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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 10, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker shock in washington as president trump sacks the head of the fbi, james comey the security chief is told without warning that he will be removed from office immediately — absolutely explosive news from washington to nine. shoppers james comey is told he will be removed it effective immediately. he had been leading an investigation into the links between resident on‘s election campaign and russia. —— shock as james comey is told. good morning, it's wednesday 10th may. also this morning — an investigation begins into the death of an 11—year—old girl who fell from a water ride at drayton manor theme park. education takes centre stage in the election campaign — as labour and the liberal democrats
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make funding pledges to tackle cash shortages in schools in england. the boss of barclays will be facing pressure today over his pay and also his handling of a controversy surrounding recruitment in the bank. i'll have the details shortly. in sport, the french open's a fortnight away and andy murray says he still needs to get better — but he's through to the third round in madrid. our build—up to this year's eurovision song contest starts here — the bbc‘s steve rosenberg is in kiev with all the tunes and all the facts you need to enjoy the world's biggest singing competition. and carol has the weather. good morning. thank you. iam in kew gardens next to the japanese gateway. i will tell you more about it through the morning but if you adjust stepping out it is a chilly start although most of us will have
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a day of plenty of sunshine, except in the north of scotland where we have some patchy rain. good morning. first our main story. president trump has fired the head of the fbi james comey in a move that has shocked us politics. he'd been leading an investigation into alleged links between the trump administration and russia. the white house says the inquiry has nothing to do with his sudden dismissal. aleem maqbool reports. absolutely explosive news out of washington tonight. this is a fox news alert — fbi director, james comey, has been fired by the president of the united states. americans have learned to expect almost anything from their president but this really was high drama. fbi director, james comey, was not even in washington, he was addressing fbi staff in los angeles, when he learnt he had been sacked. a short while later, a letter arrived at fbi headquarters. "you are hereby terminated and removed from office, effective immediately."
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"while i greatly appreciate you informing me on three separate occasions that i am not under investigation, i nevertheless concur with the judgement of the department ofjustice that you are not able to affectively lead the bureau." it was signed, "donald trump". you've become more famous than me. except the trump campaign was being investigated by the fbi for its links to russia. james comey was leading the investigation and now he's gone. are people going to suspect cover—up? absolutely. if an independent special prosecutor is appointed there still can be some faith that we can get to the bottom of this, if not everyone will suspect a cover—up. speaking on us tv, the president's adviser dismissed that notion. this has nothing to do with russia. it has everything to do with whether the current fbi director has the president's confidence and can faithfully and capably execute his duties. last week, giving testimony, james comey was accused of unfairly
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the shockwaves are being felt much as did the fbi that across the city and beyond. for supporters, this is evidence that donald trump is a strong leader. but for many others, it adds to the perception that this country is now being run by a man who is intolerant of those who disapprove of him and who do not entirely do his bidding. we will have more on that throughout the morning. drayton manor theme park in staffordshire says it will not open to the public today after the death of an 11—year—old girl on one of its rides. the year 6 pupil, who has not been named, was on a trip with her school, the jameah girls academy in leicester. in a statement the school said it was providing support to its pupils and staff and requested time to grieve. senior management at the theme park said they were shocked and devastated by the incident. jane—frances kelly reports.
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our reporter is therefore as this morning. andrew, we understand that the theme park is closed today? yes. but it closed to all visitors here today. we do not yet know the name of the girl who died here yesterday but we know she was a year 6 pupil ata but we know she was a year 6 pupil at a school in leicester not too far from here. she was on the ride here yesterday with some friends, yesterday with some friends, yesterday afternoon, she somehow fell into the water. it is unclear how that happened but she was pulled out by staff who gave her first aid next to the ride and she was then airlifted to hospital in birmingham are tragically died a short time after she arrived. to give you an idea of this ride, it is described asa idea of this ride, it is described as a fast flowing wild rabbit ride.
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—— wild rapid ride. the health and safety executive will come and investigate here. in the meantime, drayton manor has closed its own doors to visitors and her school is also closed. they say they will be supplying ongoing counselling to their pupils there today. we will in forget any more information about that. —— we will let you know if we get any more information. labour and the liberal democrats have pledged billions of pounds in extra school funding if they win the general election, to ensure budgets in england keep up with rising costs. both parties also say no school would lose out as a result of a new funding formula to divide money across the country. and there's a promise of extra cash towards education in other parts of the uk. here's our education editor bra nwen jeffreys. pa rents parents have made their feelings clear. in marches and meetings, raising concerns about school budgets and plans to change money is
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shared across england. it has pushed england schools onto the election agenda. labour is promising £4.8 billion for school budgets in england. a real terms increase over four years with £335 million to make sure that no school losers from a new funding formula. corporation tax would rise from i9% to 26% by 2021 to would rise from 19% to 26% by 2021 to pay for this and other education promises. the liberal democrats say they would put 5.8 billion pounds into real—time rises in school budgets including making sure no school losers from the funding formula and per pupil increases in further education. but it will not say how will pay for this until their manifesto was published. what labour and the liberal democrats are saying is quite different from what oui’ saying is quite different from what our current go than in policy is. as ever, there is a big choice. you either raise taxes as labour is
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talking about, raising them significantly to pay for a public servers, or you reduce spending on public servers and keep the tax burden down. teaching unions have welcomed the promises. schools have been facing financial pressures after 20 yea rs of been facing financial pressures after 20 years of regular increases infunding, the after 20 years of regular increases in funding, the conservatives say that school funding has reached record levels. we'll be speaking to both the labour and the liberal democrats later in the programme to find out more about the plans. the crown prosecution service is expected to announce later this morning whether any conservative politicians or officials will be charged with breaking rules on election campaign spending in 2015. the cps has been considering files sent by the police from nearly thirty constituencies. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo joins us now from westminster. good morning. what are we likely to
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hear this morning? this relates to claims connected to the last general election about the conservative party. there are complex rules governing spending in local campaigns and international campaigns and international campaigns and international campaigns and the claims are that the conservative party failed to properly declare its spending in local areas, either failing to declare entirely all classifying it national spending as local. about 27 constituencies are affected by this investigation. about 16 police forces have been looking into this and they have passed their findings onto the crown prosecution service. cps are expected to give their verdict on whether any politicians or officials will be charged later this morning. they are deciding whether there is enough evidence to prosecute and whether any
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prosecution will be in the public interest. the conservative party says that any irregularities were down to administrative errors and they say that some of the spending was highlighted was properly declared. this will be a huge headache to the conservative party if any politicians or officials are prosecuted because tomorrow is the deadline for candidates in this general election to be registered. of course, the campaign winner was well under way and part of that is many politicians are speaking to different television programmes. the prime minister was on the one show last night. what did we learn? it was an interesting interview that made the front pages this morning but this was a personal interview. it was the prime minister in a very different guise. she was with her husband, philip, this was his first cast interview and a chance for viewers to see them together as a couple. it covered personal
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territory, discussing when they first met, the domestic duties that philip had to do. theresa may spoke about her upbringing in a vicarage. it was quite wide ranging and very personal. i think philip may came across as a supportive and loyal husband. lots of nodding along to the things that theresa may was saying. of course there were a few slogans in there from theresa may but ina slogans in there from theresa may but in a relaxed setting. i think viewers will of centuries are made ina viewers will of centuries are made in a different light yesterday. it is worth adding thatjeremy corbyn will be appearing as well and they will be appearing as well and they will speak to will all of the other parts of the media so expect a more personal insight from them. thank you very much. who takes the bins out in your house? i take out some, but not most? how about you?” out in your house? i take out some, but not most? how about you? i have a 100% record. they arejustjobs,
