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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 11, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. labour's draft election manifesto has been leaked more than a week before its official launch. the document includes plans to nationalise the railways, royal mail and parts of the energy industry as well as scrapping tuition fees. good morning, it's thursday 11th may. also this morning — a record fine for a company that made 100 million cold calls injust 18 months. living with hiv. why those on the latest treatments can expect to live just as long as those without the condition. good morning. today i am talking about trade, an important issue in the run—up to the election. i am at
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a textiles company in yorkshire to find out how good we are exporting. in sport — its not over yet for arsenal. they're up to fifth in the premier league after beating southampton, just outside the champions league places. and carol is out and about with the weather. good morning. iamat i am at kenwood house in london where it is a beautiful yet chilly start to the day. for most of us it will be dry and sunny how whether there will be heavy downpours across parts of southern england and south wales through the day. it will feel humid and some of us will reach 2a celsius. do details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. labour's draft election manifesto has been leaked — more than a week before its official launch. the 51—page document was obtained by the bbc and several newspapers. it includes proposals to nationalise the railways and the postal service.
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a plan to create publicly owned energy companies in every region of the uk and the introduction of price caps. and there's a commitment to abolish tuition fees and reintroduce maintenance grants. the proposals are expected to be discussed by senior labour figures including the shadow cabinet at a meeting later today. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. i will start by asking you how on earth has happened. it is certainly not what the party would have wanted and definitely not what they would have planned and i think a clue! this is -- have planned and i think a clue! this is —— across the 20,000 words of this says that it is draft and confidential. a big clue that they did not think anybody would get hold of this document because when parties publish their manifestoes it is meant to be a big set piece event. their manual for governing
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is meant to be a big set piece event. their manualfor governing is published with a huge amount of fa nfa re. published with a huge amount of fanfare. instead, with this series of lea ks fanfare. instead, with this series of leaks it shows that there is a lot of division within the labour party and not a lot of discipline just four weeks out from the election. we have got it and we can see it, we are talking about it. what policies are the ones will be the headline grabbers now? there are many ideas in here. some are new and some predictable. there are a few surprises as well. some labour figures do see this document as probably the most left—wing since the 1980s. certainly the most detailed in a generation. there are 20 points alone for the rights of workers. there will be some policy that stand out and some that will not be popular. remember, not every privatisation is seen as a success. polling on some issues like renationalisation of railways and
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capping energy prices, they are not as controversial as some critics claim. 0ne as controversial as some critics claim. one interesting point is that in here, to please most of the unions is the existing labour party commitment to renewing the trident nuclear system. significantly, however, there is also a commitment for a defence review. that will allow opponents of the nuclear deterrent system, including jeremy corbyn, to question the commitment to the nuclear weapons system. i think there will be a lot in here that will please a lot ofjeremy corbyn supporters and on the other side there will be some policy that is not sitting well with the rest of the labour party and reach out to middle england who jeremy the labour party and reach out to middle england whojeremy corbyn does need to reach out to his to win this election. 0ne one of the things the leaking of
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this manifesto means is that we are talking about it this morning as we can now talk about the labour policies. —— labour policies. we'll be speaking to andrew gywnne, labour's national elections and campaign co—ordinator, just after 7. the conservatives say they will honour the nato commitment to spend at least 2% of economic output on defence if they're returned to office. they'll also increase the budget by at least 0.5% above inflation in every year of a new parliament. james comey has made his first public comments since president trump sacked him as the head of the fbi on tuesday. in a farewell letter to colleagues, mr comey said he wasn't going to "spend time on the decision or the way it was executed." democrats say they suspect the dismissal is linked to the fbi's investigation into alleged links between the trump campaign and russia. mr trump said mr comey was fired "because he was not doing a good job". three women are due to appear in court in london today, charged with preparing a terrorist act and conspiracy to murder. they include 21—year—old rizlaine boular, who was shot by police during a raid at a property in willesden two weeks ago.
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seven other people, arrested as part of the investigation, have been released from police custody. a cold—calling firm has been fined a record £a00,000 for making almost 100 million nuisance calls. keurboom communications made unsolicited automated calls relating to road—accident and ppi compensation. keith doyle reports. most of us have received them — cold calls offering anything from help with ppi claims or road accidents to investing in some sort of scheme. the cold callers play a numbers game, bombarding people in the hope that some will bite and take up their offers, and the numbers are staggering. this one company, keurboom communications, based in bedfordshire, made almost 100 million automated phone calls injust 18 months. the calls were about a variety of subject, including ppi and road traffic accidents. people got numerous calls, often on the same day,
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often late at night. companies are allowed to make marketing calls, but only if you have given permission, such as ticking a box on a form. this company didn't have permission, and so got a record £a00,000 fine from the information commissioner. you can avoid many nuisance calls by signing up to the telephone preference service. new laws which will allow the directors of cold—call companies which breaks the rules to be fined should also mean fewer nuisance calls in the future. young people on the latest hiv drugs now have a near—normal life expectancy according to a new study. researchers from bristol university say new drug treatments mean many people who started treatment in this decade will live ten years longer than those who started treatment in the mid 1990s. here's our health correspondent jane dreaper. voice-over: it is a deadly disease, and there is no known cure. doom—laden government adverts in the 19805 warned about the dangers of the virus
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behind aids, and urged us not to die of ignorance. jonathan learned he was hiv positive in 1982. he didn't expect to be alive all these years later. now 67, he is enjoying a healthy and happy retirement. i never thought that iwould hit 40, 50, 60. and to be a pensioner — is amazing. i have been very, very fortunate. medicine which stops hiv reproducing has helped jonathan and millions of others. these anti—retroviral drugs became widely available in the uk two decades ago. researchers from bristol say a 20—year—old man who started hiv treatment in recent years should now live until the age of 73, and a woman should now reach 76, close to the average. it is hoped the findings
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will encourage anyone at risk of hiv to get tested for the virus. the charity terrence higgins trust says this research is great news, although some people are still unaware they have hiv, and this means they are missing out on the treatment which will help them stay healthy into old age. later today dyson, the engineering and design company will find out if its appeal to the european court ofjustice to change the way vacuum cleaners are tested is successful. the company claims the present system is misleading as it tests appliances in a pristine condition without dust inside. melanie abbott from the you and yours consumer programme reports. if you're having avocado with your breakfast this morning, ifyou if you are having avocado at
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this time on a thursday morning, you are doing pretty well. however, there is a warning. that's because a plastic surgeon says there's been an increase in people cutting their hands while trying to get the stone out. it's being dubbed by medical staff as "avocado hand". simon eccles, who's a plastic surgeon has told the times the fruit should carry warning labels. no! to be fair, my uncle did that at christmas time. no—one was in a fit state to drive him to a andy either so we state to drive him to a andy either so we had to do a patch upjob. i have seen avocado hand first hand... so to speak. he was fine. no fingers lost. i've done it a few times. would a warning any difference? no, i'io would a warning any difference? no, no we wouldn't. i think we have
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reached peak avocado. let's talk now about arsenal. they have yet to miss out on a place in the champions league and they may yet still get one. arsenal won two nil at southampton. alexis sanchez and 0livier giroud scored the second half goals to move them up to fifth above manchester united. they're three points behind manchester city in fourth. holders real madrid could become the first team in the champions league era to win back to back titles — they beat their neighbours atletico 11—2 on aggregate, thanks to an away goal. manchester united manger jose mourinho says he had no regrets about prioritising the europa league over the premier league. united carry a one nil lead over celta vigo into tonight's semi—final second leg at old trafford. wayne rooney says he does not want to leave the club. slovenia's luka pibernik thought he'd won the fifth stage of the giro d'italia. he was mistaken. arms aloft in victory he didn't realise the stage still had another lap to go in messina in sicily.
