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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 9, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. a cap on energy bills for millions of households is confirmed as conservative policy. it will be part of the party's manifesto later this month — labour says the plans won't stop prices rising, while some energy firms are warning customers could lose out. good morning, it's tuesday the 9th of may. also this morning: major tests begin to find out if statins — which are taken by millions to cut the risk of heart attacks — could also help people suffering from multiple sclerosis. this is the scene of one of reservoir in kent after shortages
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for years. we'll be reporting on how farmers and others are coping with the growing water shortage. the rate of car recalls across europe was the highest on record in the first three months of the year — and the uk‘s got the third highest number of recalls in europe. the biggest culprit has been faulty airbags. i'll have more details on why, later. in sport, chelsea are one win away from the premier league title. after co mforta bly beating middlesbrough. that also means boro go straight back down to the championship. hollywood legend goldie hawn is back on our screens and even co—star amy schumer is excited. loving all the horn was a family affair for us. loving all the horn was a family affairfor us. my loving all the horn was a family affair for us. my family is ecstatic. —— goldie hawn. they will have 30 seconds with her and i will be like, "don't touch her! " we've more form cinema's newest mother and daughter pairing throughout the morning. and carol has the weather. good morning. it will be at cloudy day today than yesterday but nonetheless, there will still be some sunshine, particularly so in
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the west was a bit of rain today across the northern isles and not filling is called dump the east coast. all have more details on all of that in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the conservatives have confirmed they intend to cap energy prices for millions of households if they win the election. they claim the move could save consumers up to £100—pounds a year. writing in the sun, the prime minister says "rip off energy prices" hit people on the lowest incomes hardest. but labour says the cap would not stop bills rising and the pledge has drawn criticism from the industry. here's our political correspondent ben wright. energy prices have been hot politics sometime. at the last election, labour promised a two—year price freeze. now the conservatives want to intervene in an edge imaging market they say doesn't work for most pa rt market they say doesn't work for most part —— people. writing in the sun, the prime minister says rip—off prices hit people on the lowest
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incomes hardest. switching to another tariff or supplier often brings bills down that seven out of ten households are on standard variable rates which are usually more expensive than other plans on offer so the conservatives would give 0fgem at the power to impose a price ceiling for customers on the standard rates. the b recession six months. —— the cap would be reset. it would say people around £100 per year. theresa may hinted at the move at the conference. that's why when markets are dysfunctional, we should be prepared to intervene. where companies are exploiting the failures of the market in which they operate, where consumer choices are inhibited i deliberately complex pricing structures, we must set the market right. it's just not right that two thirds of energy customers are stuck on the most expensive tariffs. the conservatives say their price cap would allow competition to continue in the market that the lib
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dems said the policy would damage investment in energy while labour said a cap would not stop prices increasing. british gas owner warned that the move to move —— could lead to higher bills. chris mason is our political correspondent in westminster this morning. 0ther conservative tanks approaching the labour lawn on this one?” 0ther conservative tanks approaching the labour lawn on this one? i think they are. as you might expect, i have been perusing my bookshelf once again. i will present you with an exhibit from my bestseller list. this is from two years ago. looking at the labour manifesto. what does it say on page 25? labour will freeze energy bills until 2017, it says, ensuring prices will fall and not right and give the regulator the power to cut bills this winter. at the time, david cameron thought it was proof that ed miliband, the zen
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labour leader, operated in a marxist universe. and then up pops a policy that looks remarkably similar. the contenders is —— the conservatives say it is different because it will be the in the power of the regulator, rather than politicians, to set the cap. they are trying to suggest there are some differences that what i looked through this morning, i can't see a vast difference. it also shows you how different a conservative instinct theresa may has been david cameron. theresa may has been david cameron. theresa may has been david cameron. theresa may made the point that she thinks it is the right thing to do. 0ne thinks it is the right thing to do. one other quick thing to show you, dan, this morning, from the campaign trail yesterday, the labour leader jeremy corbyn out and about, take a look at this. strong and stable bananas? strong and stable bananas.
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voter offering jeremy corbyn some bananas. trying to fend off the bananas. trying to fend off the bananas. jeremy corbyn saw the funny side of it. that ubiquitous conservative slogan, even being attached to fruit being handed to the opposition. disaster avoided. let's be clear, that is mine. you're not happy with me touching the brea kfast ba na na, not happy with me touching the breakfast banana, are you? the striking thing was that the lady was saying, no, take away the bananas. remove anything we don't know about. and just after seven we'll be speaking to energy secretary greg clarke about the conservatives' proposal. some other news. statins are taken by millions of people in the uk every year
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to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. but a new multi—million—pound trial launched today will assess whether the well known drug may also help those those with multiple sclerosis. ms affects the central nervous system and can cause mobility problems. it's thought statins could help slow the progression of the condition as sara smith reports. statins, the scrap to 6 million of us statins, the scrap to 6 million of us toa statins, the scrap to 6 million of us to a year to lower cholesterol but a new trial will test whether it will help tackle a new condition. it will help tackle a new condition. it will disrupt messages travelling along nerve fibres, ms. half of sufferers of ms will not be able to
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slow its progress. this trial, is aimed at them. if we can prove it has a long—term impact for people with ms, we note that you record, it's extremely cheap so it can be quickly made available to everyone who needs it and it won't put a big hole in the nhs's budget. previous smaller study suggested statins did have an impact. this trial will provide much more information but at six years long, there will be some time before they know how effective statins can be. a thirty—five—year—old man will appear in court today in connection with a dog attack on a two—year—old girl in liverpool on sunday. the toddler suffered injuries to her head and body when several dogs got into the garden where she was playing in toxteth. she's in a serious but stable condition in hospital. andrew mcgowan has been accused of being in charge of four dogs that were dangerously out of control. the former acting us attorney general has revealed
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she warned the trump administration that its national security advisor was open to russian blackmail, 18 days before he resigned. sally yates told senators general michael flynn had lied about his contacts with the russian ambassador. he resigned after it emerged he had misled the white house. but president trump has described the allegation of collusion between him and russia, a hoax. faulty airbags, steering and fuel issues are just some of the problems that led to the highest ever rate of car—related recalls in europe in the first three months of this year. tell me about recall. they were obviously triggered due to safety concerns. in the first three months of this year, 122 recall is right
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across europe. that is a record high. a lot of those, 80% of those, are from people utterly getting injuries in some point and then complaints being made and then recall is being announced. the ta kata, recall is being announced. the takata, the recall is being announced. the ta kata, the company recall is being announced. the takata, the company involved,. last timea takata, the company involved,. last time a bigger recall, not many people go for it. if you look at the list of cars that have been recalled, some of them, the bmw three series, only 1.5 % of people completed the recall. another one, there was 60 or 70% of those people making the recall is. it varies. toyota airbags, only a quarter of
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people completed the recall. there seems to be a bit of apathy out there. the manufacturers would like to think they would do it 100%.“ quite an efficient system, i had to. ——i have had to mac. —— two. a woman who alleges she was sexually harassed at fox news has asked uk media regulators to block 21st century fox's planned purchase of sky. 0fcom is investigating whether it's in the public interest for the murdoch—owned company to take full ownership of sky. 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. for the threats we face today are... 0ver for the threats we face today are... over two decades, a mixture of conspiracy and nationalism has made rupert murdoch's fox news channel made the —— be the most watched cable channel in america. but this scandal has shaken to the core. the news boss departed last year. bill 0'reilly left this year. they are
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facing sexual abuse allegations. the most important men at fox are out. for the murdochs, it could be worse. they tried to take control of sky. bec declined an interview request so isaid bec declined an interview request so i said hello to the boss as he left work in manhattan? are you worried about 0fcom ? hello? work in manhattan? are you worried about 0fcom? hello? wendy walsh filed a complaint against bill 0'reilly by phone. they flew to london specifically to explain to 0fcom why do couch they don't think the murdochs should own it sky outright. fox had appointed women to several senior positions since then. an incredibly rare example of one of the first printed pages has been
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unearthed at the university of reading. these pages were produced by william caxton on one of the first printing presses in about 1476. they'd been lying unrecognised in the university's archives, but they'll go on public display from today for the first time since they were sold from his print shop in the 15th century. so many marvellous things about that. it had read as well as black—and—white! latch red. —— red. when you open the books and smell it, it's beautiful. a good aroma. did you have to wear gloves? idea. i had to be very careful. ——i did. that is here with a look at the
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sport. that picture tells the story, doesn't it? look at the despair on the middlesbrough player's face. the other guy heading to the final. for chelsea fans, all eyes turn to friday night. a win at west brom on friday night will give chelsea the premier league title. they beat middlesbrough three nil at stamford bridge last night with goals from diego costa, marcos alonso and midfielder nemanja matic — and that extends their lead over second placed spurs to seven points. but the defeat for middlesbrough means they are relegated from the premier league after just one season. it's another blow for north—east football, after sunderland were also sent down. former portsmouth midfielder sulley muntari says fifa and uefa don't care enough about racism. he walked off during a game in italy after receiving abuse from opposition fans... and he's told the bbc he'd do it ‘again‘. and maria sharapova has been beaten by eugenie bouchard, the woman who called her a cheater,
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in what was labelled a grudge match at the madrid 0pen. the two players did shake hands at the end though. interesting, eugenie duscher said she had loads of support. interesting. lots of people coming up interesting. lots of people coming up to say good luck. you know, you need to beat maria sharapova, after what she did. we are talking about a dry winter causing water shortages. tell us about that. good morning. yes. the first chart i will show you shows april rainfall we have had. this shows a huge swathes of the british isles have had less rainfall than we would expect in april. an example, 2 places here have had the driest
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april recorded. 3 millimetres. in edinburgh we would normally expect 40.5 during april. 3. only 6 in these places. we are far down on what we would expect. may has been dry as well. is their rainfall on the horizon? yes. the latter part of the horizon? yes. the latter part of the week, thursday and friday, heavy downpours. some thundery. before that, a fairly quiet start. this far this month, 5.8 in kew gardens. nothing in edinburgh. and nothing in edinburgh today as well. high pressure dominates. things are quiet. today, cloudier than yesterday. a chilly start in western
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scotla nd yesterday. a chilly start in western scotland and western parts of northern ireland. patchy rain and drizzle. we have lost the brisk wind coming in from the north sea. a gentle breeze today. not as cold. all the cloud we have in central and eastern areas. to the west, sunshine. through the day, some of the cloud will be eroded from the west. some of it will hang around. some of us starting with sunshine. 2 differences. the rain and the northern isles, england scotland, and the difference in the field to the weather in the east coast. the temperatures are not different to the past few days. temperatures today, 15— 16 degrees. through the evening and overnight, cloud. it is eroding. patchy rain and drizzle in the northern isles. some getting into the far north of mainland scotland. breezy here. clear sky
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overnight. these are towns and cities. not as cold. the countryside it will be. frost in the countryside. tomorrow, where we have had clear skies by night, clear by day. a fair bit of sunshine tomorrow. that is away from parts of the north—east where there will be more cloud. again, more rain. temperature—wise, between 10 and about 17 celsius. thursday. this is where we see the change. a system coming up from the near continent bringing in some rain and heavy showers. some of which later in the day will be thundery. it will feel warmer. humid as well for some. north of that, more dry and bright. the rain will advance during the course of friday as it heads north. we will try to catch it. see you in half an hour. and now the papers. we
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are talking about energy prices. we are. the difference between a cap and a freeze. they are both interventions into the energy market. labour suggested something similar4years market. labour suggested something similar 4 years ago. this was the daily mail in the past. fixing energy prices and grabbing land and boosting the minimum wage. this is from 2013. this is the daily mail today after theresa may's pledged to cap tariffs. £100 off your energy bill. theresa may pledges to cap rip off energy prices. just a reminder off energy prices. just a reminder of the filter that is used on some stories. the front page of the daily telegraph. they are talking about the anger as energy prices rise by 37%. unfair increases before the
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tories bring in this price cap. and prices could be driven up even higher by reducing competition. we will speak to greg clarke about all of that later to get clarification. if you are watching the one show tonight, mr and mrs may will be together for the first time on television. no questions are allowed to be known beforehand. a genuine chinwag. as on bbc. like that question "how do you sleep at night?" the times. backlash over the energy cap. and the couple killed in the boston flat in massachusetts. they were killed by an anaesthetist in the uk. secret tory plot to bring
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back foxhunting. the guardian. jeremy corbyn saying his top priority is to build more council houses and regulation of the private rental sector. now to use. you have the front pages. the business pages. the owners of british gas, a lot relies on our savings and pensions. they said they may consider cutting dividends to withstand the knock—on effects of prices being capped. back of the queue, the sun, how to get the fastest supermarket line. look at the checkout staff, if they are slow or chatty, go to another till. i like the jackie till. in the numbers. ——
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i like the jackie till. in the numbers. — — chatty i like the jackie till. in the numbers. —— chatty till. i like the jackie till. in the numbers. -- chatty till. always go left. i always go back to the entrance. deep thinking. an interesting system. my favourite read in the telegraph. the only female muslim to take charge in a football match in britain. a really sparky lady. she says she has received a little bit of racial abuse, but not as much as you think. she says the main problem for her is bad sportsmanship. if people need to fight, they need to get on a boxing ring, according to her. she does keepy uppies at half—time to calm them down. she says the best philosophy for anyone is to be good at yourjob and people will trust you. how do you like your eggs?
