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tv   100 Days  BBC News  May 4, 2017 7:00pm-7:45pm BST

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hello and welcome to this special edition of 100 days+. conservatives in america are trinder this day for seven years. yes, republicans will shortly vote to repeal 0bamacare. we still don't know what will be in the new package. donald trump could be a step closer to fulfilling a big campaign promise but it is only step. the duke of edinburgh will retire from public duties this autumn. at 95, it is a well earned break. here in france, voters are three days away from picking their new president. marine le pen and emmanuel macron make their final pitch to voters the day after a heated debate. and we have an amazing story of survival. the server amazing story of survival. the server who clung to his board for 30 hours speech to the bbc. i turned —— they turned around. and then they saved my life.
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hello, i'm christian fraser in paris. katty kay is in washington. there are important stories on both sides of the atlantic. very shortly, we will turn to the heated debate last night and television between emmanuel macron and marine le pen. we will talk to guests in paris as well. before that, let's focus on washington. in the next few minutes we will have breaking news as republicans start to vote on repealing and replacing 0bamacare. yes, the house of representatives will start that vote shortly. there seems to have been some glitch. we expected it in the last few hours. it isa expected it in the last few hours. it is a vote on president 0bama's most important legacy. president trump promised to get rid of it. in the end of those members of congress
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are taking a vote, not knowing how much the replacement bill would cost are many americans will lose their health insurance. here is a democrat and republican. any health—care bill that came to this floor should be about expanding coverage and lowering costs. we want to work with you on that. instead, you bring a bill that will rip out ca re you bring a bill that will rip out care away from tens of millions of people. how can you do this to the american people? how can you do this to your constituents? this is a terrible, terrible bill. you should vote no. if we want to talk about misleading the american people, it started seven the american people, it started seve n years the american people, it started seven years ago and it ends today. the american people deserve better. they have been thrown under the bus seven years. president trump has tweeted about this process, accusing democrats effectively doing some scaremongering. he said insurance companies are fleeing 0bamacare. it is dead. 0ur health care plan will
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lower premiums and the great health ca re lower premiums and the great health care acclamation mark 0ne lower premiums and the great health care acclamation mark one of the things democrats don't like about the plan... somebody with stage four cancer could now pay $132,000 more per year. if you have congestive heart failure you could pay $18,000 more. and you could face an extra $17,000 per year if you happen to get pregnant. for more on the significance of this vote, we are joined byjon sopel. it is pretty extraordinary that we have republicans and democrats taking a vote on a bill that many of them have not actually even read? vote on a bill that many of them have not actually even read ?m vote on a bill that many of them have not actually even read? it is extraordinary. you can't believe it isa extraordinary. you can't believe it is a ledger to —— legislative process. there is a congressional budget office. that is the body that marks the homework, if you like, of congress. they look at what is being proposed. they are independent, bipartisan. and their job
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proposed. they are independent, bipartisan. and theirjob is to work out what the cost would be, how many people will be affected, adversely 01’ people will be affected, adversely or positively. they haven't done that with this bill. so they are flying blind. they are saying to the captain, we want to go here but we don't have a map. in the meantime you have lots of outside groups. nobody likes a vacuum in politics. they are coming in with their own numbers. it looks like certain people will end up paying more and some people could stop getting insurance. how much of a concern with this b2 republicans? insurance. how much of a concern with this 82 republicans? there is a lwa ys with this 82 republicans? there is always that thing in politics, what is the difference between short—term tactics and long—term strategy? short—term tactics, the republicans will get great headlines. paul ryan will get great headlines. paul ryan will get great headlines. paul ryan will get a big boost if the vote goes through, as we expected well. 0therwise goes through, as we expected well. otherwise it would be a catastrophe. it will be good for donald trump, short—term. but longer term, if it will be good for donald trump, short—term. but longerterm, if you are going to create a class of
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losers, look at the impact that had for barack 0bama when he introduced 0bamacare and suddenly people saw that there are deductibles had gone massively up. it could go back —— come back to bite the republicans in the long—term in the most serious way. this is the first step. it has to go through the house of representatives. it is only one step in the process. the one thing it is worth reminding out the one thing it is worth reminding our viewers about is that this is what they call gateway legislation. the republicans are keen to get on with it because it leads them onto another key campaign promise, tax reform? yes. tax reform would be a very big win. there are are all sorts of arguments, and i was with someone this lunchtime who has been involved in the details, saying, that is what they should have started with. but they should have started with. but the republicans felt health care was something they had been promising for more than seven years from the moment 0bamacare had been introduced. now if they can get