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watching these pictures, the rest of the pellet on those past him and he wonders what happens and then he realises he has won more lap to go. he finished at position 148. he felt like such an idiot. quite sad. quite funny, however, as well. state with those for the papers but first, the weather. it looks grey yesterday, don't you think? calm, no rain. but carol has details for as an kenwood house. good morning to you both. it is beautiful here this morning. a chill starred as it is across many areas and hear the birds are singing in the sun is out and the house is open
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seven days a week, free of charge and it is 100 or so acres of beautiful gardens like this. for many of us it is a chilly start and as we go through the day it will become humid, particularly in the south and we look at thundery showers developing. for most of us it will remain dry and the thundery showers will be hit and miss. as you at the moment across southern areas. hitand miss, at the moment across southern areas. hit and miss, again. at the moment across southern areas. hitand miss, again. the at the moment across southern areas. hit and miss, again. the temperature and the sunshine will pick up quickly and it will be a warm albeit humid day for many parts of the uk. in the south—east, you can see around london, east anglia and southern counties along the coast it will be mostly dry but we have a line of thundery showers extending through berkshire, hampshire towards gloucestershire into cornel and devon and south wales. not all of us will see one but if you catch it it will see one but if you catch it it will be heavy, thundery and it could have hail. just be aware of that.
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moving north into the north midlands, in through the northern parts of wales, north—west england and ireland and much of scotland, it is dry, sunny unpleasant. there will be one or two showers left over from this morning across the north—west and in the north and east there will be more cloud so that will hold the temperature down. not as warm for you but as we come back into north—east england down towards the wash and east anglia were back into the sunshine. the line of thundery showers trips, drifts north and it will not be as cold and night as in recent nights. the other thing you will notice is that we are at the risk ofair will notice is that we are at the risk of air cool frost across north—east england. in the south will brighten up, still a humid feel to the weather, some showers tomorrow will also be heavy and thundery with hail mixed in. you know the drill with showers — not
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all of us will see them. tomorrow's hi, 19 or20. all of us will see them. tomorrow's hi, 19 or 20. as we head onto the weekend, for saturday in scotland and northern ireland there will be able cloud around and some rain we will see sunshine and showers for england and wales. a mixture of sunshine and also showers. and then later in the day it comes into the west overnight and into sunday it crosses the uk, cleaving into north sea by lunchtime and then, behind it, we are back into sunshine and showers. if you have been wanting some rain, some of us at least will get it and some of it will be heavy in the next few days. so beautiful to see you there with that beautiful yellow coat and those resplendent flowers. thank you for inviting us into your garden. just joking, it is not really hers. it is 6:15am. we are going to look through some of the papers. no, actually, we
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are not going to do that. cat, you are not going to do that. cat, you are on hold. 0k, are not going to do that. cat, you are on hold. ok, i'm not going anywhere. our main story today is labor's draft manifesto being leaked more than a week for it was due to be published. it reveals plans to nationalise the railways and the royal mail, and scrap tuition fees. a cold calling firm's been given a record fine of £400,000 after making nearly 100 million nuisance calls. now we will take a look at the papers. cat is still with us. hello! we just lost that minute somewhere. we just lost that minute somewhere. we are going to talk about our main story, on the front page of the mirrorand story, on the front page of the mirror and the telegraph, and you have both of them. it is about the lea k of have both of them. it is about the leak of the labour party manifesto, which is a slight embarrassment to the labour party, but it is interesting to see how the telegraph and the mirror, both papers that have the leaked documents, have gone about presenting that news. you can see the telegraph, corbyn‘s
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necessitate written back to the 19705. you can see the imagery. necessitate written back to the 1970s. you can see the imagery. and the mirror says it is a plan to fix a rip—off written. they both have the same document and obviously different papers have written it up in different ways. we should mention that kate mccann, this lead story on the telegraph, 5he that kate mccann, this lead story on the telegraph, she is on the program later on. we will be discussing some of the contents in terms of the policy manoeuvre5 later this morning. the front page of the daily mail, labour‘s manifesto to drag u5 back to the 19705. mail, labour‘s manifesto to drag u5 back to the 1970s. not much around in the sports pages, but this caught my eye. it sparked a bit of a discussion at the sports desk this morning. manchester united unveiling their new awake kit for next season. —— away their new awake kit for next season. — — away kit. their new awake kit for next season. —— away kit. they have gone back to the same sort of pattern and the grey colour from 1992. in 1992 alex ferguson made them change out of their away kit at one point because
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it was hard for the players to pick each other out. you can see the players from the 1990s wearing that. it made us talk about what we were wearing in 1992. what would you be wearing? for me, it was one of those t—shirts that change colour when you got hot. 0ne t—shirts that change colour when you got hot. one of the least flattering items of clothing i have ever owned. ye5, items of clothing i have ever owned. yes, those were very bright colours. what did it change to? it had flowers, and they went orange when you got hot, and blue when you are cool. it just you got hot, and blue when you are cool. itjust made you look you got hot, and blue when you are cool. it just made you look sweaty all the time. do you still have it? no, charlie. the away kit these days i5 no, charlie. the away kit these days is often designed to match jean5, because it is not really about wearing it on the pitch, it is about selling the shirt. so that fans where to go to the match. so it is more of a fashion statement. do you know what i was wearing in the 19905? i was wearing a pager. remember pages? i used to have a little pager, you could wear them on
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your belt. they were for alerts. it wa5 your belt. they were for alerts. it was a work thing. you would get news alerts on your pager. it would make alerts on your pager. it would make a little noise, or a vibration. what was the best news alert you ever had? well, they are always the wor5t, aren't they? i will not reminisce about that, they were a lwa y5 reminisce about that, they were always about dreadful things. that wa5 always about dreadful things. that was how the newsroom used to alert you. lot5 was how the newsroom used to alert you. lots of people have them. the story is that they are finally out of business, effectively.” story is that they are finally out of business, effectively. i am 5urprised they are still going at all. somebody somewhere is wearing on this morning and wondering what they will do now. this in the daily mail, i don't agree with this at all. they say that smiling adds six years to your face. so smiling makes you look older. they have chosen to use a picture of the very beautiful kate moss, smiling in this picture, and not smiling in this picture. i would say that there are a few years between these photos being taken anyway. who says that smiling at 60 as to your face? a study has found,