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poached. fried. i am you. how do you like your eggs? poached. fried. iam firmly in you. how do you like your eggs? poached. fried. i am firmly in the poached camp. what about cloud? that's the rage in la. you fluff it up that's the rage in la. you fluff it up with water and put it in the oven. you will end up with this wonderful creation which is all of the rage in los angeles. one of the wonderful things about eggs as they are quick to cook. you will have seen are quick to cook. you will have seen louise shaking her head the whole time. cloud eggs. scrambled is ha rd whole time. cloud eggs. scrambled is hard enough. that is too far. whole time. cloud eggs. scrambled is hard enough. that is too fanm whole time. cloud eggs. scrambled is hard enough. that is too far. it is all about poached. good morning to eve ryo ne all about poached. good morning to everyone watching breakfast. britain's green and pleasant land isn't looking so lush at the moment after the driest winter in almost 20 years. carol mentioned it.
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during april, some parts of the uk have had the lowest rainfall in april on record and if it continues it could become a real cause for concern. breakfast‘s john maguire is at bewl reservoir in kent for us this morning. good morning. tell us what is going on. it is lovely. carol is right. it has been extremely dry, the driest winterfor has been extremely dry, the driest winter for 20 has been extremely dry, the driest winterfor 20 years. has been extremely dry, the driest winter for 20 years. many parts of the uk have had little rain. look at the uk have had little rain. look at the earth around the reservoir. you feel you should way cricket on it. it is vast. 200 million people get their drinking water from here, it is vast. 200 million people get their drinking waterfrom here, bewl reservoir. it is at about 71%. whether or not you feel that is a problem, there are other reservoirs owned by southern water. there is a
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lot of water. the best thing to say from their perspective, the water companies, is that they are optimistically cautious, i suppose. i will talk more about that later. but now for the impact this dry weather is having. at long last it is raining in suffolk. but it is not what you think. keeping these fields irrigated is complex and expensive at the best of times. but with such little rain recently, it is really tough. these have been in since the middle of january so tough. these have been in since the middle ofjanuary so they are only 3 months old. what we are looking for is obviously a nice, long, current. it needs water? it needs water. -- carrot. and as you can see, it has already had 2 inches of water added to the soil. they have built 2 large reservoirs, but it takes 2 years to fill up. they are arguing that the
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water is not fit for purpose. we never know when we are going to get a dry summerto never know when we are going to get a dry summer to be if we do and move into a second really dry winter, then we have real concerns here, because we will have limited ability to fill the reservoirs. andrew will expect to harvest around 2 tons of carrots from this 100 acre field. he is watering it, but still the soil is watering it, but still the soil is so dry. look at that as i rub it in my hand in the wind is blowing it away. recent years have seen the river in hertfordshire flood. this impressive 18th—century bridge is testa m e nt to impressive 18th—century bridge is testament to what should lay below. but instead it is arid. no 1 testament to what should lay below. but instead it is arid. no1 here remembers anything quite like it. we have just had the driest winter in the uk for 20 years. how will we copein the uk for 20 years. how will we cope in the years ahead? welcome to what will be called eddington, a new
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university being built by the university being built by the university of cambridge in response to the housing shortage. this is the uk's largest water recycling project. they all have traditional water systems for bathing and cooking and another for using recycled water from the site for irrigating landscapes and lawns and flushing toilets and supporting washing machines. so, a man-made solution to what well maybe a man—made problem, and it is expected to remain dry in the coming weeks. in suffolk, the farmers talk about a five—year cycle, so, consider this, 2012 saw hose—pipe bands, the wettest rout in history —— bans. —— drought. it seemed to rain every day in 2012 after that after the couple
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of weeks of dry weather we had for the olympics thankfully. after this, we will have water saving tips, because people want to be aware ofjust how dry it has been. as you heard in the film there, if the dry weather continues for much longer, well, that is when theissues for much longer, well, that is when the issues will really start to kick in. back to you guys. thank you. we will come back and visit you a lot if that is all right. yeah, of course, i will be we will see you later. a nice proposal. now for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are watching this morning. we will see you in a minute. good morning. the mayor of london says it's everyone's responsibility to tackle knife crime. this comes a week after the metropolitan police launched an operation to tackle the problem. over 400 arrests were made, 73 three of those
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were for possesion of an offensive weapon. nine teenagers have been fatally stabbed or shot in london this year. iam quite i am quite clear that the rise in violent crime is of concern to the new commissioner and to meet. we have published a new abuse and crime plan where we talk about the necessity to tackle violence against young people. fresh talks have been announced to resolve the year long dispute over the role of conductors on southern railway. the company will meet with the rmt union next monday. the union's already held 31 days of strike action over plans for driver only trains. southern has also announced it's axing night time trains to croydon from the 21st of may, except on friday and saturday nights. the operator says it's to allow maintenance and improvement work. a london casting for a new film, directed by idris elba was shut down because too many people turned up. the actor asked people wanting work as "paid extras" to show up in hackney to learn more about the project. but the overwhelming response meant it had to be cancelled. mr elba apologised to those who were kept waiting last night,
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but were unable to get in. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there is a good service on all lines apart from the district and circle line which is part suspended. whitehall is closed northbound at parliament square until sunday for roadworks. it caused long delays yesterday around westminster. traffic is flowing well so far around parliament square. at the staples corner roundabout, the slip road to the north circular eastbound is closed because of a collision outside brent cross shopping centre. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. another cloudy start today. good news. not as cold as yesterday. yesterday we had a keen north—easterly breeze. that has fallen overnight. without it today it will not be as cold. we still have ploughed. 0ne it will not be as cold. we still have ploughed. one or two sunny spells in the south. 0vernight tonight, that cloud starts to
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disappear. a lengthy clear spell. minimum temperatures dropping down between 7 and 9. the wind will be light. a bright start to wednesday. more sunshine around finally as we go to the middle of the week. patchy cloud. decent overall. it will feel pleasa nt cloud. decent overall. it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. a maximum of16— pleasant in the sunshine. a maximum of 16- 17. a pleasant in the sunshine. a maximum of 16— 17. a change for thursday. low pressure starts to drag in more moist air. friday evening, showers. it will drag in warmer air. it will feel more mild through thursday. maximum temperatures of 18 degrees. showers overnight thursday into friday. staying showery for friday. settled in the weekend. it will be more warm. i will be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in halfan latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. until then, more on
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the website of the usual address. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: fleur was a happy, healthy dog but a week after getting a sore leg she died. now vets are warning owners about a deadly disease, known as alabama rot, that has killed almost 100 dogs in the last five years. and, could the mysteries of the big bang be about to be revealed ? we'll hear how scientists think an upgrade to the large hadron collider could trigger one of the biggest revolutions in physics. hollywood superstars amy schumer and goldie hawn team up as a mother and daughter who are kidnapped during a trip to south america. we speak to them about their incredible relationship, on and off screen. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. where love is that it is about a
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mother and daughter relationship in that film. it is unusual. and it's authentic. good morning. first, our main story. the conservatives have confirmed they intend to cap energy prices for millions of households if they win the election. they claim the move could save consumers up to £100—pounds a year. writing in the sun, the prime minister says "rip off energy prices" hit people on the lowest incomes hardest. but labour says the cap would not stop bills rising and the pledge has drawn criticism from the industry. here's our political correspondent ben wright. energy prices have been hot politics sometime. price freeze. —— at the last election, labour promised a two—year price freeze. now the conservatives
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want to intervene in an edge imaging market they say doesn't work for most people. writing in the sun, the prime minister says rip—off prices hit people on the lowest incomes hardest. switching to another tariff or supplier often brings bills down but seven out of ten households are on standard variable rates which are usually more expensive than other plans on offer so the conservatives would give 0fgem the power to impose a price ceiling for customers on these standard rates. the cap would be reset every 6 months. it would say people around £100 per year. theresa may hinted at the move at the conference. that's why when markets are dysfunctional, we should be prepared to intervene. where companies are exploiting the failures of the market in which they operate, where consumer choices inhibited by deliberately complex pricing structures, we must set the market right. it's just not right that two thirds of energy customers are stuck on the most expensive tariffs. the conservatives say their price
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cap would allow competition to continue in the market that the lib said the policy would damage investment in energy while labour said a cap would not stop prices increasing. british gas owner warned that the move could lead to higher bills. jeremy corbyn will launch his campaign today saying that they are not trying to get the uk back in the european union. meanwhile, the snp have set out four key priorities on oil and gas. the party's westminster leader,
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angus robertson said snp mps would hold the next uk government to account and ensure the industry gets the support it deserves, including more help for oil and gas exploration. a new multi—million pound trial launched today will assess whether statins, a drug normally used to reduce the risk of heart attacks, can also be used to help those with multiple sclerosis. ms affects the central nervous system and can cause mobility problems. it's thought statins, a cheap and already widely used drug, could help slow down the progression of the condition. a 35—year—old man will appear in court today in connection with a dog attack on a two—year—old girl in liverpool on sunday. the toddler suffered injuries to her head and body when several dogs got into the garden where she was playing in toxteth. she's in a serious but stable condition in hospital. andrew mcgowan has been accused
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of being in charge of four dogs that were dangerously out of control. faulty airbags, steering and fuel issues are just some of the problems that led to the highest ever rate of car—related recalls in europe in the first three months of this year. the uk ranked third behind germany and france for the number of recalls, but car manufacturers say less than 50—percent of uk customers take up the necessary repairs. we will have some weather coming up with carol talking about the driest winter in some time. and now we have kat to talk about chelsea going to the final and poor old middlesbrough being relegated again. a lot of my family ‘s own morning, they are big middlesbrough fans. chelsea, family ‘s own morning, they are big middlesbroughfans. chelsea, come later this week, a big weekend ahead. if they go on to win a premier league. chelsea manager antonio conte said his side showed they deserved to win the league, after moving to within one win of the title. they looked very comfortable against middlesbrough last night, winning 3—0 at stamford bridge — they can become champions
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with victory at west bromwich albion on friday night. it was important to win. we must be pleased now. another step to win the title. it is important to west. rest. so chelsea are on the brink of the title — but there was despair for middlesbrough fans, who've seen their side relegated afterjust one season back in the premier league. some of them made a round trip of over 500 miles to watch the match. the supporters all season have been top class. the support, home and away, the one thing the supporters
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deserve this premier league football. we are all disappointed. we need to finish the season strong and then reflect over the summer. ghanaian midfielder sulley muntari says he'd walk off the pitch again if he was racially abused. his ban for walking off the pitch in a league game for pescara was overturned but in a bbc interview muntari, who played in the premier league for portsmouth and sunderland, claims racism is "everywhere and getting worse". and he accuses fifa and uefa of not caring enough about it. if they want to fight racism... we are playing football here. we had nothing to say about it. maybe they ran out of internet or didn't have the tv. that's why they didn't comment. if it is unnecessary things for them but this is a big deal.