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aren't they? roads in england and wales are in danger of becoming lawless because of cuts to traffic policing. that's the key finding of a major report by the charity roadpeace. it also claims there has been a "significant shift" to training courses, which it said are less effective than prosecution. the national police chiefs council says it's strengthened the way roads are policed — and is working to assess the effectiveness of driver training courses. a new study published in the british medicaljournal points to a link between high doses of some painkillers — and heart attacks. it builds on previous research that suggests anti—inflammatory painkillers, such as ibuprofen, could be connected to some heart problems. scientists said the findings were not clear cut and other factors notjust the pills, could be involved. the sydney opera house is about to undergo its biggest renovation today. the work will tackle issues with the sound inside the building which have been a problem for the concert hall since it opened more than a0 years ago. the sydney symphony orchestra says
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it's like "playing on a football pitch that's shrouded in fog". make yourjob more difficult. it would. iam make yourjob more difficult. it would. i am just imagining that right now. i have visions of somebody on the halfway line with a piano. that is what i thought. what would it sound like playing on a football pitch? that's it. you are gone, you football pitch? that's it. you are gone, you are off. andy murray, not yet at his peak at bed he says he is through? and it was not necessarily pretty. he says he has a long way to go before he is back to his best but it is good to see him win again because he has had a few unexpected slipups. andy murray's hunt for a second title this season remains on course. the world number one is into the third round of the madrid masters after a straight sets victory over romania's marius copil. murray has reached the final in madrid for the last two years. juventus are the first side into this season's champions league final. dani alves scored the pick
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of the goals as the italians beat monaco 2—1 in turin, 4—1 on aggregate. they'll play real or atletico madrid in next month's final in cardiff. geraint thomas moves up into second place at the giro d'italia — he finished third on stage four on mount etna. another british rider, adam yates, isjust behind him. tour de france champion chris froome has escaped injury after being knocked off his bike. the british cyclist says he was deliberately rammed by a car near his home in monaco. he is ok but he said the car chased onto the pavement, hit him and then drove off. what an extraordinary thing to happen. and of all the people for it to happen too. he is going for three in a row at the tour the frantz. —— two would frantz. ——
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tour de france. carol is at kew gardens with the weather this morning. good morning. it is a beautiful morning. look at the view behind me. the japanese gateway is an exact replica of a japanese gateway in kyoto, japan, which in 2019 is hosting the rugby league world cup. it was laid in 1996 and comprises a garden of harmony, activity and peace, and it is very peaceful this morning. all you can hear are the birds chirping but if you are just stepping out it is a cold start to the day. generally today the forecast is a sunny one, and a warmer one for most of us than yesterday, with just the odd exception. if you take a look around the country, at 9am this morning, across the north of scotland we have more cloud and some patchy rain as well. as we come south we are back into some sunny skies although today
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there will be a bit more cloud across southern scotland than yesterday. in the northern england a cold start. some pockets of frost but some sunshine and that sunshine and chilly start prevails down towards the midlands, in the east anglia and the south—east. at the moment there are some cloud extending from essex towards london. that will lift on any patchy fog we have will lift by around eight a.m.. as we drift towards south—west england and into wales, the temperatures picking up quite quickly in the sunshine. for northern ireland, again a fine and dry start for you but today there will be a bit more cloud around than there was yesterday. it will still bea there was yesterday. it will still be a very pleasant day. through the day, the patchy rain continues across northern scotland. here, it will be breezy at times. a bit more cloud in the far north of mainland scotland. for the rest of the uk, a beautiful day. a little bit of fair weather cloud developing, not much more than that, and temperatures could get up to 20 celsius, despite
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what you can see in that chart. anywhere from north—west england, heading south and including wales. we are looking at a range of 15 to 18. through the evening and overnight the rain across northern scotla nd overnight the rain across northern scotland sinks across mainland scotland, and by the end of the night we will be seeing some showers coming up night we will be seeing some showers coming up across night we will be seeing some showers coming up across the inner channel, possibly as fire into the south—west of england and maybe southern counties by dawn time. a lot of clear skies. there will be some frost around but not as extensive as this morning and tomorrow we pick up those showers first thing, and then they will fade in the south. equally, the rain in the north of scotla nd equally, the rain in the north of scotland will fade as well. there will be a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine but through the afternoon, showers in southern wales and southern england will again regenerate. and some of those will be heavy and thundery, possibly with some hail. it will start to feel humid, as well. by the time we the friday we have a band of showery rain extending northwards. some of this will be heavy and thundery, possibly with some hail. it is the
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far north that will see something drier and even into the weekend we're looking at an unsettled picture, with showers and temperatures gradually coming down to where they should be at this time of year. thank you very much for that. be careful on that bridge. we shall be back to you later on. the question is, who wrecks that gravel? well, who rakes the gravel in your house? —— who rakes that gravel? let's take a look at this morning's papers. they this morning's papers. are all over the place this morning, they are all over the place this morning, ina they are all over the place this morning, in a good way. the front page of the guardian, this is then appearing on the one showed yesterday. we will speak to the shadow education secretary a little bit later. the mays also on the
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front page of the daily express, the prime minister and her husband. the reason we are talking about them, it was revealed at the top of the show, he was asked about life with the prime minister and he said i decide when i take the bins out. lots of the papers talking about strictly. the newjudge is going to replace len, notjust as a judge but as head judge. send us your thoughts. we have natalie coming on later, i am sure she will have... 0h have natalie coming on later, i am sure she will have... oh yes, she is our guest! the front page of the daily telegraph, a picture of the mays. labour facing a daily telegraph, a picture of the mays. labourfacing a historic daily telegraph, a picture of the mays. labour facing a historic party split. they reveal it was love at first sight. and jeremy corbyn on the front page of the times this morning, as they balanced it up with theresa may pledging a new vote on
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foxhunting, and their main story, judge attacking the inhumanity of ca re judge attacking the inhumanity of care homes which falls apart frail pensioners. having a look at the spread in the daily mail, i have been busy with this this morning. there are three interesting stories. froome being knocked off his bike. rory mcilroy signing two new deals, bringing a combined £230 million, one with nike and one with taylor made. and michael owen really loves his resources and has his own sta bles his resources and has his own stables but has never ridden a horse before, and he hasjust got on stables but has never ridden a horse before, and he has just got on a horse for the first time. he has had a couple of spells, but he was inspired to do it by watching victoria pendleton ride at cheltenham, swapping from cycling into racing. he has fallen off a
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couple of times. he is loving it, apparently. i have two stories for you. one about food prices. last week we had a couple of chief executives from the supermarket is talking about food prices and that is what the papers up picking up on today. saying that because of poor summers and poor harvest they are saying food prices will rise considerably after the driest winter in 20 years. that is something which will put a bit of pressure on the supermarkets. when i talked to the chief executive of sainsbury is, he says that they and tesco will be trying hard not to put up prices but with that type of pressure it will be difficult. another story, which isa be difficult. another story, which is a great one. if you are at work, at your desk, you really don't want someone to come over and talk to you. but obviously in an open plan
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office people come over and talk to you all the time. scientists have come up with a light which you can have on your desk which tells you whether people should approach you or not. it is based on the algorithms of your computer. if it isa algorithms of your computer. if it is a green light it is ok to come and have a chat, if it is not, you have to be left alone. can you switch it on yourself? i was going to say, permanently on the red. so you can't just pretend. to say, permanently on the red. so you can'tjust pretend. maybe i should roll—out out at home. you can'tjust pretend. maybe i should roll-out out at home. excuse me, the light is on! —— role that out. it has been another dramatic night for american politics, as president trump fired fbi directorjames comey, the man leading investigations into the administration's alleged links with russia. the shock announcement is the latest high—profile departure since the president took office injanuary, and questions have been raised over the timing of the decision. to tell us more, we are joined by political analyst eric ham from our washington studio. good morning to you. thank you so
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much for getting up what is ridiculously early for you over there. but this announcement a p pa re ntly there. but this announcement apparently was told to james comey while he was addressing staff somewhere else in the united states. i wonder what the initial reaction was in washington, and across america? this is actually a major bombshell here in the united states. and in fact i would say this is actually a constitutional and governmental crisis that we are seeing take place in the united states right now. yesterday we saw testimony from five acting attorney general sally yates where she actually confirmed that former nsa director general mike flynn, who was also fired, was actually compromised and susceptible to bribes from the russians. and today we have an equally stunning bombshell, that president trump unexpectedly, inexplicably, has fired james comey.
