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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 30, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc world news. our top stories: get out of the way, trump! tens of thousands protest in us cities over climate change. much of their anger is directed at president trump, who's marking his first 100 days in office. european leaders take just four minutes to unanimously approve a negotiation strategy for britain's withdrawal from the eu. translation: at the end of the day, it was much easier to keep all of them united than i expected, and today, it was also a very strong mandate. pope francis calls for international mediation to ease tensions between the us and north korea, saying the situation has become "too hot." and triumph for british heavyweight, anthonyjoshua, who's beaten veteran ukrainian wladimir klitschko to claim the vacant wba title. hello, and welcome to bbc news.
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it's seen as a vital marker for all us presidents, 100 days in office. and as donald trump reaches that milestone, tens of thousands of protesters are rallying in several us cities. this is washington, where one of those protests is taking place. demonstrators made their way towards the white house holding banners and voicing their concerns over his policies on the environment. donald trump has previously called climate change a hoax. here are the thoughts of some of those attending this protest. iam from i am from upstate new york. i am
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here because this is the most important issue we have today, to ta ke important issue we have today, to take care of this earth we depend on for everything. if we don't take ca re of for everything. if we don't take care of it, we don't have anything. i want the next generations, the future generations, to be able to live on this planet without being contaminated by governments and corporations. in defence of our environment, for the climate, because we need to do it, and we believe it. well, we're expecting president trump to speak in the next half hour or so. it will be from a rally for his supporters in harrisburg, which is the state capital of pennsylvania. that is a long way from washington. here is what some of those waiting for him to arrive had to say the fa ct for him to arrive had to say the fact is he got in there and is doing what he is supposed to do. especially yesterday in his speech from the nra, it was very important
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to me. i am from the nra, it was very important to me. lama from the nra, it was very important to me. i am a huge from the nra, it was very important to me. lam a huge reagan from the nra, it was very important to me. i am a huge reagan supporter. for him to do that, right up my alley. also there is our correspondent, laura bicker. interesting that the president is in pennsylvania on the 100th day of his presidency, just explain why that's significant. pennsylvania was a crucial swing state. it was a state that helped him win the white house. he turned it into a republican state. when you hear people standing in line waiting to hear from donald hear people standing in line waiting to hearfrom donald trump, what they are telling us as they want their jobs back. this is a coal mining country, a business state. they feel that someone who is separate from politicians and politics that they see and believe is corrupt, they wa nt see and believe is corrupt, they want him to take charge and bring backjobs to pennsylvania. and that
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is one of the main reasons why people here voted for him. the interesting thing here is the contrast of two main events that will be taking place. this, tonight, is what is known as the white house correspondence dinner, it is an annual affair correspondence dinner, it is an annualaffair in correspondence dinner, it is an annual affair in washington. it is very, very glitzy. usually the president will attend and give a speech. double trouble be the first not to attend in decades. —— donald trump. instead, he will be on the podium behind me at addressing crowds of people, people he believes are his people. absolutely. they are his supporters. bite in washington and other places, there are protests. this has been an interesting 100 days for donald trump. well, donald trump said the other day that there has been nothing like the last 100 days. on that, i think both his critics and
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his supporters will agree. let us look back. you have had the russian controversy. controversy over his attem pts controversy. controversy over his atte m pts to controversy. controversy over his attempts to issue a travel ban. controversy over his attempt to repeal and replace 0bamacare. and, of course, he had the success in him appointing a supreme courtjudge. many people in the queue that i spoke to mentioned that by name. when it comes to his failures, though, if you speak to his people, if you speak to his supporters, they say, and many of them, surprisingly, blamed republicans, not just democrats. they believe he is not getting the support he needs from the republican party. it will be interesting when it comes to the midterms next year, because republicans are starting the campaign when it comes to being re—elected. will they be re—elected on donald trump's curtails, or will it be the opposite? will they stand up it be the opposite? will they stand up to him and that is held they will
