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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 8, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. france elects its youngest ever president. 39—year—old emmanuel macron sweeps to power, with a decisive victory over the far—right candidate marine le pen. at a victory rally in front of thousands of supporters he promised to unify a divided country and rebuild its economy. this morning, we're live in paris, to get french reaction and take stock of what it means for brexit negotiations. the new president was very much a guest brexit i'm in a french bakery in london — talking to french voters, businesses and entrepreneurs based here in the uk. good morning, it's monday the 8th of may. also this morning: facebook promises to get tough
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on fake news during the election campaign, saying it'll do all it can to tackle the problem. in sport, there's hope yet for arsenal's season. they beat manchester united and are still in the chase for the champions league places. and carol has the weather. good morning. for some of us, the good morning. for some of us, the good weather will last. a bit more cloud in the north and east and still cool down in the north sea coastline. i will have more details in about ten minutes. good morning. first, our main story. france's newly elected president, emmanuel macron, has promised to heal the country's divisions following his resounding victory over the far—right leader, marine le pen, in yesterday's election. the pro—eu candidate secured 66% of the vote and atjust 39 years old, he will become the country's youngest ever leader. speaking at a victory rally outside the louvre in paris, he said the task ahead was immense and made a plea for unity.
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here's our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas. this is an election victory that will reverberate across europe. emmanuel macron, liberal, pro—eu, who supports globalisation and immigration — france's next president. and he's only 39. mr macron created his movementjust a year ago to give french voters tired of traditional parties a new choice — not that the extremes, but in the middle. translation: what we've done for so many months, there is no comparison, there's no equivalent to that. everybody was saying to us it was impossible. but they didn't know anything about france! his opponent, the far—right anti—eu marine le pen,
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was strongly beaten. she did, though, secure 11 million votes, a third of those cast. and she said the fact that she made it to the run—off meant that her party should now be seen as the official opposition in france. but mr macron‘s vision is a repudiation of populist, anti—establishment wave that brought brexit and donald trump, and which marine le pen sought to harness, too. above all, this is a victory for europe's centrists, and a defeat for europe's populists and eurosceptics. mr macron has already said he will work to strengthen the eu, and eu leaders have rushed to congratulate him. they see emmanuel macron as giving the eu new impetus. so this win means the uk is about to negotiate brexit facing an eu starting to feel confident that the populist tide may be turning. we're joined now by our paris correspondent, hugh schofield.
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hugh, what challenges does emmanuel macron face in order to deliver his vision for change? indeed. we have two acknowledged the astonishing nature of his achievement. the youngest ever president of france and a man who has come from absolutely nowhere. his movement, it wasn't even a party, a year ago it didn't even exist. he won 66% of the vote. much more than anybody had predicted. a much stronger margin over marine le pen than anyone thought would happen. he has big challenges ahead. the first point is to say that many people voted for him just to keep marine le pen out. it wasn't a vote of attachment to his liberal, pro—business report —— reforms. now he has to govern and to do that, he needs the majority in parliament.
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there are elections in a few weeks time. he needs to windows against a fight back from the socialist and republicans, mainstream parties. —— he needs to win those. the bbc understands that the conservatives will once again commit to cutting net migration to the tens of thousands in the party's election manifesto. yesterday the home secretary, amber rudd, refused to say whether the pledge would be repeated. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason. it's proved an impossible target so far, what will be different this time? we have had this three times from the conservatives. they continued to say. —— they continue to break the promise. break it by a country mile.
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they never got close to that target. they never got close to that target. the argument from many during the eu russia rendering campaign, the reason for that, that government —— the target was missed by so much in recent yea rs the target was missed by so much in recent years that even without any immigration from the eu, it would have still been broken. it is a huge challenge for the next government to do something about it. getting immigration down is hugely important to so many people. we will be going through it in fine detail. a ban on television adverts for unhealthy food and sweets before the 9:00 watershed, is being promised by labour. it's part of a strategy to tackle childhood obesity. the conservatives say britain's advertising rules
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are already the strictest in the world. our political correspondent, leila nathoo, has the details. tempting treats — difficult for children to resist. bringing down high rates of childhood obesity has long been a pressing public health concern. now labour says it would tackle the problem by banning junk food ads during prime—time tv. the party says in government would stop adverts for foods — high in salt, sugar, orfat — being broadcast before 9pm. it says that it would hope to halve childhood obesity rates within a decade. and it is promising a £250 million annual fund for children's mental and physical health in england. the government has already announced a tax on sugary drinks, and, in a strategy outlined last summer, a voluntary target for the food and drinks industry to reduce sugar content — but health campaigners say the measures don't go far enough. the conservatives have accused labour of making unfunded promises, and said
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that their plan to cut childhood obesity was ambitious. leila nathoo, bbc news. the group representing hospitals and other nhs trusts in england has called for an end to the cap on pay rises. nhs providers says the government's policy of pay restraint over the last seven years is preventing employers from retaining the staff needed to deliver safe patient care. a two year old girl is being treated in hospital after suffering serious injuries to her head and body in what's been described as a horrific dog attack. police say several animals managed to get into the garden where she was playing in the toxteth area of liverpool. ten dogs have been seized from a nearby house and a man living there has been arrested. the social media giant facebook has this morning placed adverts in national newspapers to provide advice about how to spot fake news online. the initiative has been designed to stop the spread of false stories during the general
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election campaign. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. it's a term that became familiar during last you's american presidential election. fake news stories made up to make money or to act as political propaganda and it is facebook which has taken much of the blame for spreading stories such as these. now, the social network says it is doing everything it can to tackle the problem in the uk but these newspaper adverts are part of these newspaper adverts are part of these assets. facebook says it stepping up the battle against fake news and giving its users a guide to spotting for stories. it's closing tens of thousands of fake uk accou nts tens of thousands of fake uk accounts which might spread misinformation. and it's working with fact checking organisations during the election campaign. there has already been a determined effort in germany to use. the spread of fa ke in germany to use. the spread of fake stories in the run—up to get elections later this year. —— to
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stop the spread. the main political parties in the uk will be directing much of its advertising budgets at the social network of more than a0 million people. 82 nigerian schoolgirls — kidnapped by the extremist group boko haram three years ago — have met their country's president after being freed in a prisoner swap. they were among more than 200 girls taken from their school in the town of chibok. at least 100 are still being held. the girls were handed over on saturday in exchange for boko haram suspects. there are growing fears among un negotiators that president trump will pull the united states out of paris climate agreement. delegates from almost 200 countries, including the us, are meeting in germany to draft rules for implementing the deal. a beach that was washed away 33 years ago has re—appeared after a freak tide. the irish beach on achill island disappeared in 198a after spring storms washed the sand away. with nothing more than rock pools left behind, almost
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all the villages‘ hotels, guesthouses and cafes shut down. but hundreds of thousands of tons of sand were dumped there over ten days in april and locals are hoping it sticks around long enough for the area to be given blue—flag status — a quality award for clean beaches. quite extraordinary. the sand can change quite dramatically after a storm. it completely changes the beach and the beach back. incredible. a big dump. a big dump of sand. katherine is here now with the sport. a bit of an underwhelming weekend, wasn't it? arsenal are still in with a chance
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of finishing in the premier league's top four, and qualifying for the champions league. they beat an understrength manchester united 2—0 at the emirates yesterday, ending united's 25 match unbeaten run in the league. 1995 premier league champions blackburn rovers have been relegated from the championship — becoming the first team to win the title and then drop to the third tier. their win at brentford wasn't enough. newcastle won the title as brighton slipped up. ireland's first ever one day international at lord's ended in a heavy defeat. they were beaten by england — who took the two match series 2—0. and maria sharapova wins to set up a second round meeting with canada's eugenie bouchard at the madrid 0pen. bouchard has called the russian "a cheater", and suggested she should have been banned for life after testing positive for meldonium last year. that should be a tasty one. no love lost between the two of them. eugenie bouchard used to look up to
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her and called her a hero and now she doesn't look up to her any more and now they face each other on court. you know you said it was an underwhelming weekend in the premier league... moreno were so bored during the game, he was playing the bottle flip game. you have got these pictures and you will be able to see them at 630. what a beautiful day it was, at least where i was, yesterday. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. look at this gorgeous picture that one of our weather watcher is sent in yesterday from the field in glen morgan. —— morgan. these are the kind of values, 21 celsius, 22. for some of us, it will be as warm as thatis
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some of us, it will be as warm as that is to go through today. it is still chilly down the east coast of scotland. a bit of clout here to start the day. a lot of it will break up —— cloud. west is best, today, in terms of sunshine. for northern ireland and much of scotland, another fine day. northern ireland and much of scotland, anotherfine day. cloud is hugging the south coast. through central parts of england and wales, some sunshine to look forward to today. temperatures are looking nice in the sunshine. as a gift of the south—east, we will hang on to bit more. we will see them sunny spells. ——a more. we will see them sunny spells. --a bit more. we will see them sunny spells. ——a bit more cloud. through the evening and overnight, we still have the wind that it is turning light. it will be cold enough for a touch of frost here and there. temperatures will see six, seven, eight. you can expect those cabbages in towns and cities. as we head into tuesday, high—pressure well and
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truly driving. —— those temperatures. the wind wilful lighter down the east coast tomorrow so lighter down the east coast tomorrow so asa lighter down the east coast tomorrow so as a result, it won't feel as cold —— will fall lighter. having said this, the cloud will break in parts. we will see sunshine, west is best, again. the temperature range of eight to about 16. as we start the down wednesday, when we have had brea ks the down wednesday, when we have had breaks overnight, it will be called. 0vernight, the odd pocket of frost. 0n 0vernight, the odd pocket of frost. on wednesday, quite a lot of sunshine and some subtle train —— when changes. the wind changes direction so there will be more cloud where it has been signing of late in scotland and northern ireland. down the east coast, we won't have the nagging easterly that we have had of late as well. again, not feeling as call. i could sunshine as we push further south.
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—— not feeling as cold. temperatures of 9— —— not feeling as cold. temperatures of 9- 16. —— not feeling as cold. temperatures of 9— 16. what is happening for the rest of the week? it is turning a little bit more unsettled. we have the weather front moving north but it is going to have some milder, warmer conditions coming in behind it. there will be quite a lot of energy in the atmosphere by the time we get to the end of the week. when it is turning warmer, it won't be dry. there will be sunny spells, chilly nights, the chance of rain later and maybe even some thunderstorms thrown in as well. i will keep you posted on all of that. send us your pictures of a nice day on saturday and we may have time to show that. even if we don't show them, we will look at them. white it was nice and other places as well. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a big win for emmanuel macron. the 39—year—old centrist sweeps to victory to become france's new president, promising to unite
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and protect the people. facebook promises to get tough on fake news during the election campaign, saying it will do all it can to try and stop rumours and the spread of false information. shall we have a look at the papers? cani shall we have a look at the papers? can i show you this first? and don't go anywhere, i have a big shock to show you in a few minutes' time. facebook talking about fake news —— great shark. tips for spotting what they are calling falls news, i am interested in why they are not calling it fake news but they have done ten tips to spot news which is not true. false news stories have catchy headlines, all in capital letters, and shocking claims sound guess what. .. letters, and shocking claims sound guess what... it is unbelievable.