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racism is a big deal. maria sharapova has been beaten by the most outspoken critic of her return to tennis following a 15 month doping ban. former wimbledon finalist eugenie bouchard had called sharapova a ‘cheater‘ who shouldn't have been allowed to play again. the canadian won a near three—hour epic in the second round of the madrid 0pen. that a lot of players coming up to me wishing you could luck. players are don't normally speak to. getting are don't normally speak to. getting a lot of texts from people in the tennis world that were just rooting for me. i wanted to do it for myself but also all of these people were really felt support. lam iamjust i am just one of the two players out on the court and everything that surrounds myself, i don't really know a lot of it, i don't pay too much attention but i think part of this game for many years. i know the
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drill, i know the excitement. i know there is always a lot of talk and bars and match—ups, rivalries, news. it's all part of the game. —— buzz. andy murray plays later but dan evans is out. and after his defeat to robin haase, evans said he still considered himself to be the british number three, despite being overtaken by aljaz bedene in the rankings. bedene switched nationality two years ago but evans said it didn't "sit well" with him, especially as bedene has return to live in his home country of slovenia. do you feel sorry for the sky? —— this guy. an iranian student had to be taken to a police station at the weekend — because he looks too much like lionel messi. look at this, the resemblance is uncanny! so many people in the city of hamaden wanted a picture with reza parastesh that police had to look after him.
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the 25—year—old cuts his hair and grooms his beard to look like the argentina forward, and is fully booked with media interviews and has even landed modelling contracts as a result! thank you very much, cat. just over three years ago 276 school girls were kidnapped from a remote boarding school in northern nigeria by extremist group boko haram. over the weekend 82 of them were released. now their parents face an agonising wait to see them again, with many still unsure if their children were amongst the fortunate ones set free. 0ur reporter abdullahi kaura abubakar has spoken to some of the families affected and joins us now from abuja. there is a long delay on the line said it will be a bit of a gap between the questions and answers. can you tell us exactly what has happened over the last few days?
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well, over the weekend, 82 of the secondaries cool girls that were kidnapped from chibok were released by boko haram. —— schoolgirls. it followed negotiations with the international red cross and some ngos. it was for a swap for five members of the boko haram group. they were brought here on sunday with a net with the nigerian president. right now, they are being kept at a security facility where they are undergoing medical checkups and treatment. our viewers might remember that there were a number of girls, ithink remember that there were a number of girls, i think 21, released remember that there were a number of girls, ithink 21, released back remember that there were a number of girls, i think 21, released back in 0ctober girls, i think 21, released back in october that there had been a number of concerns about whether they have been able to integrate back into their communities. is that correct? how big are concerned has that been?
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21 girls have still being held by the authorities. the government wa nts to the authorities. the government wants to provide psychosocial therapy to them and there are also fears of them for their safety because over the years, they have become famous because of the pressure put on the government to get these girls released so i'm afraid this 82 will have to go through the same process before they will rejoin their families. the 21 are still with the government. now, the government is in the process of reuniting his 82 with their family members and after that reunion, i'm afraid they will have to remain with the authorities for some time to come. ok, a huge job ahead. we have been talking about the fact
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there has not been as much rain as normally. we have been lurking about in the weather. a beautiful picture. isn't it stunning? we will talk about it that quarter past 7. the forecast will take the form of heavy showers. some of them will be thundery. not everyone will see them. we are expecting them thursday into friday. humid as well. today, quiet weather. high pressure is firmly in charge. look at the lack of isobars. not as cold. northern ireland and much of scotland, beautiful to start the day if you like it sunny and dry. a bit more cloud so be further west, sunshine. the midlands and the south coast, hanging on to the cloud through the
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gate. generally speaking, cloudier than yesterday. through the day, as you can see, not much wind. temperatures on the east coast will be similarto temperatures on the east coast will be similar to the last few days. not as cold. some of the cloud will be eroded from the west. sunshine in western areas. continuing with the patchy rain and drizzle. top temperatures today, 16. and it could bea temperatures today, 16. and it could be a little bit higher. through the evening and overnight, the cloud thatis evening and overnight, the cloud that is left will be eroded. we hang on to the breeze and rain in the northern isles in the finals of man scotland. —— in the far north of. these temperatures are what you can expect in towns and cities. the countryside, 2. a little bit below is also possible. taken note, gardeners. sunshine to start the day. fair weather cloud through the
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course of the day. in scotland, especially the north and east, we will hang on to cloud. patch iranian the northern isles. temperatures are lower than they have been in the north. thursday, signs of change. a weather system coming up from the near continent moving north and taking heavy showers with it. initially through the channel islands then into southern england and wales. ahead of that, cloud will build. band sunshine. later in the day we will see thunderstorms. humidity will develop. friday into saturday, again, we continue with the uncertainty in as weather fronts traversing to the north of the country. pulling in a south—westerly wind. it will feel warmer. to the end of the week, you may not have weather like this, but some of us will see heavy showers. for some of
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us, that will be very welcome. back to you. i might have to go into the shed and get out my wellies. to you. i might have to go into the shed and get out my wellieslj a lwa ys shed and get out my wellieslj always have my wellies at the ready. have you ever gone to book a flight one day and found the price has changed the next? research out this week suggests the price of the same family trip can fluctuate by thousands of pounds on line. sean's looking into the mysterious world of holiday pricing. that much? there was a time that booking in advance was the thing to do. you could get a deal. today is about dynamic pricing. good morning, everyone. before the internet, the price of a flight or a package holiday was pretty much fixed. airlines would publish their fares and you could get the tour operators catalogues with the prices.
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but that's all been replaced by "dynamic pricing," where prices can change from day—to—day, hour to hour, and even minute to minute. a survey from fairfx found the price of one family trip to florida apparently shot up by £3,370 in a single day before falling again the day after. what is going on here? here's someone what is going on here? here's someone who buys a lot. i'm off to copenhagen. £9. it's100 now. simon calder is travel editor of the independent. he buys more tickets than most of us and can explain how it works. what you pay depends on what others are prepared to pay. the best example is a box of ripe bananas the market is trying to sell by the end of the day when they all have to be thrown away. she will no how much
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she can get for it, but it all depends how much they can sell for. —— know. if by lunchtime you cannot sell them, you cut the price. if you have loads at the end of the day you will drop the price because it is perishable. hotel beds are just the same, perishable. so they are trying to make the most. we will move on from bananas. how do we know the best price for a ticket? there are clear rules. if it is the school holidays you are looking for, the best time to book a ticket is as early as possible, 10— 11 months ahead. you will see airline is have ahead. you will see airline is have a marvellous time putting prices up the closer it gets. —— airlines. just a shortfall flight will be £883
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return around that time. —— short—haul. 0utside return around that time. —— short—haul. outside the holidays, thenit short—haul. outside the holidays, then it is to see which airline links first. -- blinks. you get the same with hotels. the prices rise the second time of searching. that is because of cookies. they are watching you, aren't they? they think that, but i have never seen any proof of that. if you sit down with 2 computers, 1 with loads of cookies because i have been searching a lot, and another that is com pletely clea n, we searching a lot, and another that is completely clean, we will see, but i don't think anyone could demonstrated to me. i will change my tune if they could. —— demonstrate it. thank you very much for that.
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keep your eye out. but whatever you do, once you have bought them, don't look again in case it goes down. good advice. that is the same as not looking at your exam after you have done the exam. now, they say you can't choose your family. but when it came to casting her on—screen mum, comedian, amy schumer, knew exactly who she wanted to call, hollywood legend and 0scar—winner, goldie hawn. in snatched they play a mother and daughter who are kidnapped during a once in a lifetime trip to south america. i met them both to talk about modern mother—daughter relationships and why goldie was persuaded to return to the big screen. goldie hawn, it has been some time since we have seen you in a movie. what is it like coming back?l
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since we have seen you in a movie. what is it like coming back? a lot of fun. it was a good feeling. look out of fun. it was a good feeling. look our fine you were, mum. pack your bags, we are going to south america. absolutely not. you need 2 years to plan a vacation. you don't do anything fun any more. look at these. i'm a bit. that is frightening. it is well observed. it isa frightening. it is well observed. it is a great look at the mother— daughter relationship. was it important to make this movie for you? i made trainwreck about my father. this was about my mother. we wa nted father. this was about my mother. we wanted it to be laugh out loud funny. but it was important to have a look at the mother— daughter relationship. it is a very powerful 1. and it is very honest. lots of relationships will be similar to this relationship. absolutely. the
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mother has complete control for a period of time. then when the daughter wants to come out on be individual herself, it is very concerning for the mother. the daughter doesn't want to be anything like the mother, i want to be totally different. all of this is going on, and the mother is thinking that you were my baby and i need you more than you need me now.|j that you were my baby and i need you more than you need me now. i can't believe you talked me into this. i should have listened to you. i love you. this is great but we need to get out of here. specifically, and you address it in the movie, the selfieness and all of that, things going viral, does it make it difficult for you? i feel bad for children growing up. ifeel grateful that social media did not exist when i was that social media did not exist when iwasa that social media did not exist when i was a teenager because i would definitely have had even more
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regrets than i have. were you thinking about that when you made the movie? i think ego is there from the movie? i think ego is there from the beginning. there is no... i mean, you don't need social media to have an ego issue, or the need to be seen or have an ego issue, or the need to be seen or loved or anything like that. but i do think it is an obsession today like i have never, ever seen. would you go on a road trip like this with your mother?” would you go on a road trip like this with your mother? i have had a lot. but the vacations i took with her were because i was so broke and your mother will take you on a free trip and give you food and drinks. notjust to be with her? that is what you do when you are ready poor kid. so, now, when we spend time together, it is a choice. is your mother jealous of together, it is a choice. is your motherjealous of goldie hawn? loving goldie hawn was a family
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affair. my parents were ecstatic. they have not met goldie hawn yet, but they will have 30 seconds with her. don't touch her. she is mine. no, my mother isjust her. don't touch her. she is mine. no, my mother is just really, really happy for me. more of that later on. sometimes when we do interviews, it looks like it is a fake friendship. that did not look like 1. the film is very funny. the film is very honest about how mothers and daughters feel about each other. do you see daughters feel about each other. do you see a daughters feel about each other. do you see a similar relationship with your daughter? i am a mother. it is really, really interesting. they are not fake friends. good to clear that up. snatched is in cinemas next week. time now to get the news,
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travel, and weather, where you are. good morning from bbc london news. 300 knives were seized and 4 people arrested during a weeklong crackdown on knife crime. we must all take responsibility for tackling knife crime, according to the mayor. his comments come a week after the metropolitan police launched an operation to tackle the problem. nine teenagers have been fatally stabbed or shot in london this year. i am quite clear that the rise in violent crime is of concern to the new commissioner and to meet. we have published a new police and crime plan where we talk about the necessity to tackle violence against young people. fresh talks have been announced to resolve the year long dispute over the role of conductors on southern railway. the company will meet with the rmt union next monday. the union's already held 31 days of strike action over plans for driver only trains. southern has also announced it's axing night time trains to croydon from the 21st of may, except on friday and saturday nights.
