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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 29, 2017 9:00am-10:01am BST

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showing you some of them will be showing you some of them throughout the morning. thank you for the guided tour. coming up, we will be looking through the papers in about 20 minutes just after the headlines. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast, with sally nugent and jon kay. calls for a public inquiry after a rogue breast surgeon is convicted of intentionally wounding his patients. ian paterson was accused of "playing god" by carrying out completely unnecessary operations. lawyers think he could have hundreds — or even thousands — of victims. good morning, it's saturday 29th april.
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also ahead... negotiating brexit. eu leaders meet in brussels to discuss how to tackle future talks. another north korean missile test. but the us military says the ballistic rocket blew up seconds after take off. as he marks 100 days in office, donald trump becomes the first us president for more than three decades to address the american gun lobby. no longer will federal agencies be coming after law—abiding gun owners. in sport, it's the richest bout in british boxing history. the countdown is on for tonight's world heavyweight showdown, as anthonyjoshua meets former champion wladimir klitshcko. and more than a0,000,000 records
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sold. the cranberries will be here to tell us why they have decided to put a new twist on their greatest hits. and sarah has the weather. it isa it is a largely dry day today with some sunshine around, too. some will see some rain tomorrow. i will have the full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. there are growing calls for a public inquiry following the conviction of a breast surgeon who carried out a series of needless operations. ian paterson was found guilty of intentionally wounding his patients at two private hospitals in the west midlands. now solicitors working on the case say the true number of his victims could be in the hundreds — or even thousands. simon clemison reports. patients are meant to be able to trust their doctor, but ian paterson practised at the exact opposite and betrayed his patients on some scale. he told people they were at risk of cancer and operated on them unnecessarily.
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the breast surgeon worked in private and nhs hospitals in the west midlands, and while staff in the public sector now hold each other to account, lawyers representing some of the victims are today calling for a full, independent enquiry into oversite of private sector healthcare. ido i do think there is more to be done. i suspect that only a full independent enquiry will bring about the changes that are needed. the private provider has told the bbc decision... shirley maroney‘s sister, marie, was one of ian paterson's nhs patients.
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the surgeon originally carried out an incomplete mastectomy, instead of the double mastectomy she'd asked for. she then had a further double mastectomy, which delayed her chemotherapy. my sister was a police officerfor 30 years, she believed in the justice system and she believed in fairness, and quite frankly this wasn't fair, this wasn'tjust what happened to her. marie died in 2008 of secondary cancer in her lungs. it's impossible to know the extent to which ian paterson's failures contributed to her death. the criminal case centred on the treatment of nine other women and one man, but solicitors say there are hundreds of patients now looking for compensation. ian paterson has been told he'll face prison when he's sentenced next month. simon clemison, bbc news. european union leaders are meeting in brussels today to formally agree their negotiating stance for brexit. it is expected the eu will insist the uk must arrange a divorce bill before agreeing any future deals. 0ur europe correspondent chris morris is in brussels where the leaders will meet. what's likely to be discussed today, chris? it is really about agreeing on the
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guidelines which they are going to use to negotiate with us. the president donald tusk has just walked in on the red carpet behind us walked in on the red carpet behind us saying we have got to sort out the past before we talk of the future. in other words, a financial settlement, how much the uk owes the eu before it leaves and the issue of guaranteeing rights for eu citizens who live in the uk. both issues, the language in the guidelines we will see today has hardened a bit in the last few weeks since the ist draft was announced. i thing that is interesting around looking around the eu, there are usually fights about everything on this sort of importance, but on this issue, it may not stay like this at the moment, but they are unusually... because i think most governments do not want it to be seen for the uk leaving to be a better thing for the
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uk. they do not want that message to be sent to their own electorates. for now, they are united about saying, look, you have got to come to terms with the fact with you are the ones you want to change the relationship and you have to listen to the terms you are being given. everyone is on their best behaviour. thank you very much indeed, chris. theresa may will campaign in scotland today for the first time since calling the general election. the conservatives currently hold one scottish seat at westminster, but opinion polls suggest support for the party in scotland is growing. meanwhile jeremy corbyn will urge young people to "claim their future" by voting labour in the election when he speaks in east london later. he will highlight figures that show 2.4 million young voters are missing from the electoral register. north korea has test fired a ballistic missile. according to south korean and american officials, tt exploded shortly after take—off. the launch, from an airfield in pukchang, camejust hours after a session at the un security council in which the us pushed for tougher sanctions