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emmanuel macron features on the front page of many of the papers. the country remains divided. 3a% of the vote went to marine le pen, and around 25% abstentions. also i2.5% of votes cast were either blank or spoiled, according to officials. the front page of the telegraph, france's new hope puts a cloud over brexit. we will be talking about what his election might mean for all of us in the uk and what kind of brexit we might get. the times have the picture, landslide for emmanuel macron. the picture on the front page of the times, and the mirror has gone with... england start betting on his own transfer, and remember last week we spoke to one of the actresses who played barbara windsor in the programme which was
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on last night and they have a story about barbara windsor, talking about her own story, the rift with her father which samantha was telling us about, which broke her heart. lots of papers carrying pictures of prince harry and his girlfriend, who we re prince harry and his girlfriend, who were at a polo match yesterday. they say staying loyal to an insurer can cost families £1000 a year, which is an extraordinary amount of money. broccoli. i love rockley, i like raw broccoli. —— i love broccoli. broccoli. i love rockley, i like raw broccoli. -- i love broccoli. lots of pictures of dejected blackburn fans, relegated from the championship yesterday. the first tea m championship yesterday. the first team to have won the premier league and then dropped down to the third tier of english football. a sad day for blackburn fans and an exclusive
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interview with tyson fury, who is trying to get back into boxing. he is 25 stone, he has to lose seven stone before he hopes to get back into the ring to fight on an undercard in july but into the ring to fight on an undercard injuly but he has a really important hearing at uk anti—doping today because he has been accused of taking banned substances. we will find out later today, or he will find out, we will find out a few weeks later, what the outcome of the hearing was, and whether he will be punished and allowed to fight again. he is keen to fight anthonyjoshua, full of the talk of how that will be the biggest fight, and what everybody wants to see, and how it will be an easy win. there is an appetite for that, as well. anthony joshua called out tyson fury straight after the fight with klitschko. he seems to have got his act together of bit. can i tell
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you about beatrice and bert whitehead? they are both extremely ill, and look what the hospital staff did. they put their beds together so they can drink a glass of press ago. —— prosecco. this shark is the largest ever caught in europe. it is 107 stone, that is how big it is. it is an absolute beast. my big it is. it is an absolute beast. my favourite thing about that story is that it can't be official because they freed it. which is nice. which is just as it should be. they freed it. which is nice. which isjust as it should be. it they freed it. which is nice. which is just as it should be. it can go to fight another day. yes, very good point. i'm glad you have clarified that. stone, 107 stone, £1500 of
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shark. —— 1500 pounds of shark. pensions are likely to be a key issue for many voters in the general election, with much debate focused around the so called triple lock. it is the guarantee that the state pension will rise in line with inflation, average wages or 2.5%, whichever is highest. so steph and the bbc‘s reality check team have been looking intojust how affordable it is. i'm sure we have all thought of ways to try and make a bit of extra money, and make life a bit easier, especially as you are getting older and thinking about retiring. now, it can be tough to save for a private pension, so a lot of people rely on the state one. there are around 13 million people claiming a state pension. it works out at a maximum of just over £159 a pension. it works out at a maximum ofjust over £159 a week marked and that costs over £90 billion a year, which is about 12% of the government's total spending. so how much it goes up by each year is
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based on something called the triple lock. so statisticians will look at how much average earnings have gone up how much average earnings have gone up by, and how much inflation, the cost of living, has risen as well. if either of them are over 2.5% then they will go with the highest. if they will go with the highest. if they are less than that, then they will increase the state pension by 2.5%. basically whichever of these three is highest. so this means, even at times when price rises and the increase in the cost of living has been close to zero, the state pension has still been going up by 2.5%. have a look at this graph. now, since april 2010, the state pension has gone up to 25%. that co m pa res pension has gone up to 25%. that compares with earnings going up by about 1a% and the price of inflation by 15%. so there is a big difference there, isn't there? so if you are retired or close to retiring, then the system is good news for you. and barry, you think you deserve this rise. we need the increase every
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year. iam rise. we need the increase every year. i am 73 years old, and i are still working. i am going to let you get back to it, thanks barry. but for george, it is a different story. you are a lot younger and you are finding it tough to save for anything. i am 28, i have been working since i left university and i haven't save much money yet. and you feel like you will work a long time before you retire. yes, i think retirement is a long way away. time before you retire. yes, i think retirement is a long way awaym time before you retire. yes, i think retirement is a long way away. it is clear the triple lock system divides the generations. now, old people are more likely to vote in an election so it is good for harnessing the grey vote but it is stirring up inequalities between the young and the old. is it sustainable? no, steph, it is not. it is already costing the country several billion pounds more to sustain at the moment, and that cost is going to keep on going up over the decades to come. so the next government is going to have to make some pretty tough decisions about how and when it is going to get rid of the triple lock, and what is going to do
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instead. will let you get back to that, tom. if we don't have that system, though, what do we do? because people still need money when they retire, and it can't be at a fixed rate with everything around is changing. so one option is to have a double lock system, so get rid of the 2.5% minimum, and instead go by either how much earnings are increasing by, or how much the cost of living is rising. this is about fairness and sustainability. also, some organisations think the triple lock system is simply an arbitrary way of setting tension rises, and it -- if way of setting tension rises, and it —— if things carry on as they are, it is highly likely the age of retirement will have to go up. that was steph looking at the future of the state pension, and she will be back with us shortly, turning her attention to the french election and the impact last night's result could have here. she is at a french cafe to tell me a
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bit more about their thoughts. she had a rather impressive french pastry. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. video footage has been released by police of a group of moped riders who mounted a pavement in park lane to try and steal a man's watch. it happened just over a week ago, with the riders working together to chase the man, who tried to run away. he was left with a broken leg. it is the latest in a spate of moped thefts in central london in the space of a few days. a woman from leytonstone is to compete for great britain in the first ever international blind tennis tournament, which starts today. brenda cassel is partially—sighted, after her optic nerves became damaged. the event is being held in spain, and brenda is already a national singles and doubles champion.
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imean, i mean, i've never played cited tennis. i've started playing tennis, but i think i am a natural sportsperson. and so a lot of what i do it instincts, because i have never been really coached to play. so put all that together, its amazing. london underground workers are staging a 2a—hour strike in a dispute over the sacking of a colleague, but it is only affecting london bridge station. rmt union members are protesting over an incident involving a fare dodger, with the union saying staff should have been praised for tackling a violent passenger, rather than sacked. underground bosses claim the employee demonstrated what they called unacceptable conduct. the protest ends at 10:00pm tonight. let's have a look at the travel situation now. london bridge station is open, despite the strike i mentioned, while the piccadilly line has severe delays from king's cross to hammersmith, because of late—finishing engineering works. 0n the roads, in northolt,
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the aao is down to one lane between the polish war memorial and target roundabout, after a vehicle caught fire yesterday. the road will be closed for resurfacing work, so expect long delays. and in croydon, barclay road is closed eastbound between the fairfield halls roundabout and altyre road, because a car has overturned. let's have a check on the weather, with kate. good morning. it is a rather grey start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around today, and the northerly breeze as well. so it is actually going to feel quite cool. now, you might get one or two brighter spells, more likely lead on this afternoon. the further west you are, further north you may get one or two matt coles in the cloud. so some bright spells there. elsewhere it stays rather grey. the maximum temperatures 15 celsius, and with
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that northerly breeze it will feel quite chilly. now, there is a bit of cloud overnight is patchy cloud. we will get some clear spells. the wind a lot lighter. the minimum temperature between seven and eight celsius. so a bright start tomorrow with some sunshine but gradually the cloud will start to develop through the course of tuesday. the wind, though, is a lot lighter tomorrow so in those sunny spells temperature feeling reasonable at 15 celsius. a ridge of high pressure builds overnight tuesday into wednesday, so we lose the cloud. plenty of sunshine, and it will feel warm in the sunshine, with a maximum of about 15 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as facebook ramps up it's fight against fake news, we'll discuss why a crackdown is needed and whether it goes far enough. sport climbing will make its 0lympic debut at tokyo 2020 — so we're at the uk's highest climbing wall to find out how gb athletes are plotting their route to the top. what are you doing here? and i said,
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i have got to be somewhere, baby. the heavyweight of comedy who stumbled into stand—up because of a dare joins us to explain why he's not afraid of speaking his mind on stage. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. france's newly elected president, emmanuel macron, has promised to heal the country's divisions following his resounding victory over the far—right leader, marine le pen, in yesterday's election. the pro—european, centrist secured 66% of the vote and atjust 39 years old, he will become the country's youngest ever leader. speaking at a victory rally outside the louvre museum in paris, he said the task ahead was immense and made a plea for unity. we're joined now by our paris correspondent, hugh schofield.
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hugh, he has got a big challenge to bring together a divided country? there is a lot of work to be done. it is an incredible achievement when you think that a year ago, very few people in france had no idea he was intending to run the presidency. three years ago, nobody had ever heard of him. he has turned his movement into a mass political formation which led him to this victory yesterday at a much more convincing victory that the polls had predicted. a big, big challenge now had four emmanuel macron. many people who voted for him did not vote for his project which is a gradual pro—business reform that they voted to keep out marine le pen. this is a perennial problem in french politics, that people vote
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against the far right. it means that whoever gets elected to not have a majority of people signing up to the programme. he needs a majority in parliament, there are elections in june and he needs to fight back now to turn his movement into a major force in the parliament. we will be live in paris throughout the morning here on breakfast. the bbc understands the conservatives will once again commit to cutting net migration to the "tens of thousands" if they win the general election. yesterday the home secretary, amber rudd, refused to say whether the pledge — which was also in the party's 2010 and 2015 manifestos — would be repeated. meanwhile, ukip says it would cut net migration to zero over five years. staying with the election campaign — labour says it would extend the ban on television adverts for unhealthy food and sweets until the 9:00 watershed. the party says its strategy on child health aims to halve the number of overweight youngsters within ten years. the conservatives say britain's advertising rules are already the strictest in the world. the group representing hospitals
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and other nhs trusts in england has called for an end to the cap on pay rises. nhs providers says the government's policy of pay restraint over the last seven years is preventing employers from retaining the staff needed to deliver safe patient care. we need to fund the nhs properly so that we're are not asking our staff to try and close the gap between the demand going through the roof and the funding staying broadly stable at the way we are trying to close the gap is by asking our staff to do more and more and more and itjust means thejobs more and more and more and itjust means the jobs have more and more and more and itjust means thejobs have become more difficult, more stressful, more pressured. the social networking site, facebook, is placing adverts in british newspapers to provide practical advice on how to spot fake news online. the website has also closed thousands of accounts linked to false stories ahead of the general election. the company advises users to "be sceptical of headlines" and to cross—check reports.
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the move comes after it was accused of helping to spread fake news during last year's us presidential election. here is an example. they top ten tips on how to spot what they are calling spot —— false news. we will be talking to one of the charities involved in helping them do that a little bit later here on breakfast. there are growing fears among un negotiators that president trump will pull the united states out of paris climate agreement. delegates from almost 200 countries, including the us, are meeting in germany to draft rules for implementing the deal. a secret space mission has returned to earth after 2—years. that's the us military‘s experimental x—37b space plane landing yesterday at nasa's kennedy space centre in florida. according to the american air force, it's been conducting unspecified
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experiments for more than 700 days while in orbit. it was the fourth and lengthiest mission so far for the secretive programme. ijust want i just want to know more! ijust want to know more! what has it been doing? you have made it sound remarkably top—secret. let's have a big and trained get past the fa ke have a big and trained get past the fake news. not that it's fake news... anyway. i've landed myself ina pit news... anyway. i've landed myself in a pit of despair. move on! i can hear it, move on. it's what happens on monday. what has happened over the weekend? not much has happened over the weekend, i was going to say. it was fairly dull in terms of football matches. you have been a bit awed in the premier league over the past few weeks? —— board. in the
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past, the teens hated each other, the pitch was really spicy. this time, it didn't really matter. jose mourinho said he had be given up. arsene wenger came out on top and they said if they can sort themselves out... arsenal kept alive their hopes of finishing in the premier league's top four with a 2—0 win over an understrength manchester united at the emirates. arsenal took the lead through granit xhaka's deflected shot nine minutes after half time. then danny welbeck scored against his former club and ended united's 25 game unbeaten run in the premier league. arsenal are still six points behind fourth place manchester city — but they have a game in hand. united remain fifth. we wa nt we want to try to win the europa league. more important for us then to finish. we really want to try to
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win it, win at the trophy. we need it to give rest to players. ask what was very short at the time. we want to win our games. the premier league is known, some teams who are safe continue to fight. let's focus to win our games. you are not going to be speaking here next season again? you want me to work for bbc, all? i don't know, i don't know. nothing new. liverpool drew 0—0 at home to southampton. liverpool captainjames milner had a second half penalty saved by fraser forster. now a couple of things caught our eye in yesterday's premier league matches.