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the operator says it's to allow maintenance and improvement work. a london casting for a new film, directed by idris elba was shut down because too many people turned up. the actor asked people wanting work as "paid extras" to show up in hackney to learn more about the project. but the overwhelming response meant it had to be cancelled. mr elba apologised to those who were kept waiting last night, but were unable to get in. the luther star was soon advised to cancel the event by police due to the overwhelming response. mr elba apologised to those who were kept waiting last night, but were unable to get in. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there is a good service on all lines apart from the district and circle line which is part suspended. and in mile end, there's a lane closed on the a11 eastbound near the tube station because of a collapsed manhole cover. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's another cloudy start to the day. but some good news. it's not going to feel quite as cold as yesterday.
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yesterday we had a keen north—easterly breeze. that has fallen light overnight. without the breeze today it will not be as cold. we still have cloud. one or two sunny spells in the south. 0vernight tonight, that cloud starts to disappear. some very lengthy clearer spells. minimum temperatures dropping down between 7 and 9. the wind remains very light. that means a bright start to wednesday. more sunshine around finally as we head to mid—week. patchy cloud. decent overall. it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. a maximum of 16, or maybe even 17 celcius. a change for thursday. low pressure starts to drag in more moist air. friday evening, showers. what it also does is drag in some warmer air. it will feel more mild through thursday. maximum temperatures of 18 degrees. showers overnight thursday into friday.
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staying showery for friday. and rather unsettled into the weekend. but it is going to be warmer. i will be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. until then, more on the website of the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. a cap on energy bills for millions of households is confirmed as conservative policy. it will be part of the party's manifesto later this month — labour says the plans won't stop prices rising, while some energy firms are warning customers could lose out. good morning, it's tuesday the 9th of may. also this morning: major tests begin to find out if statins — which are taken by millions to cut the risk of heart attacks — could also help people suffering from multiple sclerosis.
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this is the scene of one of reservoir in kent after shortages for years. after some of the driest weather in 20 years — we'll be reporting on how farmers and others are coping with the growing water shortage. the rate of car recalls across europe was the highest on record in the first three months of the year — the biggest culprit has been faulty airbags. i'll have more details on why, later. in sport, chelsea are one win away from the premier league title. after co mforta bly beating middlesbrough. that also means boro go straight back down to the championship. also this morning, the mystery disease that's deadly for dogs — we'll hear from the vet calling for urgent research. and carol has the weather. today, for many of us, another dry day. the best of the sunshine will be in the west. a bit more in central and eastern areas and we
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have some rain in the forecast. that is patchy rain in northern isles. good morning. first, our main story. the conservatives have confirmed they intend to cap energy prices for millions of households if they win the election. they claim the move could save consumers up to £100—pounds a year. writing in the sun, the prime minister says "rip off energy prices" hit people on the lowest incomes hardest. but labour says the cap would not stop bills rising and the pledge has drawn criticism from the industry. here's our political correspondent ben wright. energy prices have been hot politics sometime. at the last election, labour promised a two—year price freeze. now the conservatives want to intervene in an energy market they say doesn't work for most people. writing in the sun, the prime minister says rip—off energy prices hit people on the lowest incomes hardest. switching to another tariff or supplier often
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brings bills down but seven out of ten households are on standard variable rates which are usually more expensive than other plans on offer. so the conservatives would give 0fgem the power to impose a price ceiling for customers on these standard rates. the cap would be reset every six months. the conservatives say it would reduce gas and electricity bills by around £100 per year. at last year's conservative conference, theresa may hinted at the move. that's why where markets are dysfunctional, we should be prepared to intervene. where companies are exploiting the failures of the market in which they operate, where consumer choices inhibited by deliberately complex pricing structures, we must set the market right. it's just not right that two thirds of energy customers are stuck on the most expensive tariffs. the conservatives say their price cap would allow competition to continue in the market, but the lib dems say the policy would damage investment in energy while labour said a cap would not
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stop prices increasing. british gas owner centrica warned the move could lead to higher bills and reduce competition. and we'll be speaking to energy secretary greg clarke about the conservatives' proposal in just over five minutes. also, comparing it to a similar labour policy from four years ago. that was a freeze. we will get details on what the cap exactly means. jeremy corbyn will formally launch labour's election campaign today by saying that his party is not trying to find a way to keep britain in the european union. mr corbyn, who'll be in greater manchester, will say the issue of brexit is settled. he'll be joined by the city's new metro mayor andy burnham and will focus on labour's pledge to take on the rich and powerful. statins are taken by millions of people in the uk every year
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to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. but a new multi—million—pound trial launched today will assess whether the well known drug may also help those those with multiple sclerosis. ms affects the central nervous system and can cause mobility problems. it's thought statins could help slow the progression of the condition as sara smith reports. statins, prescribed to 6 million of us every year to lower cholesterol. but in the coming months a major new trial will test whether it will help tackle a condition which can wreak devastation on sufferers. multiple sclerosis causes the immune system to attack the lining of the nerves, disrupting messages travelling along nerve fibres. it can mean increaing levels of disiblity. more than 100,000 people in the uk have ms. half will develop the secondary progressive stage.
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there's currently no treatment to slow its progress and this trial, involving more than 1,000 people, is aimed at them. if we can prove it has a long—term impact and result for people with ms. we know its safety record, it's extremely cheap so it could be quickly made available to everyone who needs it and it won't put a big hole in the nhs budget. a previous, smaller study suggested statins did have an impact. this trial will provide much more information, but at six years long, it will be some time before it's known just how effective statins could be. a 35—year—old man will appear in court today in connection with a dog attack on a two—year—old girl in liverpool on sunday. the toddler suffered injuries to her head and body when several dogs got into the garden where she was playing in toxteth. she's in a serious but stable condition in hospital. andrew mcgowan has been accused of being in charge of four dogs that were dangerously out of control.
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the former acting us attorney general has revealed she warned the trump administration that its national security advisor was open to russian blackmail, 18 days before he resigned. sally yates told senators general michael flynn had lied about his contacts with the russian ambassador. he resigned after it emerged he had misled the white house. but president trump has described the allegation of collusion between him and russia, a hoax. faulty airbags, steering and fuel issues are just some of the problems that led to the highest ever rate of car—related recalls in europe in the first three months of this year. sean's here and can tell us more. hundreds of thousands of cars and then recalled. a lot of cars in the uk are manufactured a round europe. they are triggered because of safety
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concerns, understandably, at 80% of these are triggered from people getting in injury in the first place, a complaint being made, a manufacturer being made aware and spent a recall. they have been recalling takata spent a recall. they have been recalling ta kata airbags spent a recall. they have been recalling takata airbags for many yea rs recalling takata airbags for many years now. steering and fuel related injuries as well. the take-up was 1.196 injuries as well. the take-up was 1.1% in some case? clearly, some car owners are more apathetic than others. the bmw three series was just 1.5%. the toyota recall was probably the biggest one in recent memory. you are talking more about 2596 memory. you are talking more about 25% which is still not a lot for what was the biggest recall. a woman who alleges she was sexually harassed at fox news has asked uk media regulators to block 21st century fox's planned purchase of sky.
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0fcom is investigating whether it's in the public interest for the murdoch—owned company to take full ownership of sky. 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. for the threats we face today... over two decades, a mixture of conspiracy, aggression and nationalism has made rupert murdoch's fox news channel the most watched cable news network in america. but this huge corporate scandal has shaken fox news to the core. the network's former boss roger ailes departed last year. anchor bill 0'reilly left last month. though both deny extensive sexual and racial harrassment allegations. also gone, though not facing the same allegations, is the co—president bill shine. so, arguably, the three most important men at fox are out. for the murdochs, the timing couldn't be worse. they're currently trying to take full control of the british broadcaster sky through an aquisition by 21st century fox. they declined an interview request so i said hello to the boss as he left work in manhattan.
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i'm from the bbc. are you worried about 0fcom at all? no. hello? you should be worried about bbc as well. radio host wendy walsh filed a complaint against bill 0'reilly by phone. the women flew to london from la specifically to explain to 0fcom why they don't think the murdochs should own sky outright. the parents of fox news have said they have taken decisive action about overhauling top management and appointing women to several senior positions. an incredibly rare example of one of the first printed pages has been unearthed at the university of reading. these pages were produced by william caxton on one of the first printing presses in about 1476. they'd been lying unrecognised in the university's archives, but they'll go on public display from today for the first time since they were sold from his print shop in the 15th century. we have a historian on later to talk
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about elisabeth the first. i'm sure she will be interested in that as well. britain's green and pleasant land has been looking drive. some parts of the uk has had their lowest rainfall on record. if it continues, it could become a real cause concern. john is out and about for us concern. john is out and about for us today. he is at the reservoir in kent. it is a 70 -- 7096. look at the criterion under. these things are cyclical. parts of
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the uk seem very dry. not a problem at the moment but there are concerns that if the dry weather continues for months and months, especially into next winter, that is when the real problems could start. at long last it is raining in suffolk. but it is not what you think. keeping these fields irrigated is complex and expensive at the best of times. but with such little rain recently, it is really tough. these have been in since the middle of january so they are only 3 months old. what we are looking for is obviously a nice, long, carrot. it needs water? it needs water. and as you can see, it has already had two inches of water added to the soil.
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they have built two large reservoirs, but it takes two years to fill up. they are arguing that the water is not fit for purpose. we never know when we are going to get a dry summer. if we do and move into a second really dry winter, then we have real concerns here at euston, because we will have limited ability to fill the reservoirs. andrew will expect to harvest around two tons of carrots from this 100 acre field. —— 2,000 tons. he is watering it, but still the soil is so dry. look at that as i rub it in my hand in the wind is blowing it away. recent years have seen the river in hertfordshire flood. this impressive 18th—century bridge is testament to what should lay below. but instead it is arid.
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no—one here remembers anything quite like it. we have just had the driest winter in the uk for 20 years. how will we cope in the years ahead? welcome to what will be called eddington, a new university being built by the university of cambridge in response to the housing shortage. ——a new village being built by the university. this is the uk's largest water recycling project. they all have traditional water systems for bathing and cooking and another for using recycled water from the site for irrigating landscapes and lawns and flushing toilets and supporting washing machines. so, a man—made solution to what well maybe a man—made problem, and it is expected to remain dry in the coming weeks. in suffolk, the farmers talk about a five—year cycle, so, consider this, 2012 saw hose—pipe bands, followed by record levels of rain.