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on the north korean regime. barbara plett—usher reports. after weeks of mounting concern in washington about north korea, the secretary of state arrived at the united nations to make his case. un sanctions aren't working, was the message. there needs to be a new campaign of pressure. and he clarified the stakes. ultimately this is being driven by america's own national security considerations, he said, so it's serious. with each successive detonation and missile test, north korea pushes north—east asia and the world closer to instability and broader conflict. the threat of a north korean nuclear attack on seoul or tokyo is real, and it is likely only a matter of time before north korea develops the capability to strike the us mainland. despite un pressure, north korea's been able to accelerate its weapons programme, and shortly after mr tillerson spoke, it fired another missile,
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although that test seems to have failed. the trump administration is keeping open the threat of military action in case of further provocations. the latest missile test probably won't be enough of a trigger for that, but it may help strengthen international resolve to put the economic squeeze on north korea's determined young leader. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, at the united nations in new york. pope francis will lead a mass for egypt's catholics on the second day of his visit to cairo. he's expected to repeat the message of his first day in the egyptian capital when he urged the leaders of all faiths to renounce violence carried out in the name of god. 0ur middle east correspondent 0rla guerin is in cairo. heller, thank you forjoining us on bread. the timing of this is so significant, isn't it? certainly
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there is added poignancy. it isjust 3 weeks after a double bomb attack on charges on the nurse of egypt. —— attack on churches in the north of egypt. but there was no change after the bloodshed. he and the vatican city decided to go ahead. at the mast today in the main part of the visit is underway. very colourful, lots of people crowded into a military stadium on the outskirts of cairo. many waving flags. military helicopters ahead. the pope arrived ina car, helicopters ahead. the pope arrived in a car, no sign of bullet—proof glass, no armoured car, and he has been riding around the stadium in a golf buggy. very much to do with his low— key golf buggy. very much to do with his low—key approach. donald trump became the ist person
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to address the american gun lobby. the age of assaults on your 2nd amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end. applause you have a true friend and champion in the white house. no longer will federal agencies be coming after law—abiding gun owners. applause if traffic jam is if trafficjam is getting you down, here is the solution. you keep this in your bit and you fly over the track traffic. a british inventor has built an iron man—style suit
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and taken it for a spin, to the delight of crowds at a design convention in vancouver. richard browning said he's had a huge amount of interest since posting a video of its maiden flight. it reminds me of the things you see in holiday resorts when people do a jet ski thing. with the tube thing. it is similar. potentially more dangerous. he says it is capable of flying at 200 mph. he even says he has got something he could invent that would cover the suit he is wearing and make him invisible. a p pa re ntly wearing and make him invisible. apparently his boots are snake proof. he has thought of everything. that is very important. the time is 11 10 that is very important. the time is 1110 am. -- 910 am. "people, money and ireland" look set to dominate talks aimed at finalising europe's negotiating guidelines for brexit. it is expected that the eu will refuse to let the uk discuss future negotiations until a divorce bill is arranged. but how will it play out?
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let's talk now to mats persson, who advised former prime minister david cameron with his eu deal last year. he is now the head of international trade at the consultancy firm ernst and young. good morning. we have been live in brussels this morning. we have seen the red carpet for the politicians to walk in. it is all really quite formal, and this is very staged. what is really going on in the negotiations? i think that depends on the summit of the negotiation in question. i think these summits, the meetings which are quite regular, they tend to be relatively friendly. a lot of the hard work is actually done before the summit, before eu leaders get together amongst advisers which are the eu advisers to eu leaders. lots of the work will already have been done. this tends to be, at least sometimes, to be a more formal affair with eu leaders
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around the table signing off what a lot has already been agreed beforehand. with an election coming up beforehand. with an election coming up in this country and france, germany, too, with so much uncertainty across the eu and in the uk, how can these negotiations come with any real meaning? that is the tricky part. it is difficult to see how anything of substance will be able to be negotiated over the next month. you have the french election very soon month. you have the french election very soon and the uk election on june the 8th. i think you can have a bit of negotiation after that, though, but then you have the german election in september. we are looking at a period from september and on the words perhaps for a year to 15 months where a real intent is talk and negotiation will take place
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and lots will be settled. as chris, your correspondent rightly said, is around the 27 eu leaders, not a british leader in the removal. this is the sequencing of the talks. you rightly mentioned this issue around money, how much of the bill should be settled before they can start talking about the future relationship, we have do pay up a certain amount of money before we can talk about that. it is about those definitions and issues that will be spoken about now, but the real issues, the terms of the future relationship, that may wait until early autumn. you helped david cameron negotiate with the eu full stop how tricky can it get? how tense can it be? it can be very tense. eu summit are notorious for late nights, for dragged out