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the entertainment was somewhat lacking on the pitch at anfield so liverpool defender alberto moreno decided to make his own entertainment by having a go at the bottle flip challenge. and what do you do if you're on the bench for arsenal and your 2—0 up against manchester united ? you get the malteasers out and share them out! blackburn have been relegated to league one, becoming the first premier league winners to drop down to the third tier of english football. they did their best, winning 3—1 against brentford on the final day, but it wasn't enough. nottingham forest and birmingham city, the other sides that could have been relegated, both won their final matches to remain in the championship. aberdeen have guaranteed themselves second place in the championship. the goal in injury time means they
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will finish in at least fourth place. liverpool ladies extended their lead at the top of women's super league one after beating birmingham 2—0 in the spring series. manchester city have two games in hand on the league leaders and had to come from behind at reading — jade moore with the pick of the goals in that one. city went on to win 3—2 thanks to jill scott. elsewhere, arsenal won 5—1 at yeovil. in their first ever one day international at lord's — ireland were beaten by england by 85 runs. england racked up 328 for six in their first innings with three batsmen making scores in the seventies. ireland battled hard in the chase but eventually fell well short of the target. england take the series 2—0. i went into this and we looked really strong. you can tell that those guys that have been playing, it definitely benefited them coming into the international arena. it sets us up nicely for a really
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important series against south africa. there's an intriguing match to come at the madrid 0pen, as maria sharapova and eugenie bouchard are set to go head to head. sharapova beat mirjana lucic—baroni in the first round yesterday. last week bouchard said that the russian, who's just coming back from a 15 month ban for testing positive for a banned substance, is a cheat and should have been banned for life. will they shake hands over the net? we will just will they shake hands over the net? we willjust have to wait and see. that will be tasty. thank you for all those pictures of behind the scenes in the football. the football itself was a particularly exciting so we will show you what goes on in the pitch. we will have a go at the bottle flip challenge of it later. i do it occasionally with the kids, but.... emmanuel macron has been elected as the next french president. he has been described as charming and a tactical genius. his critics say he is vacuous.
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but what might it mean for french businesses here and for uk industry, as well as brexit negotiations? steph is at a french bakery in london this morning to find out. good morning, everyone. it smells lovely in here. so much fabulous food is coming out. we are in a french patisserie in london and you can see some of the crap going on. it smells so nice. —— prep. what will it mean for the french people who live here? there is about 350,000 french nationals living in the uk. we do a lot of business, we in points —— import. and to export.
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french entrepreneurs, if they are to say. what are your thoughts on this result overnight? first, like a lot of people, i'm very relieved because it was important to avoid a real problem. very relieved that emmanuel macron has been elected. happy in a way that he has put and shown the willingness for the future. we needed a change. it wasn't my first choice, of course. we are going to see how it is going to progress and how the next elections, which are in a very few weeks, are going to show these progress and how the other parties are going to show how they can influence one way or the other, the action he will have. thoughts? i'm very happy. i voted for emmanuel
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macron in both rounds. yesterday i felt at to be french, to be european. it has happened together. he wants to be not only working for france which work for itself but also after all the issues that we are all facing in europe. also for the business. they think it is free trade which is unusual for a french president. he wants to deal with the crisis of the migrants. i'm sure he will be the most pragmatic president for brexit. as an entrepreneur, he would do business with britain as well is on the continent. it will give a sigh of relief. business as usual, politics as usual is no longer the case. he wants to gather all the energy are around that. himself, he is also an entrepreneur. for me, it is hoped. the hope is there. it is a challenge that i like to be part of in the economic
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sector. what do you feel, as a businesswoman in the uk, what impact do you think it will have? part of my clients will leave and reside in france. a lot of people think about income tax and other tax. they tend to forget about that one which will go over 17%. it is going to have an impact on people who are going to be living in france. that is, you know... then, the other way, he is going to be able to manage the progress of businesses. there are some positive thoughts about that. i agree on that point. how will he gather all the forces? we have seen 20% of the population voting for mr melachon. to do something
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pro—business? i think that will be a challenge. of course, it is a challenge. of course, it is a challenge. remember, he has a strong team around. he has created a platform outside political deadlock. he has a strong programme, a strong team. we focus on emmanuel macron speaking well but actually, he is extremely able. his team is extremely able. his team is extremely able. his team is extremely able. we have something we have not had for a long time. in a positive way. in the positive way, it will carry a loss in europe and let's face it as well, if it is positive, people will consume and we will be able to do more business with them. thank you both for your time this morning. we will be talking to lots of people about this. i will leave you with a picture of some very delicious food. looks absolutely
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lovely in there as well. great to hear their point of view on bbc brea kfast. hear their point of view on bbc breakfast. pass the pain au chocolate, will you? here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. i think you can dream on about those ca kes i think you can dream on about those cakes now that steph is there. in five minutes they will be gone. we have some beautiful weather watchers pictures already, this one from guernsey, a lovely sunrise. a beautiful sunrise ta ken by guernsey, a lovely sunrise. a beautiful sunrise taken by paul, and the third one, beautiful blue skies in ireland, in fife. forsome the third one, beautiful blue skies in ireland, in fife. for some of us it isa in ireland, in fife. for some of us it is a lovely start to the day. as we go through the week there will be sunny spells. there will also be chilly nights, a touch of frost at times, and later in the week there is the chance of rain. i know some of us arejust is the chance of rain. i know some of us are just screaming out for some rain. what we have is a fair bit of cloud to start with in the east and across the midlands. some
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of that will melt away. still some onshore flow, still feeling cool along the east coast. as we drift further west we are into the sunshine from the word go and we will hang onto it as well. western parts of scotland, northern ireland, burning up quite nicely. it is the same across central and western parts of england, and of wales. herburger towards the east there is a bit more cloud around, but it should stay dry. and even where we have got more cloud around it will also break up at times and we will see some sunny spells. but if you are under the cloud and in that wind it will feel cold. as we had through the evening and overnight the wind sta rts the evening and overnight the wind starts to ease, becoming more of a breeze. you could see the odd bit of drizzle, maybe the odd shower, but they will be the exception rather than the rule, and under the clear skies it will be called in after a touch of frost here and there. these temperatures are indicative of what you can expect in towns and cities. as we head on into tuesday, high pressure still very much driving our weather, but look at the lack of isobars. if you live along the east
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coast you will be delighted to see that, because it does mean it is not going to feel as cold tomorrow as it has done for the last week or so. tomorrow also there will be more cloud than we are seeing today, and even so there will be some sunshine, cloud breaking up at times, the lion's share of the sunshine in the west and also parts the south. temperatures between about nine and 16 celsius. then, as we start the day on wednesday, a nippy start where we have had breaks in the cloud by night, temperatures getting down to minus two celsius. where we have the clear skies is where we have the clear skies is where we have the clear skies is where we have the sunshine first thing, but on wednesday there is a difference in the forecast with a change in the wind direction. across northern and some central parts of scotland there will be more cloud and some showers. we lose this nagging east early we have had down the east coast, so things brightening up but not feeling as cold, and a fair bit of sunshine around as well so temperatures between nine and 16. and in the sunshine it will feel quite pleasant. thank you very much,
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see you in half an hour or so. adverts forjunk food will be banned from popular tv shows, including the x factor and britain's got talent, under labour plans to tackle childhood obesity. at the moment, products high in fat, salt or sugar are not allowed to be advertised during children's programmes. but labour says, if elected, it will extend this to everything before the 9:00pm watershed. let's talk to the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth. good morning to you, mr ashworth. nice to have you on the programme. i know you are a father yourself. how old are your kids? five and three. so you are very qualified to talk about this, and you will know from your own experience it is notjust about what kids are watching on tv, it is about what parents do, it is about physical activity, it is about the availability and the price of food. yes, there are a number of factors contributing to the obesity crisis but what i am saying today is
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our ambition should be nothing less than having the healthiest children in the world. when you look at all the different indicators, we are falling down the league tables compared to other western, wealthy countries. and obesity is becoming a real crisis. 0ne countries. and obesity is becoming a real crisis. one in five children starting primary school overweight, one in three children leaving primary school of these, and ultimately obesity is costing the nhs now £6 billion. so every viewer who pay their taxes is paying for this obesity crisis. so we think one of the big, big initiatives we can take, it is not the only initiative, but one of the initiatives we can ta ke but one of the initiatives we can take is to ban the advertising of junk food. we have already banned in this country for children's tv, but a lot of the adverts have transferred to the x factor, britain's got talent, all brilliant shows, i watch them with my kids, but every parent knows when you watch the shows with your kids, your kids say let's get that happy meal at mcdonald's, and i do get that
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happy meal mcdonald's, i understand it. so let's do something to tackle this obesity crisis. so if you get elected, are your kids not going to vote for you, because they cannot go to mcdonald's any more? the thing is, it is about moderation. it is the difference between giving your kidsjunk food the difference between giving your kids junk food every day of the week and doing it once in awhile. i will admiti and doing it once in awhile. i will admit i take my kids to. not every week probably not even every month. but of course, i take them there. i am not talking about banning coco pops or anything like that, just asking people to think about the impact, and asking the advertising industry to recognise that by putting these messages into things like britain's got talent all the time it is having an effect on children saying they want to eat and drink this stuff. but also, we have a sugar tax coming in now on sugary drinks. a lot of food manufacturers are changing the recipes of their drinks in order to meet that sugar
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tax. so if food manufacturers will wa nt to tax. so if food manufacturers will want to advertise, this won't stop them changing their recipes, of course. because what we have a certain requirements about the levels of sugar and salt and fat in the food that is advertised. but i think ribena, i was looking at it, are changing the recipe for the amount of sugar in their drinks and people and children still like the taste of ribena. so manufacturers can change their recipes. on that point, the conservative government said there would be a 20% sugar reduction by 2020, but it would be volu nta ry. reduction by 2020, but it would be voluntary. you have mentioned it there, if you really want to make a difference why don't you make companies reduce their sugary various things? because i think it is about sending signals to society at that you want to change behaviour. if you go back 30 years ago we put a lot of effort into encouraging people to be careful with her drinking and two, you know, give up smoking, and i think attitudes have changed. a vis the people still smoke and people still drinki people still smoke and people still drink i think people recognise the
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health risks associated in a way in which they did 30 or a0 years ago, because there has been a lot of campaigning from government on these issues. we now have obesity crisis. children who are obese are more likely to have chronic conditions later in life, obesity is costing the nhs and hebron who pays for the nhs, us taxpayers, £6 billion and people who develop diabetes as a result of obesity, the nhs is spending £10 billion on diabetes. this initiative is good for children because we want the healthiest children in the world, but it is also good for the taxpayer. can i asked you before you go, you talk about £250 million a year to help make british youngsters the healthiest in the world. this is a drop in the ocean, isn't it? it is about reducing the demand on the nhs. and there are two big issues with the nhs at the moment. the first is the biggest funding squeeze in its history, that the conservative sadly have imposed on
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the nhs. but there is also increasing demands on the nhs. and if you can improve the public health of the nation, then they won't be those demands of the nhs. so we are saying that set up a child health fund today, to support public health workers. they are the home visitors who come and visit you when you have had a baby, or school nurses. those sorts of professions, so we can put real effort into ensuring our children do become the healthiest in the world. thank you very much for coming on this morning. we will talk about something that might help, exercise. along with surfing, skateboarding baseball and karate, sport climbing will make its 0lympic debut at tokyo games in 2020. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the uk's highest outdoor climbing wall to find out how gb athletes are aiming for the top. tim, you have got three years to make the team. how is training going? go on, tim, you can do this. good morning, yes. we are about five miles from huddersfield and i am on what will be the uk's highest climbing wall, as you say. i will
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get my bearings, and don't worry, i am completely safe. i am harnessed up. tokyo 2020 is going to feature several new sports designed to appeal to younger people. surfing, karate and climbing. it is a sign of the popularity of climbing, and how it has increased so much. good to meet you. we should stop meeting like this! this is your climbing wall, isn't it? why did you decide to create it, and how big a rise has beenin to create it, and how big a rise has been in the popularity of climbing? i think it is fair to say the last five years has seen a massive growth in indoor climbing walls, that it is accessible to two —year—olds to 70 —year—olds, it is such a social environment and you get fit without really trying. and is 36 metres high, isn't it? it was a dream, we have planned and planned in the last few years finally got it built this year. it is an awesome achievement to get to the top. it was a former
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grain silo, wasn't it? so you are using an old building in an unusual way. it had been derelict for a long time, so to make use of it seemed like a good idea. and i am a novice, and this morning i have had some training and some safety, and you canjust get training and some safety, and you can just get on and have a go. you are hoping to spot some future 0lympians, do you think, over the next few years? lee mack exactly, we have a few gb climbers in our next, and ideally they will include some of the medal winners in 2020. we have 20 metres to go. later on we will be speaking to luke, one of the medal hopefuls. now i will hand back to the studio. and wish me luck as i hopefully make my way up the rest of the uk's highest climbing wall.|j hopefully make my way up the rest of the uk's highest climbing wall. i am so impressed, tim. don't look down, tim. don't look down. so impressive, scrambling! absolutely brilliant. wa nt to scrambling! absolutely brilliant. want to stay with him, but we have
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to go to the news, travel and weather where you are. we will keep watching. see you in a minute. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. video footage has been released by police of a group of moped riders who mounted a pavement in park lane to try and steal a man's watch. it happened just over a week ago, with the riders working together to chase the man, who tried to run away. he was left with a broken leg. it is the latest in a spate of moped thefts in central london in the space of a few days. london underground workers are staging a 2a—hour strike in a dispute over the sacking of a colleague, but it is only affecting london bridge station. rmt union members are protesting over an incident involving a fare dodger, with the union saying staff should have been praised for tackling a violent passenger, rather than sacked. underground bosses claim the employee demonstrated what they called unacceptable conduct. the protest ends at 10:00pm tonight. bees in london are being credited for teaching important lessons
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about business to a successful chief executive of a recruitment firm. james reed from the reed group is an avid beekeeper, who has told the bbc that they give him vital insights into running a successful firm business. every single bee, and there are 30,000 in this hive, does itsjob. they have a clear, common purpose. they have a clear, common purpose. they are all organised around supporting the hive and making honey. bees love working. they love mondays. so it is really important to be enthusiastic, like a bee at work. if you can create that environment in your business, you're going to make of honey. let's have a look at the travel situation now. london bridge station is open despite the strike i mentioned, while the piccadilly line has severe delays from acton town to all terminals at heathrow, because of engineering works finishing late. 0n the roads, in northolt, the aao is down to one lane between the polish war memorial and target roundabout, after a vehicle caught fire yesterday. the road will be closed
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for resurfacing work, so expect long delays. and in croydon, barclay road is closed eastbound between the fairfield halls roundabout and altyre road, because a car has overturned. let's have a check on the weather, with kate. good morning. it is a rather grey start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around today, and a northerly breeze as well, so it is actually going to feel quite cool. now, you might get one or two brighter spells, more likely later on this afternoon. the further west you are, further north, you may get one or two holes in the cloud, so some bright spells there. elsewhere, it stays rather grey. the maximum temperatures 15 celsius, and with that northerly breeze, it will feel quite chilly. now, there is a bit of cloud overnight. but it is patchy cloud, we will get some clear spells. the wind a lot lighter. the minimum temperature between seven and eight celsius.