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sol inexplicably, has fired james comey. so i think right now policymakers in washington are reeling, both on the right and on the left, from this news today. i suppose you could look at it, and some have said that this isa sign at it, and some have said that this is a sign that president trump is a strong leader, able to make big decisions. at the other end of things, i was listing the radio this morning and they were using the word nixonian, this is just like morning and they were using the word nixonian, this isjust like nixon who sacked the special prosecutor because he didn't want him to investigate. absolutely, and looking at the timing of this, there are subpoenas coming down from the fbi into this investigation, looking ties between the trump campaign and the russians. and so we are actually seeing this investigation began to heat up with these subpoenas calling on associates of general michael flynn. and so many will look at this and say that this is donald trump's effo rts and say that this is donald trump's efforts to try to slow down this
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investigation. and i think what you are going to have now are calls for an independent investigation, someone who is out of the realm of the trump circle, someone who be bullied, someone who cannot be controlled by the trump administration, by a attorney generaljeff sessions and others. and i think those calls are going to grow louder and louder. what additionally, i think if and when donald trump decides to actually nominate an fbi director, you're going to see a knockdown, drag out fight in the senate in terms of the confirmation for that person to be the next fbi director. it is certainly not going to go quiet, because people now are asking the question what was james comey on to? i wonder what the public perception and is at the fbi? how will this go down that law enforcement in america? shore. the fbi has had a long and troubled history, particularly going back to its first fbi director,j edgar hoover, and
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many of us know about many of his antics and many of his investigations. and at one time he was seen as the most powerful person in the united states, more powerful even than the president. and so that is something that the fbi has actually had to try and grapple with. and the dark history that they have actually had to try to shake off over the years. and so now, when you saw james comey off over the years. and so now, when you sanames comey come out off over the years. and so now, when you saw james comey come out with this letter, and many believe that he played an integral role in shaping the outcome of the 2016 election, and that is something that has dogged him since then, and so today, to have this firing by donald trump, ithink today, to have this firing by donald trump, i think itjust reallyjust through many people for a loop. and i think even republicans are now grappling with how to address this situation. but more importantly now, many americans are going to be waking up today just many americans are going to be waking up todayjust trying to figure out who is in charge, and now you see this latest blow to the nation ‘s premier law enforcement
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agency. and i think itjust really puts people under... under the issue of where do things stand and who was actually in control of our government? and that is something that the president is going to have to reassure americans about. fascinating as ever. thank you very much for that. as he says, america is waking up to try and figure out what it feels about it, and overnight the big story as well. some people are saying that there are reports that he actually found out before he got the letter, it was on the news. they were not confirmed reports. not about way to find out, someone handing you a note to say by the way you're fired. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. ambulances not turning up and calls going unanswered are just some of the complaints from patients relying on a new hospital transport service in hertfordshire. the company, private ambulance, was awarded the contract to take people to and from mount vernon
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hospital, but many who use the service aren't happy. you need to know that your transport is there, with a friendly face, that someone is going to pick you up, talk to you, treat you like a person, walk you through the garden gate or to your door, rather than just throw you out of a car. private ambulance service says it took on the contract at short notice, but has apologised and says it is working to improve its service. the artistic director of the southbank centre has won a major new award. jude kelly has been given the inaugural social purpose award at the businesswoman of the year awards. she said one of her main aims in her role at the southbank centre was to bring arts and culture into the lives of as many people as possible. young londoners will be given free access to houses of parliament, to encourage them to vote. 18— to 2a—year—olds will be offered free tours of the house of commons, house of lords, and westminster hall between now and the general election.
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nearly 400,000 voters under the age of 25 have registered to vote since the election was called. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, this is the a11, which is closed out of town by mile end tube station for emergency repairs. it is after a manhole collapsed yesterday. elsewhere, the m25 is slow clockwise over the qe2 bridge. the a13 has delays into town from the goresbrook interchange to barking. and the a2 is slow into town from eltham to kidbrooke. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it is a cold start out there this morning. 0ne good morning. it is a cold start out there this morning. one or two makes pots, mostly outside the end 25, down below zero. so sparkles of frost this morning for some of us, but it means plenty of sunshine. a really beautiful, crisp start to the
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day, and gradually the sun warms up quite nicely. we are going to feel the benefit of that. we have lost the benefit of that. we have lost the chill that we have had for the last few days. 18 celsius the maximum in central london a little later, so a really pleasant day all in all. now, overnight tonight, starting off clear. temperatures dropping down again, but then could see a bit more cloud as we work our way towards dawn. not quite as chilly overnight. minimum temperature in towns and cities between six and nine celsius. now, a bit of a change tomorrow, coming from the south, quite moist air. it will feel quite cool, the showers could spring up anywhere, but look at the temperature. 19 celsius. now, this low pressure bringing the showers can use to move through on friday, so some potentially quite heavy and maybe thundery showers or friday as well. stays reasonably u nsettled friday as well. stays reasonably unsettled into the weekend, but we should see some decent spells of sunshine throughout, and the temperature remained 18, maybe 19 celsius. and nine night—time temperatures remain reasonable as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on the programme this morning. the private lives of the mays. we'll ask whether the prime minister's appearance on the one show, alongside her husband, will have any impact on the election campaign. new hope for thousands of victims of britain's contaminated blood scandal, as a fresh legal challenge is launched. a man who was infected with hiv and hepatitis tells us his story. and, she might be leaving strictly after eight years but natalie lowe will be here to tell us why she's not hanging up her dancing shoes just yet. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. president trump has fired the head
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of the fbi james comey in a move that has shocked us politics. he'd been leading an investigation into alleged links between the trump administration and russia. the white house says mr comey "has been terminated and removed from office", but his dismissal has nothing to do with the inquiry. drayton manor theme park in staffordshire says it will not open to the public today after the death of an 11—year—old girl on one of its rides. the year 6 pupil, who has not been named, was on a trip with her school, the jameah girls academy in leicester. in a statement the school said it was providing support to its pupils and staff and requested time to grieve. senior management at the theme park said they were shocked and devastated by the incident. labour and the liberal democrats have pledged billions of pounds in extra school funding if they win the general election, to ensure budgets in england keep up with rising costs. both parties also say no school would lose out as a result
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of a new funding formula to divide money across the country. but the conservatives say school funding has reached record levels in their government and questioned labour's plans to use corporation tax rises to pay for their plans. the crown prosecution service is expected to announce later this morning whether any conservative politicians or officials will be charged with breaking rules on election campaign spending in 2015. the cps has been considering files sent by the police from nearly 30 constituencies. the party has insisted that administrative errors were to blame for any spending which was incorrectly declared. roads in england and wales are in danger of becoming increasingly "lawless" because of cuts to traffic policing. that's the key finding of a major report by the charity roadpeace. it also claims there has been a "significant shift" to training courses, which it said are less effective than prosecution. the national police chiefs council says it's strengthened the way roads are policed — and is working
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to assess the effectiveness of driver training courses. the star of the film captain america, chris evans, said he wanted to "curl up" after filming a bedtime story for cbeebies. he's recorded a few stories, including one story about showing children how to cope when they feel overwhelmed. you can see it on cbeebies at ten to seven tonight. and it is little treat for everyone. i'm sure quite a few parents will be tuning infor i'm sure quite a few parents will be tuning in for that. i... i'm sure quite a few parents will be tuning inforthat. i... i did a sports one. a few years ago. they asked me to turn up in perak shot andi asked me to turn up in perak shot and i did that then they said the shorts were inappropriate. —— asked me to turn up in a pair of shorts. how lovely. a wonderful thing. i had
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a horrendous image in my mind of what shorts you may have been wearing. it sounds like you were wearing. it sounds like you were wearing little as let it once. they we re wearing little as let it once. they were not athletic shorts! they were ofa were not athletic shorts! they were of a good length! were so used seeing professional sportsmen bouncing back from injury, look at roger federer — he missed a huge chunk of last year and came back in january to win another grand slam. andy murray, however, is out there proving that battling back from injury is tougher. andy murray is through to the third round in madrid. he beat romania's marius copil in straight sets. murray was far from his best early on but his serve was never in danger of being broken. he's bidding to make the final for the third year in a row. the french open on players just one
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fortnight away. —— on clay. toni duggan scored an 18—minute hat—trick as manchester city won 3—0 at bristol city in the women's super league spring series. juventus have reached their second champions league final in three years — they beat monaco 4—1 on aggregate. dani alves scored with a cracking volley as they won 2—1 on the night in turin. they'll take on real or atletico madrid in next month's final in cardiff. real are 3—0 up going into tonight's second leg. and dundee united came from behind to win 2—1 at greenock morton in the first leg of their scottish premiership play—off quarter—final. toni duggan scored an 18—minute hat—trick as manchester city won 3—0 at bristol city in the women's super league spring series. he was the most expensive player ever when he moved from juventus to manchester united last summer — but now fifa are investigating paul pogba's world record transfer. they want to know who was involved in the £89.3 million deal and how much money they got out of it. united say fifa have the necessary documents from last august.
