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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 30, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 5pm. labour and conservatives compete for worker's votes — theresa may rules out a vat rise, while labour says it won't raise tax for those on low incomes. on the tenth anniversary of madeleine mccann‘s disappearance, her parents say they still have hope she'll be found. greases-meg 5; a541": 7 the president, i believe, has been putting pressure on him also, but so far perhaps nothing has happened and perhaps it has. counter—terrorism detectives have arrested a woman who was shot during a raid in north london on thursday. also in the next hour... chelsea stay well in front in the premier league. this strike from pedro set them on their way
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to a 3—0 victory at everton. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. theresa may has said there will be no increase in vat if the conservatives win the general election. however the prime minister has given her clearest signal yet that her party will abandon its promise not to raise income tax or national insurance contributions. labour has also promised not to raise vat, with leaderjeremy corbyn saying any other tax rises will fall on what he calls the "top end" and not on low and middle earners. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. in the swing of an election campaign, there is, for some, an unmentionable word. so far, theresa may has
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skirted around the issue of whether her government would increase taxes, but this morning she gave the strongest indication yet that she will drop a previous tory commitment not to raise national insurance, income tax or vat. we have no plans to increase the level of tax, but i am also very clear i don't want to make specific proposals on taxes unless i am absolutely sure that i can deliver on those. it would be my intention as a conservative government and a conservative prime minister, to reduce the taxes on working families. later, she went further in clarifying her plans. we won't be increasing vat, but what i want to ensure is we are able to have the strong... you definitely won't raise vat, that is a 100% commitment? where, then, will extra money come from to pay for schools, hospitals and social care? the prime minister hinted a long—term plan for that
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would be in her manifesto. jeremy corbyn, who has been speaking to the national association of head teachers, says labour would reverse cuts to corporation tax and make those at the top pay more. we are the party that wants low taxes for low and medium earners. the conservative party is the party who wants low taxes for the high earners. we look at things the other way around. so, yes, there will be changes but they will be very, very much at the top end. labour is guaranteeing the state pension will continue to rise by at least 2.5% a year. theresa may, though, suggested she was considering a new way of calculating the increase. but brexit looms and with the eu states uniting around their negotiation position yesterday, the other opposition parties sense an opportunity. the labour party are fighting amongst themselves and have given up on the job of opposing the government. britain desperately needs a strong, decent opposition for the sake of democracy. you don't need to agree with me on everything to agree with me that
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britain needs a strong opposition and the liberal democrats are determined. to provide it. the eu has already been clear that they have to look after the interests of the eu 27 at the moment. in the next parliament, we have a really important job of holding the government to account. theresa may doesn't want to discuss our eu divorce bill before trade talks and says she is still happy to walk away without a deal. well, with just under six weeks to go until the general election election on 8th june, and the party manifestos yet to be released — our political correspondent chris mason explained just how significant theresa may's comments were on tax. i think what is curious at this stage, the early verbal skirmishes ofan stage, the early verbal skirmishes of an election campaign, is that there is a distinct absence of
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definitive promises, and it is a good and understandable reason from the perspective of political parties. they are furiously assembling manifestos, visit those ugly sacred promises. —— those supposedly sacred promises. and so, the mantra we so often get at the moment when we ask a politician question is, wait for the manifesto. they can a week or fortnight away. we have a definitive promise that there will not be an increase in vat, and labour said the same. but, as you say, clearly there is an awareness within the conservatives, and we have seen this articulated publicly, but they do not want to buy them his —— bind themselves into something we're the do not increase income tax or national insurance, but what we do not know is how they may want to tinker with those. during election campaigns, politicians love to push the answers
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down the road into waiting for the ma nifesto, down the road into waiting for the manifesto, and the labour party has been doing this today on the question of what level of earnings they will increase taxes. is that because they have not decided on that quite yet? or is it because they know it will be controversial? both, probably. they know it will be controversial but also they know that they can see it as something that they can see it as something thatis that they can see it as something that is very different from what the conservatives are likely to say. they are going through the same process as the conservatives in rapidly assembling a manifesto, and they have found themselves in these opening skirmishes being drawn in to try to define what a higher earner would be in their view. john mcdonnell, the shadow chancellor, ten days ago was talking about people earning £70,000, which is around three times national average
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earnings. so you might save justifiably that someone in that category is rich. jeremy corbyn has not yet put a figure on it. he is again referring back to the ma nifesto again referring back to the manifesto but is specifically saying that low and middle—income earners will not be hit by tax rises, but the definition is absolutely central and we have not got that in black—and—white yet. again, and reference back to the manifesto. ten years after the disappearance of madeleine mccann, her parents have told the bbc they will do whatever it takes, for as long as it takes to find their daughter. madeleine was three years old when she went missing on holiday in portugal, while her parents were eating at a nearby restaurant. speaking to fiona bruce, kate and gerry mccann talked about the pain they continue to face, after a decade of uncertainty. every day is another day without madeleine. i think it's just that number. that ten—year mark makes it more significant. it's a reminder of how much time has