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so a bright start tomorrow, with some sunshine, but gradually the cloud will start to develop through the course of tuesday. the wind, though, is a lot lighter tomorrow, so in those sunny spells, temperature feeling reasonable, at 15 celsius. a ridge of high pressure builds overnight tuesday into wednesday, so we lose the cloud. plenty of sunshine, and it will feel warm in the sunshine, with a maximum of about 15 celsius. it isa it is a year and a day since the mayor of london took office. vanessa feltz will be discussing that. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. france elects its youngest ever president. 39—year—old emmanuel macron sweeps to power, with a decisive victory over the far—right candidate marine le pen. at a victory rally in front of thousands of supporters he promised to unify a divided country and rebuild its economy. this morning, we're live in paris, to get french reaction and take stock of what it means for brexit negotiations. the new president is very much
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against brexit. i'm in a french bakery in london — talking to french voters, businesses and entrepreneurs based here in the uk. good morning, it's monday the 8th of may. also this morning: facebook promises to get tough on fake news during the election campaign, saying it'll do all it can to tackle the problem. several new sports at the tokyo 0lympics, climbing. this is the uk's heist climbing wall that is about to openin heist climbing wall that is about to open in yorkshire. —— hi yes. —— highest. in sport, there's hope yet for arsenal's season. they beat manchester united and are still in the chase for the champions league places.
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so impressed by tim. and carol has the weather. yesterday, northern ireland had its warmest day of the year so far. today, temperatures were to be quite as high but for many, a fair bit of sunshine around, especially the further west you are. in the east, said that of cloud and still the cold wind. i will have more details and about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. france's newly elected president, emmanuel macron, has promised to heal the country's divisions following his resounding victory over the far—right leader, marine le pen, in yesterday's election. the pro—eu candidate secured 66% of the vote and atjust 39 years old, he will become the country's youngest ever leader. speaking at a victory rally outside the louvre in paris, he said the task ahead was immense and made a plea for unity. here's our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas. this is an election victory that will reverberate across europe.
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emmanuel macron, liberal, pro—eu, who supports globalisation and immigration — france's next president. and he's only 39. mr macron created his political movementjust a year ago to give french voters tired of traditional parties a new choice — not that the extremes, but in the middle. translation: what we've done for so many months, there's no comparison, there's no equivalent to that. everybody was saying to us it was impossible. but they didn't know anything about france! his opponent, the far—right anti—eu marine le pen, was soundly beaten. she did, though, secure 11 million votes, a third of those cast. and she said the fact that she made it to the run—off meant that her party should now be seen as the official opposition in france.
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but mr macron's vision is a repudiation of populist, anti—establishment wave that brought brexit and donald trump, and which marine le pen sought to harness, too. above all, this is a victory for europe's centrists, and a defeat for europe's populists and eurosceptics. mr macron has already said he will work to strengthen the eu, and eu leaders have rushed to congratulate him. they see mr macron giving the eu new impetus. so this win means the uk is about to negotiate brexit facing an eu starting to feel confident that the populist tide may be turning. in the next few minutes, we'll get the reaction macron is very pro—eu. he says, "if
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your government decides to organise brexit, i will be pretty tough on it." we have to preserve the rest of the european union and not to convey the european union and not to convey the message that you can convey —— decide to leave without any consequences. he has said in past, the best trade negotiations for britain? being in the eu. a ban on television adverts for unhealthy food and sweets before the 9:00 watershed, is being promised by labour. it's part of a strategy to tackle childhood obesity. the conservatives say britain's advertising rules are already the strictest in the world. 0ur political correspondent, leila nathoo, has the details. tempting treats — difficult for children to resist. bringing down high rates of childhood obesity has long been a pressing public health concern.
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now labour says it would tackle the problem by banning junk food ads during prime—time tv. the party says in government, it would stop adverts for unhealthy foods — high in salt, sugar, orfat — being broadcast before 9pm. it says that it would hope to halve childhood obesity rates within a decade. and it is promising a £250 million annual fund for children's mental and physical health in england. the government has already announced a tax on sugary drinks, and, in a strategy outlined last summer, a voluntary target for the food and drinks industry to reduce sugar content — but health campaigners say the measures don't go far enough. the conservatives have accused labour of making unfunded promises, and said that their plan to cut childhood obesity was ambitious. leila nathoo, bbc news. the group representing hospitals and other nhs trusts in england has called for an end to
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the cap on pay rises. nhs providers says the government's policy of pay restraint over the last seven years is preventing employers from retaining the staff needed to deliver safe patient care. a two year old girl is being treated in hospital after suffering serious injuries to her head and body in what's been described as a horrific dog attack. police say several animals managed to get into the garden where she was playing in the toxteth area of liverpool. ten dogs have been seized from a nearby house and a man living there has been arrested. the social media giant facebook has this morning placed adverts in national newspapers to provide advice about how to spot fake news online. the initiative has been designed to stop the spread of false stories during the general election campaign. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. it's a term that became familiar during last year's american presidential election.
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fake news stories made up to make money or to act as political propaganda and it is facebook which has taken much of the blame for spreading stories such as these. now, the social network says it's doing everything it can to tackle the problem in the uk with these newspaper adverts part of this effort. facebook says it's stepping up the battle against fake news and giving its users a guide to spotting for stories. it's closing tens of thousands of fake uk accounts which might spread misinformation. and it's working with fact—checking organisations during the election campaign. there has already been a determined effort in germany to stop the spread of fake stories in the run—up to its elections later this year. but facebook stands to profit from the general election in the uk. the main political parties will be directing much of their advertising budgets at the social network's audience of more than 30 million people. 82 nigerian schoolgirls —
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kidnapped by the extremist group boko haram three years ago — have met their country's president after being freed in a prisoner swap. they were among more than 200 girls taken from their school in the town of chibok. at least 100 are still being held. the girls were handed over on saturday in exchange for boko haram suspects. there are growing fears among un negotiators that president trump will pull the united states out of paris climate agreement. delegates from almost 200 countries, including the us, are meeting in germany to draft rules for implementing the deal. a beach that was washed away 33 years ago has re—appeared after a freak tide. the irish beach on achill island disappeared in 198a after spring storms washed the sand away. with nothing more than rock pools left behind, almost all the villages' hotels, guesthouses and cafes shut down. but hundreds of thousands of tons of sand were dumped there over ten days in april and locals are hoping it sticks around long enough
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for the area to be given blue—flag status — a quality award for clean beaches. look at the difference. incredible, isn't it? just an amazing story. the power of the sea. where has all the sand being? it's been hanging around, waiting to get back to the beach. the bbc understands that the conservatives will once again commit to cutting net migration to the tens of thousands in the party's election manifesto. yesterday, the home secretary, amber rudd, refused to say whether the pledge would be repeated. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason. it's proved an impossible target so far, what will be different this time? the promise goes on the back as that
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beach was seen. if you go back through the manifestoes as i have been doing this morning and there is the promise. the 2010 manifesto. what does it say? it says they will ta ke what does it say? it says they will take it back to the 1990s. fast forward five years. the 2015 ma nifesto. forward five years. the 2015 manifesto. it says on page 29, key power in the tens of thousands, not the hundreds of thousands. enrico another two years and we understand it will be back again, despite the fa ct it will be back again, despite the fact that for the last seven years, they haven't got anywhere near the meeting at the race —— anywhere near. it was the first time in two yea rs near. it was the first time in two years it had been below 300,000.|j
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have lovely image of you waking up with all these manifestoes next to your bed. ukip also making an announcement on immigration today — what are they saying? and remarkably accurate image i suspect, at the moment. ukip are also talking migration. they think they are the only party that can be truly believed and trusted on migration. they want one in, one out and a ban on unskilled labour. they speak to the conservatives' broken promise and argue that if there is great to be a big conservative majority after the election, as the opinion poll suggests they will be, there needs to be a decent number of ukip mps in debt to to ensure the migration target is met. —— in there. you need your manifestoes at
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hand. at 39 years old, emmanuel macron will become the youngest ever president of france. a man of determination and ambition, the virtual political newcomer only set up his en marche movement last year. he's a former investment banker, who married his drama teacher, and claims to offer voters a new vision for france. here's all you need to know about the soon to be president macron. emmanuel macron was born into a middle—class family in 1977. he is the eldest of three children. at the age of 15, he met his now wife, brigitte. she was his drama teacher. a2a brigitte. she was his drama teacher. a 2a years his senior, their relationship has entry to the french public. they married in 2007, despite the disapproval of his family. full of confidence and self belief, emmanuel macron said his sights on the world of finance, making millions as an investment
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banker. four years later, making millions as an investment banker. fouryears later, he making millions as an investment banker. four years later, he was appointed into francois hollande's government and went on to become the economy minister. after leaving the socialist party to stand as an independent, emmanuel macron made the move of lodging his own party en marche. 0n the move. in november, he said he would run for the presidency, promising to bring the jobs to deprived areas. last night, at just 39 years jobs to deprived areas. last night, atjust 39 years of age, he became frantic bass youngest ever president. that is a little bit about the president. we can speak to karin giannone now. karin, what's been the reaction in the french newspapers this morning? you get the sense that there are a fair few people here you get the sense that there are a fairfew people here in paris who haven't been to bed yet. the revellers are still going out and chanting, "emmanuel macron chuck wright" —— emmanuel macron. a very
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different picture in other parts of france, of course. that show you a sense of the reaction in the newspapers. excuse the rain as it sta rts newspapers. excuse the rain as it starts to poor. liberation, well played, they say on their front page. a pun on his movement's name, en marche, victory on the march, and les echo saying the front that there is. -- les echo saying the front that there is. —— france that dares. what were the celebrations like? it was great, of course. but at the end i think we had a bitter taste in the mouth, because one third of the voters voted for marine le pen. 10.6 million people voted for the far right. how aware is emmanuel macron
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of that? he is totally aware of this, and that people voted for him notjust for his this, and that people voted for him not just for his platform, this, and that people voted for him notjust for his platform, but against the national front, so he is aware that his mandate is not the greatest of all the presidents. and it is not just greatest of all the presidents. and it is notjust the —— that challenge. it is the challenge of not having any members in parliament. how will you have the authority and the mandate to carry out the dramatic reforms he wants to carry out? usually in france the majority of is really connected to the president. so if the french vote rs the president. so if the french voters vote for a president, they usually give him a majority. so i think it is going to be a very, very... it is impossible to say, but it is really possible to say that at the end of the day emmanuel macron gets a majority in the national assembly. you really think that he can go from zero to over half of the
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577 mp5? can go from zero to over half of the 577 mps? yes. injust can go from zero to over half of the 577 mps? yes. in just six weeks' time? it is a new movement, it is big, and it is not going to end right now. when you say that he wa nts to right now. when you say that he wants to bring france behind him, how will he appealed to people who chose him in this round simply to keep marine le pen out?” chose him in this round simply to keep marine le pen out? i think he needs to convince them by his quick successes. needs to have results, results on unemployment, education, the economy, he has to be very quick on theirs. and i think it is the only way to convince the people. that an open vision of society is possible for france. how challenging is it to convince people, at 39, the youngest president of france the republic has ever known?|j youngest president of france the republic has ever known? i think people don't care much about the age. if the person is smart and efficient, i think they are going to buy it. you in 2012, the last
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presidential election, voted for the socialist president, francois hollande. and in this campaign you we re hollande. and in this campaign you were on emmanuel macron's side. what swayed it for you? i am a centre—left swayed it for you? i am a ce ntre—left vote, so swayed it for you? i am a centre—left vote, so i voted for francois hollande but at the end his mandate was not a success, so i decided to change. and to find an alternative, and emmanuel macron was that alternative. you don't believe that alternative. you don't believe that in five years' time we might be here thinking that emmanuel macron hasn't achieved anything he wanted to, because he didn't have the support and didn't manage to convince france? no, ithink support and didn't manage to convince france? no, i think he is going to get a majority. if not a clear one, he will make alliances with other mp5 clear one, he will make alliances with other mps in the parliament, from the left, from the right, and get a majority to pass the reforms. thank you very much, from the emmanuel macron campaign team. and another on national event is the