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it was known as the wettest drought in history. let's talk to nicky russell from water wise. trying to ensure we use water as efficiently. we get water from beautiful reservoirs like this and aquifers underground you cannot see. it is interesting to know that the water around now is the same as from the beginning of the earth. it is really important we don't waste it. there are different definitions of drought. the government says it is keeping an eye on things. they are
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urging the consumers to think about that. that is right. the further south you are, the higher the proportion of groundwater the companies use. a groundwater drought isa companies use. a groundwater drought is a slow burning 1. it takes longer to kick in, and longer to fix. a river drought is easier because some rainfall and it is back. but a groundwater drought is a slow burn. we need to waste less water. water companies are doing a lot with customers to help them do this. we say people have to be water—wise. turn the tap off when you are brushing your teeth. it can save 6 litres a minute, even if it sounds simple. in the 1920s, 20% of us had showers. now it is 80%. that is a benefit because they use one third
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of baths. clean your pets on the lawn. two jobs at once. thank you. this reservoir is at 71%. others run by southern water are at 85%. some in the mid—90s. as we have been saying all morning, we are cautiously optimistic. look at our beautiful view in kent. and now for the weather. we have a map with a lot of brown. absolutely right. good morning. this map shows april rainfall. if it is brown we have had less tha n rainfall. if it is brown we have had less than average rainfall for april. much of it is brown with a couple of anomalies with average or above—average rainfall. we have had
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the driest april on record in edinburgh and kew gardens. edinburgh has had 4 millimetres, rather than 40.5 millimetres. they go back a number of years. kew gardens, normally, 45.3, now, 6 millimetres. look at what has happened in may. kew gardens has had 5.8 millimetres, almost as much as the whole of april. edinburgh has had none so far. these figures will change as rain comes our way towards the end of the working week. not much rain in the forecast today. high—pressure dominates still. not many isobars. not very windy. patchy rain with drizzle in the northern isles. chilli and bright to start in northern ireland and much of
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scotland. the east coast. cloud. we are back into the sunshine in the south—west. although some of us have had a bright start in east anglia, most will not. the other thing about the weather today if it will not feel as cold without the onshore breeze we have had in the last few days. a lot of cloud in the east. not especially warm. highest temperatures further west in the sunshine. a lot of sunshine in the coastal areas with highs of 18 degrees. the evening and overnight. this cloud in central areas will melt away, leaving clear skies. that is away from the far north of scotland. 6—9 is what you can expect in towns and cities. the countryside. two degrees. just above or below that. some of us will see
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frost. if you are gardening, bear that in mind. tomorrow, under the clear skies, sunshine. showery outbreaks of rain in the finals of scotland. a bit more cloud in the south and east. in the sunshine, it will feel pleasant with highs of16— 17. just before i go, i want to tell you a story. the worst drought on record goes to 1976 with the warmest 3 months, the worst drought in 150 yea rs. 3 months, the worst drought in 150 years. the government decided to appoint a drought minister cold dennis howell. the day after he was appointed, it rain for 3 months. dennis howell. the day after he was appointed, it rain for 3 monthsi of us on the sofa remembers that and 1of us of us on the sofa remembers that and 1 of us does not. i was not here yet. i remember it. we used to have to save the bathwater. yet. i remember it. we used to have to save the bathwaterlj yet. i remember it. we used to have to save the bathwater. i was one—year—old. i remember my mother telling me about how difficult it
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was. we had to save our bathwater and put it in the garden. now we are talking about energy prices. we are indeed. well, listening to that was our political correspondent chris mason. are we any clearer how this could work in practice? back in 2015 labour included a promise to freeze energy prices in their manifesto. two years on and the conservatives say they'll cap prices for millions of householders. greg clarke is the energy secretary and joins us now from westminster. it was a botched policy. they talked about a freeze. they advertised it ina about a freeze. they advertised it in a block of ice. after that the wholesale price of gas and electricity fell. if it had been introduced, people would have paid more than they needed. what we are acting on it is a diagnosis from the competition authority that serves for the standard tariff, the standard variable tariff, the
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default that people are transferred toa default that people are transferred to a mass they make an active choice, people are being overcharged by £11! choice, people are being overcharged by £1.4 billion a year. —— unless. that is what the authorities said. we have a duty to act. we will bring ina cap we have a duty to act. we will bring in a cap for default tariffs so we cannot be overcharged like at the moment. when did you last switch? i haven't. 0ne moment. when did you last switch? i haven't. one of the reasons, and many will know this, it is quite a hassle to do so. and, in my view, it should not be necessary to have to switch, to have to go through that, simply to avoid being ripped off. i think there should be a safeguard so that if you are loyal to your supplier, if you are someone that does not perhaps have access to the internet and is not able to haggle with your supplier, then you should
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pay a bit more than the best deals, but you should not feel, you should not have the reality, that you are paying through the nose for that. you admit you have not switched on but it is a hassle, as you put it. we know how many do not switch and are in the same boat as you. is that not where the energy should go to and what you should be looking at. does a cap change that? what it would do is that you would still have vigorous competition and good rates out there for those that scour the internet for the best deals, and thatis the internet for the best deals, and that is good. what the competition authority recognised was that there are authority recognised was that there a re really authority recognised was that there are really 2 markets. there is competition, but power to those who are competition, but power to those who a re loyal to competition, but power to those who are loyal to suppliers and who don't have the wherewithal to switch. they are paying, as i say, £1.4 billion
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more than they should. and what we are proposing, extending something that the competition authority proposed for people on prepayment visas, is that there should be a maximum. it won't be the cheapest deal on the market. there will still be competition for that, but you should not pay through the nose. be competition for that, but you should not pay through the nosem would be great to have some details. how would the cap be set. is it that has a rate? is there a percentage? —— does it have a rate? has a rate? is there a percentage? -- does it have a rate? we would ask the energy regulator, 0fgem, to do what they do now for those on prepayment visas, look at the wholesale costs, look at the cost of supplying people through the networks, have a reasonable contribution to costs and profit, and then to set that price as a maximum for the default and standard
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tariffs. it would be for the regulator to do that.” tariffs. it would be for the regulator to do that. i don't entirely understand. what would it mean for your bill, for example? there would be a maximum. the competition authorities said, as i said, currently £1.4 billion of detriment, the difference varies over time. it has been from around £70 to somewhere as much as £200 difference. the energy regulator would set the maximum level for those default tariffs that people get transferred to if they don't make a switch. so we cannot have the details right now because you are talking about the regulator. what about... it is an important principle that it should not be in my view a politician deciding this is going to be the price of electricity. that was another fault of the aid miliband proposal. we have a regulator called 0fgem who worried the experts of this. they should be given the power to set
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this safeguard tariff to make sure people are not ripped off.” this safeguard tariff to make sure people are not ripped off. i am asking on behalf of those at home. they will want to know the details of the pounds in their pocket. can you guarantee that bills will not go 7 you guarantee that bills will not go up? even if there is a cap, can bills go up? the point of getting a regulator to assess his is that if the wholesale price of gas, goes up in world markets, of course you would it record to increase. if it goes down like in the past, you would expect it to go down. that is why we should put it in the hands, and this is what was recommended, to put it in the hands of the regulator. thank you for your time this morning. i was listening carefully to that, as i am sure you where as well. here is the manifesto man outside of westminster. listening to that detail and the
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fa ct listening to that detail and the fact that the energy regulator will be setting the price, does that make it clearer about how this policy will work and how different is from the labour policy? it gives us an insight into the mechanics of how the conservatives say it will work. but crucially, and we were pushing him on it, we don't know definitively precisely what difference it will make to our bills. 0n the whole issue of the cut—and—paste job of the labour party, this is the manifesto for a couple of years ago after the waving a round of the tory1 yesterday, they said labour would freeze energy bills and they would fall and not rise and they would give the power to cut bills this winter. you were listening to him and so was i. that sounds remarkably similar in terms of the power of the regulator. what is striking, as i said, to come back to the point we were pushing him on,
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we don't know precisely what difference it will make. what we do know is politically the conservatives want to be seen to be on the side of us consumers. that of itself is different from the conservatives of old. theresa may is more than happy to be seen to be intervening in the market if she thinks it is the right thing to do, which is not very conservative.” thinks it is the right thing to do, which is not very conservative. i am sure that we will see the labour and lib dem manifesto soon. he will have them for us and we will see them. yes. if you have any questions or comments after speaking to him about those energy policies from the let us those energy policies from the let us know. now it is time for the news, weather, and travel news, wherever you are waking up this morning. we will see you again at 730. we must all take responsibility for tackling knife crime,
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according to the mayor. his comments come a week after the metropolitan police launched an operation to tackle the problem. over 400 arrests were made, 300 knives seized. nine teenagers have been fatally stabbed or shot in london this year. i am quite clear that the rise in violent crime in the last few years is of concern to the new commissioner and to meet. we have published a new police and crime plan where we talk about the necessity to tackle violence against young people. fresh talks have been announced to resolve the year long dispute over the role of conductors on southern railway. the company will meet with the rmt union next monday. the union's already held 31 days of strike action over plans for driver only trains. southern has also announced it's axing night time trains to croydon from the 21st of may, except on friday and saturday nights. the operator says it's to allow maintenance and improvement work. a london casting for a new film, directed by idris elba was shut down because too many people turned up.
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the actor asked people wanting work as "paid extras" to show up in hackney to learn more about the project. but the overwhelming response meant it had to be cancelled. mr elba apologised to those who were kept waiting last night, but were unable to get in. the luther star was soon advised to cancel the event by police due to the overwhelming response. and in mile end, there's a lane closed on the a11 eastbound near the tube station because of a collapsed manhole cover. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's another cloudy start to the day. but some good news. it's not going to feel quite as cold as yesterday. yesterday we had a keen north—easterly breeze. that has fallen light overnight. without the breeze today it will not be as cold. we still have cloud. one or two sunny
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spells in the south. 0vernight tonight, that cloud starts to disappear. some very lengthy clearer spells. minimum temperatures dropping down between 7 and 9. the wind remains very light. that means a bright start to wednesday. more sunshine around finally as we head to mid—week. patchy cloud. decent overall. it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. a maximum of 16, or maybe even 17 celcius. a change for thursday. low pressure starts to drag in some more moist air. friday evening, showers. what it also does is drag in some warmer air. it will feel more mild through thursday. maximum temperatures of 18 degrees. showers overnight thursday into friday. staying showery for friday. and rather unsettled into the weekend. but it is going to be warmer.
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i will be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the headlines. the conservatives have confirmed they intend to cap energy prices for millions of households if they win the election. they claim the move could save consumers up to £100—pounds a year. writing in the sun, the prime minister says "rip off energy prices" hit people on the lowest incomes hardest. but labour says the proposed cap would not stop bills increasing and the pledge has drawn criticism from the energy sector with one senior figure warning that customers could end up losing out. jeremy corbyn will formally launch labour's election campaign today by saying that his party is not trying to find a way to keep britain in the european union. mr corbyn, who'll be in greater manchester, will say the issue of brexit is "settled". he'll be joined by the city's new metro mayor andy burnham and will focus on labour's pledge to take on the rich and powerful.
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meanwhile the snp has set out four key priorities on oil and gas ahead of the general election. the party's westminster leader, angus robertson said snp mps would hold the next uk government to account and ensure the industry gets the support it deserves, including more help for oil and gas exploration. a new multi—million pound trial launched today will assess whether statins, a drug normally used to reduce the risk of heart attacks, can also be used to help those with multiple sclerosis. ms affects the central nervous system and can cause mobility problems. it's thought statins, a cheap and already widely used drug, could help slow down the progression of the condition. a 35—year—old man will appear in court today in connection with a dog attack on a two—year—old girl in liverpool on sunday. the toddler suffered injuries to her head and body
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when several dogs got into the garden where she was playing in toxteth. she's in a serious but stable condition in hospital. andrew mcgowan has been accused of being in charge of four dogs that were dangerously out of control. the former acting us attorney general has revealed she warned the trump administration that its national security advisor was open to russian blackmail, 18 days before he resigned. sally yates told senators general michael flynn had lied about his contacts with the russian ambassador. he resigned after it emerged he had misled the white house. but president trump has described the allegation of collusion between him and russia, a hoax. faulty airbags, steering and fuel issues are just some of the problems that led to the highest ever rate of car—related recalls in europe in the first three months of this year. the uk ranked third behind germany and france for the number of recalls, but car manufacturers say less than 50—percent of uk customers take up the necessary repairs. look at this.