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fifa has decided to replace two of the leaders of its reform programme. investigator cornel borbely and judge hans—joachim eckert have banned numerous football officials — they say the move was politically motivated and effectively ends fifa's efforts to reform. tour de france champion chris froome had a lucky escape yesterday, when he was knocked off his bike while training near his home in monaco. the british rider, who wasn't hurt, posted this picture on social media writing "just got rammed on purpose by an impatient driver who followed me onto the pavement!" thankfully i'm 0k. bike totalled. driver kept going!" he reported the incident to police. stage four of the giro d'italia was a good one for the british riders — but not so much for the leader at the start of the day, fernando gaviria. he rather misjudged his speed at a corner taking a number of riders the wrong way with him. geraint thomas moved up to second place, behind new leader
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bobjungels, with adam yates third, after an edgy stage. everyone was watching each other so nobody went. i think everybody was apprehensive but i felt good and it was nice to win a sprint and gain a couple of seconds. i remember doing that the half marathon. i the other way. i was so annoyed! we've got the draw for the rugby world cup to look forward to this morning — and next month, jamie roberts will captain wales for their tests against tonga and samoa. roberts missed out on a third tour with the lions — but will be in new zealand with wales as take on tonga in auckland onjune the 16th before travelling to samoa a week later. double olympic champion nicola adams will face mexico's maryan salazar on saturday night, in herfirst
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fight in her home city of leeds for 20 years. it's adams‘ second professional contest and it'll be the first time she's fought over four, three—minute rounds, rather than the conventional two—minute rounds in women's bouts. that will be a massive night indeed. iam that will be a massive night indeed. i am regretting telling that story about inappropriate shorts. i am being sent many photos... education policy is under the spotlight this morning as the general election campaign continues, with both the liberal democrats and labour pledging to boost school budgets should they form the next government. we're joined now by lord richard newby, leader of the liberal democrats in the house of lords, to tell us more. good morning and thank you for joining us. can we look at the money first of all? you are talking about £7 billion a year? do you raise
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taxes to get that? there are a raft of things we will be doing. 0ne taxes to get that? there are a raft of things we will be doing. one of the basic things is reversing a numberof the basic things is reversing a number of conservative tax cuts which will raise several billion pounds which will make biggest event in funding the shortfall in school budgets. which tax cut? corporation tax which is on a downward path, we think that is unnecessary and a large proportion of the money we are talking about raising can be found by just not talking about raising can be found byjust not doing that tax cut. we will get details of this in your ma nifesto, will get details of this in your manifesto, right? tell us about where you target this funding. what are your main concerns? they are twofold. first of all, all schools are facing a cut in funding per
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pupil which over the period ahead looks like being something in the order of eight, nearly 10%. this means that schools are having to reduce the number of teachers they employee, and the class sizes are going up. additionally there is the nationalfunding going up. additionally there is the national funding formulae which is quite skewer and the government are reforming it in such a way that many schools will lose out, in addition to the general cuts. many of those schools are in disadvantaged inner—city areas so they will really lose out and they will need to be protected as well. you speak about disadvantaged schools and protecting them. will you be giving them more budgets, higher budgets or not? no, what we are doing is making sure that these schools as a whole do not lose out. at the moment the government is planning to have this redistribution away from the cities towards, in many cases, towards the counties. and we are saying that
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there are schools outside the cities that need to have their funding reduced on a fairer basis but we would like to do that while at the same time ensuring that these schools that get good levels of funding at the moment do not suffer. and, talking about class size, d you have a particular ideal size and how do you ensure that is how all the class size stays? it is not that we wa nt to class size stays? it is not that we want to bring class sizes down, what we say at the moment is that most schools are losing a couple of teachers in the next school year, or planning to, and the inevitable consequence is that class sizes will increase. so we are talking about protecting the current levels of class sizes and making sure that pupils get the kind of education they have expected in the past. how about university tuition? that was not mentioned. today we concentrate
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on schools because there is a crisis in schools and that is why everything that we have been concentrating on today is that narrow point of how you make sure that every child is unaffected by cuts in the amount of money that is spent on them at school. will you mention university tuition in your ma nifesto ? mention university tuition in your manifesto? we will. what are you suggesting? that they will be scrapped again? the details will be set out in the manifesto when it comes out in a few days time. a few days, can we have a date?|j comes out in a few days time. a few days, can we have a date? i think we are all planning to launch ma nifestoes are all planning to launch manifestoes next week. and we'll be speaking to labour shadow education secretary angela rayner after 7 this morning. everyone keeps saying wait for a ma nifesto. everyone keeps saying wait for a manifesto. we have to realise an
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mason. we need the new manifestoes. carol has the weather for us. it looks beautiful there. carol has the weather for us. it looks beautifulthere. it carol has the weather for us. it looks beautiful there. it is. carol has the weather for us. it looks beautifulthere. it is. good morning. iam looks beautifulthere. it is. good morning. i am in the oriental hub of kew gardens and behind me you can see the japanese gateway, an exact replica of a gateway in kyoto. we have rhododendrons, cherry blossoms and an austrian pine to namejust a blossoms and an austrian pine to name just a few. gardner went to japan to learn about this and how to maintain it, and to do the horticultural side of things. here in kew gardens it is notjust beautiful but a beautiful start to the day. it is colder in 0xfordshire, where it is minus three. some frost around, and also some patchy fog. that will lift by around 8am this morning and for all
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of us today's forecast is a sunnier and warmer one than it was yesterday. so if we take a look around the country, at 9am, in scotland, first of all, across the far north of scotland there is more cloud around and some patchy rain. south—west scotland will see more cloud than yesterday but for the rest of scotland we are seeing some sunshine and a chilly start. across northern england there are some patchy fog currently, which were left. it is cold and we have some blue skies, and those blue skies and a chilly field continue down into the midlands, east anglia and the south—east. at the moment there is more cloud across essex and london, but you will find that will break up as we head towards the morning. in the south—west we are back into the sunshine and any missed or fog will have cleared. for wales, a similar story. a nippy start but in the sunshine temperatures will pick up quite quickly. for northern ireland, a dry and fine start but compared with yesterday there will be more cloud around, what it will still be
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a beautiful day. as we go through the course of the day we hang on to the course of the day we hang on to the patchy rain across the far north of scotland. elsewhere, there will be some fair weather cloud developing. but it is going to be a sunny and pleasant day, and with lighter winds it will feel much right along the east coast. we have lost that onshore flow and locally somewhere in england and wales we could hit 20 celsius. generally we are looking at a range of 15 to 18 but whole under that rain in the northern isles. through the evening and overnight the rain in the north moves and overnight the rain in the north m oves a cross and overnight the rain in the north moves across the far north of mainland scotland. a lot of clear skies, a cold night with some frost around, less than the nightjust gone and by the end of the night we will have some showers crossing the channel islands and getting an across parts of south—west england. so that is how we start the day tomorrow. the showers in the south will tend to fade in the morning but they will come back in the afternoon, and some of those will be heavy and thundery, with some hail. they will be hit and miss. not all of us will necessarily see one.
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there will be some sunshine in between. further north a lot of sunshine and like today some places will get up to 20 celsius. and it will get up to 20 celsius. and it will be drier across northern scotland. by the time we get to friday we have more showery outbreaks of heavy rain coming up from the south. some of that will be thundery, some of it will have some hail in it and you might find some issues with surface water flooding. north of that, especially the further north that you go, we are looking at something drier. but into the weekend it remains unsettled at times. some sunshine and showers and temperatures will gradually come down to where they should be. you are asking about the raking of the gravel, it gets done every single day. i guessed that to have that quality gravel they would have to have that, and maybe we will see the gravel raker later. and if you would like to see gravel being raked, we
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will have that later. talking about the weather, a few storms around ba rclays, the weather, a few storms around barclays, at their agm. yes, barclays is one of our biggest banks, but it is the boss that has been under scrutiny lately. last month, it was revealed that he had attempted to find out the identity of a whistleblower in the company. he apologised and referred himself to the regulator. today will be the first time that mr staley has publicly faced shareholders since then, and there is increasing pressure on shareholders not to re—elect him as the boss. joining us is andrew silvester from the institute of directors. good morning to you. can you remind us good morning to you. can you remind us what the controversy is here, around this whistleblower? yes, essentially a letter was sent to senior colleagues at barclays about the conduct of a long—time colleague, and jes staley attempted
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to find out who had sent a letter. and as he was warned off from doing that another letter was sent to the board informing them thatjes staley had been looking to find the whistleblower, and the board gave him quitea whistleblower, and the board gave him quite a censure. so far so bad, and intense scrutiny has come upon ba rclays as and intense scrutiny has come upon barclays as a result of this. if you look at the measures they had in place during the whistleblowing scandal, actually their checks and bala nces scandal, actually their checks and balances worked quite well. so clearly he will be facing shareholders today. there is another question around his pay as well. tell us about that. the board have taken a lot out of his pay packet. he won't be receiving much of the bonus he was expecting. he has apologised publicly and shareholders have had their say. some advisory services have suggested he not be reappointed to the board and while his role as boss is not up for discussion today, that will be seen asa discussion today, that will be seen as a proxy way of saying to the chairman that they want him out. we're not necessarily expecting
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that, but we are expecting a day of robust discussion. it would be good forjes robust discussion. it would be good for jes staley if robust discussion. it would be good forjes staley if he gets a good night's kip, it might be a rough day. they have been strong in their views in terms of bad behaviour by executives and in terms of things like remuneration with bank bosses. what are your thoughts on all of this? well, there is no question this? well, there is no question this whistleblowing is incredible is serious. whistleblowing is an incredibly important part of our financial markets work so that conduct regulators in particular know what is going on inside banks. i think what we have seen here, jes staley has said it was an honest mistake and he didn't know the rules, so on and so forth, we have shown that no matter how thin you you are in a bank, how experienced you are in a bank, how experienced you are, it is important to remind yourself of your roles and responsibilities, and that needs to be led by the board as much as by ceos. and on the issue of pay, whenever i talk about results from companies and we talk about bonuses that the bosses are getting, often a lot more than other people in the
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company, higher multiples in terms of what they get compared to other stuff, do they deserve the millions they get? there is no question that running these gigantic organisations is difficult, and companies and shareholders will say they always need to pay to get the best. there has been a trend for shareholders to ask tougher questions at these agms. in the bad old days these kinds of things were nodded through. it has been the case that particularly the larger pension funds are taking more ofan larger pension funds are taking more of an interest in what ceos are paid. it is notjust the reputation of the company but the business as a whole. there is a lot of public angen whole. there is a lot of public anger. and a lot of people might have pensions with money invested with companies like barclays, and they want to make sure they get returns on investment. absolutely, it remains important and we sometimes forget the effect on the wider economy. thank you very much, more from me a bit later on. this weekend, more than 200 million people will tune in to the eurovision final.