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victory europe celebrations here, a national holiday. emmanuel macron as president—elect will be standing by the arc de triomphe with the outgoing president, francois hollande. thank you very much, we will be back with you throughout the morning and we will have a little bit of a look at the view. you can see this morning in paris it is a bit of a great day. a 20 a.m. in paris, 7:20am approaching here. and we will find out what the weather will be doing for us over the course of the next few days. good morning, all. i have a beautiful picture from guernsey sent in by one of our weather watchers, another beaut from torbay and another one from fife. some of us are getting off to a dry and bright start although generally speaking there is more cloud across eastern scotland and england, around the midlands, and through the day some of that will melt away. we still have this cold wind coming in off the north sea. drift further west and we are into the sunshine,
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and through the afternoon that will continue. sunshine across south—west england, temperatures getting up to 13 or 1a. it is the same across wales and as we head through parts of the midlands, heading northwards. don't you just note, monday morning, your clicker is stuck once again. i hope it will spring into action, but while it doesn't, west is best for today, central areas is where we will have the cloud but in the north and east we will hang on to the cloud and with a nagging wind coming from the north sea it will feel quite cold. temperatures today, in the east, will range from around nine to 12 celsius but as we drift further west we are looking at up to 16. yesterday northern ireland had the highest temperature of this year so far, reaching 21.1dc. so that was a very pleasant fields of the day. we don't expect it to be quite as high today. through the course of the night there will be some cloud around but where the cloud breaks it will be cool enough touch of frost
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here and there, bringing us into tomorrow. tomorrow will be cloudier than today but nonetheless there will be some sunshine around and temperatures in range about ten to 16 celsius. i will phone the engineers, because goodness knows what has happened and hopefully me and my chart will be back with some more pictures in half an hour. thing is, we are very happy to look at you, but you are properly right, we need a little bit more. now it kicks in! do you want to carry on? ok. tomorrow there is more cloud around, but we will see some brighter breaks, as you can see here but the other thing is, tomorrow, we don't have this nagging wind any more so if you are in the east it won't feel as bad. temperatures between ten and 16. leading us to a cold start on wednesday morning, temperatures hovering around freezing the two celsius and for wednesday itself a lot more sunshine but with the change in the wind it means more cloud across the north, a few showers and not as cold down the
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east coast. a fair bit of sunshine. so at this stage in may, not too shabby at all, at ten to 16. do you still need to phone them, or have i fixed it now? i think! had better phone them. there is no point, they will just switch phone them. there is no point, they willjust switch it on and off. i'm sure a good kick will sort these things out. one of the biggest shocks in last week's local elections was the triumph of the conservative candidate to become the metro mayor of tees valley, a traditionally labour region. but will the party be able to replicate that success in next month's general election? breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to the constituency of middlesbrough south and cleveland east to find out more. we are in a patchwork constituency. rural farmlands and market towns like guisborough, a now—defunct steel industry on the coast, and working—class steps in
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middlesbrough. at the crafty cooks baking session for mums and toddlers there is anger at what the conservatives have been doing in power. seven years of austerity has not sat well with me. education is suffering, health service suffering, and it is heartbreaking. helen will vote forjeremy corbyn. i'm tired of hearing that he is unelectable, because i don't think that he is. i think he has a strong record of voting the things that i personally agree with. this seat has been labour since 1997, but ask a simple question. who makes the better prime minister, theresa may orjeremy corbyn? i would say that is a no—brainer, theresa may. corbyn? i would say that is a no-brainer, theresa may. the labour majority has been falling steadily in this part of the world and most observers the storm clouds ahead. for the last 20 years, really, it has been falling out of love with labour. over fish and chips, the political editor of the northern echo tells me about the shifting
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tide. just before easter the conservatives won the local council seat here for the first time from labour, with an 8% swing. it is even said that theresa may had one look and said we are winning seats in middlesbrough, let's do this. let's go for this election. dance night at the local social club in middlesbrough. voting labour here is in the blood. always vote labour, yes. i have never, ever, not voted labour. many will still vote labour, but there is disillusioned with jeremy corbyn, particularly over brexit. two thirds of people you voted to leave the eu. control your borders, control immigration, that is what i want. control our own laws. jeremy corbyn, i think he is...| laws. jeremy corbyn, i think he is... i don't think he is happy with the brexit. so, to guarantee we do leave the european union, for the first time in their lives, people likejohn first time in their lives, people
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like john and make first time in their lives, people likejohn and make will vote conservative —— mick. likejohn and make will vote conservative -- mick. the hardest thing i have had to do in my life. if the labour party told me if you vote for us i will execute your mother, i would still vote for them. the only thing we don't know is brexit. how many micks are there from middlesbrough and across the country? enough. and the government will win ina country? enough. and the government will win in a landslide injune. jane eyre, the lady of shalott and frankenstein — just some of britain's finest cultural offerings. but it is feared the grandeur and power of their content is lost on many children, who haven't studied such works. we went out in the sun yesterday to see if some children here in salford could recite some classic poems. i wandered lonely as a cloud, that
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floats on high o'er the velvet hills. when i saw a crowd. a host of golden daffodils. this overlay, the trees, —— beside the lake, beneath the trees... in the breeze. 0nly only a little bit of hamlet. to be or not to be, that is the question. whether ‘tis nobler in the mind... we have some half price black tights, tvs, dvd ‘s, lps. trevor francis tracksuits. .. we would love to know what you think, and let us know what bonds you are able to recite. —— poems. know what bonds you are able to
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recite. -- poems. and large swathes of ghostbusters and star wars. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. video footage has been released by police of a group of moped riders who mounted a pavement in park lane to try and steal a man's watch. it happened just over a week ago, with the riders working together to chase the man, who tried to run away. he was left with a broken leg. it is the latest in a spate of moped thefts in central london in the space of a few days. london underground workers are staging a 2a—hour strike in a dispute over the sacking of a colleague, but it is only affecting london bridge station. rmt union members are protesting over an incident involving a fare dodger, with the union saying staff should have been praised for tackling a violent passenger, rather than sacked. underground bosses claim the employee demonstrated what they called unacceptable conduct. the protest ends at 10:00pm tonight. bees in london are being credited for teaching important lessons
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about business to a successful chief executive. james reed from the reed group is an avid beekeeper, who has told the bbc that they give him vital insights into running a successful firm. every single bee, and there are 30,000 in this hive, knows its job. they have a clear, common purpose. they're all organised around supporting the hive and making honey. bees love working, they love mondays. so it is really important to "bee" enthusiastic, like a bee at work. if you can create that environment in your business, you're going to make a lot of honey. let's have a look at the travel situation now. london bridge station is open, despite the strike i mentioned, while the piccadilly line has severe delays from acton town to all terminals at heathrow, because of engineering works finishing late. 0n the roads, in northolt, the aao is down to one lane between the polish war memorial and target roundabout, after a vehicle caught
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fire yesterday. the road will be closed for resurfacing work, so expect long delays. and in westminster, whitehall is closed northbound at parliament square until sunday, for roadworks. let's have a check on the weather, with kate. good morning. it is a rather grey start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around today, and a northerly breeze as well, so it is actually going to feel quite cool. now, you might get one or two brighter spells, more likely later on this afternoon. the further west you are, further north, you may get one or two holes in the cloud, so some bright spells there. elsewhere, though, it stays rather grey. the maximum temperatures 15 celsius, and with that northerly breeze, it will feel quite chilly. now, there is a bit of cloud overnight, but it is patchy cloud. we will get some clear spells, the wind a lot lighter. the minimum temperature between seven and eight celsius. so a bright start tomorrow, with some sunshine, but gradually the cloud will start to develop through the course of tuesday. the wind, though, is a lot lighter tomorrow, so in those sunny spells,
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temperature feeling reasonable, at 15 celsius. a ridge of high pressure builds in overnight tuesday into wednesday, so we lose the cloud. plenty of sunshine, and it will feel warm in the sunshine, with a maximum of about 15 celsius. va nessa vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london with the breakfast show, and she is talking about mental health. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. thank you to all of you who are sending in your poems this morning. france's newly elected president, emmanuel macron, has promised to heal the country's divisions following his resounding victory over the far—right leader, marine le pen, in yesterday's election. the pro—european, centrist secured 66% of the vote and atjust 39 years old, he will become the country's youngest ever leader. speaking at a victory rally outside the louvre museum in paris, he said the task ahead was immense and made a plea for unity. the bbc understands
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the conservatives will once again commit to cutting net migration to the ‘tens of thousands' if they win the general election. yesterday the home secretary, amber rudd, refused to say whether the pledge — which was also in the party's 2010 and 2015 manifestos — would be repeated. meanwhile, ukip says it would cut net migration to zero over five years. staying with the election campaign — labour says it would extend the ban on television adverts for unhealthy food and sweets until the 9:00 watershed. the party says its strategy on child health aims to halve the number of overweight youngsters within ten years. the conservatives say britain's advertising rules are already the strictest in the world. it's about changing behaviour. 30
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yea rs it's about changing behaviour. 30 years ago, we put a lot of effort into encouraging people to curb their drinking and give up smoking but i think attitudes have changed. still smoke and people still drink that recognise the health risks associated which they might not have 30 or a0 years ago because there have been a lot of campaigning from the government. the group representing hospitals and other nhs trusts in england has called for an end to the cap on pay rises. nhs providers says the government's policy of pay restraint over the last seven years is preventing employers from retaining the staff needed to deliver safe patient care. a two—year—old girl is being treated in hospital after suffering serious injuries to her head and body in what's been described as a horrific dog attack. police say several animals managed to get into the garden where she was playing
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in the toxteth area of liverpool. ten dogs have been seized from a nearby house and a man living there has been arrested. the social networking site, facebook, is placing adverts in british newspapers to provide practical advice on how to spot fake news online. the website has also closed thousands of accounts linked to false stories ahead of the general election. the company advises users to "be sceptical of headlines" and to cross—check reports. the move comes after it was accused of helping to spread fake news during last year's us presidential election. here is an example. a secret space mission has returned to earth after 2—years. that's the us military‘s experimental x—37b space plane landing yesterday at nasa's kennedy space centre in florida. according to the american air force, it's been conducting unspecified experiments for more than 700 days while in orbit. it was the fourth and lengthiest mission so far for the secretive programme. i just want to know more! they need to find out what is going
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on. somebody called mulder and scully. coming up on the programme — carol has the weather. we will have other maps today. how dare you downplay carol! katherine has the sport now. it was a mixed weekend of sport. very exciting in the championship. we will get to that. arsene wenger finally beatjose we will get to that. arsene wenger finally beat jose mourinho. we will get to that. arsene wenger finally beatjose mourinho. 0r we will get to that. arsene wenger finally beatjose mourinho. or a jose mourinho's managed side. he
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couldn't resist having a dig. saying finally, finally i gave arsenal fans something to swing their scarves are bout. arsenal kept alive their hopes of finishing in the premier league's top four with a 2—0 win over an understrength manchester united at the emirates. arsenal took the lead through granit xhaka's deflected shot nine minutes after half time. then danny welbeck scored against his former club and ended united's 25 game unbeaten run in the premier league. arsenal are still six points behind fourth place manchester city — but they have a game in hand. united remain fifth. we want to try to win the europa league. more important for us than to finish fourth. we really want to try to win it, and go to the champions leagues through winning a big trophy. so, we needed to give rest to players. 0ur squad is very short at the time. we want to win our games and when it is possible, we need a bit help. but, the premier league is known,
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some teams who are safe continue to fight and you have seen that with west ham, you know. so, let's focus to win our games. you're not going to be speaking here next season again? look, you want me to work for bbc, or? laughs. no, i don't know, i don't know. nothing new. arsene wenger had still not made up his mind. liverpool drew 0—0 at home to southampton. liverpool captainjames milner had a second half penalty saved by fraser forster. now a couple of things caught our eye in yesterday's premier league matches. the entertainment was somewhat lacking on the pitch at anfield so liverpool defender alberto moreno decided to make his own entertainment by having a go at the bottle flip challenge. and what do you do if you're on the bench for arsenal and your 2—0 up against manchester united ?