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gone by and obviously ten is a big number. i think that the day and the poignancy of it... we don't tend to go back because it's so draining. but inevitably on anniversaries and birthdays, they're by far the hardest. how different is your life now to what you must have imagined all those years ago? it's a hard one. it's such a long time. i think before madeleine was taken we felt we'd managed to achieve a little perfect, nuclear family of five. we had that for a short period. you adapt. you have a new normality. unfortunately for us, the new normality at the minute is a family of four. last time we talked, you told me how you were still buying birthday presents and christmas
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presents for madeleine... are you still doing that? yes, we still do that. a lot of thought goes into it. i couldn't not do that. she'll always be our daughter. the police have talked about one signifca nt lead that they're still pursuing. can you tell me anything about that? we're very much... the investigation is in the hands of the met police. there are ongoing enquiries. we've come a long way and there is progress, there are some very credible lines the police are working on, and while there's no evidence to give us any negative news, that hope is still there. it really is there, in your hearts? yeah. one day you'll be reunited with your daughter? no parent is going to give up on their child unless they know for certain their child is dead. we just don't have any evidence. my hope of madeleine being out there is no less than it was ten years ago. you can see the full version of that
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interview on panorama: madeleine mccann:10 years on. that's on wednesday night at 9pm on bbc one. a woman who was shot by armed officers during a counter terrorism investigation in north london has been arrested. the 21 year old was taken to a hospital on thursday to be treated for her injuries. she has now been discharged and arrested. police say the incident is not connected to the whitehall terror suspect khalid mohammed omar ali. our correspondent is in harrisburg,
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pennsylvania, where president trump attended that rally and made that speech. laura, first to the overview of his 100 days. are voters in areas like harrisburg keeping the faith with president trump? they really are. they were queued in their thousands ) the are. they were queued in their thousands) the arena. it was not entirely filled last night, but those that were the were vehement supporters, the believe that whatever he is doing is correctly and for them. he is their champion in the white house, and it is worth noting where he decided to come to make this speech. he came to hear, and industrial heartland. here they
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believe their industries are being taken away by the likes of climate change regulations and the believe that by repealing those, president trump is helping them bring back the coal and steel industries, and that is one of the reasons why they support him, and they believe he is not a politician. he is a different kind of candidate. when i asked them about his failures to replace obama ca re about his failures to replace obama care and get through the travel ban, they said it is because he is coming up they said it is because he is coming up against congress, politicians, the establishment. the believe he is the establishment. the believe he is the antiestablishment candidate and president. moving one to his comments today on north korea, interesting given that actually he has been getting much more success on his foreign policy agenda ban on domestic policy, so what has he been saying? during the rally last night
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he mentioned china, because during the campaign, he decried china as a currency manipulator, he told his crowds at every rally that china needed to be dealt with, and last night he said, well, china is helping us with the north korea situation. he said he is getting on very well with president xi. here is what he said a little earlier. very well with president xi. here is what he said a little earlierlj have got to like and respect the president of china, president xi, i believe has been putting pressure on them, but so far perhaps nothing has happened, and perhaps it has. this was not a big missile order nuclear test, which he was expected to do, we will see what happens. earlier this week he described kim jong—un isa
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—— young leader with a tough task. ata —— young leader with a tough task. at a young age, he was able to take power. a lot of people try to take that away, whether his uncle or anyone else. obviously he is a pretty smart cookie. looking at what president trump has done on the foreign policy agenda, comparing it to domestic policy agenda, how is he doing regarding other us presidents at this 100 day stage? when it comes to this stage, he has signed 29 different pieces of legislation, but when you compare it to other presidents, he has not got any major pieces of legislation through congress. he failed to repeal and replace obama care, his travel ban has been very difficult because he has been very difficult because he has been very difficult because he has been stopped by the courts. one of the main things he has managed to do is appoint a supreme courtjudge
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which has not been done by a president in over 130 odd years. he said that was his success, but last night he was talking about his job creating opportunities, he was talking about rolling back these environmental regulations and creating those. so when it comes to those 100 days and this marker, supporters think he is doing extremely well and they have faith he will continue to do so, and they say when he is coming up against problems, he is up against congress, republicans, and they will make their feelings known at the ballot box. thank you very much. one of the world's most accomplished mountaineers, ueli steck, has died in an accident on mount everest. steck, known as the swiss machine, was climbing alone on the mountain as he prepared for an attempt on the summit without oxygen. steck, who was 40, had won many awards and was famed for the speed of his ascents. alexandra mackenzie reports. mount everest, dangerous and daunting, even for the most
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experienced of climbers. just climbing from base camp to camp number two. ueli steck, also known as the swiss machine, planning the detail of his route. we don't know if it is possible, that is the interesting thing. nobody has done that before. having the chance, it is there and it is possible, but i don't know. so he knew the dangers, he had reached the summit without oxygen in 2012 and in 2015 he climbed all 82 alpine peaks, over 4000 metres injust 62 days. he conquered the north face of the eiger in less than three hours. ueli steck was on everest to acclimatise before attempting a new route on the summit. if he had been successful, it would have pushed him into another sphere.