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be elected. some say they will not vote republican unless they back donald trump. that is what you expect to hear from a roomful of donald trump supporters. in terms of his 100 days, how was that being received across the united states? this is such a vast country that is very difficult to characterise how people feel. new, california, there have been protests springing up. —— new york. you heard earlierfrom climate change protesters that fear that he is signing away acts that president 0bama had tried to help the environment with, had tried to keep the paris climate change agreement on track, and had also tried to stop drilling in the arctic. with a stroke of a pen, donald trump got rid of all of that yesterday. and you have, when it comes to his supporters, perhaps, in
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the rust belt, they are patient and they are awaiting because they believe this president will come through for them. all will be, i suppose, revealed, at the end of this term, when he goes for real action. in pennsylvania, thank you very much, laura bicker. well, you can get much more on donald trump's first 100 days on our website. including this quiz, where you can test your knowledge about his policies. and work out whether you'd hire orfire him. that's at bbc.com/news. or go to the bbc news app. let's go to brussels now. here, the president of the european commission has warned that many people in britain are underestimating the difficulties of brexit. jean claude juncker was speaking after eu leaders unanimously agreed their negotiating position on britain's departure from the union. from brussels, here's damian grammaticas. at the heart of the eu today,
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european leaders, 27 of them, now ready for brexit. their offer to the uk, ready to go. translation: we all want a close and strong future relationship with the uk. there's absolutely no question about it. but before discussing the future, we have to sort out our past. michel barnier is the man tasked with enforcing the eu's position. everything ready for the uk negotiations? i think so. depends on the uk. his concerns are shared by eu leaders too. what eu leaders are most worried about is what angela merkel has called "illusions" on the british side about what can be achieved in brexit negotiations. this process today is about injecting a bit of realism into the debate. the eu's red lines. it took the 27 just minutes to sign off on their negotiating guidelines. they're clear brexit
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talks will be in phases. stage one, the uk must satisfy their demands on exit terms. what illusions do you think some of the uk harbour? translation: sometimes, i have the impression that some in britain, i don't mean the government, do not understand the process we have set, a phased negotiation. this gives me the opportunity to say again, there is no conspiracy, no—one is ganging up on britain. but the eu is being firm. theresa may's desire to talk about a future trade deal early on won't be entertained. first, the eu want to agree a guarantee of citizen's rights. meaning the rights to live, work and study now enjoyed by 4 million people, eu citizens in the uk, british citizens in the eu. a financial settlement. meaning the uk must agree to pay all its portion of eu spending up to 2020. and solutions to avoid new border controls between north
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and southern ireland. and the eu side believe even agreeing the first item on their list, citizens‘ rights, won't be straightforward. jean—claude juncker says the eu is ready to give guarantees but he isn't so sure about the uk. we have already prepared a text which could be adopted immediately if our british friends were ready to sign it like that. that will probably not happen. and that's just one stumbling block. money could be another before any talk about trade deals will start. damian grammaticas, bbc news, russell is. —— brussels. chris morris is in brussels for us — with the response from britain. david davis has said these talks will be tough at times. he is the minister for will be tough at times. he is the ministerfor brexit. will be tough at times. he is the minister for brexit. they will be controversial. there will be people in the uk and the eu who will seek
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to undermine them. britain has been surprised by how quickly the eu has come to this show of unity. there is definite concern in brussels, not just among eu officials, but among several member states, like a gap of expectation emerging about how the 27 countries of the remaining eu believes negotiations will go, and how quickly they can move forward, and the feeling in london. it was notable that donald tusk and jean—claude junker know that jean—claudejunker know that during elections, people say things and their domestic audiences. but the fa ct, their domestic audiences. but the fact, for example, one of the most important initial issues, the rights of the citizens worry in the uk, and of the citizens worry in the uk, and of course, produces addison's elsewhere in the eu. donald tusk said we are still waiting for a
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serious proposal on this. —— british citizens. jean—claude junker said we have a deal but britain probably won't sign it. they are where of the technical difficulties to be there isa technical difficulties to be there is a fear that this will move more slowly tha n is a fear that this will move more slowly than people are hoping. chris morris reporting. let's take a look at some of the other stories making making the news. in his first public speech after more than 20 years in exile, the veteran afghan warlord, gulbuddin hekmatyar, has called on the taliban to lay down their weapons. known as the butcher of kabul for his attacks on the capital, he signed a peace deal with the afghan government in september. speaking in eastern afghanistan, he urged militants to stop what he called "the pointless war." a day of mourning has been declared in kyrgystan after at least 2a people died in a landslide following heavy rain. nine children were among the dead in a village in the country's 0sh region.