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negotiations and talks, so it can be very intense, can be very energy and time—consuming. the summit today and ido time—consuming. the summit today and i do not think will be like that at all. it is quite a formal affair. as we go into the substantive negotiations that i talked about earlier, this will be intense, this will be a lot of hours and there will be a lot of hours and there will be a lot of hours and there will be lots of noise and the negotiations involved will probably have some of the toughest times in their lives to be honest, in terms of the issues and the challenges ahead. at the end of the day, i think there are incentives on all sides to get some sort of deal between the uk and the eu, so hopefully that is what will happen. mats persson, thank you. we're going to talk weddings and a
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couple of minutes time. we will talk about the spiralling cost. eu negotiations, you have seen nothing yet! the average cost of a wedding is 30 grand?! we will ask what to do to keep the bills down. weddings are not today, weather has got the weather for the weekend. it is looking like a decent day if you are getting married to day. there will be some sunshine breaking through. not wall—to—wall sunshine, some patchy card. today is probably the best day of the bank holiday weekend. although things will feel a little warmer, it will turn quite breezy and some of those macro will see some range rings sunday and monday. but certainly not everywhere. we have got a front which is approaching from the atlantic. that will bring tamara's
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wet weather. 102 isolated showers tomorrow. it will turn quite breezy in the west later on. for eastern parts of the country, there are lighter winds and sunshine. this is for pm this afternoon. it is dry, bright, 16, 17dc, a bubbly alone beat south coast is the best of sunshine. there may be isolated passing showers in northern ireland. similar picture in parts of scotland. some bright spells developing. dry into this evening and overnight. but with the breeze picking up and a bit of cloud moving in from the west, we're looking at no frost with temperatures at 9, 10dc. tamara, rain working in across the south—west of england and wales where it will be quite windy. a brighter picture for the rest of the country. rain clears away and we're
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left with sony spells and a view blustery showers for bank holiday monday. thank you, sarah. it is time to look at the saturday papers. simon fanshawe is here to speak with us. simon fanshawe is here to speak with us. i have picked out the french elections. i see you have the financial times. it is an interesting difference between them and the times. what is really strange about this election is the 2 candidates in the 2nd round and neither from the socialist party narrowly from the other party. so you have got these 2 insurgents. the question is where will the other votes go, because these 2 only got 45% of the boat altogether. votes go, because these 2 only got 4596 of the boat altogether. this is very difficult to predict. what is interesting is the financial times
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from the far left candidate, people are arguing his votes, but marine le pen is making for his votes. that is really interesting because what it illustrates is french politics is no longer this left right divide. there isa longer this left right divide. there is a battle between a globalist and the protectionist. you sorry to when emmanuel macron went to the factory. marine le pen immediately went there and stood on the right lines. he we nt and stood on the right lines. he went down and spoke to the workers. marine le pen said i will get your jobs back, close the borders. he we nt jobs back, close the borders. he went down and said i am not causing the borders, that will harm the economy. i cannot get yourjobs that because i cannot tell a private company what to do. and i do have a strategy to revive the economy. apparently he'd left in complete
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silence after lots of bees.|j apparently he'd left in complete silence after lots of bees. i think it was a white goods factory, and i promise... what he did not do is he could promise to give them theirjob back. that is the challenge he has got, because if he does not reform the economy, which the article is on about. if you'd is not reform the economy, the next election, that is what matters. marine le pen has doubled her boat. both these candidates were aiming for the next time, not this time. but1 of them is going to get it this time! france spends 57% of its gdp on its public spending. that is absolutely huge. they do not have the money to suspend it. —— sustain it. they do not have the money to suspend it. -- sustain it. to the guardian, van. she is the best. she
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will be close to the hearts of people in salford. you will remember her voice, she clearly reflects where she is from. people are asking her to where she is from. people are asking herto drop where she is from. people are asking her to drop the accent. she has acts. we are from the north, we can read. she's fantastic. here is a really heart—warming story. well, it isa hard really heart—warming story. well, it is a hard story. this man is called tokyo myers. do remember when philip lawrence, the man in the picture, do remember he was stabbed and a man was convicted for his murder? well, this boy, tokyo, was practising music when he was 11 years old as that was happening, and his music teacher came and grabbed him, picked
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him up, shielded his face as the murder was taking place and the headmaster staggered into the atrium of the school. he told tokyo to go home. he is on britain has got tale nt home. he is on britain has got talent night, and he is arguing that the teacher, of music, is what saved him, put him on the right path. good look to him, tonight. he has not seen look to him, tonight. he has not seen the teachers for a long time. i would find the teacher, wouldn't you? there have been brilliant it is it's supposed to be on it e of the best days of your life, but does your wedding need to be the most expensive? the lifestyle magazine, country life, says the pressure of social media has turned getting married into the "equivalent of an arms race" as couples try and out—spend and out do each other.