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a first ascent like that on everest, it isjust sinking in at the moment. he was known as the swiss machine, really fit, lovely guy when you meet him. a bundle of energy. at the peak again. pretty cool. the climbing community has said it has lost a pioneer. he was known for his speed and ruthlessly methodical approach, with an ability to push push himself to the limit of human endurance. the headlines on bbc news. labour and the conservatives compete for workers votes. theresa may rules out a vat rise, while labour says it will not raise tax for those on low incomes. madeline mccann has been missing for ten years. but in an interview to mark the anniversary,
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her parents say they still hope she will be found. —— madeleine. president trump says china is helping the united states regarding north korea's nuclear programme. officers from the uk borderforce have detained a group of people — suspected to be illegal immigrants — on board a yacht which ran aground at orford in suffolk. one source suggested that there were 7 ukrainians onboard. earlier our correspondent richard slee, who's been following the story, told me it was a member of the public who alerted 999. two lifeboats were dispatched, and they discovered a yacht which had run aground on high winds. a number of people on board were from the ukraine, now believed to be seven people. the coast guard alerted the border force and police officers,
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and coastguard told the yacht to the safety of the harbor. how much of an issueis safety of the harbor. how much of an issue is this? this is the second time... there has been a report on the situation written by the chief inspector of borders and immigration recently. according to the sunday times today, this report was delivered to the government two months ago and would normally have been published by no. so we asked the home office today about the details of this report and when it would be released to the government. the response was that this report would be released in due course. they also said no further comment would be made until after the election. authorities in the united states say that several tornados that hit texas on saturday evening have left at least five people dead and nearly 50 injured.
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emergency services are conducting a search for missing people and say they fear the death toll may rise. as david campanale now reports, the american midwest has been struck by an intensive weather system that has caused damage across several states. it's texas, and this region of the united states is known as tornado alley for its frequent, powerful storms. twisters like this are not uncommon but their dramatic capacity for death and destruction is unstoppable and always unwelcome. homes in the state have been flattened, trees uprooted and cars overturned. at least one powerful storm hit the city of canton about 80 kilometres east of dallas. more were reported in surrounding areas. this is the tornado crossing the road right in front of us. blocked roads have hindered emergency responders, who are still trying to get out to numerous calls for help. fatalities, i believe, what i'm getting is that they are still coming in. we are talking about
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maybe five casualties. that number may go up once we can get into those areas. we are trying to deploy search and rescue and recovery right now. that number may go up, hopefully it doesn't, but we do know we have a number of fatalities as of right now. heavy rains and damaging winds have struck a broad swathe of the us heartland. downpours that began on friday have been so intense the ground has been unable to absorb rainfall, causing widespread flooding and prompting evacuations. the governors of missouri and oklahoma have declared states of emergency due to flooding and the damage caused to power supplies and structures. the massive storm system has also delayed thousands of flights. colorado and wyoming further north have been struck by snowstorms. heavy rain in the midwest is expected to continue to the end of the weekend, along with wind gusts of 95 kilometres per hour. turkey's government says
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its imposing new hardline measures to protect its national security — two weeks after president erdogan won a referendum on extending his power. it's sacked almost four—thousand more civil servants, banned hugely popular television dating shows and blocked access to wikipedia — claiming the website is smearing the country's reputation. sarah corker reports. since lastjuly‘s failed to attend, ankara has sacked or arrested more than a thousand people, and president ed dorgan‘s crackdown on those who he believes have plotted against shows no sign of abating. on saturday 4000 people were expelled from the civil service and military, including 1200 members of the armed forces. those expelled posed a
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security threat, the authorities said. hours earlier turkey blocked access to one of the world's most visited websites, wikipedia, claiming it is smearing the country's reputation. some tv dating shows were also banned. we're used to social media blocking, but this is slightly different because wikipedia is actually a platform to reach out as well. people in the country use wikipedia to promote a turkish point of view, which means tax cannot edit it. so it is almost handing over editorial decisions to other countries. it is a policy that could backfire. wikipedia founder jimmy wales took to twitter. access to information is a fundamental human right. turkish people, i will a lwa ys human right. turkish people, i will always stand with you to fight for this right, he said. while in ankara, others reacted with disbelief. i do not think it is nice to control information in this age
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where information can be easily accessed. i do not welcome the way it is blocked. this was done with youtube twitter before, now it is wikipedia. they will see this is the wrong approach and i believe it will be the first. this latest purge comes days after thousands of police officers were suspended or detained. many of them accused of having links to this man, and excelled muslim cleric, accused of inspiring the military coup, something he denies. president ed dorgan was granted new powers in a referendum earlier this month. he says it makes country safer, but opponents say it has brought turkey closer to dictatorship. president clear in turkey, the manager of an iranian television network has been
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shot dead in istanbul. saeed carry—man was driving with a business partner when masked gunmen opened fire on their vehicle. mr carryman‘s network, gem tv, broadcasts foreign and western shows in iran. he'd previously been convicted in his absence of spreading anti—iranian propaganda. mps are calling for best—before dates on food to be scrapped, saying they‘ re unnecessary and contribute towards unacceptable levels of food waste. in a report published today the environment, food and rural affairs committee also believes that supermarkets should sell more wonky vegetables, as claire marshall reports. mixed in with other waste, we throw more than £10 billion worth of food away every year. the committee calls it a scandal. councils have to raise bills to dispose of it. and this is happening while food bank use is at a record high. mps say the best before date should be abolished. on packaging, it only refers to quality. it is perfectly safe to eat afterwards, but the food may not be at its best.