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health care reform, then maybe that will embolden them to go on to tax reform. but we still don't know what the costs are going to be of the reform measure that will be introduced. you can't go on to tax reform until you have worked out your budget and how much you have got to spend. there is still so much thatis got to spend. there is still so much that is unknown. anyone who says it is clear what the sequencing for legislation is going to be, health care, tax reform and the infrastructure programme, i don't think we know yet. here is a question. what do lawsuits and eggs they both made it into the french election campaign today. marine le pen was out campaigning and had eggs thrown at her entourage. she avoided a direct hit back. she didn't, however, avoid a lawsuit. emmanuel macron filed one against. kristian, what is going on? it is quite interesting. there is a lot of focus about the involvement
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of the russians after what happened in the united states. so scared they of some interference by the russians, they changed their within the emmanuel macron campaign. yesterday there were rumours of paper is coming out which apparently, allegedly, showed that mr macron had an offshore bank account in the bahamas. it was fake news. part of the cyber warfare attack we have seen in other elections. today he has filed a lawsuit, effectively a defamation claim. he doesn't name anybody. it is basically against x. it is an example of just how is basically against x. it is an example ofjust how tense things have been getting. three days remaining. marine le pen and emmanuel macron back on the campaign trail. she has gone to the north. emmanuel macron has gone to the south. it certainly suggest the last three days will not be particularly easy going for either candidate. today's
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events follow the debate last night. there were a lot of insults. marine le pen accused her rival of being out of date. he accused her of spreading lies and fear. he went into the television debate a long way ahead in the polls, 20% ahead. it looks as though he did not drop the ball. when you look at how people thought of the debate he came out clearly on top. 63% of respondentss rated him as the winner. 34% picking marine le pen. it was a heated debate. here are some of the key moments. translation: mr macron is the candidate of savage globalisation, economic uncertainty, social brutality, have every man for himself. you say globalisation is too hard. so is europe. let's shut our borders. let others succeed, not‘s. you have been the minister of the
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economy, an adviser to the president. why didn't you apply at the time? your strategy has been the same for decades. what is it? making many lies and saying everything is —— doesn't work for the country. it doesn't work for the country. it does work. tax hasn't gone down. the safety of our people, the fight against terror and islamic extremism —— extremism, you don't want to take it on. i know why. we need to close our borders straightaway, immediately. that is what i do the moment i take power. that achieves nothing. there are many countries outside schengen that have been hit as hard as us by terrorist attacks. since 2015, we put back border controls to fight terrorism. the emmanuel macron camping good humour three days out. let's steep —— speaks to sophie maclachlan, one of theirfundraisers. —— speaks to sophie maclachlan, one
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of their fundraisers. how did you get involved in the movement, on march? i have a very small company. iam the march? i have a very small company. i am the only employee. i have been very worried now for a? years because our politicians, left and right, have not been doing much these last 30 years. i have never voted before. i voted for the first time in my life for emmanuel macron. ijoined the time in my life for emmanuel macron. i joined the campaign time in my life for emmanuel macron. ijoined the campaign through some friends a year ago and i have been working with a fundraising team. i ama working with a fundraising team. i am a volunteer. i worked two days a week. it has been a challenge. we started a year ago with few members. we are now 250,000. and we have over 40,000 contributors. there is a very interesting story about this. it is a party that has got up and running in eu and it is in the second round of the presidential election. it is down to 39—year—old emmanuel macron. but there has been a lot of fundraising going on in the
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background. you hired someone from —— that president 0bama had used? absolutely. we hired the same person he used for his campaign. where you are attracted by something they had done? we liked what they had proposed. we went to grass —— grassroots movements. bottom up information. they proposed door—to—door, very new for french people. we not done more than 100,000 doors. we got a lot of very interesting information which we used afterwards to create the programme. 0r used afterwards to create the programme. or at least part of the programme. or at least part of the programme. when you talk about the failure of hillary clinton's campaign in america, one of the things she forgot to do, particularly in wisconsin, florida etc, she forgot to get out on the ground and meet the voters. you have been doing that? we have. the campaignfor been doing that? we have. the campaign for the fundraising is similarto campaign for the fundraising is similar to bernie sanders. we
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appealed to our members by e—mail, by social media, to help with whatever money they could, so we get donations from 1 euro to 7500, which is the maximum authorised in france because our fundraising rules are extremely strict. no companies are allowed to give any money, only people like you and i. let's presume he wins on sunday. the polls say he will. let's presume he does. he will then need a parliament. there are very important elections injune for a new party such as yours. he is going to field more than 500 candidates. half of them have never worked in politics. where will you find them? is not exactly half. it is one third were never worked in politics. we trained them. the rest of it is people who have been elected but not with a political party. we are talking about mayors of small cities that were not right