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the kyrgyz president, almazbeck atambayev said people did not heed advice to leave the area when they were warned of the danger. pope francis has called for international mediation to ease escalating tensions between the united states and north korea. he said the situation had become "too hot." he urged the united states and north korea to defuse their increasingly tense standoff and avert a potentially dangerous conflict. he also directly appealed to the united nations to take a leading role in resolving the conflict. translation: these missiles in korea, it has been a year that they have been talking about it. but now it seems the issue has heated up too much. i always appeal for a solution through diplomatic means for the future of humanity. a more wide wall would destroy humanity. —— war. it would destroy humanity. —— war. it would destroy humanity. —— war. it would destroy the culture of
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everything. it would be terrible. let us stop and find a diplomatic solution. i feel the united let us stop and find a diplomatic solution. ifeel the united nations have a duty to resume their leadership because it has become too watered down. donald trump has accused officials there of ‘disrespecting' it's closest ally china. it's after north korea test—fired another ballistic missile, which reportedly exploded shortly after take—off. it's the second failed launch in the past fortnight. meanwhile, an american aircraft carrier has arrived in the region, after it was sent to the korean peninsula as part of mr trump's "armada." kevin rudd is the former prime minister of australia and he spoke to me a short while ago, i asked him about his view on president trump's strategy on north korea. donald trump wants to apply maximum pressure on china. china is the only one with effective diplomatic pressure on pyongyang at the moment because of north korea's dependency on the people's republic of china. what president trump is seeking to do, based on his discussions at murrah largo, is to keep the pressure on in the hope that beijing
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can actually bring about, through political pressure, a change in north korean behaviour. —— mar—a—lago. north korean behaviour. —— mar-a-lago. do you think that strategy is going to work?m mar-a-lago. do you think that strategy is going to work? it is too early to tell. this has not been tried with this level of focus before. china, as most people are aware, has been reluctant to deploy at this level of political or a diplomatic leverage in the past, not because of historical relationship reasons going back to the korean war and the relationship with korea, but because china has often been plain about the fact that it does not want to see a group on the peninsula and the collapse of the regime and it does not want to see any american troops one day landing in what would then be a vacated territory in the north. this is, therefore, a very
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complicated and multilayered situation. in what sense is china going to play ball? we don't know. there are divided opinions in beijing on this question. and frankly, for any government, this would be a very hard coal. 0n the one hand, they don't want the nuclear proliferation on the korean peninsula. they do wantjapan or south korea having their own retaliatory deterrent. they also wa nt retaliatory deterrent. they also want a stop to us nuclear deterrence long—term. they have caution about the great unknown is which flow from putting pressure on pyongyang. do you see the regime of kim jong—un fall, just him? replacing him with someone they are less familiar with? this is a divided debate in beijing at the moment. the call politics in
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china and diplomacy lies there as far as president trump is concerned. —— core. far as president trump is concerned. -- core. kevin rudd, the former prime minister of australia, speaking to me there. stay with us on bbc world news. still to come: the promise was glamour and luxury. the reality a bad cheese sandwich and a night in a tent. we'll tell you why punters who paid thousands to attend this music festival are not happy. nothing, it seems, was too big to withstand the force of the tornado. the extent of the devastation will lead to renewed calls for government to build better government housing. internationally, there have already been protests. sweden says it received no warning of the accident. indeed, the russians at first denied anything had gone wrong. only when radioactivity levels began to increase outside russia were they forced to admit the accident. for the mujahideen, the mood
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here is of great celebration. this is the end of a 12—year war for them. they've taken the capital, which they've been fighting for for so long. it was 7:00am in the morning, the day when power began to pass from the minority to the majority, when africa, after 300 years, reclaimed its last white colony. this is bbc in you is. here are the latest headlines: —— world news. tens of thousands of people are protesting in us cities over climate change. much of their anger is directed at president trump, who's marking his first 100