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industry experts told the committee it was meaningless. the important information to be displayed was the use by date, which is about safety. the best before date, i believe, can be scrapped, because it is unnecessary. it means food is wasted and sometimes people don't actually eat that food when it goes beyond the best before date. the use by date is still safe to eat. we need to make the best use of our food. if it is still good to eat, let's eat it. customers at a pioneering project in leeds sell food that otherwise would have gone in the bin. three tonnes arrive each day. they say we need to learn to love our wonky veg. priceless egyptian artefacts that were badly damaged during the second world war are once again going on display at liverpool's world museum, for the first time in more than 70 years. a gallery expansion and extensive restoration work means they're now part of the largest egyptology collection outside of london, as lindsey prosser reports.
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from the everyday to the beautifully decorative, these objects reflect the rise and fall of ancient egyptian society. it is our most ambitious exhibition we have done for egypt. we've got a whole range of artefacts, right from the prehistoric period, we have stone vases and stone tools, all the way through the christianity in egypt. so we've got these beautiful leather slippers that people would wear in life, and also be buried in. when the museum was bombed during the second world war, part of its priceless collection was badly damaged. we have two granite statues of the goddess sekhmet, of the goddess s2ekhmet, a human form with a lioness head, and they were both shattered. the fire damaged the two pieces, which were intact before then, and it wasn't until recently
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we have restored them, pieced them back together, and put them back on display for the first time with the rest of the egyptian collection. the challenge for this team is to move the statues into the gallery without breaking them. at the same time, mummies who were also fire—damaged are being installed. we keep the objects not because they look stunning, because they look beautiful. it is because of the information they hold. so part of what we do is unlocking the stories that they hold, and revealing their hidden histories. we have two romano—period mummies here, and they are both quite young. one is a teenager. we have wondered in the past if they were associated with each other, so they could be sisters. you never know, they could be. this display at liverpool's world museum is now the largest ancient egyptian gallery outside of london. it is almost 5:30pm. here is the
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weather. i think sunday is shaping up to be the better day of the bank holiday weekend, certainly compared to what we expect on monday, certainly across central and southern areas. that's because this area of low pressure really comes into play during sunday night and in towards monday. it's going to continue to be windy this evening across central northern areas but a dry end to the day here. we've got that area of low pressure spinning up from the south—west. this will bring outbreaks of rain, further rain to the south—west and a band of rain in towards the midlands, northern england, north wales. to the north, mostly dry, a few clear spells. to the south, quite a lot of cloud. it will be a mild night across the board. this area of low pressure is going to bring some unsettled weather to a swathe of england and wales through bank holiday monday. it's not going to be a wash—out by any means but we could see some heavy and persistent rain across the south—west of england and towards south wales and some rain across northern areas. through central areas where we get the sunshine breaking through in the afternoon,
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that will lift temperatures up so we could see some heavy, slow—moving cloud and potentially thunderstorms. remaining quite wet, though, for cornwall. a few showers as well for northern england but here we will see an abundance of sunny spells. the further north you head away from that area of low pressure, it's likely to stay dry altogether. northern ireland, parts of north—west england and for much of western scotland, here we will probably see the best of the temperatures, 18—19, maybe 20 celsius across the north—west highlands. always cooler across the east because of the onshore breeze. as we head through bank holiday monday evening, that area of low pressure begins to pull away, so we see the showers easing down into the evening and overnight. there is the area of low pressure pushing off into the main continent. then we have an area of high pressure starting to build in. it'll start to push easterly winds our way — never a warm direction, even at this time of year. it will be quite cool across eastern coastal areas on tuesday, we will have some low cloud, maybe mist. the best of the weather will always be across
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southern and western areas. we will have some shelter, sunshine and the best temperatures. on wednesday, it is cool across the east coast because of the north—easterly breeze. quite cloudy across the south—east, with one or two showers. the best of the sunshine will be across the north and the west, with the best of the temperatures. the rest of the week is going to be dry for most because of high pressure. always chillier in the east because there will be cloud and a few showers and warmer in the west. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: theresa may's followed labour in ruling out a rise in vat after the general election, whilejeremy corbyn‘s promised not to raise taxes for low earners. kate and gerry mccann say they will do whatever it takes to find their daughter, ten years since the disappearance of madeline mccann. donald trump says he hopes china — north korea's only real ally — will be able to pressure pyongyang into abandoning its