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you get the malteasers out and share them out! 0nly red chocolate bags are allowed. what a way to celebrate, why not? blackburn have been relegated to league one, becoming the first premier league winners to drop down to the third tier of english football. emotional scenes on and off the pitch. they did their best, winning 3—1 against brentford on the final day, but it wasn't enough. newcastle united one. —— won. celtic‘s scott sinclair was named pfa scotland's player of the year last night. 0n the pitch aberdeen have all but guaranteed themselves second place after they won 2—1 at hearts.
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and rangers will also play europa league football next season. they came from behind to beat partick thistle 2—1 in injury time. in their first ever one day international at lord's — ireland were beaten by england by 85 runs. england racked up 328 for six in their first innings with three batsmen making scores in the seventies. ireland battled hard in the chase but eventually fell well short of the target. england take the series 2—0. there's an intriguing match to come at the madrid 0pen, as maria sharapova and eugenie bouchard are set to go head to head. sharapova beat mirjana lucic—baroni in the first round yesterday. last week bouchard said that the russian, who's just coming back from a 15 month ban for testing positive for a banned substance, is a cheat and should have been banned for life. the one person who can keep her out of wimbledon is eugenie bouchard who says she shouldn't be playing tennis at all. the pressure is on. she is
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one win away for being automatically into wimbledon. did you see the two—hour marathon attempt? it was a pr stunt. another company are going to try it. this guy managed two hours and 35 seconds. an unofficial record. if you work it out. to run a sub two—hour marathon, that is the equivalent of running 100 metres in 17 seconds and then repeating that a22 times so in order to run under two hours, marathon, you have to do that. i know it's not a sprint but that's pretty quick, isn't it? for two hours! when we were watching the normal london marathon at home, if you count, one, two, one, too, how quickly they are moving their legs. it feels like a sprint, doesn't it?
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the speed that they travel at. you only need one second teia miles. ——1 second a mile. as we've been hearing, france has a new president. but how might emmanuel macron's victory be felt across the channel, here in the uk? steph's at a french bakery in london this morning. how much have you eaten this morning, steph? i have only had one thing this morning. to be fair, i am in food heaven. i added a french patisserie this morning. i have been watching them making it this morning. they all up at the crack of dawn getting this setup. it is a french patisserie here in south london and lots of people are french who worked here and lots of their customers are as well. there are
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about 350,000 french people living in the uk. how are you feeling this morning? i'm not very happy about the result because i had no feeling about the two candidates. do you feel optimistic about the future in france? i hope. you own is fantastic cafe and bakery. how are you feeling today? i'm not feeling very good because it was not my favourite bank god, not marine le pen. —— but, thank god. how do you think your friends and family and people will be feeling? let's see because three yea rs be feeling? let's see because three years ago, nobody knew him and let's see if he is going to be a good president that he is very young. we will see. they queue and thank you
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for letting us in. —— thank you. we export 1.8 billion pounds things to france and import as well. it is important to keep the relationship. we have a doctor of politics. tell us we have a doctor of politics. tell us what this will mean for french people and what the task of emmanuel macron is. he has his work cut out. a lot of people who wanted him to win in the second round in 20 and to win in the second round in 20 and to win in the first. the big problem that he has is getting himself a parliamentary majority. he has less than six weeks to do it. he is doing it with a political party that has only existed for one year. he needs to get it together because if you can't get his laws through parliament and his presidency is over before it is begun. he has been strong on things like brexit and not wanting that to happen. is very pro- european which is a rarity in the
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current climate. i don't think he will be giving any gifts to therese in may. it'll be interesting to say. —— to therese may. what is your reaction as a businesswoman? i'm quite relieved because we didn't want the extreme to be ruling france. that is a good point. also, there is a new changing politics so that is quite hopeful. though i didn't really feel that they wanted to vote for emmanuel macron but i did it to avoid the extreme. we are going to see how it's going to happen and hopefully the opposition ‘s are going to be able to say what they have to say in the next election before the parliament which is going to be very soon and hopefully, some of these
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ideas are going to be implemented as well. will it impact your work here, do you think? of course. doing financial planning, we will have a lot of changes in regulation so we are going to have a lot of things to do, yes, of course. thank you for your time this morning. i probably have crumbs all over my face. it was good to hear their point of view. thank you very much. we will be live in parisa thank you very much. we will be live in paris a bit later in the programme. i bet steph knows some poetry. we should have asked her. they queue for the messages about poetry. we are talking about that today because people are saying that it's really important. —— thank you. —— important that we read certain bits of poetry and music. thank you for all the suggestions and what sticks in your mind from when you we re sticks in your mind from when you were at school and making sure that the teacher drummed it into you and
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it's still there now. hamlet is still with me, always will be. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this morning it is a chilly start the some of us but there is a fair bit of sunshine to expect through the course of the day. however, in the east there is more cloud. as we look at this week ahead, while we have a variety of sunny spells, chilly nights, a touch of frost at times and later in the week the chance of rain or indeed some showers, and some of those could be thundery, not at the start. what we have first thing today is a fair bit of cloud across eastern areas and the midlands. through the day some of that will melt away but if you are in the east you are still going to be exposed to that northerly wind. and that will make it feel cold. if you are in the west, a completely different story. a lot of sunshine around first thing, temperatures climbing as we go into the afternoon and the
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sunshine sticking around for the afternoon as well. notjust in south—east england, wales, northern ireland. yesterday northern ireland had its warmest day of the year so far. across much of scotland, again we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine, except across the north—east. if you have cloud coming and going through the course of the day, the same across eastern england. a bit more cloud and don't forget with that northerly breeze, it will feel chilly if you are exposed to that. coming south into the south—east, here we will see some brighter skies coming through at times. the emphasis is on a lot of cloud. through the evening and overnight, the wind turns that bit lighter. more of a gentle breeze. still some cloud coming in from the north sea, producing the odd spot of drizzle, and we will also see some clearer skies, so once again in chrome, sheltered areas there is the risk of some frost. that does mean that tomorrow morning will dawn on a bright note. high—pressure still firmly in charge of our weather and you can see in this chart there is hardly a nice bar in sight. so the wind is going to fall light, so if you are in the east of the uk, the
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last week or so we have had that nagging easily northerly wind. it will not feel as cold. but tomorrow, generally speaking it will be cloudier than we expected to be today. there will be some sunshine around, however, especially in parts of the west, once again, or the south, and temperatures getting up to around 16 celsius. but as i mentioned, feeling much more pleasa nt mentioned, feeling much more pleasant across the east that it has done. now, we dawn on wednesday morning on a cold night where we have the clear skies, but of course we have the clearest skies we also have sunshine to start the day. a bit of a change on wednesday, largely down to the wind direction. so across northern scotland and some parts of western scotland, there will be some more cloud around. we will be some more cloud around. we will also see some splashes of rain across the far north—east. down the east coast, hardly a breath of wind, so again feeling much more pleasant. and as we drift on towards southern and western areas, again, this is where we will see the lion's share of the sunshine. and in that sunshine, temperatures up to 16. thank you very much for that. i am
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glad to see the computer is in fine working order, as well. me too, me too. we should have started that with shall we compare you to a summer's day? sonnet 18, great expectations, and how do i love thee — some of britain's finest cultural offerings. but it is feared their grandeur and power could be lost on many children who don't study such works as part of the school curriculum. there are now calls for pupils to be able to memorise and recite classic poems and books, as a way of improving their cultural knowledge. we will discuss this in a moment, but first we spoke to some parents in sunny salford, to get their thoughts. you sort of learn a few, don't you? and you might retain a couple of verses, maybe, of each one. i think it is pretty hard going to learn
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entire poems. i think it depends what year it is, because the young ones might not be into it, they might find it boring. personally i don't think you should force people to learn specific things. i think the joy of reading is the personal discovery. every form of writing, no matter whether it is the story or poem, matter whether it is the story or o . matter whether it is the story or poem, is good to learn in school. matter whether it is the story or poem, is good to learn in schoolm there is a list of 100, though, it might inform me to think perhaps i should read that one, but not all of them, necessarily. dame rachel de souza is the chief executive of 13 schools in norfolk and suffolk, where pupils will study classics from the autumn. we are alsojoined by poet matt abbott. good morning to you both. thank you very much forjoining us. let's start with you, first of all. you have made a list, haven't you? how do you choose from the vast array?
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well, with great debate. the excitement among the teachers and stu d e nts of excitement among the teachers and students of compiling that list has been massive. and really we could make a list of hundreds, because there are so many fantastic poems and so much fantastic literature out there in compiling the list is half of the fun. but really what we want is for our students to read the best that has been said or thought, and if we can get some way towards that, we are going to really enrich young lives. you are a poet now, what got you into that in the first place? is a classic samuel taylor coleridge, or what was it? i am into coleridge now, but i didn't get into it at school, to be honest. i think anything that encourages people to read more poetry at school can be a good thing. and i like the idea of them reciting them as well, because it isa them reciting them as well, because it is a different way to experience a poem. and for classmates to hear that classmates residing in, it will help them experience it in a different way. to be honest i got into it more through music lyrics
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and things like that. it was actually after school. so i think this new measure could be really useful in terms of helping people get into it in school. so when you tell people you are a poet now, what sort of reaction do you get? scrunched up face. the problem is the way that poetry is taught in school is quite bad. they may be forced to read a text which doesn't appeal to them, forced to read it in silence in a classroom, and they are put off poetry for life. it is like algebra, why would you go back to poetry? but this way of doing it, getting them to learn it and read a wide range of staff, could be really useful. let's get that to some of the things on the list. geoffrey chaucer's prologue from the canterbury tales. how much relevance does that have for a child on the zist does that have for a child on the 21st century? well, it is amazing how much it actually does. 0ne 21st century? well, it is amazing how much it actually does. one of the key things is that people who are in the top jobs the key things is that people who are in the topjobs in the key things is that people who are in the top jobs in this country will have been to schools where they have learnt these things. if our children are going to be up out
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there and competing, they need to have learnt it as well. this is about equity and making sure they know what people in the cloud know. so when they are grown up and that a meeting and someone talks about things being dickensian or talks about chaucer, they need to have those references and know what they mean. it is just enriching. those references and know what they mean. it isjust enriching. i am the daughter of a steelworker from scunthorpe, daughter of a steelworker from scu nthorpe, and daughter of a steelworker from scunthorpe, and i can remember my mother reading for me the highwayman tom and that vocabulary is in my head, the road was a ribbon of moonlight across the purple moor, and the highwayman came riding, riding up to the old indoor. it enriches you forever. it is in your memory and your hearts, really, so i canjust encourage memory and your hearts, really, so i can just encourage parents to read poetry to their children. we are going to do it at school, and it will allow students to compete with the best out there. i suppose that comes back to what you said, in the performance, that winds people over.