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still going strong after 62 years, the latest contest got underway last night, with the first semi—final in kiev. let's take a look at some of the highlights over the years. # rise like a phoenix... it is consistently one of the world's most watched tv events of the year. in 2016, some 20a million viewers tuned in to at least one of the three televised shows. nearly 1500 songs have been entered the contest began in 1956. 12 points to ireland, which is the most successful country to ta ke is the most successful country to take part, winning seven times. like a puppet on a string... the uk is not far behind, though, with five
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victories. 0ur not far behind, though, with five victories. our last success came some 20 years ago, though, when katrina and the waves one europe over with love shine a light. the impact of the song contest, in 1981 velcro sold out across the uk within 48 hours of the famous making your mind up costume change. this year, 43 countries were due to take part in kiev, which would have equalled the record for the contest. but russia withdrew after their representative was banned from entering ukraine. now, if you are looking for a eurovision expert, you need look no further than the bbc‘s moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. i wonder if that is why he got the job. he is a super—fan, and he reckons he can play every winning song on the piano. all you need to do is tell him the year. he is live in kiev, so we can put this to the test. we should say there is quite a long
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delay on the line, which will make this musical item even more entertaining. good morning to you. before we get you tinkling the ivories, where and why and how did these eurovision obsession began?” don't think it is an accession. it isa don't think it is an accession. it is a medical condition, really. some people collect stamps, some people build model aircraft, and i play eurovision songs. i have loved the eurovision songs. i have loved the eurovision song contest since i was a kid. i think it was the thought that hundreds of millions of people across europe were watching the same programme that i was that i found quite exciting. people knock the eurovision song contest for the quality of the songs, but i think if you look back at the 62 years of this contest, and you listen back, there are some great melodies, really, which have come out of the eurovision song contest.” really, which have come out of the eurovision song contest. i feel nervous, given what i am about to do. i have a sheet here with all the
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winners from all the years. you have claimed that you can play any of them. i'm going to put my finger down on the sheet and stop and ask you. 1979. israel, gali atari and milk and honey with hallelujah. hallelujah, yes. # gali atari and milk and honey — hallelujah.” hallelujah, yes. # gali atari and milk and honey - hallelujah. i have no idea whether that is right or wrong, but it sounds lovely, steve, nonetheless. 1974, though. # abba - waterloo. an easy one. surely give
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him something more difficult? are you ready? you're doing absolutely brilliantly, so far, as we can tell. let's go for 2001, estonia, tanel padar, dave benton and 2xl with everybody. 0k, padar, dave benton and 2xl with everybody. ok, so that was... let's see. # tanel padar, dave benton and 2xl - see. # tanel padar, dave benton and 2xl — everybody. see. # tanel padar, dave benton and 2xl - everybody. ithink see. # tanel padar, dave benton and 2xl - everybody. i think you are brilliant. we will check, i am sure they are right. i will never be able to ask steve a question about vladimir putin's foreign policy again, without thinking of eurovision! the russians don't know what they are missing this year, they just don't what they are missing this year, theyjust don't know. our correspondence have hidden talents.
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i look forward to seeing chris mason playing his oboe at some stage. you can watch the second semi—final and eurovision song contest final on the bbc. and steve will be there covering it for us, as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. ambulances not turning up and calls going unanswered are just some of the complaints from patients relying on a new hospital transport service in hertfordshire. the company, private ambulance, was awarded the contract to take people to and from mount vernon hospital, but many who use the service aren't happy. you need to know that your transport‘s there, with a friendly face, that someone's going to pick you up, talk to you, treat you like a person, walk you through the garden gate or to your door, rather than just rather than just throw you out of a car with your bag. private ambulance service says it
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took on the contract at short notice, but has apologised and says it is working to improve its service. the artistic director of the southbank centre has won praise for making works accessible to a wider audience. jude kelly has been recognised in the social purpose category at the businesswoman of the year awards. she said one of her main aims is to bring arts and culture into the lives of as many people as possible. young londoners will be given free access to houses of parliament, to encourage them to vote. 18— to 24—year—olds will be offered free tours of the house of commons, house of lords, and westminster hall between now and the general election. nearly 400,000 voters under the age of 25 have registered to vote since the election was called. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. this is the a13, where there are queues into town from the goresbrook interchange to barking. elsewhere, the m25 is congested anticlockwise from junction 20 for kings langley to junction 19 for watford. traffic is heavy on the north circular westbound between neasden and wembley. and the a2 is slow into town from eltham to kidbrooke. let's have a check on the weather
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now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a cold start out there this morning. one or two spots, mostly outside the m25, down below zero. so sparkles of frost this morning for some of us, but it means plenty of sunshine. a really beautiful, crisp start to the day, and gradually the sun warms up quite nicely. we are going to feel the benefit of that. we have lost the chill that we have had for the last few days. 18 celsius the maximum in central london, a little later, so a really pleasant day all in all. now, overnight tonight, starting off clear. temperatures dropping down again, but then could see a bit more cloud as we work our way towards dawn. not quite as chilly overnight. minimum temperature in towns and cities between six and nine celsius. now, a bit of a change tomorrow.
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air coming from the south, quite moist air, it will feel quite cool. we will feel some showers. they could spring up anywhere, but look at the temperature — 19 celsius. now, this low pressure bringing the showers continues to move through on friday, so some potentially quite heavy and maybe thundery showers for friday, as well. stays reasona bly u nsettled into the weekend, but we should see some decent spells of sunshine throughout, and the temperature remains 18, maybe 19 celsius, and night—time temperatures remain reasonable as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin he's fired! president trump sacks the head of the fbi without warning. explosive news out of washington tonight. shock in the united states as james comey is told he will be removed with immediate effect — he had been leading
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the investigation into links between mr trump's election campaign and russia. good morning, it's wednesday 10th may. also this morning — an investigation begins into the death of an 11—year—old girl who fell from a water ride at drayton manor theme park. education takes centre stage in the election campaign — as labour and the liberal democrats promise more funds for schools in england. the tv architect george clark is a plan to transform the construction industry in the way that houses are built. i will talk to him about that and how we make sure young people have the skills for the work. in sport, the french 0pen's a fortnight away and andy murray says he still needs to get better —
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but he's through to the third round in madrid. from taking out the beans to read books in the bedroom. —— bins. we'll be assessing the appearance of teresa and philip may on the one show last night. and our build up to this year's eurovision song begins. our own steve rosenberg is in kiev with all the tunes and all the facts you need to enjoy the world's biggest singing competition. he can play any eurovision winner from any year. we shall test him a little later on. hidden skills... carol, the weather. can you follow that? not a chance. i am at kew gardens and it is stunning. the sun is up to but it is surely. that will give way to sunshine. for most it will be a pleasant, warm and sunny day except for northern scotland where there is patchy rain. more details in 15 minutes.