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nuclear ambitions. a woman who was shot by police during a counter terrorism operation in north west london on thursday has been arrested. and an unlikely group of misfits are back together in the outer reaches of the universe. find out what jason solomons made of guardians of the galaxy volume 2, and the rest of the week's cinema releases, in the film review. now, for a look at the sports news, we can cross to the bbc sport centre. the football to begin. five of the top six in action. chelsea have extended their lead at the top of the premier league with a 3—0 win over everton at goodison park. as hannah lupton reports, their biggest test of the run
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in was passed with flying colours. the title is closer for chelsea. and manager antonio conte wants to keep matters in their own hands. goodison parkis matters in their own hands. goodison park is not an easy place to visit, everton have won their last eight league games here. and entertaining first half, with both teams willing to attack. the only thing that was missing, the finishing. it was uncharacteristic from agro one, but then the pendulum swung. pedro's left foot. 66 minutes, and a strike worthy of champions. cahill bundled ina worthy of champions. cahill bundled in a second. it was not the prettiest, but they all count. football is a squad game, and cesc
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fabregas combined with willian after coming off the bench. 3—0. three points. jubilation and celebrations, it is not won yet but chelsea are closing in. we have got to be pleased, because we played a game with our heads. and at this part of the season, it is important to do the season, it is important to do the head, then heart, legs. i think we did this today. really strong defensively, and their system makes it difficult, you know that if you lose the ball, gavin space, they kill the game. second goal, third... it was high—class football and that was the difference. but our offensive football was not at the level of chelsea today. second placed tottenham hotspur can
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close the gap to four points, but they face the substantial hurdle of north london rivals arsenal at white hart lane. victory for spurs would mean they finish above arsenal for the first time in 22 years. delle alli should have put them ahead early on and then christian erikksen perhaps had an even better chance — putting it over in front of an open goal. 0—0 and the players are just getting the second half underway now. manchester city were looking to leapfrog liverpool into third place. they were away at middlesbrough, who themselves needed something from the game in their battle against relegation. instead, a 2—2 draw means pep guardiola's side stay in fourth spot, while boro move six points from safety with just three games to go. a contentious penalty decision allowed city's sergio aguero to cancel out alvaro negredo's opener. but calum chambers' first boro goal then gave them another surprise lead with 12 minutes to go. only for brazilian gabrieljesus' header to earn city a valuable point in the last five minutes. it is going to be tight until the
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end. today was the chance the win. but nothing is going to happen until the last game. from where i was, not a foul. i was disappointed with the way that the player went down. ref ina way that the player went down. ref in a position to give it? we have taken on manchester in a position to give it? we have ta ken on manchester city, in a position to give it? we have taken on manchester city, and we can do the same against chelsea. we are capable, with the way that the players have worked, band with that determination, nor reason we cannot win more matches. so that result keeps city a point ahead of manchester united, who stay fifth. their hopes of a champions league place were dented with yet another home draw, this time it finished 1—1 against relegation threatenedswansea city. and, as nick parrott reports, there are more injury
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concerns forjose mourninho. swansea city came to old trafford fighting to stay in the premier league, while manchester united seem to be fighting just to stay fit enough to challenge for qualification for the champions league. before there was even a shot on target, the home side were having to make unplanned changes. when luke shaw has been fit, he has often been out of favour withjose mourinho and with less than ten minutes gone another spell on the sidelines beckoned. it was another man who has been on the fringes this season that turned things around just before the interval. after neil swarbrick awarded marcus rashford a penalty for this, wayne rooney stepped up to score only his fourth premier league goal of the season. the joy was short—lived as a challenge by eric bailly led to the ivory coast defender limping off. wayne rooney got involved, or perhaps he shouldn't have, and gylfi sigurdsson made them pay from the resulting free kick. the iceland midfielder clearly claiming the man of the match award
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for his ninth goal of the season. he has won 15 points for swansea this term and without him they would have already been relegated. for the welsh team, the draw felt like a win. united rewrote the record books as they extended their unbeaten run to 25 matches, but with the top four out of their own hands, it will have felt more like a defeat. what can you do? in this moment we can walk from the bed to the toilet and break a leg in five metres! we are in trouble. the boys are very, very tired and obviously the levels of fatigue are more than normal, but we fight, that is for sure. so, there you go. i am very pleased with the overall performance. we showed a lot of qualities and characteristics right throughout the game.