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at the end of the world cup, a player read out rudyard kipling's pollen, you will be a man, my son. and the next day, and the week after that, loads of national newspapers printed upon in its entirety. and that was a way of engaging the public in upon which —— in a poem thatis public in upon which —— in a poem that is incredibly popular. lots of amazing spoken word performers, i have been to gigs where they have been thousands and thousands of teenage girls whose imaginations have been lit up by the words. it is because they have heard it or seen it or have watched it, and if you are forced to read something on a piece of paper you get two or three lines in, you don't really get it, you stop reading, you just scan it. whatever you need to do to get
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through the lesson. if you hear someone reading it, you think actually, i get that. is different reading, the way people read it. thank you very much. and we will read some of your comments a bit later on. along with surfing, skateboarding, baseball and karate, climbing will make its 0lympic debut at the tokyo games in 2020. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the uk's highest outdoor climbing wall, to find out how gb athletes are aiming for the top. tim, you've got three years to make the team. how is training going? thank you, i have my highs on tokyo 2020. there will be several new sports and that the olympics. so karate, skateboarding and climbing, and where i am today will be the uk's highest climbing wall. some 36 metres, five miles from huddersfield, in west yorkshire. take a look at the shots from a little earlier, giving you a sense of the scale of this place. it used to be an old grain mill, and it has been converted and it reflects the
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growing popularity of climbing, and it is the brainchild of a man who i will hopefully make my way around... good to see you. we are a bit tangled up, aren't we? so why did you decide to do this, and how big a thing is climbing becoming?” you decide to do this, and how big a thing is climbing becoming? i think the last five years we have seen aoo plus climbing walls emerged and it is completely accessible. two —year—olds to 70 —year—olds, anyone can do it. it is very social, a nice way to get fit, and it is relatively risk—free. way to get fit, and it is relatively risk-free. and why is becoming so popular, do you think?” risk-free. and why is becoming so popular, do you think? i think at the 2020 tokyo olympics, it is a big move for claiming to be recognised, and sport climbing in general is such an accessible, exciting sport. we are going to have a chat to luke, who is a hopefulfor tokyo we are going to have a chat to luke, who is a hopeful for tokyo 2020. we are going to have a chat to luke, who is a hopefulfor tokyo 2020. he isa who is a hopefulfor tokyo 2020. he is a member of the team gb climbing team. i will interview him as he climbs. what is it about climbing
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which you love so much, and how confident are you about team gb's chancesin confident are you about team gb's chances in tokyo? i think the big thing is freedom, just to be able to go anywhere and do a sport that you are really passionate about. yes, it is great. as an olympic discipline, how is it judged? is great. as an olympic discipline, how is itjudged? is that fosters to the top? how will it work at the olympics? at the olympics there are three disciplines which made it in. the short, up to about five metres, where it is quite gymnastic, quite powerful. speed climbing is, as it sounds, the fastest to the top. and lead climbing, which is whether you can get to the top, or who can get the highest on the route. thank you very much indeed. it is quite a feeling being out there. and normal people are giving it a go, as i am this morning. a00 climbing walls
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across the uk, and this one is the highest, 36 metres high, higher than the tower of london. you in the climbing gold medal, times ten! i know lots of people were wondering whether he got to the top. keep going, we will keep watching. and we will get some news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. video footage has been released by police of a group of moped riders who mounted a pavement in park lane to try and steal a man's watch. it happened just over a week ago, with the riders working together to chase the man, who tried to run away. he was left with a broken leg. it is the latest in a spate of moped thefts in central london in the space of a few days. london underground workers are staging a 2a—hour strike in a dispute over the sacking of a colleague, but it is only affecting london bridge station.
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rmt union members are protesting over an incident involving a fare dodger, with the union saying staff should have been praised for tackling a violent passenger, rather than sacked. underground bosses claim the employee demonstrated what they called unacceptable conduct. the protest ends at 10:00pm tonight. bees in london are being credited for teaching important lessons about business to a successful chief executive. james reed from the reed group is an avid beekeeper, who has told the bbc that they give him vital insights into running a successful firm. every single bee, and there are 30,000 in this hive, knows its job. they have a clear, common purpose. they're all organised around supporting the hive and making honey. bees love working, they love mondays. so it is really important to "bee" enthusiastic, like a bee at work. if you can create that environment in your business, you're going to make a lot of honey. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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london bridge station is open, despite the strike i mentioned, while the piccadilly line has severe delays from acton town to all terminals at heathrow, because of engineering works finishing late. on the roads, in northolt, the aao is down to one lane between the polish war memorial and target roundabout, after a vehicle caught fire yesterday. the road will be closed for resurfacing work, so expect long delays. and in westminster, whitehall is closed northbound at parliament square until sunday, for roadworks. let's have a check on the weather, with kate. good morning. it is a rather grey start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around today, and a northerly breeze as well, so it is actually going to feel quite cool. now, you might get one or two brighter spells, more likely later on this afternoon. the further west you are, further north, you may get one or two holes in the cloud, so some bright spells there. elsewhere, though, it stays rather grey. the maximum temperature 15 celsius, and with that northerly breeze, it will feel quite chilly.
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now, there is a bit of cloud overnight, but it is patchy cloud. we will get some clearer spells, the wind a lot lighter. the minimum temperature between seven and eight celsius. so a bright start tomorrow, with some sunshine, but gradually the cloud will start to develop through the course of tuesday. the wind, though, is a lot lighter tomorrow, so in those sunny spells, the temperature feeling reasonable, at 15 celsius. a ridge of high pressure builds in overnight tuesday into wednesday, so we lose the cloud. plenty of sunshine, and it will feel warm in the sunshine, with a maximum of about 15 celsius. va nessa vanessa feltz is talking about the number of holidaymakers scammed in london the new president is against brexit. iam in the new president is against brexit. iamina the new president is against brexit. i am in a french patisserie in london talking to people about what impact it could have on negotiations. good morning it's
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monday the 8th of may. also this morning... facebook promises to get tough on fake news during the election campaign, saying it'll do all it can to tackle the problem. there will be several new sports at the tokyo olympics, climbing is one of them and this is the uk's highest climbing wall in west yorkshire. we'll be talking to some people hoping to become inspired, who knows, perhaps some medal winners for team gb. in sport...there's hope yet for arsenal's season. they beat manchester united and are still in the chase for the champions league places. blackburn are relegated. sometimes this sad now paul say after 200 george is there left and i
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will go —— sometimes this sat now will go —— sometimes this sat now will say there left... some lovely sunshine per parts of the uk yesterday but is it going to last? carol it will do for some of us, especially the further west you are. eastern areas hanging onto a lot of cloud throughout today, the cold feel exacerbated by a northerly wind. i'll have more details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. france has elected emmanuel macron as its next president. he has promised to heal the country's divisions following his resounding victory over the far—right leader, marine le pen. the pro—eu candidate secured 66% of the vote and, atjust 39 years old, will become the country's youngest ever president. speaking at a victory rally outside the louvre in paris, he said the task ahead was "immense" and made a plea for unity. our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas was at the macron rally and has this report. this is an election victory that
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will reverberate across europe. emmanuel macron, liberal, pro—eu, who supports globalisation and immigration — france's next president. and he's only 39. mr macron created his political movementjust a year ago to give french voters tired of traditional parties a new choice — not at the extremes, but in the middle. translation: what we've done for so many months, there's no comparison, there's no equivalent to that. everybody was saying to us it was impossible. but they didn't know anything about france! his opponent, the far—right anti—eu marine le pen, was soundly beaten. she did, though, secure 11 million votes, a third of those cast. and she said the fact that she made it to the run—off meant
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that her party should now be seen as the official opposition in france. but mr macron's vision is a repudiation of populist, anti—establishment wave that brought brexit and donald trump, and which marine le pen sought to harness, too. above all, this is a victory for europe's centrists, and a defeat for europe's populists and eurosceptics. mr macron has already said he will work to strengthen the eu, and eu leaders have rushed to congratulate him. they see mr macron giving the eu new impetus. so this win means the uk is about to negotiate brexit facing an eu starting to feel confident that the populist tide may be turning. take —— dramatic scenes in paris
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last night. we're joined now by our paris correspondent, hugh schofield. hugh, he has got a big challenge to bring together a divided country? first of all, you have to hand it to him, a yearago first of all, you have to hand it to him, a year ago did not even have a political formation behind him, a year ago did not even have a politicalformation behind him at all, that's when he launched this movement, en marche, and a year later at this triumph, a triumph with a score much larger than had been predicted, two thirds against a third, a huge achievement which eve ryo ne third, a huge achievement which everyone recognises but the task ahead is big. one has to recognise that many of the people who voted for him were not voting for his programme but to keep about marine le pen, a perennial problem in french politics, people vote to stop for a ride. that's a problem but another problem is he has to get a majority in parliament, legislative
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elections in a month and he has to turn his novice formation en marche into a political party that can control a majority in the lower chamber of the house against a right and left which will be wanting to get their revenge on him in some way and secure their majority in parliament. that's the big challenge ahead but for now, the victory is clear. we saw marine le pen role -- le pen dancing after she hadn't won. i think she's saying it's le pen dancing after she hadn't won. i think she's saying its positive from our perspective and we are going to be the main opposition party in france. a ban on television adverts for unhealthy food and sweets before the nine o'clock watershed, is being promised by labour. it's part of a strategy to tackle childhood obesity. the conservatives say britain's advertising rules are already the strictest in the world. our political correspondent, leila nathoo, has all the details. tempting treats — difficult for children to resist. bringing down high rates of childhood obesity has long been
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a pressing public health concern. now labour says it would tackle the problem by banning junk food ads during prime—time tv. the party says in government, it would stop tv adverts for unhealthy foods — high in salt, sugar, orfat — being broadcast before 9pm. it says that it would hope to halve childhood obesity rates within a decade. and it is promising a £250 million annual fund for children's mental and physical health in england. the government has already announced a tax on sugary drinks, and, in a strategy outlined last summer, a voluntary target for the food and drinks industry to reduce sugar content — but health campaigners say the measures don't go far enough. the conservatives have accused labour of making unfunded promises, and said that their plan to cut childhood obesity was ambitious. leila nathoo, bbc news. the group representing hospitals and other nhs trusts in england has called for an end to the cap on pay rises.