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days in office. european leaders have taken just four minutes to unanimously approve a negotiation strategy for britain's withdrawal from the eu. two weeks after winning a referendum to extend his powers, the government of president erdogan, in turkey, has launched a crackdown. nearly 4,000 officials have been purged in the latest in a series of purges following the failed coup last year. and one of the world's most visited websites, wikipedia, has been blocked. this is what anyone trying to visit the site would see if they try and access it. the government say wikipedia is trying to run a "smear campaign" against the country. it also suggests the website is co—operating with militants. in order tojustify the move — the government used laws designed to protect national security and public order. well i've been getting the views of alp toker. he is part of the group turkey blocks, which monitors internet shutdowns in turkey. it isa it is a very widespread block and it
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is affecting the whole country. in the last few hours, we have heard that the temporary blocking order has become permanent, because of a court order. so it looks like this is if long haul. why do you think wikipedia has been blocked in the country now? why has it not been blocked before in that case? country now? why has it not been blocked before in that case ?m unprecedented that such a large international site like this has been blocked. we are use to social media blocking, but this is different. and this is different because wikipedia is a platform to reach out, as well. people in the country use wikipedia to present a turkish point of view. if wikipedia is locked in turkey, turks cannot edit it. so it is handing over the editorial decision to other countries. it could backfire. we also hearing that 4000 public officials have been dismissed and popular dating shows bad. what justification is the government
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using for these sorts of moves? justification is the government using for these sorts of moves7m is part of a crackdown and a response against the coup. they see a huge threat in the country. internet censorship is part of a crackdown and is seen as a legitimate measure to protect the country. it seems that an awful lot of innocent people are getting caught up. it has affected the online sphere a lot. that is what we have been tracking. the censorship of what is that websites, but also things that are affecting your country. —— the censorship of websites, but other things are affecting our country. and jimmy wales the founder of wikipedia has tweeted today about this — he said access to information is a fundamental human right. britain's anthonyjoshua has beaten ukraine's wladimir klitchko to become the world heavy weight champion. it happened in front of a packed crowd in wembley stadium in london. the fight was stopped in the 11th round afterjoshua
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sent his veteran opponent to the canvas several times. 0lly foster was at wembley, watching the match for us. it was an absolutely extraordinary fight. anthony joshua, it was an absolutely extraordinary fight. anthonyjoshua, the ibf world champion, was taken to a very, very dark place to note. he was dropped to the canvas for the first time in his career. his 19 fight. he had a ready put bloody klitschko down in the fifth round. wladimir klitschko, 14 years his senior, the former world champion of the world. undefeated in a decade. he politico get back to the top, and he nearly did, the ukrainian. —— he thought he could. there was unbelievable response from anthonyjoshua. this is the longest fight in his professional career. he then knocked
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out wladimir klitschko in the 11th round. all wladimir klitschko had to do was hang on to the end of the fight. he was ahead on points. he was ahead on points in this fight, but the joshua knocked was ahead on points in this fight, but thejoshua knocked him down three times in the 11th round, and the referee at two intervened, and the referee at two intervened, and the fight was all over. now it was advertised as the ultimate in luxury — but a new festival in the bahamas was imploded on the day it was supposed to begin. harvey biggs has the story. the actual experience exceeds all spectators... this is how the festival was billed, a cultural moment, boasting some of the greatest artists on earth. fyre festival offered a weekend of a private island in the bahamas, rubbing shoulders with the rich and famous. with tickets costing up to $2000 for a four person package. an event, heavily promoted on social media, but caused a viral buzz of a