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this is cctv footage showing the moment a ship hit a huge crane in one of the world's busiest ports in dubai. have you ever stood underneath one of these cranes? they are just extraordinary. ten people were left with minor injuries. considering what happened, it's lucky nobody was killed. it is a massive crane. coming up on the programme. carol's got the weather. it has been really dry. and kat is
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here. chelsea looks pretty certain that there set —— fate is sealed but miserable —— middlebrow is gone. bad news of the north—east, middlesbrough down, sunderland down. they will not be happy to see newcastle taking their place as well considering the rivalry in the south—east. if they don't wrap it up, they have another couple of opportunities to get the title in the bag against watford and sunderland. easy obstacles if they don't manage it on friday. chelsea manager antonio conte said his side showed they deserved to win the league, after moving to within one win of the title. they looked very comfortable against middlesbrough last night, winning 3—0 at stamford bridge — they can become champions with victory at west bromwich albion on friday night. it was very important to win and to exploit their defeat. yeah, we must be pleased now. another step, another step to win the title. for sure, now it's important to rest
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very well and to prepare for the west brom game. so chelsea are on the brink of the title — but there was despair for middlesbrough fans, who've seen their side relegated afterjust one season back in the premier league. some of them made a round trip of over 500 miles to watch the match. the supporters all season have been top class. you see tonight, on a monday night in london, they travelled again in the thousands and we have to thank them for that because that support, home and away, has been absolutely top class. one thing the supporters deserve is premier league football. we are all disappointed. we need to finish the season strong and then reflect over the summer. ghanaian midfielder sulley muntari says he'd walk off the pitch again if he was racially abused. his ban for walking off the pitch in a league game for pescara was overturned but in a bbc interview muntari, who played in the premier league
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for portsmouth and sunderland, claims racism is "everywhere and getting worse". and he accuses fifa and uefa of not caring enough about it. if they want to fight racism... they should be the first people to jump on. we're playing football here, under fifa, under uefa. if they had nothing to say about it, probably they didn't have tv on their side. or maybe they ran out of internet. that's why they didn't comment. but if it is unnecessary things for them... but this is a big deal. this is really a big deal. racism is a big deal. maria sharapova has been beaten by the most outspoken critic of her return to tennis following a 15 month doping ban. former wimbledon finalist eugenie bouchard had called sharapova a ‘cheater‘ who shouldn't have been allowed to play again. the canadian won a near three—hour epic in the second round of the madrid 0pen. i was actually quite inspired before the match because i had a lot
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of players coming up to me privately, wishing me good luck, players i don't normally speak to. getting a lot of texts from people in the tennis world that were just rooting for me. so i wanted to do it for myself but also all of these people so i really felt support. i am just one of the two players out on the court and everything that surrounds myself, i don't really know a lot of it, i don't pay too much attention. i've been part of this game for many years. i know the drill, i know the excitement. i know there is always a lot of talk and buzz and match—ups, rivalries, news. it's all part of the game. andy murray plays later but dan evans is out. and after his defeat to robin haase, evans said he still considered himself to be the british number three, despite being overtaken by aljaz bedene in the rankings.
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bedene switched nationality two years ago but evans said it didn't "sit well" with him, especially as bedene has return to live in his home country of slovenia. do you feel sorry for the sky? —— this guy. we have quite an incredible "and finally" for you this morning, because an iranian student had to be taken to a police station at the weekend — because he looks too much like lionel messi. look at this, the resemblance is uncanny! so many people in the city of hamaden wanted a picture with reza parastesh that police had to look after him. the 25—year—old cuts his hair and grooms his beard to look like the argentina forward, and is fully booked with media interviews and has even landed modelling contracts as a result! he looks like he is living the dream, pretending to be lionel massey. he got mobbed the other day
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and had to be taken to the police station. —— lionel messi. the people that potente be david beckham —— pretend. at least lionel messi doesn't have sleeves of that too is that he would have to get. alabama rot sounds like an obscure rock band from america's deep south but it is a very unwelcome import that is no joke to uk's dog owners. although it remains rare, the disease is killing an increasing number of pets in the uk and the first symptoms tend to appearjust days before dogs become seriously ill. alabama rot was discovered in the late 1980s in the united states. it was first reported in the uk in december 2012. since then, 98 dogs have died after contracting the disease. with 15 confirmed cases so far this year. vet david walker, who is chairing the first conference on alabama rot in the uk later this week, is with us on the sofa.
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first lets speak to gabrielle williams, who sadly knows all about this terrible disease from personal experience. she joins us from her home in monmouthshire. is that another one of your dog with you that? good morning, yes. tell us little about ——a bit about fleur who contracted this. she was sick one morning. i didn't think much of it. the day after, she had an intermittent limb. i couldn't see anything. couldn't see anything in her foot. a anything. couldn't see anything in herfoot. a lesion anything. couldn't see anything in her foot. a lesion appeared was not
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there was a thorn stuck in there. i took her to the vet and she deteriorated. we will come back to you ina deteriorated. we will come back to you in a minute, gabrielle. from what i know about alabama rot, it is a typical lesion. lim at the bottom of their legs,. they might have a bit of a limp. then they develop kidney failure, vomiting, going off their food. unfortunately, we still a relatively little about the disease. how quickly did you have to have fleur put down eventually? from
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the first symptom which was her being sick to being put to sleep was one week. she deteriorated extremely quickly. they found her kidneys were failing and more legions appeared in her mouth. then one appeared on her foot. it was extremely fast. because was awful to see her deteriorate so badly. we are concerned that she wasn't the only one who had it? it's the first question i ask the vet. i will be more concerned during the winter. it seems to be apparent that there is a link with the dogs
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that there is a link with the dogs that have contracted this disease. bad as of yet, luckily, none of the other dogs have shown any signs. —— but. they are all checked regularly. this is an incredibly rare disorder. is there anything dog owners... we know there are thousands of people who own dogs watching this morning. what should they be taking care of? you are right. 98 confirmed cases is still 98 more than we want. but we don't want people to panic. without knowing because of the disease it is to give repetitive advice. people are concerned. if you want to
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know the geographical location of cases, go on line. there are various tools on the websites to tell you where cases have been. once you have got alabama rot, do most dog die from it? unfortunately, yes. the mortality rate is about 85%. but some make it through. 1 dog made it through and had some puppies afterwards. does early intervention make a difference? based on the information we have, we don't know, but it is likely yes. does it look like anything in particular? but it is likely yes. does it look like anything in particular7m but it is likely yes. does it look like anything in particular? it is often quite unique. the skin sores are circular. you can see it looking are circular. you can see it looking a bit like an ulcer. it might not
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look like a simple kite. if it is an unknown reason for a skin sore, go to your vet and let them know as they know about these things now. thank you for that. thank you for talking to us this morning. and thank you for showing your dog to us this morning. she's been absolutely angelic. it is nice to see you. the weather. carol has told us many things. there is rain on the way for some of us on thursday and friday. this morning, weather watchers have been out in force. this is a beautiful picture of devon. a lot of cloud. contrast here. generally speaking, it will be fairly cloudy. central parts of the uk has high
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pressure driving the weather. not especially windy. that will make it feel different down the east coast today. under the cloud it will not be as cold because we have lost the wind. further west, sunny skies. some of the cloud will be eroded from the west during the day and most of us will see sunshine. through the afternoon, patchy rain and drizzle in the northern isles. cloud on the far north of men in scotland. the rest of scotland and northern ireland, sunny. wales is having a sunny afternoon. in the midlands, parts of yorkshire and east anglia, the south—east, a lot of cloud at times, but here and there, brighter spot. this evening and overnight, hanging on the cloud for a time. it gets washed away. dry weather overnight. clear skies.
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persistent rain in the far north of scotland. temperatures will dip low enoughin scotland. temperatures will dip low enough in the countryside for some frost. around two degrees. tomorrow morning, bright. sunshine. remnants of overnight cloud through the day. fair weather cloud will develop as well. blustery in the english channel. cloud in the north and east of scotland. rainy in the final. temperatures in the sunshine getting to 17 degrees. —— far north. as we head into thursday, a change. systems, from the near continent bringing heavy showers initially across the channel islands. in the afternoon, we will see some turning thundery. humid. north of that,
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brighter skies. sunshine. temperatures up to 90 degrees. as we go from friday into saturday and the weekend generally, low pressure. —— 19. all of it goes anticlockwise. sucking up warm airfrom the south—west. that does not mean it will be bone dry at all. of course, some of us really want some of that rain, as we have been hearing this morning. for gardening and all sorts of things. thank you very much. the rate of car recalls across europe was the highest on record in the first three months of the year according to research out today. sean's taking a look at this. you have been looking at various aspects of these recalls and how many take them up. it is not all to do with volkswagen and issues like that. good morning. this comes from
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research from a company called ste ri cycle. they advise other companies on recalls and keep an eye on how many are happening. they've found there were 122 car recalls across europe in the first three months of this year, that's the highest number they've recorded and a 31% increase on the previous three months. if we have a look at where those recalls are coming from, top of the table is cars made in germany with 40 recalls, then france, and the uk has the third highest number of active recalls with 14. and you might be surprised to hear most of those, 90%, are related to more luxury cars like range rovers and jaguars. but across europe, it's actually airbags that are the biggest single cause of these recalls, followed by problems with steering, and then fuel—related problems jim holder is from the car magazine, whatcar? good morning. good morning. what is driving this big increase? car
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manufacturers share parts and use the same sources. this recall focusses on one manufacturer source. focusses on one manufacturer source. many have used it. this airbag manufacturer has been the issue. when you look at those getting the recall, it is low. are people leaving themselves at risk? you should take heed of warnings like this. in this case, in europe, they have not been any deaths or injuries. around the world, there has been. it is a potentially serious fault. people are saying don't panic and take your time. but you should get it fixed. over the morning we have been talking and some of the figures are at 2%, the
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success rate of recalls coming in. the manufacturers need to make more ofan the manufacturers need to make more of an effort to make people aware of the fault is? absolutely. they do all they can at the moment. they contact owners quickly. figures do very around europe. there is strong evidence people react faster and more quickly across europe. figures are up to 90%. there are some cases where it is lower than that. the british system does appear to work. if you are! british system does appear to work. if you are 1 of those people hearing this now and have received 1 of these and want to act now, what can you do? you can go to the motor ombudsman website and see if there isa ombudsman website and see if there is a recall on your vehicle by checking on line. they will advise you how long it will take and they
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will usually make some sort of provision if you are going to be off the road for a while. these things don't expire? no. the uk market. we make a lot of cars it is 1 of our most successful exports. —— cars normally, luxury cars more complex. more goes wrong because of that. what normally happens before a car is launched is it is driven more than1 million is launched is it is driven more than 1 million miles is launched is it is driven more than1 million miles by exporter drivers. but there are various combinations that can set off these faults. —— expert drivers. combinations that can set off these faults. -- expert drivers. what kind of things could trigger a recall? there was a good case recently where 1car had there was a good case recently where 1 car had to be driven downhill at a certain speed with cruise control on and the driver had to hit the
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throttle to the full degree it could be. that would trigger an electrical fault. it was a strange combination of factors, but it could be dangerous. thank you very much, jim. hand up in the corner. 0n dangerous. thank you very much, jim. hand up in the corner. on behalf of viewers getting in touch, they say they are concerned with recalls they will be charged. you will never be charged for that. thank you very much. thank you. people shouting at the television wanting to put in a question. and i can put my hand up. thank you for getting in touch. can i say something? go on. it is time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are watching this morning on bbc news. good morning from bbc london news. we must all take responsibility for tackling knife crime,
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according to the mayor. his comments come a week after the metropolitan police launched an operation to tackle the problem. over 400 arrests were made, 300 knives seized. nine teenagers have been fatally stabbed or shot in london this year. i am quite clear that the rise in violent crime in the last few years is of concern to the new commissioner and to meet. we have published a new police and crime plan where we talk about the necessity to tackle violence against young people. fresh talks have been announced to resolve the year long dispute over the role of conductors on southern railway. the company will meet with the rmt union next monday. the union's already held 31 days of strike action over plans for driver only trains. southern has also announced it's axing night time trains to croydon from the 21st of may, except on friday and saturday nights. the operator says it's to allow maintenance and improvement work. a london casting for a new film, directed by idris elba was shut down because too many people turned up. the actor asked people wanting work as "paid extras" to show up in hackney to learn more about the project. but the overwhelming response meant it had to be cancelled.