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nhs providers says the government's policy of pay restraint over the last 7 years is preventing employers from retaining the staff needed to deliver safe patient care. a 2 year old girl is being treated in hospital after suffering serious injuries to her head and body in what's been described as a "horrific" dog attack. police say several animals managed to get into the garden where she was playing in the toxteth area of liverpool. ten dogs have been seized from a nearby house and a man living there has been arrested. the social media giant facebook has this morning placed adverts in national newspapers to provide advice about how to spot fake news online. the initiative has been designed to stop the spread of false stories during the general election campaign. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. it's a term that became familiar during last year's american presidential election. fake news stories made up to make
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money or to act as political propaganda and it is facebook which has taken much of the blame for spreading stories such as these. now, the social network says it's doing everything it can to tackle the problem in the uk with these newspaper adverts part of this effort. facebook says it's stepping up the battle against fake news and giving its users a guide to spotting for stories. to spotting false stories. it's closing tens of thousands of fake uk accounts which might spread misinformation. and it's working with fact—checking organisations during the election campaign. there has already been a determined effort in germany to stop the spread of fake stories in the run—up to its elections later this year. but facebook stands to profit from the general election in the uk. the main political parties will be directing much of their advertising budgets at the social network's audience of more than 30 million people. we'll be talking about that shortly
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here on bbc breakfast. 82 nigerian schoolgirls — kidnapped by the extremist group boko haram three years ago — have met their country's president after being freed in a prisoner swap. they were among more than 200 girls taken from their school in the town of chibok. at least a hundred are still being held. the girls were handed over on saturday in exchange for boko haram suspects. this is my favourite story of the date mainly because i want to know more! a secret space mission has returned to earth after two years. that's the sound of the us military‘s unmanned x—37b space plane landing yesterday at nasa's kennedy space centre in florida. according to the american air force, it's been conducting unspecified experiments while in orbit. it was the fourth and lengthiest mission so far for the secretive programme. unspecified experiments... what does
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that mean? i feel we unspecified experiments... what does that mean? ifeel we need more information. but i fear we are not going to get it. it is a secret space mission! maybe in years to come we will find out about it. it's going to be a busy week of political news. chris mason will guide us through it. the bbc understands that the conservatives will once again commit to cutting net migration to the "tens of thousands" in the party's election manifesto. yesterday the home secretary, amber rudd, refused to say whether the pledge would be repeated. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason...it‘s proved an impossible target so far, what will be different this time? you delighted us by dragging out your old copies of conservative ma nifestoes. your old copies of conservative manifestoes. have you brought them out again? i've then scarring the book shelves again, here we have the
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2010 conservative manifesto, an invitation tojoin the 2010 conservative manifesto, an invitation to join the government of britain was its title, page 21, talking immigration, will take steps to ta ke talking immigration, will take steps to take net migration back to the level of the 1990s, tens of thousands a year, not hundreds of thousands. they were in government for five years, the target was never met. flash forward 2015, the ma nifesto a met. flash forward 2015, the manifesto a couple of years ago, david cameron on the front cover, theresa may on the front cover as well but not as prominent as the then boss, page 29, a little further into the tone, we keep our ambition of delivering annual net migration in the tens of thousands not the hundreds of thousands. two years on, promise still not mess, the most recent figures for the office for national statistics a couple of months ago, net migration 273,000, that was the first time in two years the ons pointed out at the time it'd been below 300,000. nonetheless they
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are renewing the target, for the third time in a row that will be in the conservative manifesto published in the next few weeks. ukip also making an announcement on immigration today — what are they saying? they are talking about this issue as well and trying to outflank the conservatives on this, they were nuked in the local elections last week, so many seats tumbling in the direction of the conservatives, a feeling from ukip that the conservatives had parked their tank on the ukip long but the argument from ukip is the conservatives have a track record of not meeting this promise they have made repeatedly. there argument, ukip, is that it should be won in and one out for immigration and they say as well but she be a five—year ban on unskilled migrants coming to the uk. yet again, this issue of immigration which matters to so many people
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likely to be a recurrent topic in the next month. mr mason, thank you. let's talk now about the subject of fa ke let's talk now about the subject of fake news. reports of pope francis supporting donald trump, is just one example of how facebook was accused of spreading fake news stories during last year's us elections. now with our own general election just over a weeks away, the social media giant says it'll do everything it can to stop fake news stories from spreading during campaigning. this morning, facebook has published adverts in newspapers, with details on how to spot fake articles. let's talk to will moy, he's from the charity full fact, which is working with the social media site on this. macron good morning. thank you for joining us. they're calling it a false news. some people, of course, banding around the term fake news. how do you spot it? we spot it by doing what everyone could do if we have the time to do it which is
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asking where did you get that from? can we trust your sources? do they really say what our researchers say they say? our researchers will get they say? our researchers will get the sources out for everyone to look at. you talk about the time you spend doing it. the point about any social media site things can get passed around extremely quickly. is there the time to do that before something that's not true gets out and passed on? well, that's why we're gearing up for the election and we have been running a crowd funder. we're doubling our team for the election and working with an organisation called first draft who are experts in how misinformation spreads online, but there are simple things which all of us can do. it's about asking, 0k, where is the source? can i see it? if i can't, why should i trust what i'm seeing? keeping an eye out for things that look odd. if you see a photo that might have been recycled for another time ora might have been recycled for another time or a date that didn't look
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right or a web address that looks like a proper news site and isn't one, it is time to be on your guard and that's something all of us can do. facebook are talking and you've said the ten different things they're talking about, asking all of us they're talking about, asking all of us to be on their guard, but what about facebook, are they doing enough? they are telling us how to spot it, but not what to do about it? we've said to facebook you can make these questions easier for people on facebook to answer. so there is a responsibility for facebook to look at how do we change facebook to look at how do we change facebook itself, to make it easier for people to spot sites that aren't what they're cracked up to be and things that need to be checked out in more detail. so, yes, this is a good start from facebook. but it should only be the beginning. that's what i wanted to follow up with you. we spot it. they spot it. do they then take it down and stop it spreading. can they do that? will they do that? will we want them to do that? that's the question.
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facebook is something i can share with my friends what i want to share with my friends what i want to share with my friends and i would have a problem with somebody telling me i can't share things with my friends. what worries me though is when governments and politicians are pushing things out and the rest of us pushing things out and the rest of us can't see. so, what we know at the moment is that lots of political parties and other campaigns will be advertising on facebook, very, very targeted advertising at certain groups of people. the rest of us won't see what the adverts are or what they say and that means they're going to be hard to scrutinise. so i think there is a next step which can't do in time for this election, but after this election we're going to have a look at the rules of political advertising and make sure they are transparent for all of us to scrutinise. rory was talking about the different parties will be advertising on these sites so they stand to profit by having those adverts as well, don't they, on the sites? yes. i mean, that's one of the odd ironies of this and of course, anywhere that has advertising does. that's one reason
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why i was quite encouraged at this election when it was announced both facebook and google came to full fa ct facebook and google came to full fact and said, "how can we support you during this election?" that hasn't happened and it is a recognition that it has been important part to play in the election. we've got more to do, but they are beginning to step up in a way that's new. it's good to talk to you. the director of full fact, thank you very much. tonight, the bbc‘s panorama looks at, what facebook knows about you, examining the masses of data it holds about us and what it does with it. that's at 7.30pm on bbc one. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. normally i love your weather watcher pictures, but that's a dull roof
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shot you've got that that's a beautiful picture. it has been sent in by one of our weather watchers. it's from chester. down the road from where you are. this one is interest east sussex. there is more cloud around. it's a grey start. across some northern and eastern parts of the uk that's what it's like. we have a fair bit of chancellor george osborned. we've got cloud around the midlands, some of that will burn away and we will see sunshine, but we're going to hang on to a fair bit across the north and the east and the chilly feel under the cloud exacerbated by the wind. drift further west and we're back into the sunshine and temperatures picking up nicely to 16 to 18 celsius in south—west england. the same too across wales. some lovely sunshine from the word go and carrying on into the afternoon. yesterday in northern ireland, had its warmest day of the year so far with temperatures getting up to 21.1 celsius in county fermanagh. across north—east scotland there will be
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cloud at times. the same as we head down to lothian and the borders but for the rest of scotland and northern england we'll hang on to the sunshine. we have got the cloud towards yorkshire and lincolnshire and derbyshire and the south coast. at times, it will brighten up. through this evening and overnight, you'll find the wind eases and becomes more of a gentle breeze. there will be cloud around. thick enough for drizzle, but equally there will be clear skies and that means in rural areas it is going to be cold. cold enough for a touch of frost, but where we've got the clear skies by night, we'll start with them first thing in the morning and that means sunshine as high pressure remains firmly in charge of our weather. just looking at this chart, note the distinct lack of isobars across our shores. if you're in eastern parts of the uk, particularly close to the coast, it's not going to feel as cold as it has done for the last week or so. tomorrow, generally speaking there will be more cloud around than today especially across england and wales and also northern scotland and in
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northern scotland, more especially the north—east, we're prone to seeing showers or light patchy rain, but the rest of the uk should stay dry. temperatures between nine and 16 celsius. then as we head on in through wednesday. well, it's going to be cloudy in parts, but where the cloud breaks, it's going to be cold. cold enough for a touch of frost once again. wednesday sees a change in the wind direction which means more cloud across northern scotland where we have seen a lot of sunshine recently particularly the north—west. some spots of rain. again, a distinct lack of wind down the east coast. temperatures a little bit higher than they have been as well. so a real change for you. move away from that and we're back into brighter skies and temperatures once again up to 16 celsius, but lou and dan, some of us may well see rain and even some thunderstorms. thank you, carol. that roof is going to get a bit wet. a lovely roof. the gorgeous roof you've chosen. it's one of the
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finest roofs i've ever seen! from that historic french presidential decision to uk politics. one of the biggest shocks in last week's local elections was the triumph of the conservative candidate to become the metro mayor of tees valley — historically a labour region. but will the party be able to replicate that success in next month's general election? breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to the constituency of middlesbrough south and cleveland east to find out more. we're in a patchwork constituency. rural farmlands, and market towns like guisborough, a now—defunct steel industry on the coast, and working—class estates in middlesbrough. at the crafty cooks baking session for mums and toddlers, there is anger at what the conservatives have been doing in power. seven years of austerity has not sat well with me. education is suffering, the health service is suffering,
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and it is heartbreaking. helen will vote forjeremy corbyn. i'm tired of hearing that he is unelectable, because i don't think that he is. i think he has a strong record of voting for things that i personally agree with. this seat has been labour since 1997, but i asked a simple question. who makes the better prime minister, theresa may orjeremy corbyn? i would say that is a no—brainer. that's theresa may. the labour majority has been falling steadily in this part of the world, and most observers see storm clouds ahead. for the last 20 years, really, it has been falling out of love with labour. over fish and chips, the political editor of the northern echo tells me about the shifting tides. just before easter, the conservatives won the local council seat here for the first time, from labour, with an 8% swing. it is even said that theresa may had one look and said, "we are winning seats in middlesbrough.
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let's do this, let's go for this election". dance night at the local social club in middlesbrough. voting labour here is in the blood. always vote labour, yes. i have never, ever, not voted labour. many will still vote labour, but there is disillusion with jeremy corbyn, particularly over brexit. two—thirds of people here voted to leave the eu. control your borders, control immigration. that's what i want. control our own laws. jeremy corbyn, i think he's... i don't think he's happy with the brexit. so, to guarantee we do leave the european union, for the first time in their lives, people likejohn and mick will vote conservative. the hardest thing i've had to do in my life. if the labour party told me, "if you vote for us i will execute tomorrow", i would still vote for them.
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the only thing we don't know is brexit. how many micks are there from middlesbrough and across the country? enough, and the government will win in a landslide injune. we have been asking if children should remember famous works. barbara says, not just should remember famous works. barbara says, notjust many years, barbara says, notjust many years, barbara is 65 this year and she says i'm learning under milkwood. another viewer says i have always enjoyed learning famous speeches. patricia, the poem i read many years ago, i read many years ago, i believe it's by sarah churchill. barry says i can still recite lines from shakespeare. he learnt it for his o—level 60
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yea rs he learnt it for his o—level 60 years ago. coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. here on breakfast, climbing make its olympic debut at tokyo 2020. so we're at the uk's highest climbing wall in yorkshire this morning to find out how gb athletes are plotting their route to the top. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. new week about an all too familiar tale in terms of the weather. still giving us that nagging north—easterly wind, the very best of the conditions throughout the day will be finding western areas, this is where we will see buyers to the temperatures, maybe not just is where we will see buyers to the temperatures, maybe notjust as warm as it was throughout the weekend. well into the teens for the western side of scotland. more cloud lurking round about the northern north east shores, temperatures paid around 12 degrees. northern ireland glorious again, the western side of the
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pennines, west midlands into the south—west of england, almost unbroken sunshine. hopeful that some of the cloud will break up over eastern england although in east anglia you are content with a onshore breeze. the cloud thickening across the far north of scotland for across the far north of scotland for a spotty rain, where the skies stay clear in the countryside, some frost, elsewhere single figures pretty much where we've been for a number of days. coolish start tomorrow, a lot of dry weather, notice how these open up over the british isles, no onshore breeze across the east, even though you may keep a across the east, even though you may keepafairamount across the east, even though you may keep a fair amount of cloud in some spots and it will generally be a cloudy day for the greater part of england and eastern wales, and the north—east of scotland, at least it will feel a little warmer having lost the strength of that win. wednesday, could start, decent sort of day, lot of dry weather thanks to
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the area of high pressure. then we start spreading in this frontal system to bring rain into the south of the british isles, further north, remaining dry. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. emmanuel macron wins the french presidency, but that may prove to have been the easy part. we assess how his en marche! movement hopes to tackle the huge problems facing the french economy. live from london, that's our top story on monday 8th may. brussels receives a brexit boost! emmanuel macron beats the eurosceptic marine le pen to become france's new president. following the election result, we're live from a city trading floor for all the latest market reaction. markets today, in mixed
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