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but is this an overreaction? we asked some of you what you thought. you spend money on the 1 time in your lifetime and you to mean something. they do it'sjust to show off. it is just something. they do it'sjust to show off. it isjust really close. ridiculous. people want to do nice stuff, don't they, and celebrate that special day in an amazing way. people feel they have to do have lots of different things and add—ons that are expensive and is more important than the actual ceremony and why they are getting married in the 1st place. save your money and spend it on something else. it is only! spend it on something else. it is only 1 day. we'rejoined now by sharn khaira, a wedding planner and blogger, and julia braime, editor
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of brides up north blog and unveiled magazine, along with natalie, who is getting married today. morning, natalie. this is natalie, who where somebody to talk to. natalie is getting married today. how are the nerves? absolutely fine. i have all the bridesmaids, phones out, so it is absolutely fine. how many bridesmaids have you got? i've got four bridesmaids. add a all adults? how did you choose? all adults. they arejust adults? how did you choose? all adults. they are just my closest friends from all different groups. what sort of wedding do expect to have today? would you say you have been careful with the budget? looking at the gorgeous dressings hanging up behind you, it looks to me like you have done some very
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careful shopping. yeah, i think we initially had a budget. i cannot tell you exactly how much we spend. i don't know. we have had a long engagement. 0ver i don't know. we have had a long engagement. over the time, we bought it and bobs. you have to shop around. we were very careful choosing and in terms of the bridesmaids dresses, we were good to look at the high street shops and things like that. sounds like you have been pretty careful, but lots of people cannot resist the spending. we will talk to you again ina spending. we will talk to you again in a moment. i have been astounded by the figures. around £30,000 is around the average now! how can it cost that much money. there is a lot to do. it does not have to cost that much. you have to do work within your own budget, and that is something we really encourage our
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people to do. do not overspend on your wedding day, but do try within your wedding day, but do try within your budget to choose the best quality suppliers. if the dress is really important to you, spend on that. i would always say... 0r really important to you, spend on that. i would always say... or the suit! of that. i would always say... or the suit! 0fa that. i would always say... or the suit! of a really good photographer. get the best quality images for your day. spend your priorities. choose wisely. what are the basics? what are the things you really need? forget the extravagances.” are the things you really need? forget the extravagances. i would say catering and the venue are really, really important. normally couples we see are not willing to compromise on that. sometimes what you will see in the asian wedding market is the catering side is the most important aspect to them, but in terms of other things, they will fall back on the outfits, photography and the other elements. when i say the basics,, you need to
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buy a licence, you need to pay someone buy a licence, you need to pay someone to buy a licence, you need to pay someone to marry buy a licence, you need to pay someone to marry you. you need a marriage license, you need to be in a building licensed for weddings. marriage license, you need to be in a building licensed for weddingsm thatis a building licensed for weddingsm that is how much? i think about £500. could you do it for less than £1000? absolutely. we have people on our blog that spend near that. they are celebrating the fact that they have been able to put together a fabulous wedding on a budget. consciously, some people able to invite their family and have a really good day. people getting in touch have said they have put the money into the honeymoon for the long—term memories rather than just one day. ashley said she got herjob for £450 , one day. ashley said she got herjob for £450, everything was second—hand, hired the suits, and they used friends to make the cake, they used friends to make the cake, the flowers and drove her friend's
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are. you can do it. of course. there are. you can do it. of course. there are always ways to save money. are you guys to blame? it is in your interest to bump up the prices.|j would say no. what we do via our media products is we give them a choice. we let them see the whole gamut from a really nicely done budget wedding to the biggest weddings. we never push anything, we never say this is the right way to do it. neither do our suppliers. people will always work within bride's budget. the supplies i meet with would never add extra money because it is a wedding. i think it isa because it is a wedding. i think it is a really honest and lovely industry and i think brides can be confident on their wedding day. sorry, ladies, but there is one important lady we have to go back
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to. natalie, ido important lady we have to go back to. natalie, i do not know if you heard all of that, but we were talking about that you do not have too spend lots of money. you said thatis too spend lots of money. you said that is something you have been good with. we also spoke to luke and hour ago. 0k! with. we also spoke to luke and hour ago. ok! i don't know if you manage to catch it, but he was looking quite nervous! he's looking much more nervous than you, natalie!|j have more nervous than you, natalie!” have had lots of people to help me this morning, so i am problem at an advantage. he did have a message for you. we wanted to know what he wa nted you. we wanted to know what he wanted to pass on and what special message we could give you. he said, please don't be late!” message we could give you. he said, please don't be late! i am only next—door, so... please don't be late! i am only next-door, so... before you go, can we say hello to the bridesmaids? bring them in. hello! good look,