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or left. they just got of small cities that were not right or left. theyjust got elected. some of these people will be joining. most importantly, half of the candidates are women. that is very new. it is legal in france. we have to have half the candidates as women. 0ther to have half the candidates as women. other parties put these women in zones that were not winnable. in our case the women will be in zones where we can win. sounds interesting. thank you. they will try to revamp the parliament in france. emmanuel macron is saying that not only are half the people going to be new, but they will only be able to do a certain at a time in parliament as well. it's interesting, isn't it? he does seem it's interesting, isn't it? he does seem to have the wind in his sales, the opinion poll we talked about. and president 0bama stepping in and adore sing him. i don't know if that helps. it didn't help brexit very much, did it? that is an interesting point. when you look at the opposition to the
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transatlantic trade deal at the moment, a lot of the opposition in europe is actually here in france. and a lot of it is in support of marine le pen and the far left. i'm sure there will be plenty of people like sophie, who welcomed president 0bama's involvement today, but a lot of people will say that you're open globalisation view of france is not what we want. they will not welcome it. let's get back to the vote taking place on health care in the house of representatives. it is under way. i am joined by eric kanter, a republican from virginia. how important is it to president trump that this vote passes? this is a really important that this vote passes? this is a really im porta nt vote, that this vote passes? this is a really important vote, fresher. what this vote of those is a private —— provides the pathway for overall health care reform, which was one of the major promises by donald trump in his presidential campaign. repealing, replacing 0bamacare has
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been a consistent team in election cycle after election cycle for republicans. you are no longer in office. you can speak with a certain amount of candour. isn't it a responsible for members of congress to be voting on a bill that they don't know exactly what is in it? they don't know how much it'll cost and they don't know what it will to health care premiums. and they don't know what it will to health care premiumslj and they don't know what it will to health care premiums. i don't think that business is fairly accurate. because what happens typically in this process is the congressional budget office scores the base bill. we have had that score. we have had that for some time. 8ut the previous version of the bill? if you look at the amendments that have been offered, they have been offered with certain dollar amounts. we know the additional spending over the period was amounting to little over 20 billion. the latest amendment was an
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$8 billion amendment that they proffered and adopted yesterday. it is not quite accurate to say they are ant budget projections. i think numbers —— members also know this is the first step in a process. this bill will go to the senate and will likely be changed in significant ways. there may be counting on the senate to change it. if it comes to a member of congress who is a republican in a moderate district, who is up for re—election, how much ofa who is up for re—election, how much of a problem could voting for this bill cause them? in the end what matters most is what the product is. 0nce matters most is what the product is. once this measure works his way through the process and is finally voted on, and goes on to the president for signature, it depends what is in that law. clearly there is an understanding on both sides that 0bamaca re is is an understanding on both sides that 0bamacare is in a death spiral.
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we have just heard yesterday and other major insurer has pulled out of yet another state. my state in particular, virginia. and what we are seeing is people are not going to have any choices for health care coverage, the way that it was promised when the 0bamacare legislation was first passed. this would be an improvement. the vote has now passed. the republicans do have the vote. they have the numbers. 216 republicans have voted for the bill, 19 against. donald trump has got his win. a big moment for him. it is a big moment. an initial step in a process. the bill will then go to the senate. the work will then go to the senate. the work will begin there. just listening to this, standing in a country where they have one of the best health care services in the world, they have a high number of
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doctors, they spend, comparative to america, and awful lot less per person, a lot less of their gdp. there will be people in europe saying, why is it so difficult for america to find the ideal health ca re system ? we in america, as you know, have a different health care system. we believe in the private sector. 0ur health care is largely run with competitive forces in the private sector, with the introduction of 0bamacare sector, with the introduction of 0bamaca re about seven sector, with the introduction of 0bamacare about seven years ago, it took a turn towards much more government involvement. and so this hybrid system that resulted from 0bamacare, i think, hybrid system that resulted from 0bamacare, ithink, will hybrid system that resulted from 0bamacare, i think, will be corrected. there will be a large participation by the government. obviously are a senior health care programme is the largest health care programme. add the indigent programme. add the indigent programme of medicaid and you still have the government being the largest pay for health care. people
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wa nt largest pay for health care. people want a choice. they don't want the government to impose it upon them. that is the thrust behind the kind of repeal and replace reform that we are seeing undertaken in congress right now. ok, right now. 0k, thank you very much. we are seeing it happen right now. republicans they want to pray that this bill doesn't hurt their chances of getting re—elected. they may want to start praying today. in america it is national day of prayer. in the white house, it was marked with christian music. # ourfather, who art in heaven. # ourfather, who art in heaven. # hallowed be thy name. # hallowed be thy name. # thy kingdom come, i will be done.