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different kind. —— $12,000. festival viewers arrived on friday to find utilitarian white tents, accommodation some described as like accommodation some described as like a refugee camp. 0n the menu, cheese sandwiches instead of gourmet cuisine. hours later, organisers postponed the event and then cancelled it altogether, saying there team was overwhelmed. that led to chaotic scenes at the airport, as people tried to get off the island. many turn to social media to vent their frustration, many turn to social media to vent theirfrustration, describing the event as a complete disaster. the festival co— organiserja event as a complete disaster. the festival co— organiser ja rule event as a complete disaster. the festival co— organiserja rule took to twitter to apologise, saying he was heartbroken, and the event was not a scam. 0rganisers have promised a refund to all festival—goers and are already looking ahead to next year, promising to be a little less ambitious. but recovering from scenes like these will take one ambitious pr strategy. a man who crawled round the route
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of the london marathon dressed as a gorilla has completed the course more than a week after he started. tom harrison, a police officer, crawled on his hands and knees on the streets for up to twelve hours a day. incomplete in defeat, he raced more than $34,000 for a charity to save gorillas from extinction. we ta ke save gorillas from extinction. we take you to harrisburg, pennsylvania, web donald trump is getting ready to address a rally. he is marking his first 100 days in office. a vital marker for any us president. plenty of supporters there, but as we said, there were also tens of thousands of climate change protesters in several us cities across the country. that is it from me in the team. goodbye for now. hello, there.
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good evening. a pretty quiet start to the bank holiday weekend. over the next few days, it looks as if things will be getting warmer. there could be a bit of a breeze blowing across all parts, and it would not be a bank holiday forecast with at least some rain and the forecast. that is coming from this area of low pressure. just ahead of that, we have these fairly tightly packed isobars. that means it is windy, but it is coming from the south, bringing milderair. that low pressure system will also brings a range of the far south—west bursting. with that southerly breeze, it is not too cold in most places. eight, nine, ten, or11. a breeze for all parts. bright and breezy start, but turning wet and windy to the south—west. a gal down there. that comes through wales and spreads across the south coast. so after a lovely sunny saturday on the south coast, it will be a different sunday. 0nly ten or 11 degrees and windy underneath all that cloud and
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rain, which is not quite getting to londonjust rain, which is not quite getting to london just yet. it will eventually. north of our rain, it is a decent day in the midlands and the north. always wore me away from the eastern coasts. as high as 15 or 16 in manchester. fraser mckevitt is in northern ireland. the western side of scotla nd northern ireland. the western side of scotland will also do well. 1617 degrees in the north—east. 16 — 17. in dublin, we will see some cloud and rain developing through the match, and for the journey home as well. but no problems for stage of the tour de yorkshire. the rain will spread north. a few showers in northern england, but generally it isa northern england, but generally it is a north and south split. temperatures are holding up quite nicely. as temperatures in the
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western side of scotland to be 25 or six degrees. bank holiday monday itself will a north south split. there will be some spells of sunshine. the northern half of uk does well. temperatures will be about ten or so degrees on the east coast. 0n about ten or so degrees on the east coast. on tuesday, it will be cool, cloudy, and grey, along the eastern coast. the moving inland and further west, much in the way of sunshine and better temperatures. drier the most pa rt and better temperatures. drier the most part this week. light winds, and while it will be worn for many, it will always be cooler on the sea coast. —— north sea. this is bbc world news.
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the headlines. tens of thousands of protesters are rallying in washington and other us cities to express concern over climate change. it comes as president trump marks his first 100 days in office, eu leaders in brussels have unanimously agreed their approach to negotiations over britain's withdrawal. eu council president donald tusk called for a serious british response to proposals on reciprocal rights for citizens. pope francis has called for international mediation to ease tensions between the united states and north korea, saying the situation had become "too hot." he made the comments on a flight back from a papal visit to egypt. in a highly anticipated clash of the heavy—weights, the british boxer, anthonyjoshua, has beaten 41—year—old, wladimir klitschko of ukraine, to claim the vacant wba title. now on bbc news, it is time for
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