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everybody expire... you look absolutely brilliant. relax and enjoy it. thank you very much indeed. all the best to you. if you are getting married today, whoever you are, have a fantastic day. worry about the budget tomorrow. this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when michel rouxjunior takes over in the saturday kitchen. michel, what's on the menu for us? good morning. 0ur good morning. our special guest today can say what she wants. so, say what you want for food heaven. my say what you want for food heaven. my heaven would be lennon sole. and your help? scarlets. tried hard can't do it. two chefs here. welcome
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to the studio. what is on your menu? cotswold la m b to the studio. what is on your menu? cotswold lamb with asparagus. you are not keen on lamb, are you? and welcome back. what is cooking? where doing something very different today. we will make a spiced gerrit so today. we will make a spiced gerrit so dish with chile in it. and some spicy tomato mayonnaise. and our wine expert is jane. and our wine expert isjane.” and our wine expert is jane. i have something for everybody, we have it all. and all european? they are. we will see you at ten o'clock. judy has been in touch, she is winning on the cheap wedding front, the whole thing for under £100! strangers as witnesses and they have been married for 20 years! even with inflation they are still doing well! it might
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be about 15 grand now! coming up here... she had the most distinctive voices the 905 and now the cramp is here to tell us why they decide to rework some of the most popular hits. —— the cramp reuse. hello this is breakfast, with sally nugent and jon kay. coming up before 10am, sarah has the weather. michael will have the sport. but first a summary of this
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morning's main news. there are growing calls for a public inquiry following the conviction of a breast surgeon who carried out a series of needless operations. ian paterson was found guilty of intentionally wounding his patients at two private hospitals in the west midlands. now solicitors working on the case say the true number of his victims could be in the hundreds or even thousands and that regulation of private health care has to be looked at. i do think there is more to be done and i think, i have been shocked by the lack of regulation in the private sector and i suspect that only a full, independent enquiry will bring about the changes that are needed. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has called on the eu to keep the united front in the eu to keep the united front in the face of brexit negotiations. they are meeting at a special summit in brussels to discuss the para meters in brussels to discuss the parameters that will form the basis of discussions of the uk leaving the
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eu. it also includes the so—called divorce settlement which is the money that the eu believes it would be owed by britain. we need to remain united as indefinite macro 27. it is only then that we will be able to conclude the negotiations which means that our unity is also in the uk's interests. north korea has test fired a ballistic missile. according to south korean and american officials it exploded shortly after take—off. the launch, from an airfield in pukchang, camejust hours after a special session at the un security council in which the us pushed for tougher sanctions on the pyongyang regime. president trump says north korea's latest missile test disrespects china's wishes. well, last night, donald trump became the first us president in 30 years to address america's powerful gun lobby, the national rifle association. 0n the eve of his 100th day in office, he told a rally in georgia what his administration
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had achieved so far and pledged to protect gun ownership. the eight—year assault on your second amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end. applause you have a true friend and champion in the white house. no longer will federal agencies be coming after law—abiding gun owners. headteachers will today be asked to "vigorously oppose" the expansion of grammar schools in england. school leaders gathering at their annual conference are warning of a "perfect storm" of pressures which could have dire consequences for standards and pupils. the conservatives are planning a fresh wave of grammars, but labour and the lib dems are strongly against them. those are the main stories this morning. it is just after half past nine and
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mike now at the sport and it is all about the boxing. this is my reach! we could give them a run for their money! sally must have good reach as well. there is so little to choose between them and that is what makes it so interesting. apart from the age, anthonyjoshua is 27, wladimir klitschko is 41. only one inch in terms of reach between them, 81 against 82, pretty much equal r , against 82, pretty much equal weaponry, it is a case of who wins the mind games and the chess match we we re the mind games and the chess match we were talking about earlier. and it has all been so simple now. rather unlike most boxing vesteinn hafstei nsson rather unlike most boxing vesteinn hafsteinsson ‘s rather unlike most boxing vesteinn hafsteinsson '5 do they have been best mate —— boxing press conferences. the countdown is on then for tonight's world heavyweight title fight, as anthonyjoshua, meets former champion wladimir klitshcko at wembley. the fighters weighed in, withjoshua ten pounds heavier than his ukrainian opponent.