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good morning. president trump has fired the head of the fbi james comey in a move that has shocked us politics. he'd been leading an investigation into alleged links between the trump administration and russia. the white house says mr comey "has been terminated and removed from office". aleem maqbool reports. absolutely explosive news out of washington tonight. this is a fox news alert — fbi director, james comey, has been fired by the president of the united states. americans have learned to expect almost anything from their president but this really was high drama. fbi director, james comey, was not even in washington, he was addressing fbi staff in los angeles, when he learnt he had been sacked. a short while later, a letter arrived at fbi headquarters. "you are hereby terminated and removed from office, effective immediately." "while i greatly appreciate you informing me on three separate occasions that i am not under investigation, i nevertheless concur with the judgement of the department
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ofjustice that you are not able to affectively lead the bureau." it was signed, "donald trump". you've become more famous than me. except the trump campaign was being investigated by the fbi for its links to russia. james comey was leading the investigation and now he's gone. are people going to suspect cover—up? absolutely. if an independent special prosecutor is appointed there still can be some faith that we can get to the bottom of this, if not everyone will suspect a cover—up. speaking on us tv, the president's adviser dismissed that notion. this has nothing to do with russia. it has everything to do with whether the current fbi director has the president's confidence and can faithfully and capably execute his duties. the shockwaves from this decision are notjust being felt here at the fbi, but across this city and beyond. for his supporters, this is evidence
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that donald trump is a strong leader but for many others, this just adds to the perception that this country is now being run bya man who is intolerant of those who disagree with him and who do not entirely do his bidding. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in washington. drayton manor theme park in staffordshire says it won't open to the public today after the death of an 11—year—old girl on one of its rides. the year 6 pupil, who has not been named, was on a trip with her school, the jameah girls academy in leicester. 0ur reporter andrew plant is at drayton manor for us this morning. we understand there has been an updated statement from the school? that is correct. they said they are deeply shocked and saddened by what happened yesterday and have asked for time to grieve at this morning. drayton manor remains closed today
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asa drayton manor remains closed today as a mark of respect to the girl's family and also to allow investigations to continue. we do not know her name but we know she was a year 6 student who was here on a school trip with staff and other pupils at yesterday when she was on the ride. you can go on this ride with six other students. she fell into the water and was taken out by drayton manor staff, given first aid and then airlifted to hospital where she tragically died, in birmingham a short while later. you probably know the type of ride she was on, everybody on a circular bow with a ring around the outside. ex— people ata time, ring around the outside. ex— people at a time, 20 boats at a time. —— six people at a time. the girl's school remains closed and they say they will offer counselling to their stu d e nts they will offer counselling to their students there today. labour and the liberal democrats have pledged billions of pounds in extra school funding if they win the general election, to ensure budgets in england keep
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up with rising costs. both parties also say no school would lose out as a result of a new funding formula to divide money across the country. and there's a promise of extra cash towards education in other parts of the uk. here's our education editor bra nwen jeffreys. parents have made their feelings clear. in marches and meetings, raising concerns about school budgets and plans to change monies shared across england. it has pushed england schools onto the election agenda. labour is promising £4.8 billion for school budgets in england. a real terms increase over four years, with £335 million to make sure that no school loses from a new funding formula. corporation tax would rise from 19% to 26% by 2021 to pay for this and other education promises. the liberal democrats say they would put £5.8 billion into real—time rises in school budgets, including making sure no
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school loses from the funding formula and per pupil increases in further education. but it will not say how they will pay for this until their manifesto is published. what labour and the liberal democrats are saying is quite different from what our current education policy is. as ever, there is a big choice. you either raise taxes as labour is talking about, raising them significantly to pay for a public service, or you reduce spending on public service and keep the tax burden down. teaching unions have welcomed the promises. schools have been facing financial pressures. after 20 years of regular increases in funding, the conservatives say that school funding has reached record levels. we have already spoken to the
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liberal democrats and we will speak to the labour shadow education secretary in a few moment's time. the crown prosecution service is expected to announce later this morning whether any conservative politicians or officials will be charged with breaking rules on election campaign spending in 2015. the cps has been considering files sent by the police from nearly thirty constituencies. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo joins us now from westminster. can we talk about these files and background to all of this? this investigation relates to the 2015 general election when it is claimed that the conservative party misreported its spending on the campaign. there are complex rules and strict limits on what can be spent locally and what can be spent nationally. the allegations are that the conservative party declared as national spending, it the conservative party declared as nationalspending, it was the conservative party declared as national spending, it was actually local. the conservative party says there was no intent to deceive.
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there was an administrative error when it came to things like hotel bills and battle buses. they say that their spending has been properly reported in most areas. but we have 16 police forces investigating 27 constituencies around the country. key marginal constituencies so the claim is that more money was pumped into them to make sure the result went the way of the conservative party. the cps needs to decide if there is enough evidence to prosecute any election agents all politicians and whether that prosecution would be in the public interest. the conservative party have already been fined but as yet there has been no action by the cps. if they do choose to prosecute any politicians, this could be a huge problem because tomorrow is the deadline for the selection of candidatess in this election. so many candidates are being prosecuted and there could be a scramble to
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replace them. politicians out and about, talking to the public and in various tv studios such as the prime minister yesterday with her husband. did we learn anything? a different setting to see theresa may there on the sofar when her husband made his first broadcast interview last night. this was an attempt to make politicians relatable, a more relate able to the public rather than just seeing them on the stump or going around the country campaigning. it was a personal interview that theresa may and her husband gave, they were talking about when they first met, their wedding pictures, their domestic duties. we learnt that theresa may takes out the bins. he was praising herfor her cooking. he was praising herfor her cooking. he was praising herfor her cooking. he was a supportive and loyal husband, and nodding along and talking about being the husband of the prime minister and what a privilege it was. there were still
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plenty of slogans from theresa may, albeit in a relaxed setting although i think viewers will have seen the prime minister in a different light. jeremy corbyn will also be on the 0ne jeremy corbyn will also be on the one show. we will talk about that when that happens. roads in england and wales are in danger of becoming increasingly "lawless" because of cuts to traffic policing. that's the key finding of a major report by the charity roadpeace. it also claims there has been a "significant shift" to training courses, which it said are less effective than prosecution. the national police chiefs council says it's strengthened the way roads are policed — and is working to assess the effectiveness of driver training courses. a new study published in the british medicaljournal points to a link between high doses of some painkillers — and heart attacks. it builds on previous research that suggests anti—inflammatory painkillers like ibuprofen, could be connected to some heart problems. scientists said the findings were not clear cut and other factors, notjust the pills, could be involved. the main issue in the election campaign today is education funding.
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labour and the liberal democrats are promising a major cash boost for schools. we're joined now by labour's shadow education secretary angela rayner. good morning and welcome to the red sofa. loads... i'm sure thousands of pa rents sofa. loads... i'm sure thousands of parents will be watching this show this morning. if labour were elected in one month's time, what would the education system, what would a school look like under a labour government? it would be fully funded, first of all. i want to reassure pa rents funded, first of all. i want to reassure parents that that is what we will do. our plan, an exciting one, is the national education service, mirrored off the nhs because i believe it will be transformative like the health service. it means that schools will
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have the money they need and adult education as well will be free at the point of use so people can return to education. many children and many adults like me who did not have those apogee nitties when we we re have those apogee nitties when we were young, would like to be able to go back and be retrained. —— did not have those opportunities when we we re have those opportunities when we were young. you said it would be fully funded let's discuss the funding. this will be funded, apparently, by savings from the corporation tax. you know how many the conservatives say —— policies the conservatives say —— policies the conservatives say you say will be funded by the conservative tax, things like british steel, public pay restraint, introducing maintenance, scrapping tuition fee, reversing changes to universal credit, the triple or pension,
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social care of the nhs, the school budget and charisma and payment. corporation tax is currently at 19%. you say you will raise it to 26% by 2021. not one study says that in order to pay for these policies that you believe will be paid for by corporation sex, corporation tax would need to rise to 28% now. let's be clear, we haven't said that. we will release the full list in our manifesto, but we have been absolutely clear, and i make no apologies, the conservatives have cut corporation tax to the lowest in the 620. cut corporation tax to the lowest in the g20. we will raise corporation tax and make sure that small businesses are protected and that businesses are protected and that businesses will get the skills they require from british workers when they are trained properly. and we will still be the lowest in the g7 when we have raised the corporation