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scientists from the university in israel, they found that when volunteers pulled a surprise face they looked almost one year younger thana they looked almost one year younger than a neutral expression. so looking shocked makes you look younger. you doing the for us now? that is my surprise face. now can you smile for us? we will let the audience decide, 5hall you smile for us? we will let the audience decide, shall we? thank you. smiling definitely makes you look younger. well, it makes me feel younger. 6:20am is the time. recent election results have shown that opinion polls aren't always a reliable indication of what is going to happen at the ballot box. so ahead the general election, the bbc‘s nick robinson has been out and about to see how voter5 really feel. nick has been to halifax, west yorkshire, to meet a group of working class voter5 put together by ipsos mori to see where their loyaltie5 lie. we are here above a pub in halifax. it might look a bit like a church
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because this is no ordinary pub. thi5 because this is no ordinary pub. this is actually where the halifax building society was founded. you can see those panels and 5tained—gla55 can see those panels and stained—glass windows. we are here to talk about politics and eat some curry. we know that all of you voted for brexit. what are you looking for in the person who leaves tho5e negotiations? somebody who is 5trong. negotiations? somebody who is strong. who is trying to get the best deal for britain. to take the 85 early in euros bill when they throw at us. confident. not easily led. trustworthy. strong. you said trustworthy, a5 led. trustworthy. strong. you said trustworthy, as well? yes, trustworthy, as well? yes, trustworthy, that is a good one. 0k, tho5e trustworthy, that is a good one. 0k, those are the words. that is what you want. so is there anybody who feel5 you want. so is there anybody who feels that role for you? not at the minute. nigel farage. barrage? well,
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he is staying in europe to make sure we get a decent deal. he is staying in europe to make sure we get a decent deallj he is staying in europe to make sure we get a decent deal. i think we need somebody who doesn't exist at the moment. somebody who has got a bit of a bone. we need somebody who isa bit of a bone. we need somebody who is a realist, somebody who will listen to the people and take what the people have spoken to europe. somebody who understands the needs of somebody from a working—class background, not somebody born the ve55el background, not somebody born the vessel the spoon in their mouth. background, not somebody born the vessel the spoon in their mouthm there no leading politician in britain who speaks for the working class ? britain who speaks for the working class? jeremy corbyn. he does? he does, yeah. he is definitely the most down to earth, the biggest realist out of them all, i think. and probably the most trustworthy. anybody else likejeremy corbyn? no? not sure? just me, on my own. nobody 5aid there5a may. not sure? just me, on my own. nobody said theresa may. i voted labor the past few times, but i honestly don't know if i will vote labor again this time. —— labour. lot5
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know if i will vote labor again this time. —— labour. lots of in—house arguing, they cannot seem to get their own house in order. if that is their own house in order. if that is the state of their house, i don't wa nt the state of their house, i don't want them coming to my house. as far as you can remember, have you ever voted for a different party? probably in the late 805 or early 905, i voted conservative back then. but you have been labour for a 905, i voted conservative back then. but you have been labourfor a long time. a long time coming yes. could you make the journey back?|j time. a long time coming yes. could you make the journey back? i don't know. a5 you make the journey back? i don't know. as i said before, it is a 5ticky wicket. know. as i said before, it is a sticky wicket. not sure if you want to go as far as voting tory? not too sure, no. however, never say never. if they have got something that is good and solid in place, and something they can prove, well, then maybe i could 5way. something they can prove, well, then maybe i could sway. what about you, john? you said you would vote tory. i would. we were talking about corbyn 5peaking i would. we were talking about corbyn speaking for the working cla55, corbyn speaking for the working class, there are lots of people who
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5ay class, there are lots of people who say they could not vote tory. he doesn't have the charisma, as far as i'm concerned. he reminds me of somebody from the 19705, like michael foot. an old labour mp, somebody was no charisma. he has not got enough charisma. sol somebody was no charisma. he has not got enough charisma. so i couldn't vote to him. plus, lots of the labourmps, ican vote to him. plus, lots of the labour mp5, i can think of about three, corbyn, dannevirke, actually, ican three, corbyn, dannevirke, actually, i can only remember two. i don't really know who anybody is. but you feel strongly about him ? really know who anybody is. but you feel strongly about him?” really know who anybody is. but you feel strongly about him? i do, yes. i think labour created a mess and i think they should come back in and clear it up. they will make a bigger mess. i don't think they will. i think they will write their wrongs. you have to believe in that person earns what he says, you have to believe in what they say. and you don't? no. you can see more of that discussion on nick's election takeaways at 2:30 on saturday afternoon on the bbc news channel. and there'll be more from nick in the coming weeks on breakfast,
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looking at the challenges facing some of the other parties ahead ofjune 8. late5t figures coming up about how much britain is buying and selling from the rest of the world. good morning, everybody. iam at from the rest of the world. good morning, everybody. i am at a fabrics factory where you can see what they are making, churning out about 8 million metres of fabrics every year. you might recognise 5ome of it, because it is the kind of stuff you will see on bus 5eat5, perhap5 on the tube, certainly you might be sitting on this at some point in the future. they sell this product all over the world, to 80 different countries. they export about 68% of what they manufacture. that is why we are here, we are talking about trade. we will find out later on this morning how we have been doing in terms of our trade. at the moment we are in a trade. at the moment we are in a trade deficit. in other words, we
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are importing more than we are exporting. certainly our relationship with other countries is really important for us to be making money in this country. interestingly, since the referendum, i have spoken a lot about the value of the pound falling. that actually help5 export5 because it makes our product5 cheaper for other countries to buy. so it will be interesting to 5ee, to buy. so it will be interesting to see, with these figures, whether that has made a difference at all to what is happening in terms of the trade deficit. so they will be out at about 9:30am. i will be here throughout the morning, talking to them about how we can make sure that we export enough to get rid of that trade deficit. and also, what it will mean for things like the election and brexit, how we will get the right trade deal5 election and brexit, how we will get the right trade deals in order to do that. it is beautiful, isn't it? all the colours on the fabrics they have been using. i will be showing more of this off later on, but first we can get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning.