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klitschko weighed in at 17 stone 2 pounds. it's his his first fight since losing his belts to britain's tyson fury in 2015. but this is klitschko's 69th professional fight, joshua has had just 18. eye to eye, six foot six apiece, a good fighter but one that will have to come up against myself and we'll get it on. i'm ready to go as far as i need to go to get the win. i've shown it before and that's all it is. i have got the skill and determination but i'm willing to dig deep. now is the right time, the opportunity is there. opportunities are not coming every day, the opportunity is there. i have one of the rising stars in anthonyjoshua, it's perfect. who else would i have fought ifjoshua wouldn't be there? nobody. sorry to interrupt him! this is the
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size of his left fist, the actual size. it is as big as your head! you can size. it is as big as your head! you ca n follow size. it is as big as your head! you can follow that fight on bbc radio 5 live with commentary and build up from 90. and it is also on the app —— from 9pm. a strange old week for newcastle in which they were promoted to the premier league, and raided as part of a fraud investigation, ended with victory. they beat cardiff 2—0 thanks to a brilliant free kick from christian atsu. isaac hayden added the second, as they close in on leaders, brighton, but brighton will still win the title if they beat bristol city today. in the scottish premiership, liam boyce scored all four goals as ross county beat inverness in the highland derby. boyce scored twice from open play and twice from the penalty spot to keep inverness bottom by five points. less than a week after being beaten in the scottish cup semi—final by their biggest rivals, rangers today have the chance
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to gain some revenge in the league. celtic have already won the title and beat their glasgow neighbours 2—0 at hampden park last sunday. the midday kick off at ibrox will see rangers try to inflict celtic‘s first domestic defeat of the season. in the premier league, it could be a sad afternoon for sunderland who take on bournemouth at the stadium of light. david moyes‘ side can be relegated if they fail to at least match hull city's result at southampton. we need a really really good run of results now for things to go our way but while there's a chance, we're not going to admit to anything else. we've got to try and win. we have done and said it in every other game, that we have to try and win, and we've not done so. what i would say about this one, it's at home, we've got a great chance, we've played quite well in the recent games so we'll take that into the game and hope we get a result from it. andy murray is through to the semi—final of the barcelona 0pen after a hard —fought victory against albert ramos—vinolas. the spaniard knocked murray out of the monte carlo masters last week and took the first set here, but the world number one fought back
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to take the match two sets to one. meanwhile, maria sharapova is through to the semi—final of stuttgart‘s wta tournament as she continues her comeback from a doping ban. sharapova saw off estonian qualifier anett kontaveit for her third straight win after 15 months out of the game. excuse me! sebastian vettel looks determined to increase his lead in the formula 1 drivers‘ championship after topping the timesheets in friday's practice ahead of this weekend's russian grand prix. the ferrari driver was a quarter of a second ahead of his team—mate, kimi raikkonen, and more than half a second ahead of the mercedes of valtteri bottas and championship rival lewis hamilton. final practice gets underway at 10am with qualifying from 1pm. the first stage of the tour de yorkshire was marred by a big crash within sight of the finish
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line in scarborough. danish rider magnus cort nielsen fell with less than 200 yards to go. the crash brought down several other riders, including briton tao geoghgan hart, who's in his first season as a professional rider with team sky. dutchman dylan groenewegen won the stage and all those caught up in the crash will be given the same time. team sky's elia viviani has won stage three of the tour de romandie in switzerland. the italian was guided to the sprint finish by team leader chris froome. the briton remains 29 seconds off the overall lead. in rugby union's premiership, harlequins beat top of the table wasps, even though their captain, england scrum—half danny care, went off early with a stomach muscle injury. nick evans, who's due to retire at the end of the season, kicked 22 points in his last home game as quins won 32—13. newcastle beat worcester 16—14 in last night's other match. in the pro12, a last—minute try
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from captain grant gilchrist gave edinburgh a 24—20 win over newport gwent dragons. there were also wins for cardiff and leinster. edinburgh a 24—20 win over newport gwent dragons. there were also wins for cardiff and leinster. hull fc have gone top of rugby league's super league after a convincing victory over warrington wolves. twenty unanswered second—half points, including this try from jamie shaul, helped them to a 34—10 win. elsewhere st helens beat leigh 28—6. you just can't separate them in the semi—finals, at the world snooker in sheffield. after two sessions it's neck and neck between defending champion mark selby and ding junhui, the man he beat in last year's final. ding came back from 10—7 down, clearing up with a break of 135 in the last frame, to draw level at 12—12. they'll resume at 2.30pm. in the other semi—final, john higgins is 10—6 up against barry hawkins after winning a marathon final frame in yesterday
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afternoon's session. they start again at ten o'clock this morning. and you can follow that on the bbc, on tv and the website. the match between ding junhui and selby was incredible, both coming back, i wouldn't like to call it. it might be like the boxing match tonight! well done for keeping going. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. the number of victims of breast surgeon ian paterson could run into hundreds — or even thousands — according to solicitors. he was convicted yesterday of carrying out needless operations. north korea has launched another ballistic missile, hours after washington called for a tougher international approach towards the communist state. for the last time, sarah has the