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tax as well. it is a responsible way of paying the public services and making sure that fishworkers and british children get the education and the opportunities to work in skilled manufacturing industries, et cetera, of the future. and that will help british businesses. louise mentioned this to the democrat earlier as well. why isn't it included —— liberal democrats earlier as well. why hasn't it included? well, i wanted to give reassu ra nces to included? well, i wanted to give reassurances to parents, like you said, who are concerned up and down the country that they are facing redundancies of their teaching assista nts redundancies of their teaching assistants in classrooms. giving them reassurances first of all that our priority is that our education services will be fully funded. then i wanted to announce about adult education. there are a lot of announcements are made today and during the manifesto process, throughout the couple of weeks that we have now, labour will make sure that the promises we give to the public are fully costed, and our promises will be delivered if labour get into power on june
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promises will be delivered if labour get into power onjune the eighth. the tories have failed to deliver on their promises and they have broken their promises and they have broken their contract with the british people when they promised not to reintroduce grammar schools and promised funding to our schools, and broke that promise.” promised funding to our schools, and broke that promise. i know this isn't the brexit election, but according to recent polls, if you believe the polls, 40% of voters say they will make a decision based on that relationship with the eu. can i ask you to clear up the labour position? for a few weeks you have been saying that the coming out of the eu is a done deal and jeremy corbyn seemed a little unclear that yesterday, refusing to answer specific questions. can you clear up our viewers, what is the position? is it done and sorted, or other steel arguments to be had with regard to labour policy on that? well, i am clear. the prime minister said she needed this election... what are labour saying?” said she needed this election... what are labour saying? i will tell you that. we are clear on article 50 being triggered. we are coming out of europe. everyone in parliament accepts that we are coming out of europe. why would an jeremy corbyn
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a nswer europe. why would an jeremy corbyn answer that question, when he was directly asked its? well, i didn't see that interview. we have been clear and see that interview. we have been clearand in all see that interview. we have been clear and in all my conversations with jeremy and the clear and in all my conversations withjeremy and the shadow cabinet, it has been clear we are coming out of europe, and it is about what kind of europe, and it is about what kind of deal we get coming out of europe. i want to protectjobs in the north—west, the north—east, the midlands, that feel left behind. we wa nt midlands, that feel left behind. we want a brexit that works for everybody in the uk. the working class of the uk feel left behind. i wa nt to class of the uk feel left behind. i want to invest in young people and children and make sure that brexit works for them. and jeremy corbyn is going to be on the one show. did you see it last night? i have seen all the papers this morning, and she was talking about her husband taking out the bins. who takes out the bins in your house? it is whoever is there at the time. half the time it is —— likely it is colour—coded, and we know which to take out wenn. and we
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will be talking about the appearance on the one show with the prime minister. carol is at kew gardens with the weather this morning. it is looking lovely there this morning. it certainly is. iam it is looking lovely there this morning. it certainly is. i am on the south side of kew gardens at the 0riental hub, and you can see behind me the beautiful japanese 0riental hub, and you can see behind me the beautifuljapanese gateway. that is an exact replica of a japanese gateway in kyoto, japan, the rugby world cup will be held on 2019. it is a cold start in the lowest temperature overnight was just below minus three. here, the temperature is rising. it is now 6.7, but it feels chilly and in parts of rural 0xfordshire it is just a roundabout 0.1 celsius. you need to wrap up warmly, and it will bea need to wrap up warmly, and it will be a warm day. you will be shedding it later on in the day. talking of such things, it will be sunnier and a warm day that it was yesterday from any of us, with one or two
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exceptions. with other forecast at 9am, across scotland. the north of scotla nd 9am, across scotland. the north of scotland will have a lot of cloud and rain on and off throughout the course of the day, and it will feel cold. a bit more cloud across south—west scotland as well, but for the rest of scotland we are looking at some sunshine. in the northern england, you have a cold start as well. a little bit patchy fog, which will now be starting to clear, and then we will see some sunshine and is becoming the midlands, east anglia and the south—east generally, again it is a a dry and cold start. a little bit more cloud extending from essex towards london, that will and break and break and we will have some warm skies. across southern counties, the south midlands and into the south—west, a similar story. again it is a chilly start. patchy fog, it won't last much longer and we are in the clear skies. wales seeing some sunshine from the word go, but nifty if you arejust stepping out. for northern ireland it is a beautiful day ahead
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that they will be more cloud around that they will be more cloud around that you have been used to this week. through the course of the date you will find the rain will remain on and off throughout northern scotland, and for the rest of us it will be a beautiful, dry sunny day, if that is what you like. and we are losing all that low cloud we had crossed the north sea coastline, because we don't have that onshore flow. anywhere across england and wales we could hit between 18 and 20, generally we are looking at a range between 15 and 18 apart from the northern isles, where it will be cold. talking of such things, through the evening and overnight period the rain in northern scotland will drift a bit further south into the north of mainland scotland. many of clear skies. it will be some frost. not as cold as last night, so there will be some frost but some showers crossing the english channel, getting in the south—west england by dawn. tomorrow we will see a few more of those showers before they fade, and then they will rejuvenate once again through the course of the afternoon, and some of those will be heavy and thundery with hail, with sunshine in between. they will be fairly hit and miss but
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the rest of the uk it will be a sunny, dry and warm day, again with temperatures locally up to 20 celsius. dry out across the north of scotland. by friday we will get a band of showery rain moving up across the english channel, heading across the english channel, heading across southern parts of england and wales on its journey northwards. some of that again will be heavy and thundery, with some hail. could lead to some local surface water issues on some of the roads, for example, something to bear in mind. as we head into the weekend that remains sunshine and showers with temperatures gradually coming back to where we would expect them to be at this stage in may. thank you very much. it really does look gorgeous there. we will be back at kew gardens later in the day, speaking to shane williams, for whom raking is very important, and jonny wilkinson, about the draw for the rugby world cup a little later in the programme. they will not be talking about that, though. they will be talking about rugby, not about raking. last night saw another dramatic
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twist for american politics as donald trump fired fbi james comey, the man leading investigations into trump links with russia. questions have been raised over the timing of the decision. earlier in the programme a political analyst spoke to us from our washington studio. this announcement was told to james comey while he was addressing staff elsewhere in the us. i wonder what the initial reaction was in washington and across america? this is actually a major bombshell here in the united states, and i would say this is actually a constitutional and governmental crisis we are then take place in the united states right now. yesterday we saw testimony from fired acting attorney general sallie yates where she actually confirmed that former nsa direct general michael flynn, who was also fired, was actually conquer most and susceptible to
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bribes from the russians —— sally yates. and today we have an equally stunning bombshell that president trump unexpectedly and inexplicably has fired james comey. so i think right now policymakers in washington are reeling, both on the right on the left, from this news today.” suppose you can look at it, and some i have already seen have said that this is a sign that as an trump is a strong leader able to take big decisions, and at the other end of things ina decisions, and at the other end of things in a radio discussion they we re things in a radio discussion they were using the word nixonian, just like nixon, who sacked the special prosecutor because he didn't want him to investigate. absolutely, and looking at the timing of this, there are subpoenas coming down from the fbi into this investigation, looking ties between the trump campaign and the russians. and so we are actually seeing this investigation began to heat up with these subpoenas calling
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on associates of general michael flynn. and so many will look at this and say that this is donald trump's efforts to try to slow down this investigation. and i think what you are going to have now are calls for an independent investigation, someone who is out of the realm of the trump circle, someone who cannot be bullied, someone who cannot be controlled by the trump administration, by attorney general jeff sessions and others. and i think those calls are going to grow louder and louder. but additionally, i think if and when donald trump decides to actually nominate an fbi director, you're going to see a knockdown, drag—out fight in the senate, in terms of the confirmation for that person to be the next fbi director. it is certainly not going to go quietly, is it? because people now are asking the question what was on to, what did he know? i wonder what the public
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perception and is at the fbi? how will this go down that law enforcement in america? sure, the fbi has had a long and troubled history, particularly going back to its first fbi director, j edgar hoover, and many of us know about many of his antics and many of his investigations. and at one timej edgar hoover was seen as the most powerful person in the united states, more powerful even than presidents. and so that is something that the fbi has actually had to try and grapple with, and a dark history that they have actually had to try to shake off over the years. and so now, when you sanames comey come out with this letter, and many believe that he played an integral role in shaping the outcome of the 2016 election, and that's something that has dogged him since then. and so today, to have this firing by donald trump, i think itjust reallyjust threw many people for a loop, and i think even republicans are now grappling with how to address this situation.