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we played well in the first—half, created some chances. having gone behind, we didn't let us affect us and we got on with it. we might have had all three points at the end. bolton wanderers have been promoted back to the championship. their 3—0 win over peterborough meant they pipped fleetwood to the second automatic promotion place on the final day of the league one season. phil parkinson's side have been a model of consistency this season as they haven't been out of the top four since october. their opening goal came throuthem karacan scoring his first of the season. david wheater made it 2—0 before adam le fondre rounded things off. a year after relegation and despite financial issues off the field, it was a day to celebrate for bolton's fans and players. port vale. bad news for them.
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relegated. anthonyjoshua is targeting another huge heavyweight title fight after his 11th round stoppage of wladimir klitschko last night. he challenged fellow briton tyson fury to be his next opponent after a dramatic victory in front of a massive crowd at wembley stadium. olly foster reports. anthonyjoshua is burning brighter than ever, but last night the lights almost went out. wladimir klitschko, at the age of 41, defying the march of time. in a stadium famous for knockout competitions, they came in record numbers to see aj deliver the most important ko of his career. the fight exploded in the fifth. the ukrainian rocked but he was so resilient. in the next round joshua was stunned, hitting the canvas for the first time. but his fight was just getting started. he had never been beyond the seventh round, this went to eight, nine, ten. and wladimir klitschko looked like he was going to be on top by the time they reached the 11th — a round that'll live long in the memory. anthonyjoshua put him down again and again. wladimir showed unbelievable heart,
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but another flurry of punches signalled the end of the contest. and the fire was still burning. fighting is fun. i don't box just for the belts, i don't box just for money. ijust enjoy it. i don't feel like someone who lost. tonight, we all won. even though i did not get the belts, i don't feel like i lost. wembley is slowly returning to normal. but this night will not be forgotten in a hurry. if you cut through all the hype, this was one of the great heavyweight contests. anthonyjoshua is still improving, still learning, and that is a frightening thought, especially for his next opponent. finland's valtteri bottas has picked up his first victory in formula one, winning the russian grand prix as the mercedes driver beat both ferraris to the first corner and held off a late charge from championship leader sebastian vettel for his maiden win.
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lewis hamilton could only finish fourth. john higgins has the early advantage over defending champion mark selby in the final of the world snooker championships in sheffield. selby took the lead twice in the opening three frames but only to see higgins draw level at 2—2 — and in doing so hit a break of 141 in the fourth frame. higgins then ran away with the final four frames after the interval to lead 6—2 going into this evening's session. they resume at seven o'clock. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. north london derby, still 0—0. 30 minutes left. now, time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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to take us through this week's cinema releases is jason solomons. hi, jason, what do we have this week? long weekend, a visit to the cinema is on the agenda for many families, and they can climb aboard a spaceship if they like. those saviours of space, the guardians of the galaxy, are back, complete with talking raccoon for volume two of guardians of the galaxy. the terrible atrocities of the armenian genocide in the first world war era turkey are on the agenda in the promise, getting big screen love treatment with christian bale, and rising star florence pugh takes centre stage for lady macbeth, a low—budget british chiller that has nothing to do with shakespeare. i was at the cinema at the weekend and i saw the trailer for guardians of the galaxy vol 2. oh my goodness, even watching the trailer, ifelt like i was bombarded with this wall of noise and fury and funny little creatures.
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that sums it up, really. we'll move on! laughter. if you saw volume 1, you'll know that it is about... there a talking raccoon, a talking tree, it doesn't say much. itjust says, "i am groot." that tree has now been cut down to a tiny tree which is very cute. bear with me on this. i'll take your word for it. i don't know what they do, they save the galaxy from something, although the raccoon who is voiced by bradley cooper steals some stuff which means that half of the galaxy is after them in a kind of flash gordon style chase. as we join the action now, as they like to say in the crucible in sheffield, they are being chased by hordes of golden aliens. this is weird, we've got a sovereign fleet approaching from the rear. why would they do that?