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good morning from the news team in london and the south—east. emergency 5ervice5 london and the south—east. emergency services are spending hundreds of thousands of pounds on 5pecialist vehicle5 thousands of pounds on 5pecialist vehicles to cope with obe5e thousands of pounds on 5pecialist vehicles to cope with obese patients in the south—east. specialist bariatric ambulances are taking more than 300 obe5e bariatric ambulances are taking more than 300 obese patients per year to hospital acro55 kent and sussex. new figures obtained by bbc south—east 5how figures obtained by bbc south—east show they have been used over 1700 time5 show they have been used over 1700 times in the past five years, for the most overweight people. meanwhile, east sussex fire and re5cue has revealed it is pushing its 5pecialist bariatric equipment in all of its fire engine5 its 5pecialist bariatric equipment in all of its fire engines to assist with rescuing tho5e in all of its fire engines to assist with rescuing those who are obe5e. and if you are in kent this morning you can hear more on this story on bbc radio kent breakfast. after eight o'clock, john and maggie will be speaking to the chair of the national obe5ity forum, the charity
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who are trying to raise awareness of obe5ity issues. police say they are growing increasingly concerned about a missing growing increasingly concerned about a mi55ing14—year—old girl from kent. scarlet king was last seen at her home in rochester yesterday morning and has connections to be north craig area of london. —— north key. 0fficers a5k anybody with information to get in touch. an eight —year—old boy from dover who wa5 eight —year—old boy from dover who was given a high cancer treatment as a last resort is now set to be declared medically cured. blue tobin wa5 declared medically cured. blue tobin was offered the treatment after all the other options failed to work. he wa5 the other options failed to work. he was only given a 10% chance of being 5ucce55ful, was only given a 10% chance of being successful, but today he is due to have a 5—year checkup at the royal ma rle5ton to get have a 5—year checkup at the royal marle5ton to get the all clear. co nsulta nts marle5ton to get the all clear. consulta nts have branded marle5ton to get the all clear. con5ultant5 have branded it a miracle. cctv has been released after nine burglaries acro55 kent in ju5t after nine burglaries acro55 kent in just one month. 0fficers after nine burglaries acro55 kent in just one month. officers are currently looking into reported
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ratings acro55 sevenoaks, swanley and longfield, which are all believed to be connected. two suspects have been seen wearing high visibility jacket5 suspects have been seen wearing high visibility jackets and suspects have been seen wearing high vi5ibilityjacket5 and cru5h suspects have been seen wearing high vi5ibilityjacket5 and crush on that. they are reportedly u5ing moped5 to commit the crimes. now for a check on the good morning. the weather will turn u nsettled good morning. the weather will turn un5ettled over the next few days, and we will see some proper showers for the parks and gardens. today we will have warm and humid air spreading in from the south so it will feel different to how it was yesterday when there was lots of 5un5hine around. today that will tend to be hazy. so it is a bright and fairly chilly early start, then we will get that humid air pushing in from the south. you might get one or two light showers this morning. you are more likely to catch light showers a5 you are more likely to catch light showers as we had late into the afternoon in the first part of the evening. many places 5taying dry all day today. top temperatures all the way up to twitter one. showers becoming pretty wide5pread a5 way up to twitter one. showers becoming pretty wide5pread as we
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head through the overnight period. that is when your garden is more likely to get a watering. we will start off on a fairly warm and humid note, it never not 12 celsius. more showers around again tomorrow. a weekend of sunny shell5 showers around again tomorrow. a weekend of sunny shells and showers, feeling fresher on sunday. ahead of next month's election we are hosting a special question 5ervice next month's election we are hosting a special question service in saint leonards. that's if an hour. —— and that's it for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. just why did donald trump fire the director of the fbi, jame5 comey? we'll be live in washington to analyse the latest white house controversy. i put iputa i put a plastic bucket over his head and he said are, eye5. very good. who needs cgi when you've got a bucket. actor michael fa55bender and director ridley scott
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on the new alien film and the return of cinema's 5carie5t creature. the 17th century painting "girl with a pearl earring" inspired tracy chevalier to write a best selling book of the same name. she'll be here after nine to tell us how shakespeare has influenced her latest project. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. labour's draft election manifesto has been leaked more than a week before its official launch. the 51—page document was obtained by the bbc and several newspapers. it includes propo5al5 to nationalise the railways and the postal service. a plan to create publicly owned energy companies in every region of the uk and the introduction of price caps. and there's a commitment to abolish tuition fees and reintroduce maintenance grant5. the proposals are expected to be discussed by senior labour figures including the shadow cabinet at a meeting later today. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster.
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i know you have been reading through the draft of the manifesto but it is quite embarra55ing that it is out there, isn't it? it is certainly not what the party wanted and certainly not what their plan would have been. the big clue to that, all through the document are printed right acro55 the document are printed right a cross every the document are printed right acro55 every single page the watermark draft and confidential. so obviously the labour party did not expect anyone to get their hands on it. what is in the manifesto? what are they going to say? there are some things in here that will be popular. not everybody 5ee5 privatisation a5 a success so ring nationalising railway5, for example and capping energy prices. tho5e things will be popular. there is also contrast with the conservative party. no figure put on immigration. there are guarantees that rather
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than cutting we welfare that payment5 than cutting we welfare that payments to some groups will rise. when it comes to trident, there is a commitment to the existing labour proposal commitment to the existing labour propo5alfor commitment to the existing labour proposal for renewal but there is also a commitment to review win, having a defence review and that will allow critics of the system, 5uch will allow critics of the system, such as will allow critics of the system, 5uch a5jeremy corbyn, to question whether at all it should be renewed. with the document there are things that will be very pleasing to many in the gerryjeremy corbyn camp but outside that count, whether he can reach out to middle england which he needs to do if he is to win, that remains a question. another big thing that will be hanging over the document is does it all add up? can labour described in detail exactly how these policies will be paid for? there are big commitments to think
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that tuition fees and social care, as well as other big spending project5. as well as other big spending projects. they will all need to be co5ted with the tax spelt out if the commitment of labour to have a fully co5ted manifesto i5 commitment of labour to have a fully co5ted manifesto is to come true. the liberal democrats say they will accept refugees. they are committed to reopening the programme for unaccompanied asylum seeker children stranded in europe. jame5 comey has made his first public comments since president trump 5acked him as the head of the fbi on tuesday. in a farewell letter to colleagues, mr comey said he wasn't going to "spend time on the decision or the way it was executed." democrats say they 5u5pect the dismissal is linked to the fbi'5 investigation into alleged links between the trump campaign and russia. mr trump said mr comey was fired "because he was not doing a good job". three women are due to appear in court in london today, charged with preparing a terrorist act and conspiracy to murder. they include 21—year—old rizlaine boular, who was shot
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by police during a raid at a property in willesden two weeks ago. seven other people, arrested as part of the investigation, have been released from police custody. a cold—calling company has been fined a record £400,000 for its nuisance phone calls. keurboom communications bombarded people with almost 100 million nuisance phone calls about road accidents and ppi claims over an 18 month period. the fine was handed to them by the information commissioner's office, which has already fined 23 companies in the past year. young people on the latest hiv drugs now have a near—normal life expectancy according to a new study. researchers from bristol university say new drug treatments mean many people are now living ten years longer than those who started treatment in the mid 19905. their findings show a ten—year increase in life expectancy since anti—retroviral drugs became widely available two decades ago. are you ready to sprinkle 5ome