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mr elba apologised to those who were kept waiting last night, but were unable to get in. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there is a good service on all lines apart from the metropolitan. 0n the roads, whitehall is closed northbound at parliament square until sunday for roadworks. and in mile end, there's a lane closed on the a11 eastbound near the tube station because of a collapsed manhole cover. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's another cloudy start to the day. but some good news. it's not going to feel quite as cold as yesterday. yesterday we had a keen north—easterly breeze. that has fallen light overnight. without the breeze today it will not be as cold. we still have cloud. one or two sunny spells in the south. 0vernight tonight, that cloud starts to disappear. some very lengthy clearer spells.
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minimum temperatures dropping down between 7 and 9. the wind remains very light. that means a bright start to wednesday. more sunshine around finally as we head to mid—week. patchy cloud. decent overall. it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. a maximum of 16, or maybe even 17 celcius. a change for thursday. low pressure starts to drag in some more moist air. friday evening, showers. what it also does is drag in some warmer air. it will feel more mild through thursday. maximum temperatures of 18 degrees. showers overnight thursday into friday. staying showery for friday. and rather unsettled into the weekend. but it is going to be warmer. i will be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. until then, more on the website of the usual address. goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. a cap on energy bills for millions of households is confirmed as conservative policy. it will appear in the party's manifesto later this month — labour says the plans won't stop prices rising, while some energy firms are warning customers could lose out. good morning, it's tuesday 9th may. also this morning... major tests begin to find out if statins — which are taken by millions to cut the risk of heart attacks — could also help people suffering from multiple sclerosis. this is the scene at one reservoir in kent this morning after some of the driest weather in 20 years — we'll be looking at how farmers and others are coping with a growing water shortage. good morning. the rate of car recalls was the highest on record in the first few months of the year,
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with the biggest culprit being faulty airbags. i'll have more on that shortly. in sport, chelsea are one win away from the premier league title. after beating middlesbrough — and sealing their relegation — chelsea can become champions on friday night. and we're celebrating the return of hollywood legend goldie hawn to screens and so is co—star amy schumer. loving goldie was a family affairfor us. my parents were both ecstatic. they haven't met goldie yet. they've, like, facetimed. they are going to have 30 seconds with her. "don't touch her!" we've more from them on their relationship on and off the screen before nine. carroll has the weather. for many it is going to be dry, the exception to that will be across the far north of scotland and the northern isles, where we see some patchy rain. the best of the sunshine will be in the west. i will
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have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the conservatives have confirmed they intend to cap energy prices for millions of households if they win the election. they claim the move could save consumers up to £100 a year. but the energy secretary greg clark told bbc breakfast that it still meant prices could go up as well as down and the pledge has drawn criticism from the industry criticism from the industry, with one senior figure warning that customers could end up losing out. 0ur political correspondent ben wright reports. energy prices have been hot politics for some time. at the last election, labour promised a two year price freeze. now, the conservatives want to intervene in an energy market they say doesn't work for most people. writing in the sun, the prime minister says rip—off energy prices hit people on the lowest incomes hardest. switching to another tariff or supplier often brings bills down, but seven out of ten households are on standard variable rates, which are usually more expensive than other plans on offer. so, the conservatives would give 0fgem the power to impose a price
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ceiling for customers on the standard rates. the cap would be reset every six months and the conservatives say it would reduce gas and electricity bills by around £100 a year. the point of getting the regulator to assess this is if, for example, the wholesale price of gas goes up in world markets, of course you would expect that to increase. if a price goes down, as it did in the past, you would expect the price to go down. that is why it is sensible to put it in the hands, and this is what the competition authority recommended, for prepayment meters, of the regulator. the conservatives say the price cap would allow competition to continue in the market. but the lib dems say the policy would damage investment in energy, while labour said a cap would not stop prices increasing.
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british gas owner centrica warned the move could lead to higher bills and reduced competition. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. after your interview with greg clarke, he said he hasn't switched because it would be too difficult? he said it was a hassle. a lot of people getting in touch. alan says changing is not too much hassle, i change every few years. it is well worth doing. peter says nobody should feel they have to switch companies, companies should bend over backwards to keep the present customers. richard also got in contact, why are there so many different tariffs? anna —— electricity costs a certain amount of produce and generate, surely one tariff is all that is needed and customers can decide based on customers can decide based on customer service. theresa may has been writing about that in the sun newspaper. in the telegraph, on television tonight, bbc one, 7pm, theresa may and her husband will be doing an interview on the one show.
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iam sure doing an interview on the one show. i am sure they will talk about energy. shall we talk to chris mason? 0ur political correspondent, in westminster. what do you make of this talk about energy caps, freezers, what is the difference and what is there was me thinking that you two were the double act on bbc 0ne you two were the double act on bbc one that everybody is talking about. yes, jumping on this over themselves tonight. you know that an election is imminent when politicians invade the studio of the one show will stop jeremy corbyn will be on at some stage in the future. energy prices, ifa stage in the future. energy prices, if a little bit of it seems to ring a bell, it has featured in ma nifestos a bell, it has featured in manifestos before. the labour ma nifesto, manifestos before. the labour manifesto, two years ago, it said something remarkably similar. we will freeze energy bills until 2017, they said, ensuring that bills can fall, but not rise, and we will give
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the regulator the power to cut bills this winter. it looks like a cut and paste job from the conservatives. the idea that ed miliband floated a couple of years ago was very popular at the time. the conservatives insist that their idea is a little different. what is also striking this morning is that you were talking to greg clark on breakfast 30 minutes ago. we are hearing that when this idea was put before the cabinet, greg clark was one of a number of ministers around the table that was a little sceptical about it. thought it was a little bit crude. but theresa may pushed ahead with it, she is very keen on it. to illustrate that point about the power of theresa may at the moment, and the conservatives' belief in her branding, if you like, take a look at these pictures from yesterday, theresa may campaigning in north—west london. look at the signs. theresa may's team, and written very small, conservatives. there is a real push from the conservatives to push theresa may,
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who they see as a useful brand, perhaps stronger than the brand of the party itself. thank you, we will speak to you through this whole campaign. for those of you asking for more clarity on the energy policies, we will be speaking to somebody who is an energy expert just after 8:30am, trying to get to the bottom of what the differences between a cap and a freeze, and how will it affect our pockets? a 35—year—old man will appear in court today in connection with a dog attack on a two—year—old girl in liverpool on sunday. the toddler suffered injuries to her head and body when several dogs got into the garden where she was playing in toxteth. she's in a serious but stable condition in hospital. andrew mcgowan has been accused of being in charge of four dogs that were dangerously out of control. faulty airbags, steering and fuel issues are just some of the problems that led to the highest ever rate of car—related recalls in europe in the first three months
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of this year. sean's here and can tell us more. what is going on, a manufacturing problem? 0r what is going on, a manufacturing problem? or are we better as consumers? a little bit of both. things have been quite high profile, we have the volkswagen emissions scandal, people are more aware of issues with their car. a lot of this issues with their car. a lot of this is not to do with volkswagen, it is to do with airbags. 0ne is not to do with volkswagen, it is to do with airbags. one of their suppliers, they had a lot of problems with airbags and they supply to a lot of car manufacturers. there have been recalls on those and that helped cause a peak. 80% of them were triggered by somebody being injured and making a complaint. people are at risk if they don't get it sorted out. what else can you tell us? steering issues have been part of it as well, fuel related issues, in the uka lot as well, fuel related issues, in the uk a lot of the recall is, we make a lot of luxury cars, 90% of the
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recall is hoping down to issues with them. that has been interesting, a lot of it is to do with manufacturers being more on top of it than they were. some of the consumer return rates are pretty low. we heard bmw, the 3 series, 1.596 low. we heard bmw, the 3 series, 1.5% recall completion across europe. a lot of people still need to get their car sorted. the nissan micra, they did better. people like their cars. they don't like to give them away. but you are not charged, if it is a safety issue? you can go online and get it sorted. a woman who alleges she was sexually harassed at fox news has asked uk media regulators to block 21st century fox's planned purchase of sky. 0fcom is investigating whether it's in the public interest for the murdoch—owned company to take full ownership of sky. 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. for the threats we face today... over two decades, a mixture of conspiracy, aggression and nationalism has made rupert murdoch's fox news channel the most
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watched cable news network in america. but this huge corporate scandal has shaken fox news to the core. the network's former boss, roger ailes, departed last year and anchor bill 0'reilly left last month. they are both denying extensive sexual and racial harassment allegations. also gone, though not facing the same allegations, is co—president bill shine. so, arguably the three most important men at fox are out. for the murdochs, the timing couldn't be worse. they are currently trying to take full control of the british broadcaster sky, through an acquisition by 21st century fox. they declined an interview request, so i said hello to the boss as he left work in manhattan. i'm from the bbc. are you worried about 0fcom, at all? no. you should be worried about the bbc as well. i said, sorry, i can't do that. radio host wendy walsh, seen here with lawyer lisa bloom, filed a complaint against 0'reilly by phone. the two women flew from los angeles to london specifically to explain to 0fcom why, in their view, the murdochs are not fit and proper to own sky outright. 21st century fox, parent
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of fox news, says it has taken prompt and decisive action to improve its workplace, overhauling top management and appointing women to several senior positions. an "incredibly rare" example of one of the first printed pages has been unearthed at the university of reading. these pages were produced by william caxton on one of the first printing presses in about 1476. they'd been lying unrecognised in the university's archives, but they'll go on public display from today for the first time since they were sold from his print shop in the 15th century. it is rather beautiful. and it is not just black and it is rather beautiful. and it is notjust black and white, there is some red going there as well. they had red biro. i love the smell of
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old paper. when you open a book and you get that pong. more than 100,000 people in the uk live with multiple sclerosis. it's a condition that attacks the central nervous system. we don't know what causes it and there is no cure. but following the success of a small sample trial, a multi—million pound project is being launched to see if statins, which are usually used to reduce the risk of heart attacks, could help slow progressive forms of ms. statins — prescribed to six million of us every year to lower cholesterol. but in the coming months, a major new trial will test whether they could help tackle a condition which can wreak devastation on sufferers. multiple sclerosis causes the immune system to attack the lining of the nerves, disrupting messages travelling along nerve fibres. it can mean increasing levels of disability.