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probably because rocket stole some of their batteries. dude! right. he didn't steal some of those. i don't know why they are after us. what a mystery this is. what were you thinking? dude, they were really easy to steal. that's your defence!? come on, you saw how that high priestess talked down to us. now, i am teaching her a lesson! i didn't realise your motivation was altruism. it is a shame that the sovereigns had mistaken your intentions and are trying to kill us. exactly! i was being sarcastic! oh, no! you're supposed to use a sarcastic voice! now i look foolish. can you put the bickering on hold until after we survive this massive space battle ? ok, the raccoon looks quite cute. that's what i'm taking from that. people call him a puppy. a triangle—faced panda. it is a film about banter and insult and very little else, strangely enough. i kind of enjoyed it in a kind of lobotomised carapace that i entered. it doesn't really go anywhere. there is a plot about chris pratt's character going to find his father played by kurt russell, who has luxuriant hair and delivers every line like he's looking in the bathroom mirror.
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they have to explode this guy because he is a planet really and... it really makes no sense. it is kind of a pity, because if it had that it would be a much better superhero movie than normal. the colours are good, and if you like green zoe saldanas, and the other guy who is a benjamin thing type person, there's a lot to look at. visually it has a prog rock album cover look. it looks a bit like mike hodges' flash gordon all those years ago. it doesn't really go anywhere, and i feel that plotless in space leaves you a bit lost. you are — you're not selling it to me. i hate... i better stop saying that. if you liked the first one... is that who it's aimed at? it is not going to convert people who weren't there in the first place. if you did like the first one, there is nothing here that will put you off it, it feels like it is treading water into volume 3. oh, my god! it is inevitable. thanks for leaving me with that thought. shall we move on?
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to something that is not volume two of anything. this is a change of pace, this is the promise which stars christian bale, oscar isaac and a french actress charlotte le bon. she is no relation to the duran duran singer. this is set against the terrible atrocities of the armenian genocide, which took place in 1914, 1915 in turkey. 1.5 million armenians were killed in that. yet to be acknowledged as a genocide. it has never had a big—screen treatment, only a few times been dealt with in popular culture. and here it is really fronted in what has become a sort of love war—torn epic with this love triangle. christian bale, as we can see him there, oscar isaac, and charlotte le bon. they try to stay together during the terrors of this war where armenians are being turfed out of villages, ethnically cleansed is the modern term. they are moved away. the turks arejoined with the germans in this war and it becomes a sort of uneasy mix of terrible tragedy with this kind of beating—hea rt love story. is that the director trying to inform us all about history? history that he clearly feels we should know more about by using that age—old
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tradition of a love story? love triangle, but still a love story. that is a sort of thing we have seen in second world war movies and first world war movies countless times. but here, i didn't really know about the armenian genocide and i'm not alone in this. many people don't. and i don't really know much more about it having seen the film, which i think is a pity, because that is what is important. there are some terrible things that were done to the armenian population, concentration camps, train transport, in a way which sort of foreshadows holocaust movies and holocaust tropes that we see. kristallnacht—style kind of riot in the streets where the armenian shop owners were rounded up. these are a very interesting kind of foreshadowing. it is partly interesting to the point where a love story didn't interest me at all, i wanted to find out what was happening to the armenians. bit of a pity. but you need that love story to give you entry into the story. they play it very well, oscar isaac is good, christian bale is good as a gruff ap news reporter, and charlotte le bon lacks a bit of star power in the middle of it.
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it is very well intentioned. but i don't think it is going to be the monument that the armenian genocide deserves in terms of cinema. let's move on to a film i feel a lot of people are talking about. lady macbeth, not to do with the shakespeare play. not really. if shakespeare is not your thing don't let that put you off. but she is a lady macbeth like character. this is played by a british rising star called florence pugh, who was in carol morley‘s film, the falling. this is her second major role and she completely devours this role. it is like watching someone blossom on screen. she is terrific. she plays a woman called katherine who is sold to a wealthy mine—owning family up north and becomes a wife, imprisoned in this terrible house which creaks and cracks and the wind wuthers through. the husband goes away. she is left to rule the house herself and gets drunk on the power and takes a fancy to herself as lady of the manor, and takes a fancy to sebastian the stable boy, played by cosmojarvis. they have a torrid affair and here they are out on the moors. could you do without me?
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it's husbands and wives that kiss like that. laughter. she won't speak. you know i shant be parted from you alive, sebastian. through hell and high water, i will follow you. to the cross, to the prison, to the grave, to the sky. i'd rather stop you breathing than have you doubt how i feel. florence pugh, as you say, a lot of people talking about her, she was only 19 when that was filmed. it is a debut by
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the director as well. yes, william old royd, he is an opera director, and the story has been made into an opera before. it was banned byjoseph stalin because it was feared that women would take instruction from this film and become rebellious from that opera. have our own mind! yes, it's terrible, it should never happen! what a suggestion! the way that she does it in this film, it is perhaps a good idea, she has a terrible consequence for her thirst. we admire her and love her, and think she is brilliant, but she's terribly complex. the way it is played is brilliant. i think this is one of the best british debuts i have seen in ages, and if you think it is a costume drama, think again. it kind of subverts all those frills and furbelows and merchant ivoryness. it is stark, lean and kind of frightening and macabre. it has a fairly mixed race cast with two black characters which bring another shade of class and race to that period drama. i think it is a superb film, five stars from me. fantastic.