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—— thy will be done. that was the scene in the rose garden earlier today. president trump then signed an executive order allowing churches to be more political. the president said he will not allow people of faith to be bullied any more. i should point out that that executive order that he has signed is already facing legal contest from the american civil liberties union. they say the actions today are a broadside to the country's long—standing commitment to the separation between church and state. they are referring to the sixth amendment of the american constitution, which says you have to have separation. i have a six lane carriageway behind me. was that as bad as it sounded?! worse? i can tell by your laughter it was worse! it was quite odd. it was a strange it was worse! it was quite odd. it was a strange scene. it was worse! it was quite odd. it was a strange scene. move on,
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quickly! let's go from france to buckingham palace. the duke of edinburgh will stop carrying out public engagements this autumn. prince philip, 96 next month, made the decision himself with the full support of the queen. the queen will continue with a full programme of official engagements. peter hunt is in london. peter, i would imagine there is broad support for prince philip on this? he's five yea rs for prince philip on this? he's five years old. he deserves a rest? yes, on this global programme, can viewers think of anybody else at the age of 95, 96, who is on the global stage and still functioning in the way that he has done until now? in one way it is not that much of a surprise. in the uk, people generally retire in their 60s. he is doing it in his 90s. it was something he highlighted in an interview with the bbc for his 90th birthday. he said he had gone past its sell by date. it has taken in six years to act on his own advice because, in part, there has been a
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lot going on for the royal family. the queen became the longest bring —— serving monarch in british history. she celebrated her diamond jubilee and her 90th birthday. at the start of this year he finally felt he could act on what he said all those years ago and start to withdraw from public life. good for him. i'm 52 and i feel like withdraw from public life. good for him. i'm 52 and ifeel like i could do with a rest. the queen will not be giving up her duties and will be taking on more commitments? i'm not sure she will be taking on more commitments. she will not give up any offer duties. the reality of the age of being a 90—year—old elected head of state in the united kingdom and 15 other countries means she has started to do less. investitures. ceremonies in london and in windsor where people in public life are awarded knighthoods, that involves standing for about one hour. she is doing fewer of those and giving them
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onto other royals, like prince william, prince charles and princess ann. she, in a statement, welcomed what prince philip was doing. but i think privately she will feel a sense of loss, really. obviously she —— he is still in her life. but in terms of public performances, not having him there would be quite striking for her. what is noticeable when you see them together is how he helps to lighten the mood. i saw him when he was slightly younger, lifting people over crash barriers so lifting people over crash barriers so they could meet the queen. and he, crucially, we are talking about a british royal family he, crucially, we are talking about a british royalfamily in a very good place at the moment, that wasn't always the case. the house of windsor in the 1980s and 1990s had terrible problems, not least the public and painful collapse of the marriage of princess diana and prince charles. then we had her death. the worst week in the queen's rain. everybody around the couple say prince philip ‘s advice always
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got better the worse the problem was. i have to tell you both ably quick story. when i was paris correspondent here a couple of years ago i was invited to the state dinner the queen attended. and afterwards, on the terrace at the back of the lycee terrace —— palace, president hollande mingled with journalists. the queen was still there. he didn't speak very good english but he did get across that they come here to the arc de triomphe to look at the flame of the unknown soldier. he said there were more crowds for her than there were for his inauguration. what he was incredulous about was the stamina of the woman. the queen was just extraordinary, he said. she was still on the terrace in the evening. it is exhausting work? yes. the our we commented on him stepping down. we're making clear that she is not. she does public engagement and we will be seeing her continue to do
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that at this age of 91 when, as is obvious to people watching, plenty of people far younger have retired and put on the slippers. that is not something the queen will be doing any time soon. peter hunt, thank you. this is also getting a lot of attention in the united states. the royalfamily still very popular, despite our little misunderstanding a couple of hundred years ago, with americans. they watch and follow royal avenue is consistently. and the news that prince philip was stepping down was headline news all day. you are watching 100 days+ from bbc news. still to come reviewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news, the amazing story of the surfer who survived more than 30 hours clinging to his board in the irish sea. he thought he wouldn't be found alive. and from paris, i will be looking at the economics in france and how employment or unemployment
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plays into sunday's election. good evening. a lovely day for a large part of the united kingdom. plenty of sunshine. this is the view at mid—afternoon in the highlands of scotland. it wasn't sunny for all. mid—afternoon in the south—west of london. lots of clothes but little rain. it was quite cloudy for many southern counties, parts of south wales as well. thickening cloud pushing its way in on the breeze from the north sea may bring the odd spot of rain. that will be in the south—east and east anglia. clear skies further north. a chilly night. no major problems in towns and cities. five to 7 degrees. in rural parts of northern inland and northern scotland we will see a touch of frost. a chilly start for some. it could be grey around the north and north—east of scotland. elsewhere, a lovely start with plenty of sunshine. and there is a
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good deal of sunshine to be had in northern ireland. most of northern england as well. wales, the midlands, across to east anglia, a lovely start to the day. always breezy and cooled and north sea coast. breezy along the south coast as well. that is where we will see most of the cloud. the southernmost counties in particular seem that lead. that cloud will be there or thereabouts as you go through the day. quite breezy. a dry day pretty much everywhere. spells of sunshine for wales, much of the midlands and the northern half of the uk generally. still cool. head further west and inland, temperatures up to 18 degrees. quite a warm day. through the evening, there may be a few spots of rain in the midlands. rain getting into cornwall as well. this weather front in the south—west will not amount to much. rainfall will not amount to much. rainfall will not amount to much. rainfall will not be widespread on saturday. it is confined to the strath south—west of england. it may skirt its way along south coast later.
