern scotland but they can to peter out and die away in the afternoon. most of the cloud should thin and break up and there should be plenty of sunshine for england and wales with some patchy cloud around and temperatures around 16 or 17. a bit warmer than recently. some patchy cloud moving into northern england and northern ireland and scotla nd england and northern ireland and scotland and the odd like passing shower coming from that. but generally at dry day. heading into the evening, the breeze will pick up in the west with some cloud moving in and it will be frost free in the early hours of sunday morning. and
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you'd notice the rain creeping in to the south—west. it could be wet and windy in the south—west and much of wales tomorrow and that area will nudge slowly north—eastwards but quite a lot of eastern england and northern england and scotland and northern ireland get away with a largely dry day, 18 degrees but you have the wind so feeling quite cool on the east coast of scotland for instance. on tobacco on a monday, low— pressure instance. on tobacco on a monday, low—pressure drifting slowly eastwards —— onto bank holiday monday. sunshine and scattered showers on monday, the driest weather in scotland and northern ireland. thank you. we have talked recently about energy bills. there isa recently about energy bills. there is a warning this morning because energy companies are said to be installing so—called smart meters
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which might already need to be replaced. they're aiming to meet a government target to have the device fitted in every home by 2020, but new communication technology may mean they won't work. paul lewis from radio a's money box is in our london studio. what is this all about? the government wants us all to have a smart atrocity and gas meter by the end of 2020 as you said, that is 50 million metres. the companies are busy fitting them now, 6 million have been done and there will be another two or 3 million but i have been told that these are type one meters and with the new standard of type two, comes into use, that will use a new big communications network across the whole country. the type one meters might not work with that communications network. people have been aware of this problem but they we re been aware of this problem but they were hoping they would and the
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company responsible has said twice in the last few days i ask, if all the old meters would have to be replaced, they said yes. it is possible that millions of meters will have to be replaced. why were we even given the wrong ones in the first place? the government was very keen to get this done by 2020 and it was a european union position that we should have a certain standard by then. they wanted to get it done but there were delays with the network, with the design, it had to be referred to gchq for security reasons because of the data was being passed around and it has delayed things so to meet the target and get enough meters in and of homes by 2020, they went with the old standard and are still fitting them. they may not work with this new network, they may have to be replaced, i stress the word may. what has the government said? they did not deny this, they said, " our
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expectation that all these type one meters will be enrolled and work with this new network." the network themselves are saying they are consulting and it is about how this can be done but neither would guarantee that all these old meters woodwork. when i said they would have to be replaced, nobody would deny that. there is a danger they will and that will put up the cost for every meter being fitted and a few million meters will add a few 100 million maybe £1 billion the cost and a technology expert said to me earlier that it may mean the whole thing is not viable. it sounds like that is looming. thank you for that, there is more on that story on money box on radio a from midday.
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museums used to be dusty and dry old places that were not so much about fun but you know now but a lot have become more exciting and accessible and up—to—date. so much has changed. there is now a museum of the year award. centres of sculpture, geology, modern art, and the home of two of the queen's former race horses are all in the running for this year's art fund museum of the year award. so what will clinch the deal and push one of these over the finish line with the judges? our arts correspondent colin paterson has been taking a look at the contenders. talk us through what you have on display. good morning. it is one of the nominees for the award, that is sirjohn, he was an architect who designed the bank of england and he left his entire art collection and this house to the nation and in the last year £7 million as been spent restoring it so it looks exactly like it did when he died in 1837.
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this is a starter, this is a model of the tomb he designed for his wife elizabeth and if it looks familiar, thatis elizabeth and if it looks familiar, that is because if you came the inspiration for the red phone box that we have seen around the country. but as well as here, i have been looking at the other nominees starting with a trip to yorkshire. when the hepworth wakefield was designed, the idea was that the outside of outside the building would be a work of art itself, every bit as much as the exhibits inside. now the gallery has received some serious recognition. it is one of the five nominees competing for the title museum of the year. specialising in the sculpture, it has been rewarded for a year which has seen a 20% rise in visitors, many of them very young. i think actually children are the most open—minded people of all to work with and they end up
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inspiring their families and adults to come back on a regular basis too. and they have certainly been taking it all in. i've seen some very pretty sculptures. they're made of glass and wood material and metal. i have never seen paintings hanging on doors before. another reason the hepworth has been nominated is that its year was enhanced by one very special donation. an old chinese dog, i suppose, from about 2000 bc. 2000 bc? probably, yes. it's just balancing in the corner. just balancing, yes. watch out, gavin, don't knock it off with the camera! an art collection which covers every inch of a north london house. here we have the loo. the toilets! even the toilet has art in it. absolutely packed full of art. again, on both sides of the doors. tim sayer has been collecting art for more than five decades.
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a visit to the hepworth prompted him to donate his entire collection to them. and now the hepworth wakefield is nominated for art fund museum of the year and your donation was in their submission. how does that make you feel? excited, surprised, amazed really. i had no idea we were going to be singled out as a contributory factor. and we're so pleased. when it comes to museum of the year, there are some other very strong runners and riders including the national heritage centre for horseracing in newmarket opened in november by the queen. one of its star exhibits, a racing simulator. it is not believed that her majesty had a go. the tate modern is nominated for a year which saw the opening of a new building, the switch house, increasing its space by 60%. and also up for the prize is the lapworth museum of geology in birmingham, home to a quarter of a million objects.
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onjuly the 5th, only one of the museums will be given a new precious item, the title of museum of the year. that was the duchess of cambridge presenting the price to the winner of last year, the victoria and albert museum. what a collection of nominees, what do you make of them? extraordinary and how can you pick? it is like having five different children and asking which is best. but how do you go about comparing a place where the queen's race are to be taken more than? the wonderful thing about the selection is that each of them offers something for everybody —— each of them offers something for everybody — — the each of them offers something for everybody —— the queen's racehorses. it is about looking at the future and notjust it is about looking at the future and not just the it is about looking at the future and notjust the past it is about looking at the future and not just the past and what these places can offer to the children of
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tomorrow. how do you get children into our galleries and museums? you have to be a good parent and schools had their love of it on the curriculum. and finally, you admitted that you hadn't even heard of two the nominees! this means that its prize is doing itsjob if someone its prize is doing itsjob if someone like you is learning from it. absolutely, i have never been to the geology museum or the horse won but coming here, it is fantastic and soane reminds me of the ikea of his day, these flatpack areas that you would even know where they were. we will be showing you some of them throughout the morning. thank you for the guided tour. coming up, we will be looking through the papers in about 20 minutes just after the headlines. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast,
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with sally nugent and jon kay. calls for a public inquiry after a rogue breast surgeon is convicted of intentionally wounding his patients. ian paterson was accused of "playing god" by carrying out completely unnecessary operations. lawyers think he could have hundreds — or even thousands — of victims.
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