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there is the bank holiday viewing sorted. a quick thought about the best out. one, to my shame, i have still not had a chance to see and i am dying to see. this is an oscar—nominated documentary called i am not your negro. it is still out at select cinemas if you can find it. or find it on some streaming channel somewhere. it is a terrific documentary examining race in america through the eyes of a forgotten activist, james baldwin, who is a sort of poet, kind of jazz—era writer and author and activist. an extraordinary figure who's put front and centre of this, an examination of the civil rights movement through him, but it is an angry and powerful film. i can't forget it. i'm surprised it didn't win the best picture at the oscars. it is voiced by samuel ljackson, doing james baldwin's narrative. i think it's one of the best things samuel ljackson has ever done. the dvd, have you picked this just for me? your choice is reminding me how old i am, normally it is something that is out in the last few months. i would never do that, remind a lady of her age. now you've taken us back to the 1980s.
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1985, letter to brezhnev, which is like me delving into my albums and coming out now that's what i call music 4. yes! it is very much a soundtrack album from that era. it is a film that everyone went to see, it is the story of two girls in liverpool on a night out and falling in love with two russian sailors, played by peter firth and alfred molina, who have gone on to big things as well. margi clark is one of the girls. it has got bronsky beat in it. we all went to see it. it was the film to see. it was a film everyone saw. it was about working—class liverpool, thatcher—era britain. it was a rebellious film. but it was also bleak in that classic british way. restored and put on blu—ray, i wonder if the grit will still hold to it, but i think it is a real snapshot of britain that might have been forgotten. a kind of lost classic film, but one, as soon as you hear the name, letter to brezhnev, you are reminded of it. it is a cult classic from the british archives and i'm delighted it is out for a new generation to witness on blu—ray and dvd. and for you to be reminded of your youth.
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thank you, jason. you can come again. thank you very much and enjoy your bank holiday viewing. thank you. that is it for this week for now. enjoy your cinema going and we'll see you next time. bye bye. i think sunday is shaping up to be the better day of the bank holiday weekend, certainly compared to what we expect on monday, certainly across central and southern areas. that's because this area of low pressure really comes into play during sunday night and in towards monday. it's going to continue to be windy this evening across central northern areas but a dry end to the day here. we've got that area of low pressure spinning up from the south—west. this will bring outbreaks of rain, further rain to the south—west and a band of rain in towards the midlands, northern england, north wales. to the north, mostly dry, a few clear spells. to the south, quite a lot of cloud. it will be a mild night across the board. this area of low pressure is going to bring some unsettled weather to a swathe of england and wales through bank holiday monday.
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it's not going to be a wash—out by any means but we could see some heavy and persistent rain across the south—west of england and towards south wales and some rain across northern areas. through central areas where we get the sunshine breaking through in the afternoon, that will lift temperatures up so we could see some heavy, slow—moving cloud and potentially thunderstorms. remaining quite wet, though, for cornwall. a few showers as well for northern england but here we will see an abundance of sunny spells. the further north you head away from that area of low pressure, it's likely to stay dry altogether. northern ireland, parts of north—west england and for much of western scotland, here we will probably see the best of the temperatures, 18—19, maybe 20 celsius across the north—west highlands. always cooler across the east because of the onshore breeze. as we head through bank holiday monday evening, that area of low pressure begins to pull away, so we see the showers easing down into the evening and overnight. there is the area of low pressure pushing off into the main continent. then we have an area of high pressure starting to build in. it'll start to push easterly winds our way — never a warm direction,
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even at this time of year. it will be quite cool across eastern coastal areas on tuesday, we will have some low cloud, maybe mist. the best of the weather will always be across southern and western areas. we will have some shelter, sunshine and the best temperatures. on wednesday, it is cool across the east coast because of the north—easterly breeze. quite cloudy across the south—east, with one or two showers. the best of the sunshine will be across the north and the west, with the best of the temperatures. the rest of the week is going to be dry for most because of high pressure. always chillier in the east because there will be cloud and a few showers and warmer in the west. this is bbc news. the headlines at 6pm. labour and the conservatives compete for workers' votes — theresa may rules out a vat rise,
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while labour says it won't raise tax for those on low incomes. on the tenth anniversary of madeleine mccann‘s disappearance, her parents say they still have hope she'll be found. president trump says pressure on north korea over its nuclear programme is working — and says china is helping. counterterrorism detectives have arrested a woman who was shot during arrested a woman who was shot during a raid in north london on thursday. president trump says pressure on north korea over its nuclear programme is working — and says china is helping. president xi, someone i have a man i've gotten to like and respect,
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