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bank holiday weather. it is looking good for many of us, this picture was taken in newquay. and many parts of the country will have similar scenes to this through the day with some cloud suddenly but most the day with some cloud suddenly but m ost pla ces the day with some cloud suddenly but most places looking dried. through the weekend it is feeling warmer than for the past week but breezy conditions and a chance of rain at times on sunday and monday but not for all of us. high—pressure holding onto the weather today with this front in the atlantic heading our way over sunday but for much of the country dry with sunny spells, a few isolated showers in wales, north—west england, southern scotland, but either side of that band of cloudy conditions some decent sunshine. this afternoon, dry and bright in the southern england with sunny spells in wales and
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perhaps an isolated shower or two and temperatures around 16 or 17 degrees. heading northwards, a similar picture, breezy in northern ireland later and temperatures around 12 or 13 with the chance of an isolated shower in central scotland. into this evening and overnight, it stays dry and clear and decent evening in store, the wind will pick and the cloud increases from the west but a frost free start to sunday with temperatures around nine or ten first thing. the rain comes into the south—west and on sunday it will turn pretty wet and windy across south—west england and wales. it will creep north—eastwards across the country, perhaps reaching northern ireland and the london region by mid—afternoon but further north and east it will remain dry and reasonably warm away from the east coast but pretty windy on sunday. and the low pressure pushes
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eastwards, petering out a bit heading into a bank holiday monday but we still have some showers around that area of low pressure. a day of sunshine and showers across the southern half of the country, brighter and drier further north and the temperatures are not too bad, about the mid—teens. thank you, that does not sound bad at all. if it is raining you might fa ncy at all. if it is raining you might fancy a trip to the museum. we are about to discover what is the museum of the year. centres of sculpture, geology, modern art, and the home of two of the queen's former racehorses are all in the running for this year's art fund museum of the year award. so what will clinch the deal and push one of these over the finish line with the judges? 0ur arts correspondent, colin paterson, is at the sirjohn soane's museum for us this morning. that looks fairly traditional. this is traditional, we have moved into the picture room and they have spent
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£7 million making it look exactly as it did when sirjohn died in 1837. this is all about tradition. there isa this is all about tradition. there is a lot the paintings, how many? 0ver is a lot the paintings, how many? over 110. and how were they stored? he called them movable planes. this is the trick, it is pulled back and there are more on the other side! we will show you the big deal in a minute as to what is behind that panel but i had also been looking at the other nominees starting in yorkshire. when the hepworth wakefield was designed, the idea was that the outside of outside the building would be a work of art itself, every bit as much as the exhibits inside. now the gallery has received some serious recognition. it is one of the five nominees competing for the title museum of the year.
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specialising in the sculpture, it has been rewarded for a year which has seen a 20% rise in visitors, many of them very young. i think actually children are the most open—minded people of all to work with and they end up inspiring their families and adults to come back on a regular basis too. and they have certainly been taking it all in. i've seen some very pretty sculptures. they're made of glass and wood, material and metal. i have never seen paintings hanging on doors before. another reason the hepworth has been nominated is that its year was enhanced by one very special donation. an old chinese dog, i suppose, from about 2000 bc. 2000 bc? probably, yes. it's just balancing in the corner. just balancing, yes. watch out, gavin, don't knock it off with the camera! an art collection which covers every
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inch of a north london house. here we have the loo. the toilets! even the toilet has art in it. absolutely packed full of art. again, on both sides of the doors. tim sayer has been collecting art for more than five decades. a visit to the hepworth prompted him to donate his entire collection to them. and now the hepworth wakefield is nominated for art fund museum of the year and your donation was in their submission. how does that make you feel? excited, surprised, amazed really. i had no idea we were going to be singled out as a contributory factor. and we're so pleased. when it comes to museum of the year, there are some other very strong runners and riders including the national heritage centre for horseracing in newmarket opened in november by the queen. one of its star exhibits, a racing simulator. it is not believed that her majesty had a go. the tate modern is nominated for a year which saw
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the opening of a new building, the switch house, increasing its space by 60%. and also up for the prize is the lapworth museum of geology in birmingham, home to a quarter of a million objects. 0njuly the 5th, only one of the museums will be given a new precious item, the title of museum of the year. the duchess of cambridge presenting the award lasted to the victoria and albert museum. we are ready for the big reveal here, this is how the paintings are displayed here and look at this! we can see a nymph and below him, the bank of england model, one of sirjohn's most famous designs. helen is from the museum
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and you have a remarkable title bestowed upon you. it is the inspector. you often try to jazz up museums but this is doing the opposite. absolutely, it is authentic through and through and it speaks for itself. sirjohn's vision is strong enough without labels. he died in 18305 and left it to the nation and we heard about tim sayer, a modern—day example of leaving a collection. how common is it for somebody to do that? not very common at all but sirjohn did it because he wanted his collection to inspire future generations of architects and painters and sculptors and he left it for amateurs and student so for everybody, for free. we have been talking a lot about the boxing. museum of the year, you're taking on