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stardust on this programme? david beckham is facing criticism for his acting as he made his big screen debut. he was met with cheer5 at the premier of the new film king arthur: legend of the sword in los angeles, but reception for his performance in the movie hasn't been so welcoming by some fans who've labelled him ‘cringey‘. where do you want me? bouncing on my knee? where do you think i want you? hands on the hilt, stupid. it must be hard to direct that sequence... to tell david what to say? it can be tricky. i think he is great. better than any of us would be. what do you mean it can be tricky directing sport5 mean it can be tricky directing sports stars in movies? what do you know? i just 5ugge5ted sports stars in movies? what do you know? iju5t suggested it may be. you have a superstar coming into the rank5. how do you say, ok, can i
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have a little more emotion? they deal with 5uper5tar movie stars. there are in your experience, because you are in the remake of love actually, it was difficult for richard curti5 to direct you? love actually, it was difficult for richard curtis to direct you? to be fair, idid richard curtis to direct you? to be fair, i did not have any line5. that i5 fair, i did not have any line5. that is possibly te5tament fair, i did not have any line5. that is possibly testament in its self that they did not trust me with line5. that they did not trust me with lines. i would that they did not trust me with line5. iwould be that they did not trust me with lines. i would be interested in people who can name big sport5 lines. i would be interested in people who can name big sports stars who have been succe55e5 people who can name big sports stars who have been successes in an acting career. vinniejone5 who have been successes in an acting career. vinnie jones is who have been successes in an acting career. vinniejone5 is not allowed. that was too long ago. but he was great. although he did play himself. leave that one with me. there were many basketball players... how about arnold schwarzenegger? how about the rock? there we go. here's the
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wre5tler and that is part pantomime, isn't it? oh, you will have the wrestling fans on the —— your back. imagine the mind claims on the blu5ter of the rest of the premier league whereas arsene quietly goe5 about his business. arsenal have had about his business. arsenal have had a late surge. will they make it? arsenal are closing in on the top four in the premier league after a two nil win away at southampton last night some nimble footwork from alexis sanchez gave arsenal the lead in the second half while an 0livier giroud header made sure of the points for arsene wenger‘s in—form side in the second half i believe that going forward they looked dangerous and dynamic and i am pleased with the performance. do you feel that
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nine points from your last three matches would do it?” nine points from your last three matches would do it? i do not know. the only thing i do know is that we give our best to win every game and we will start again on saturday. holders real madrid reached the final of the champions league after a 4—2 aggregate win over neighbours atletico. they had to resist a fightback though with goals from saul niguez and antoine griezmann putting atletico 2—0 up after quarter of an hour. but isco's away goalju5t before half time effectively won real the tie, even though they lost 2—1 on the night. manchester united captain wayne rooney says he wants to stay at old trafford despite not featuring injo5e mourinho's side for much of the season rooney is unlikely to feature as united defend a 1—0 lead in tonight's europa league semi—final second leg against spanish side celta vigo, but the captain insists he doesn't want to move out of the club i would like to play more. that is the way it has panned out and, you
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know, and i am happy to help the tea m know, and i am happy to help the team on and off the pitch. i haven't made a plan nor a big fu55 but, of course, iam made a plan nor a big fu55 but, of course, i am a football player and i would like to play football. britain's geraint thoma5 and adam yate5 remain second and third overall after the fifth stage of the giro d'italia. but the stage was rather embarrassing for slovenian cyclist luka pibernik. he was leading as it entered messina in sicily. unfortunately for him he celebrated his victory a lap too early. the rest of the pellet on came behind him and overtook him. the poor cyclist fini5hed 148. it is so sad. can you imagine how embarra55ing that is. you feel so sorry for him.
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it's the decision that has stunned america but the former head of the fbi, jame5 comey, says he's not going to spend time thinking about why president trump fired him. in a farewell letter to staff, mr comey wrote "i have long believed that a president can fire an fbi directorfor any reason, or for no reason at all." so let's look at what some of those reasons could be with dr mike cornfield, a political scientist at george washington university. i would like to talk about the letter from james comey in a second because it was quite sanguine. an interesting letter to his staff. but let's start with donald trump. did he think this through for long before making the decision?” he think this through for long before making the decision? i think he brooded over it for a long time but he did not prepare his explanation very well and he did not have a replacement ready. he looks more guilty than he did before. if
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he had done this in a more professional manner from a political standpoint, i think that more people would have accepted the decision without agony. james comey was not the most popular person in america. according to donald trump, james comey had lost the confidence of republicans and democrats. is that fairto republicans and democrats. is that fair to say? it is. he behaved erratically over the last year. getting involved in the election and he did lose a lot of confidence. i think one of the things that mr trump, president trump, excuse me, hasn't quite reconciled himself to is the idea that everyone who works in the executive branch of the federal government is not his employee. he has the right to fire somebody orfor any employee. he has the right to fire somebody or for any cause whatever but that person does not do his job according to the way a president wa nts. according to the way a president wants. he does his way according to
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the constitution and the laws of the land. there is tension there. are we seeing here then a man who was learning as he goes along and, quite clearly, doing things at times that may not make a huge amount of sense? well... he has the lowest ratings of any president since polling began. i don't think they will rise this week after this decision. he has not accomplished anything on domestic policy because he cannot get congress to vote as he wants. he is one accomplishment has been nominating a new supreme court justice. so he's not doing well and this will not help. james comey was not the most popular person in america but he was popular within the fbi, wasn't it? that is absolutely correct. a5 the fbi, wasn't it? that is absolutely correct. as you know there are many comparisons being made right now between this scandal
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and watergate 45 years ago. and, of course, watergate turned on the lea ks of course, watergate turned on the leaks of someone who had worked at the fbi who went under the name of deep throat. the president not only has less support in official aboveground washington he probably has less support within the fbi because they are mad at what they see as a betrayal of this investigation. so we are all waiting for more leaks. who knows what may happen. thank you very much indeed. the time now is 644 and time for a look at the weather. upside to getting up early, and it looks like where you are this morning it is one of those days. absolutely right. good morning. a beautiful start to the day here at
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kenwood house. you can see it in all its glory behind me. the original building was built in the early 17th century. all around, look at these gorgeous grounds. they are used for many scenes from many films, including notting hill. you might rememberjulia roberts herself was filming here in the movie notting hill when hugh grant came down and found her. it is so peaceful, so tranquil and quiet. it is chilly, not just here but tranquil and quiet. it is chilly, notjust here but across many parts of the uk first thing this morning. if you have got cloud around, the chances are it will not away and leave you with a sunny day. in fact, it will turn more humid through the day, and we will see further heavy thundery downpours developing. this morning, what we have is lots of dry weather. the temperature will pick up weather. the temperature will pick up quite quickly now in the sunshine. patchy rain across the far north of scotland that will tend to ease through the day, and dave few showers, some of which a thundery, across parts of southern england, south wales and the channel islands.