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most its way along south coast later. m ost pla ces its way along south coast later. most places will be dry as well. the odd shower possible for the north. the western side of scotland doing well, 17 or 18 degrees. this week weather front drift away to was the near continent in the second part of the weekend. the winds fall much lighter across most parts of the uk. stella breeze and sea coast. head further west, temperatures should be higher. these guys will be brighter as well. —— the skies. welcome back to 100 days+. i'm katty kay in washington. christian fraser is in paris. members of the us house of representatives have voted to repeal barack 0bama's healthcare programme. people in this country, they want to have a choice. they don't want to have a choice. they don't want to have a choice. they don't want to have a government impose upon them the kind of health care they need theirfamilies. the french presidential candidate emmanuel macron has filed a lawsuit after his nationalist rival marine le pen alluded to an alleged offshore account during wednesday's debate. returning now to the french
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presidential election. as marine le pen and emanuel macron make their final arguments to the voters, economic issues have taken centre stage. compared to germany, france's economic performance has fallen behind, and youth unemployment is a particular problem. one infour one in four young adults unemployed and a lot of talk last night about the economics and also about tax affairs as well. we are going to speak to affairs as well. we are going to speakto an affairs as well. we are going to speak to an economist who is with us. with me now is eric chaney, economic advise to the institute montaigne. he hasjust he has just arrived this minute so he's going to step into the picture! he is taking off his scarf! sorry to drag you straight onto camera! tell
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us drag you straight onto camera! tell usa drag you straight onto camera! tell us a bit about last night's debate. a lot of talk yesterday about unemployment, which is of course a keyissue, unemployment, which is of course a key issue, and particularly in the areas of the north of the country where marine le pen has done so well. which of the candidates do you think has the answer? there is only doubt the only candidate has an a nswer doubt the only candidate has an answer about the labour market is macron. because he has reforms. whether these are the best one could imagine, i'm not totally sure, but she has absolutely nothing. she doesn't want to change anything. she just wants to close the borders, like the us did in 1930, and she tries to tell people, if we close the borders everything will be fine. we will getjobs. but there is no change whatsoever in the labour market. how can you reduce unemployment if you don't change things? you from the business world and of course you are in favour of a emmanuel macron, but many le pen
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supporters will say, what has globalisation really done for us? what has the eu really done? it's taken away our factories and jobs and brought us nothing. we have exactly the same debate in the us, france, the uk. not in germany, by the way, where they are happy with globalisation. france is a small economy in a big world. if france cannot export and it has to import, it will be even poorer. and that is the answer that is not that easy to tell people. not really because of china but because of the incredible technological changes we are seeing. so if you tell these people, we need to export, if you put barriers on imports, there will be barriers for exports, and then it will be very ha rd to exports, and then it will be very hard to hear that, but it's the truth. what they need to do is cut spending. it's the highest government spending in the world. you spend far too much money on the
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public sector. that's absolutely right. 56% of the french gdp is made of public spending, of which half is for the government and half is for of public spending, of which half is for the govn state, tand half is for of public spending, of which half is for the govn state, so 1d half is for to it toito very, , verv muchj very much “$3555” 7, w’ ”7, "f very much “$3555” ' your ”7, "f f' a lot of fear a: on
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a lot off;;._:. on emmanuel §hel g he does win this election m sunday lid the - of has mstedofi’twittie-r:”" * w w" e
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