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but more importantly, now, many americans are going to be waking up todayjust trying to figure out who's in charge, and now you see this latest blow to the nation's premier law enforcement agency. and i think itjust really puts people under — under the issue of where do things stand and who was actually in control of our government? and that's something that the president is going to have to reassure americans about. we haven't heard the end of that. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. ambulances not turning up and calls going unanswered are just some of the complaints from patients relying on a new hospital transport service in hertfordshire. the company, private ambulance, was awarded the contract to take
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people to and from mount vernon hospital, but many who use the service aren't happy. you need to know that your transport‘s there, with a friendly face, that someone's going to pick you up, talk to you, treat you like you're a person, walk you through the garden gate or to your door, rather than just throw you out of a car with your bag. private ambulance service says it took on the contract at short notice, but has apologised, and says it is working to improve its service. a man who was wrestled to the ground in whitehall last month has been charged with committing —— planning terrorist attacks. he has also been charged with two counts of possessing explosives and will be
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arraigned in london later. young londoners will be given free access to houses of parliament, to encourage them to vote. 18— to 24—year—olds will be offered free tours of the house of commons, house of lords, and westminster hall between now and the general election. nearly 400,000 voters under the age of 25 have registered to vote since the election was called. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. this is the a13, where there are queues into town from the goresbrook interchange to barking. elsewhere, the m25 is heavy clockwise between clacket lane services and j6 godstone. traffic is heavy on the south circular westbound towards clapham, from the tulse hill gyratory to a23 streatham hill. and the a2 is slow into town from eltham to kidbrooke. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a cold start out there this morning. one or two spots, mostly outside of the m25, down below zero. so sparkles of frost this morning for some of us, but it means plenty of sunshine. a really beautiful, crisp start to the day, and gradually the sun warms up quite nicely. we are going to feel
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the benefit of that. we have lost the chill that we have had for the last few days. 18 celsius the maximum in central london, a little later, so a really pleasant day, all in all. now, overnight tonight, starting off clear. temperatures dropping down again, but then could see a bit more cloud as we work our way towards dawn. not quite as chilly overnight. minimum temperature in towns and cities between six and nine celsius. now, a bit of a change tomorrow. it will feel quite mild, but we will feel some showers. they could spring up anywhere, but look at the temperature. 19 celsius. now, this low pressure bringing the showers continues to move through on friday, so some potentially quite heavy and maybe thundery showers for friday, as well. stays reasona bly u nsettled into the weekend, but we should see some decent spells of sunshine throughout, and the temperature remains 18, maybe 19 celsius,
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and night—time temperatures remain reasonable as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. the white house says mr comey "has been terminated and removed from office", but his dismissal has nothing to do with the inquiry. drayton manor theme park in staffordshire says it will not open to the public today after the death of an 11—year—old girl on one of its rides. the year 6 pupil, who has not been named, was on a trip with her school, the jameah girls academy in leicester. in a statement the school said it was providing support to its pupils and staff and requested time to grieve. senior management at the theme park said they were shocked and devastated by the incident.
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labour and the liberal democrats have pledged billions of pounds in extra school funding if they win the general election, to ensure budgets in england keep up with rising costs. both parties also say no school would lose out as a result of a new funding formula to divide money across the country. but the conservatives say school funding has reached record levels in their government and questioned labour's plans to use corporation tax rises to pay for their plans. the crown prosecution service is expected to announce later this morning whether any conservative politicians or officials will be charged with breaking rules on election campaign spending in 2015. the cps has been considering files sent by the police from nearly thirty constituencies. the party has insisted that administrative errors were to blame for any spending which was incorrectly declared. roads in england and wales are in danger of becoming increasingly "lawless" because of cuts to traffic policing.
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that's the key finding of a major report by the charity roadpeace. it also claims there has been a "significant shift" to training courses, which it said are less effective than prosecution. the national police chiefs council says it's strengthened the way roads are policed — and is working to assess the effectiveness of driver training courses. the star of the film captain america, chris evans, said he wanted to "curl up" after filming a bedtime story for cbeebies. a busy day helping people and saving the world. good work, teddy. he's recorded a few stories, including one story about showing children how to cope when they feel overwhelmed. you can see it on cbeebies at ten to 7 tonight. what a wonderful tradition it is. can you remember any of the books you did? there was one about fish, i
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cannot remember the title. i had one about sitting on the naughty step. it is likely michael mcintyre sketch, you find just off talking to a parrot. an inanimate object. it is such good fun. it is wonderful. carol will have the weather shortly but first let's talk andy murray. yes. 0ne fortnight or so until the french open. he is back from one months out after his elbow operation. he says he is a long way to go and he needs to get better. it was not brilliant but he is through and things are wrong course after a couple of slipups in recent tournaments. —— things are on course. andy murray is through to the third round in madrid. he beat romania's marius copil in straight sets. murray was far from his best early on but his serve was never in danger of being broken.
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he's bidding to make the final for the third year in a row. juventus have reached their second champions league final in three years — they beat monaco 4—1 on aggregate. dani alves scored with a cracking volley as they won 2—1 on the night in turin. they'll take on real or atletico madrid in next month's to manchester united last summer — but now fifa are investigating paul pogba's world record transfer. they want to know who was involved in the 89.3 million pound deal — and how much money they got out of it. united say fifa have the necessary documents from last august. fifa has decided to replace two
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of the investigators it brought in to oversee its reform programme. cornel borbely and judge hans—joachim eckert have banned numerous football officials — including former fifa president sepp blatter. they say the decision to replace them means fifa's efforts to reform are effectively over, which willjeopardise the future of football. they will hold a press conference this morning so i am sure we will hear more later on. on. tour de france champion chris froome had a lucky escape yesterday, when he was knocked off his bike while training near his home in monaco. the british rider, who wasn't hurt, posted this picture on social media writing: he reported the incident to police. he will be going for three
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back—to—back wins this summer. stage four of the giro d'italia was a good one for the british riders — but not so much for the leader at the start of the day, fernando gaviria. he rather misjudged his speed at a corner, taking a number of riders the wrong way with him. geraint thomas moved up to second place, behind new leader bobjungels, with adam yates third, after an edgy stage. everyone was watching each other so nobody really went and there was a headwind in the last couple of k so everybody was apprehensive but i felt good and it was nice to win the sprint. we've got the draw for the rugby world cup to look forward to this morning — and next month, jamie roberts will captain wales for their tests against tonga and samoa. roberts missed out on a third tour with the lions — but will be in new zealand with wales as take on tonga in auckland onjune the 16th before travelling to samoa a week later.
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we will be talking to them later. i think they are in the japanese garden with carol. i think that garden with carol. i think that garden is a beautiful calming thing andi garden is a beautiful calming thing and i know some people may not believe that gravel to be charming but i think it will be lovely.” believe that gravel to be charming but i think it will be lovely. i am more interested in talking to the by more interested in talking to the rugby players. we will find out who england and wales will be playing in 2019 injapan at about nine o'clock this morning. i am sure if you want to ask about the gravel, they will add further anything. —— anther. —— answer. the party leaders are in full campaign mode, as the general election approaches, but last night it was the prime minister's husband
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who took centre stage. theresa and philip may appeared together on last night's one show, for an interview which gave us a little insight into the couple's private life. we found out who puts the bins out, and whether it was love at first sight. let's take a look. let's get down to the nitty—gritty then, philip. how hard is it to win a negotiation with your wife? there is give—and—take in every marriage. i get to decide when i take the bins out, not if. there are boy jobs and girljobs, you see. what is your earliest memory of wanting to become prime minister. many people say that it just prime minister. many people say that itjust happened, prime minister. many people say that it just happened, you prime minister. many people say that itjust happened, you did not want to. what is the truth on - there a idoi around a i do not recognise. i around a i do not recognise. 0ne round a i do not recognise. 0ne ofind a i do not recognise. one of the which i do not recognise. one of the other things i was taught by my parents is whateverjob you are doing, just get on and do your best. that is how i have approached everything in my career. so that is
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what i was doing. i knew you were interested in politics but i never heard her say she wanted to be prime ministerand heard her say she wanted to be prime minister and tissue was quite established in the shadow cabinet. do you try to leave work at number 10? philip, what do you see your role as being here? to give my wife as much support as i possibly can. it isa as much support as i possibly can. it is a difficultjob as much support as i possibly can. it is a difficult job with difficult decisions and many things you need to work harder. i think i am there to work harder. i think i am there to give heras to work harder. i think i am there to give her as much support as i can. it is a 2-way street. if you did not watch the show last night, is this the way forward for political campaigning? campaigning? do people need to know the personalities behind the politicians? joining us now is steven fielding, a professor of political history, and from our london studio is freelance political journalist martha gill.
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good morning to you both. thank you for talking to us. wasn't it into resting? we're used to seeing theresa may talk about policy and she has said words that we know she uses a lot. but talking personally, you can see she seems uncomfortable. she did not get into politics to discuss her marriage but at that level when you are prime minister it is something that people want to know. they want to know about you. do the electorate care? do they do it isa do the electorate care? do they do it is a good way for politicians to communicate with their electorate. 0ne communicate with their electorate. one of the best ways to win over an audience is to convince them that your character is the same as theirs. so by going on television she shows that she is a normal order nary person with a long—term
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marriage and an emotional life. she got married, we saw pictures of her asa got married, we saw pictures of her as a young wife and it establishes a rapport that she would otherwise not have, just by standing on a laxton. they do have an audience of several millions. how do you think they came across? is it important that people see her husband as well, do you think? i agree that that is what the electorate expect at this point. but ido electorate expect at this point. but i do not think she shows her at her best. she is not a relaxed chitchat person. what we saw was a nervous awkward appearance and she kept trying to awkwardly shoehorn her policies into the discussion. she was shown a wedding picture and
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asked what it reminded her of an she said it reminded her ofa asked what it reminded her of an she said it reminded her of a stable childhood, strong and stable being her current slogan. i think she came across as an easy. what is working at the moment on the doorsteps is her... the way she presents herself formally. her brand is very strong, very... sort of j,,
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