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heavyweight, the tate modern. how can someone heavyweight, the tate modern. how can someone like sirjohn soane's museum take on the tate modern? we are going to be true to ourselves, we think the vision is strong enough and we have achieved so much and for and we have achieved so much and for a tiny place it is amazing, the whole collection is available online, there is an interactive way to experience the museum. 150 volu nteers to experience the museum. 150 volunteers being trained him and masses of lost interior is restored. and £100,000 prize, that could be yours. we will leave you and have a quick look into the recess. it all opened at 10am if you want to come down. come and have a look yourself. we wa nt we want to stay with you for longer and see what we discover! it is fantastic, thank you. it is beautiful. an american dating show might not be the most likely place to bring a celtic rock band back together again, but that's exactly what happened
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to the cranberries two years ago. now they are back with a new album and a stripped back sound. something else combines a re—versioning of some of their best known hits alongside several brand new tracks. lead singer dolores 0'riordan and guitarist noel hogan are here but before we talk to them let's take a listen to their album. # in your head, in your head # zombie, zombie, zombie # what's in your head, in your head # zombie, zombie, zombie # and through my dreams # and through my dreams #itis # and through my dreams # it is never quite as it seems # it is never quite as it seems # your own dream to me, dream to me
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# your own dream to me, dream to me # your own dream to me, dream to me # you know i'm such a fool for you # you know i'm such a fool for you # you've got me wrapped around your finger #do finger # do you have to let it linger # do you have to let it linger #do # do you have to let it linger # do you have to let it linger # do you have to let it linger # do you have to, do you have to let it linger # i thought the world of you #. 0ur lovely to see you here. our lovely to see you here. thank you for having us. we started by saying an american dating show. the bachelorette! they asked if we would doa bachelorette! they asked if we would do a performance of linger in their grand finale and we said we would and we recorded it with a quartet and we recorded it with a quartet and it sounded so nice we decided to do an album with the quartet. and you had not done any work together in the meantime? nothing? no, the la st in the meantime? nothing? no, the last thing we did was in 2012. we
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had taken a five—year hiatus at that stage. we were meant to go back on the road. where you still in touch in that time? not really. we don't really hang out with each other because we sick of looking at each other! is it a bit like a marriage! you are back together and did it just all click into place in that performance? we clicked back into it very quickly, it is like second nature because we were so young when we began. you were 17. just turning 18 at the time. we came from school straight into it. it was really the only proper fulljob we have had. before the five year break we had takena before the five year break we had taken a seven—year break. we found it was quite easy to go away from
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it. you know it's not the end and you can come back to it and that is what we do. after an hour of being ina room what we do. after an hour of being in a room together, it fits back together. it is always there? always is and it has been there for ever. things come and go in life but the band has always been there since we we re band has always been there since we were young, something solid we can a lwa ys were young, something solid we can always go back to. and how rewarding was it to go back to the music that we all recognise, those incredible hits you had? reworking them, you said you preferred the new versions? it was kind of like a rebirth of something it gave them a new life. they were nice, the original recordings, but they are more stripped back and raw and it shows a good song is a good song if you can do it acoustically. this was 1993, let's have a linger. that's michael asano listen. #do
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# do you have to let it linger # do you have to let it linger # i thought the world of you #. i was going through my tea cosy period! my mother took it back and put it on the teapot! you talk about getting back together and it feeling right but dipping in and out of the cranberries but are you back together for good now or will there be more gaps? we hope not to have too many gaps because we are getting older! it has been such a long time since we did anything. the only thing is health permitting we would like to talk a lot in the next 12 months and bring out a new album of new material for our fans. we want to get down to writing and we tend
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to get down to writing and we tend to write a lot more on the road as null as more time because he had little kids —— noel. null as more time because he had little kids -- noel. when we focus on this, we really focus on it and we put everything into it. and the schedule starts to get busy. we have always found it easier to write when we are away because we had the success so early, we were never at home after the first album, we will always gone. it is a natural way to do it for us. the impact your health? you said you had to watch your health, was it tough physically? i have had health issues a lot in the last few years but one of the worst things was i had a disc problem in my back and i stopped playing guitar and i was so depressed about that. but my guitar was really heavy, and i have been wearing them and jumping around with it hanging off your neck and then posture problems and the spine and i had to stop playing. it is great to
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have you back, thank you for coming the cranberries new album is called something else. ben and i will be back tomorrow morning at 6am. until then, have a lovely weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 10. european union leaders meet in brussels to agree joint guidelines for for brexit negotiations. before discussing the future, we have two sort out... north korea test—fires another ballistic missile. donald trump says it shows "disrespect" to china. theresa may will campaign in scotland today for the first time since calling the general election. solicitors representing patients of breast surgeon ian paterson say many more women will seek compensation. also in the next hour, the heavyweights head for wembley. around 90,000 people will pack into the stadium tonight as anthonyjoshua faces wladimir klitschko in the richest bout in british boxing history. keeping cool at gunpoint.
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the cashier who didn't bat an eyelid when confronted by an armed robber.

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