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they are very hit and miss at the moment. heading into the afternoon, if we go down into the south—east we will see lots of dry weather, and along coastal counties in the south. go along the m4 corridor to the west of london, to places like berkshire, hampshire, gloucestershire, the west country, devon, cornwall and hampshire, gloucestershire, the west country, devon, cornwalland south wales, that is where we are likely to see some torrential downpours which could lead to local issues of surface water flooding. north wales, most of the midlands, north—west england and northern ireland will see sunshine, feeling pleasantly warm and gentle breezes. in scotland, the remnants of this morning's ran across the north—west, but nothing to write home about. —— rain. cloud across parts of the northern and eastern coasts holding temperatures down, but for the rest of scotland, the north—east of england and east anglia, we are back into sunny skies, and feeling pleasa nt into sunny skies, and feeling pleasant temperatures, up to 24. that will fill humid in london. through the evening and overnight, all these showers migrate north. we
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will also see some in the west. it will also see some in the west. it will not be as cold as last night, and we will start to see some poor coming in across the north of scotland. —— some hoarforst. moora, lots of showers, heavy and thundery with hail. some sunshine in between. through the afternoon you will see more cloud coming in from the coast, along the northern and eastern parts of scotla nd along the northern and eastern parts of scotland and the north—east of england, and there will be hill fold developing as well. —— hill fog. a5 we head into the weekend, on saturday, scotland and northern ireland will have a cloudy start with some rain, fragmenting to leave showers and sunshine. for england and wales, sunshine and showers, and temperatures coming down a touch from where we are at the moment. later in the day, a weather front coming in from the west will introduce rain. 0vernight and into sunday, that will move east, clearing into the north sea. behind it, you have probably guessed,
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sunshine and showers. what's going on with the weather in the next couple of days, and for those of us who want rain, some of us will actually see it. —— lots going it looks like she is on a film set. beautiful. later today, we will get some figures released which will give us a clue as to how britain is doing with exports at the moment, and with imports. steph isn't a textile mill in east yorkshire, already shipping more than half of what they make overseas. —— steph is at eight textile mill. what do they make ofair? at eight textile mill. what do they make of air? they make fabrics the lots of things that you sit on. bus seats, cube seats, lots of different fabrics. —— tube seats. sorry for the noise, it is quite loud, but i wa nt to the noise, it is quite loud, but i want to show you this. ahmed is here making sure that he has got all this going, that thread is going off to be died. —— dyed. the reason we are
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here is to talk about trade. a5 charlie said, we will be finding out later this morning the latest trade figures. just to give you a bit of information about it, you should see it appearing on the screen below me as well, we are actually in a trade deficit at the moment. that means we import more than we export. we have seen with the value of the pound falling that our products are a bit cheaper. companies like this also import a lot of products, in order to be able to make the fabrics here. so those create different costs when you think about the value of the pound. here is one of the bosses. how is your business doing well, on the exports front? well, we exported 6096 exports front? well, we exported 60% of what we manufacture here. that is over £50 million every year. it is growing over 10% each year, with
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around about two thirds of what we export going to be eu. i merrily germany, poland, sweden. so you have got double—digit growth, which lots of businesses would kill for. where is that coming from? it is coming from a strategy that we believe in, which is not just from a strategy that we believe in, which is notjust setting short—term goals, but taking a long—term view. we are also entering new markets and have done so recently in north america and china, where the growth we are seeing there is well over 30%. obviously there is a lot going on at the moment and trade is the big topic of the election. brexit is coming. does this mean for you as a business person? —— what does this. well, nothing changes in terms of innovation and product, because that is critical for our clients, as well as investing in capital equipment to keep ourselves as productive and as efficient as possible. but obviously having brexit hanging over our heads
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isa having brexit hanging over our heads is a bit ofa having brexit hanging over our heads is a bit of a sword over our heads, in terms of the impact on us. we buy raw materials from europe every year and we export even more back into the eu, so clearly the impact of tariffs, and potentially border restrictions on border delays, that is critical for us to understand going forward. thank you for your time. thank you for having a seer. we have got leslie bachelor here, we just heard graham talking about some of the concerns he has about leaving the european union in terms of the ta riffs the european union in terms of the tariffs and water controls. what are businesses thinking about at the moment? i think we alljust want certainty. that is the main message we are hearing. what we are also finding is that people are looking at new markets outside europe, and what we are going to try to do is encourage them to research it thoroughly and get it right, really. there is a chance for opportunities for businesses as well? absolutely. i think it is great, because we have
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got a bit complacent. it is so easy to do business with the eu that we have started to take it for granted. now we will have to start thinking and planning a lot more. obviously this morning we have got the latest trade figures out. what we expect?” don't think we expect anything surprising. i think they will be quite static. there will be some industries that are going very well, taking advantage of the weaker pound, whereas some of them will be suffering because they are bringing in more raw materials. it is a little bit swings and roundabouts. but businesses are getting on with business, what they do best. leslie, thank you. i want to show you this. it is hard to show on camera, but you can see the thread is going through at an incredible speed there, all ready to be zipped off and made into the fabrics they make here. i will show you some of those a little bit later on this morning. i want to see some of the fabrics that his young bus seats, you know,
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those brightly coloured and jazzy ones. we will expect that soon. it is 6:52 a.m.. it began with just 10 pupils in 1967, now in its 50th year the national star college in cheltenham caters for more than ten times that amount. but its mission has remained the same — to help young people with disabilities realise their potential. 0ur disability news correspondent, nikki fox, has been speaking to pupils past and present. hgppy happy birthday! things have changed a lot over the 50 years that star couege a lot over the 50 years that star college has been going. the students here, born from overseas, come from all over the united kingdom. in 1967 first 10 students arrived. now the couege first 10 students arrived. now the college has over 150, all with very different disabilities. patrick studied here in the 19805. he left this place with a—levels and went on to get a degree in social science. this is the actual bbc computer that patrick took his exams on. today, he
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is back with his former teacher john, reminiscing about how quickly he picked up the old technology.” absolutely love my three years here. my dad often said the star college was the equivalent to... i think personally it is essential to have specialised schools and colleges for students with complex disabilities. hello, how are you? thanks to these accessible flats, students can study and live independently away from home. you've got a lot of space here. there is a pillow on your bed. who is that man? boyfriend! what do you think your life would be like if you think your life would be like if you were not living in this place?” would need more help. you would need more help? do you think you would be less independent than you are? yeah. this school changed my life.