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more than 100,000 people in the uk have ms. half will develop the secondary, progressive stage. there is currently no treatment to slow its progress and this trial, involving more than 1000 people, is aimed at them. if we can prove it has a long—term impact, long—term results for people with ms, we know its safety record, it is extremely cheap, so it could be quickly made available to everyone that needs it and it won't put a big hole in the nhs budget. a previous, smaller study suggested statins did have an impact. this trial will provide much more information. but, at six years long, it will be some time before it's known just how effective statins could be. sarah smith, bbc news. joining us now is stuart nixon an ambassador for the ms society who has the condition and drjeremy chataway, the lead researcher on the project. we will come to you in a minute. i
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wa nted we will come to you in a minute. i wanted to talk to you first of all, you had this for many years, you first had signs when you were 13. give us a little... you know, it is a lifetime come in some ways, but a little bit about the impact it had? the impact is enormous, for myself, being a teenager, being keen on sport, setting up my plans for life, going to university, having a career in place, all of those things, it ta kes in place, all of those things, it takes those things away from you. really, it is about aspiration. it is about removing your ability to aspire which, at the end of the day, makes us different from all of the other animals. 0bviously makes us different from all of the other animals. obviously the physical symptoms, the physical signs and symptoms. i am here in a chair, you can see that. but there is far more than that. your nervous system control is absolutely
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everything you do. unfortunately, it is also things like vowels, bladder, sex, a million different things. —— bowels. everything your bodily functions do, it affects them.” think it would be helpful if you could clarify what secondary progressive ms is, and how you think statins might be able to help? yes, it begins with paralysis, problems with site or balance. people have relapses and go into remission. it lasts for ten or 15 years. in over half of people, as you have heard, it can become progressive. the disability remains with that person and they develop the problems you have seen with stuart. you have real hope, they are widely used already, they are not expensive. you hope
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they are not expensive. you hope they could make a difference. we did this trial in 2014 which showed that high dose statin reduced the slight rate of brain shrinkage by about 40%. it was an amazing result and seemed to have some effect on the patients with mull till sclerosis. this gave us the signal to move on to the larger study of 1,000 people. we don't know how it works, but it is a brain protective mechanism. is this exciting news for you? at what point did you realise there were limited treatment options for you? well, it's 20, 25 years since i started with secondary progressive ms. so in my ms life this is the single most exciting day in those 25 years because this is the first time that there is the opportunity for a drug
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which will have an impact on progression. i say will, i which will have an impact on progression. isay will, i have which will have an impact on progression. i say will, i have to at this point say, "may have" because of the work thatjeremy and his team are going to do, but it's a really exciting day and a great opportunity for people in the ms community to actually start to take control of their ms. so, i'm sure jeremy will tell us how people can get involved with this trial because this is the time that we as a community need to stand up, get involved with the trial, and then really sign up and make this work and give it the results that we need asa and give it the results that we need as a community. that's what i wanted to know as well. how do people get involved? who do you need to get involved? the details are on the ms uk website. there will be 25 sites up and down the whole of the united kingdom and ireland and we want people to get ready tojoin the ireland and we want people to get ready to join the trial. to get those details and to talk to their
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neurologists and their doctors and we aim to start dosing the first dose towards the end of the year and then into next year. so we'd really like as stewart quite rightly says people with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis to get ready for the trial. people can't self dose. they need to be part of the trial, don't they? that's right. this is high dose statins. it is a safe drug, but there are occasional, rare, but serious side—effects and people should not be dosing. but ta ke people should not be dosing. but take part in this trial and let's make it happen. stewart, would you wa nt to ta ke make it happen. stewart, would you want to take part in the trial yourself? oh, absolutely, yes. there is no question. sign me up as soon as we can. yes. jeremy before we go, i know all this, this research, of course, quite rightly, because of safety, etcetera, needs to take time. when are you likely to see results that can start making a difference? so we'll be recruiting over the next two years and then we follow people for three years in trial. so we'll come back to you in
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six years time. we might still be here! frustrating, but there we are. it's the best day you've had in 25 years and thank you for sharing it with us on breakfast. no problem, thank you. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. well, it's certainly a dry start to the day, lou for many parts of the uk. the exception is across the far north of scotland. the weather watchers have been sending us in picture. this one from northern ireland shows the sunshine and west is best today in term of sunshine. now, we've got patchy light rain and drizzle across the northern isles. that extends further west, but for the west itself, and parts of the north, we're in that sun and the sun will prevail. if anything, we will see more will prevail. if anything, we will see more developing. the rain continues across the far north of scotland. sunshine further south. sunshine across northern ireland,
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sunshine across cumbria, lancashire and cheshire. as we push in through yorkshire and lincolnshire, we're back under the cloud. not as gusty a wind. for wales and south—west england, back into the sunshine once again. almost unbroken blue skies. for the midlands, heading down towards the south east and east anglia, well, we still will have that cloud with a few breaks at times. through the evening and overnight we start with the cloud but it becomes eroded. there will be a lot of clear skies tonight. still the rain and the stronger breeze across the northern isles. these temperatures indicate what you can expect in towns and cities, but in the countryside, it will be much colder. cold enough for a touch of frost. so gardeners and growers be aware of that. tomorrow, we start with a lot of sunshine. still this cloud draped across parts of the north and the east of scotland with patchy rain in the northern isles, blustery winds across the english channel, but again, a pleasant day if you're in the sunshine. temperatures down in the north and up temperatures down in the north and up as we come further south. we're looking at highs up to 17 celsius.
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then it changes. thursday into friday. we've got this rain coming up friday. we've got this rain coming up across the channel islands and the english channel and in across southern england and wales. some of that will turn thundery and it will start to feel humid. ahead of that, drier and brighter with sunshine. and i'll have a more detailed weather forecast later on, dan and lou. carol, thank you very much. we weren't quite ready for you, but we are now. you nearly saw us being pampered and powdered there! i was having my make—up done. sorry, carol! laughter we nearly got caught out there, didn't we? britain's green and pleasant land isn't looking so lush at the moment after the driest winter in 20 years. during april, some parts of the uk have had the lowest rainfall on record and if it continues it could become a real cause for concern. breakfast‘s john maguire is at bewl reservoir in kent. it
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is at bewl reservoir in kent. looks like a beautiful ( john, it looks like a beautiful day there, john, what's going on? yes, good morning louise, it is a beautiful day as you say. a little bit chilly earlier as carol has been telling us. this is bewl water in kent. it has the potential, the potential to provide drinking water for 200 million people. so it's huge, isn't it, of course, it doesn't serve that many, but the level of it at the moment is 71%. so southern water which runs the reservoir have other reservoirs, some are at a higher level. so there is not a great deal of concern at the moment. what there is concern about is that if there is a dry summerand is concern about is that if there is a dry summer and it's dry into next winter, what's going to happen then? at long last it‘ raining in suffolk. but it's not what you think. keeping these fields irrigated is complex and expensive
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at the best of times. but with such little rain recently, it's really tough. these have been in since the middle of january so they are only three months old. what we're looking for is obviously a nice, long, carrot. but it needs water? it needs water. and as you can see, this soil already had two inches of water added to the soil. they have built two large reservoirs, but each takes several years to gain planning approval. they argue here that our water infrastructure for farms and homes isn't fit for purpose. obviously we don't know we're going to get a dry summer. if we do and then we move into a second really dry winter then we have real concerns here because we'll have limited ability to fill our reservoirs through this next winter. now, andrew will expect to harvest around 2,00 tons of carrots from this 100 acre field. he's watering it at the rate of an inch a week, but still the soil is so dry.
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just look as i rub it in my hand, the wind is blowing it away. recent years have seen the river in hertfordshire flood. the impressive 18th century bridge is testament to what should lay below, but instead it's arid. no one here remembers anything quite like it. we've just had the driest winter in the uk for 20 years. how will we cope in the years ahead? welcome to what will be called eddington, a new village being built by the university of cambridge in response to the housing shortage and the uk's largest water recycling project. all of the buildings will have two water systems on the site. they have one that's a traditional water system for bathing and cleaning your teeth and cooking and another system that uses recycled water from the site for irrigating landscapes and watering lawns, flushing toilets and
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supporting washing machines. soa supporting washing machines. so a man—made solution to what may well be a man—made problem and it's expected to remain in the coming weeks. in suffolk, the farmers talk ofa weeks. in suffolk, the farmers talk of a five year cycle. so consider this 2012 saw hosepipe bans followed by record levels of rain. it was known as the wettest drought in history. well it may not be good weather for duxment we've got a boat out on the water tootling past us. i want to talk to nicky russell from a water campaign group encouraging us to use our water more efficiently. we turn the taps on, where do we get the water from? from reservoirs and from rivers and the further south you come in the united kingdom, the more the water companies rely on the acra
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fers and a drought from those takes longer to happen, but it takes longer to happen, but it takes longer to happen, but it takes longer to fix for the water to seep underground. so that's where our water comes from and the water that we have has been around since the beginning of human life, but there is more of us now so it's really important we waste less water all the time, and notjust during drought. is it making small changes to save water? if you're on a meter you save money too? there are simple things like don't worry if your grass goes brown it will soon come to life again when it rains. if you must use a sprinkler, remember that it uses 1,000 litres an hour which is the same as a family of four use ina is the same as a family of four use in a day. really? try a drip irrigation system, maybe use in the morning or the evening, don't use your toilet as a rubbish bin. 30% of our water use comes from toilets and you're flushing five to ten litres every time, don't chuck a single tissue down it and flush it. nicky,
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thank you very much indeed. we will be keeping an eye on the situation for you as i say, the water companies are saying to us, look it is not an issue at the moment, but i think everybody certainly in this industry, farmers as we have been seeing this morning will be fingers crossed for a bit of rain. the ducks have gone, but i'm sure they want a bit of rain too. studio: they've walked off into the distance. do ducks walk or waddle? i think they probably waddle. you're right on most things. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. at its best, the day offers the prospect of more fine, dry weather, especially across the western side of the british isles. there are many fewer isobars on this particular chart than was the case yesterday, where the wind was a real factor through the north sea coast and the north sea itself. that prospect has disappeared, but there are still a lot of cloud to be had across sun central and eastern parts of the british isles, even well into the
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afternoon. the cloud at its thickest across the far north of scotland, bits and pieces of rain for 0rkney and shetland, coming further south, dry, fine weather right across the heart of scotland, into the south—west. yet again into northern ireland where, after a chilly start, temperatures responding. somewhere on the south—western corner of wales, to the south—west of england, we will be well into the teens with all of that sunshine. less in the way of sunshine towards the east. where you do have an onshore breeze, you will be locked at around nine or 10 degrees. 0vernight, the sky is really clearing and it will be a cool start to the new day on wednesday. most towns and cities are well above wednesday. most towns and cities are well a bove frost wednesday. most towns and cities are well above frost limits. in the countryside, especially, but not exclusively in scotland, we could be down at around one or two degrees, maybe a fraction lower. it gets as a way to a glorious day on wednesday. still a fair amount of cloud with the odd bit of rain coming through into the very far north of scotland.
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elsewhere, as you can see, it really isa elsewhere, as you can see, it really is a lovely day. even east coast should, by this stage, be responding to the sunshine. if your lawn is looking like this, i can begin to offer the prospect of some rain for some, getting into the far south on thursday. come friday, that will have worked its way a good deal further north. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. voting is under way in south korea — but will new leadership make a difference this time? ka nte b rea k ka nte break the kante break the cosy relationship between big business and government? live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 9th may. south korea's massive conglomerates dominate the country's economy, but the election frontrunners say that more needs to be done to tackle corruption at the top. who will win and what can they
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achieve? also in the programme, there's a new kid on the block
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