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a5 as the college celebrates its big anniversary, it is expanding with new schools in england and wales. although as a charity, uncertainties around funding make every investment around funding make every investment a calculated risk. but being bold is what national star is all about. the frc is to realise the aspirations of disabled people, and today, just for fun, they are doing that in a hot—air balloon. —— the ethos here. the tailored support that people get here allows them to freedom to live and study like any other student,
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with one aim. to prepare them in the way possible for life after college. nikki fox committee is in use. brilliant images to finish that piece. and of course, the entire ethos about places to give people the independence that they can achieve. great to see. it is 6:56 a.m.. still to come, how many times have you received a nuisance call about ppa claims of accidents that we re about ppa claims of accidents that were not yourfault? we about ppa claims of accidents that were not your fault? we will hear about the firm that is facing a record fine for sending out nearly 100 million of them. now it is time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from the news team in london and the south—east. a motorist from hackney who chased and ploughed into a cyclist, causing him serious injuries, has been jailed for three years. the cctv images may disturb some viewers, so we have paused them before the point
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of impact. they can be viewed on the bbc london website. 25—year—old justine henshaw brian, who is now pregnant, struck damian dowty after he confronted her for using pregnant, struck damian dowty after he confronted herfor using eight mobile phone while driving. police say they are growing increasingly concerned about a missing 14—year—old girl from kent. scarlet king was last seen at her home in rochester yesterday morning and has connections to the north cray area of south—east london. 0fficers connections to the north cray area of south—east london. officers are asking anybody with information to get in touch. motorists are calling for quicker response times from councils to fix potholes. more than 18,000 drivers were questioned. 70% said potholes should be filled in within a week. 18% thought pretty prowess is the maximum time repairs should take. —— 24 hours is the maximum. councils are expected to fill the most dangerous potholes within a few hours. last month a coroner urged surrey county council to reconsider how it rates the severity of tolls after a cyclist died due to an ineffective pothole
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repair. —— severity of potholes. let's look at the travel situation on the tube this morning. minor delays on the central line between hainault and leytonstone via newbury park. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel‘s southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover, heading through finchley, traffic on the 8406 north circular is queueing westbound from east end road towards the a1 at henley ‘5 corner. 0n the a3, the southbound entry slip is down to one lane at junction 2, and between the 35 at wolseley, due to an accident. in central london whitehall is close northbound from parliament square to horseguards avenue for construction works. now let's check on the weather. hq changes in the weather today. in fa ct, hq changes in the weather today. in fact, over the next few days it will turn quite unsettled, but at last we will get proper showers for the parks and gardens. yesterday was a lovely day with lots of sunshine. todayit lovely day with lots of sunshine. today it will tend to be able to hazy. we will see warm humid air pushing up from the south as well.
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that will happen through the course of the morning. a chilly start for northern home counties. lots of brightness around here first thing, then the sunshine turns hazy with then the sunshine turns hazy with the arrival of high cloud and humid out. watch out for a few light showers through the morning, but they will turn heavy towards western areas into the afternoon. top temperatures today maybe 22 celsius. not every level see a shower through the late afternoon, but i think showers will become quite spread —— widespread overnight. your garden is more likely to get a watering through the night into tomorrow morning. a human start to the day tomorrow, 12 or 13 celsius. the risk of some showers tomorrow, especially in the afternoon when they could turn quite heavy again. still quite warm and humid, notjust tomorrow but also for the first part of the weekend. either time we get to sunday it will be feeling fresher. _by sunday it will be feeling fresher. —— by the time. a weekend of sunny spells and heavy showers. you line i am back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. pity more on the website until then. hello, this is breakfast,
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with charlie stayt and sally nugent. labour's draft election manifesto has been leaked more than a week before its official launch. the document includes plans to nationalise the railways, royal mail and parts of the energy industry as well as scrapping tuition fees. good morning, it's thursday 11th may. also this morning — a record fine for a company that made 100 million cold calls injust 18 months. today i am talking about trade, an important issue in the run—up to the election. and with brexit looming. i am at election. and with brexit looming. i amata election. and with brexit looming. i am at a textile factory in yorkshire to find out how good we are exporting. in sport — it's not over yet for arsenal. they're up to fifth in the premier league after beating southampton, just outside the champions league places. and the aliens are back —
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director ridley scott tells us how he came up with the look for space's scariest monster. he originally only had eyes. and then eiger was staring. i put a plastic bucket ovaries head and he said oh, no eyes. very good. —— over his head. it is a chilly start across many parts of the uk as well asa across many parts of the uk as well as a sunny one. there are showers around in the south and we will see further showers develop later and it will feel humid with highs today reaching 24 celsius. good morning. first, our main story. labour's draft election manifesto has been leaked — more than a week before its official launch. the 51—page document was obtained by the bbc and several newspapers. it includes proposals
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to nationalise the railways and the postal service. a plan to create publicly owned energy companies in every region of the uk and the introduction of price caps. and there's a commitment to abolish tuition fees and reintroduce maintenance grants. the proposals are expected to be discussed by senior labour figures including the shadow cabinet at a meeting later today. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. we will discuss the policies in a second but, first of all, how embarrassing that this manifesto d raft embarrassing that this manifesto draft is out there in all of the newspapers and we talk about it before the labour party plan that we know what is in it. it is embarrassing. and it is definitely not what the party would have wanted nor indeed planned. a big clue to thatis nor indeed planned. a big clue to that is the fact that printed on every single page across the 20,000 word document it says draft, confidential. so clearly the party
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did not expect the bbc or newspapers to get hold of the document. what it shows in this series of leaks is the division within labour and the lack of discipline just four weeks out from a general election. the one upside for us as journalists is that we have some in concrete to talk about. what other highlights? there will be some policies of course that are very will be some policies of course that are very popular. things like renationalising the railways, a cap on energy prices as well. they are not as controversial as some critics would make out. there are some noticeable differences with the conservatives. there is no target on immigration, rather than a guarantee there is... rather than guaranteeing cutting, rather, there is a guarantee that payments to some groups will increase. there is a commitment to renewing trident but, significantly, there is a commitment toa significantly, there is a commitment to a defence review. that will allow
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critics and opponents of the nuclear deterrent, such as critics and opponents of the nuclear deterrent, such a5jeremy corbyn, the leader, to question it. there is lots of detail in here, things like providing free wi—fi in city centres and public trans port. even banning certain pesticides. there are lots of detail and lots of big spending commitments. £1 billion the social care, scrapping tuition fees. that will cost a lot of money. 0pponents and sceptical voters will want more details about other promised from labour that everything in he will be co5ted. remember, this isjust one d raft co5ted. remember, this isjust one draft of the bbc have gotten hold. it meant to be signed off today by big figures in the labour party so they could, of course, be changes to come. it will be interesting to see the draft document matches the document see in the end. we will speak to the national elections and
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campaign co—ordinator just after seven. the conservatives say they will honour the nato commitment to spend at least 2% of economic output on defence if they're returned to office. they'll also increase the budget by at least 0.5% above inflation in every year of a new parliament. james comey has made his first public comments since president trump sacked him as the head of the fbi on tuesday. in a farewell letter to colleagues, mr comey said he wasn't going to "spend time on the decision or the way it was executed." democrats say they suspect the dismissal is linked to the fbi's investigation into alleged links between the trump campaign and russia. mr trump said mr comey was fired "because he was not doing a good job". he has become more famous than me. donald trump may have once embraced the fbi director but the lovell shortlist. it is thought the president's frustration had been building for months. he had hoped that allegations that russia had meddled in the us election to help him when to be dismissed as fake news. but the towering figure of the fbi to capture the story alive by confirming the investigation. and
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thatis confirming the investigation. and that is why democrats think that mr trump fired that is why democrats think that mr trumpfired him. that is why democrats think that mr trump fired him. the russian leader offered his opinion on his way to a hockey match in sochi. translation: president trump is acting in accordance with his law and the constitution. in a farewell letter, james comey told his colleagues he was not going to spend time on the decision or the way was executed. he said that the american people should see the fbi as a rock of sense, honesty and independence. meanwhile, the investigation continues and, back at the centre of it, if the former national security adviser michael flynn. he was 5/ lying about his with the russian ambassador. senators are now wish to form new demand —— have now issued a formal demand, a sub li na, forfurther details. the controversy surrounding
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donald trump and his aides goes on. three women are due to appear in court in london today, charged with preparing a terrorist act and conspiracy to murder. they include 21—year—old rizlaine boular, who was shot by police during a raid at a property in willesden two weeks ago. seven other people, arrested as part of the investigation, have been released from police custody. a cold—calling firm has been fined a record £400,000 for making almost 100 million nuisance calls. keurboom communications made unsolicited automated calls relating to road—accident and ppi compensation. keith doyle reports. most of us have received them — cold calls offering anything from help with ppi claims or road accidents to investing in some sort of scheme. the cold callers play a numbers game, bombarding people in the hope that some will bite and take up their offers, and the numbers are staggering. this one company, keurboom communications,
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based in bedfordshire, made almost 100 million automated phone calls injust 18 months. the calls were about a variety of subject, including ppi and road traffic accidents. people got numerous calls, often on the same day, often late at night. companies are allowed to make marketing calls, but only if you have given permission, such as ticking a box on a form. this company didn't have permission, and so got a record £400,000 fine from the information commissioner. you can avoid many nuisance calls by signing up to the telephone preference service. new laws which will allow the directors of cold—call companies which breaks the rules to be fined should also mean fewer nuisance calls in the future. later today dyson, the engineering and design company will find out if its appeal to the european court ofjustice to change the way vacuum cleaners are tested is successful.
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the company claims the present system is misleading as it tests appliances in a pristine condition without dust inside. melanie abbott from the you and yours consumer programme reports. if you're having avocado with your breakfast this morning, be careful. that's because a plastic surgeon says there's been an increase in people cutting their hands while trying to get the stone out. it's being dubbed by medical staff as "avocado hand". simon eccles, who's a plastic surgeon has told the times the fruit should carry warning labels. beware! be careful. open at your peril. it is easy to laugh at... i'd like to knows different techniques
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for opening and avocado. a cut and twist, a teaspoon... ijust know those two. it is ten minutes past seven at the moment. what are the most astonishing medical achievements of our generation. a study led by bristol university, published points to the success of hiv treatments in the past two decades. we'rejoined by paul attinello who was diagnosed with hiv in 1987, and from our bristol studio, jonathan sterne, who led the research. good morning to you both. if i could come to you first of all, paul, could we heed your health story and how you why now? it is quite long. i was probably infected in 1981, 1982 in san francisco. a boyfriend fell
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horribly ill because everything went wrong at once in 1983, the first timel wrong at once in 1983, the first time i really noticed. but we did not really know how anything was passed on, you know? when i teach this to students they forget how long it took to figure anything out. sol long it took to figure anything out. so i finally went for testing in april 1987 and i was sure i would be positive. so we will come to the doctor and a second but at that point in time, the prognosis for you was what? the social worker who gave me my results was a psychoanalyst in training so did psychoanalysis with him for five years. the whole point was we knew i would be dead soon. and all of the understanding and medical science at that point said that the position you irene, you are going to die and it will be quite a
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short lifespan. yes. until 1996. and even then, i know that it took a long time for me to really understand that was not the whole point of my life. listening to that it isa point of my life. listening to that it is a perfect illustration ofjust how far we have come. could you outline for is where medicine has reached in terms of treatments now? as you say, the big revolution occurred in the late 19905 when combination therapies became widely available and it became apparent that what had been a rapid death sentence was no longer the case. what we have shown is that things have become steadily better over years since then and, so, because of better drugs, that are easier to ta ke better drugs, that are easier to take with fewer side—effects and less likely to develop resistance to and more drug options if the virus you are infected with does develop
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resistance, patients the starting therapy these days, providing they start early in the course of the infection, can expect to live a new normal lifespan. could i ask you this? treatment has changed significantly and this news is wonderful to hear. a5 significantly and this news is wonderful to hear. as a changed attitudes, in a way? in a way that is more challenging? because people are no longer so frightened of hiv and aids any more so they are really not being careful about not getting it. there are different levels. i just taught a course on this at university again and we speak to medical students and people all over the world. there is always a level of being rational and medical about it and then there is the very charged crazy level where, oh my god, i'm going to die. all the people that were 19 quite accustomed to the fact that patients who come
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inajust sure to the fact that patients who come in a just sure that this is the end of the world. and, generally, the patient group, people who have been hiv—positive for a while will often speak to people who are newly diagnosed. normally what we try to say is... it is ok, it will not be that bad. but then when someone is not infected, it usually it's that you do not want this. it is still rough on the body. but people newly diagnosed today should expect to have a normal life. it is an amazing achievement to reach this point. if you could try and name one thing that has changed over the years, was that has changed over the years, was that the money was made available for the research? so often in medical science, the argument is just around how much money goes into the research process. did something happen in relation to that which made this possible? certainly, money was made available for research but
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in sub saharan africa in particular, money was also made available to treat millions of people. and, um, in fact it is not often understood achievement of president george w bush that he decided to put billions of american dollars into treating people in sub saharan africa. it is notjust people in north america who have had access to treatment. with regard to the situation now i think another very important finding from re ce nt another very important finding from recent years is that if you are on these therapies and successfully treated it is hugely beneficial for you but it also means that you are very unlikely to transmit the virus to anyone else. it has become very important to address these issues of stigma and to say to those who may be infected with hiv to please get tested, if you think you may be at risk and health systems need to try to diagnose people because that will benefit the people who go on the
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treatment. it will also mean that there are fewer new infections. at there are fewer new infections. at the moment treatment is lifelong and europe and in america it costs a lot of money. thank you very much both of money. thank you very much both of you for your time. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. shall we look outside and see what the weather is like? it is looking a bit sunnier at salford quays this morning. at week not compare with the views were carol is, at kenwood housein the views were carol is, at kenwood house in north london. —— but we cannot compare. can you describe exactly what vegetation is behind you? yikes! rhododendrons, that is the best i can offer. it is beautiful here at kenwood house in north london. the sun is out, but it is chilly if you are stepping out, not just in north london but across the board. today will be largely dry, but increasingly it is going to turn humid, especially in the south. some
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parts of southern england, especially the south—east, could hit 2223dc, but there will also be thunderstorms developing, some of which will be torrential. —— 22 or 23 celsius. if you have cloud around you at the moment the chances are high that it will burn away. we have showers scattered around southern areas, and some of them are thundery. in scotla nd some of them are thundery. in scotland we have the remnants of a weather front producing some patchy rain, which will increasingly weakened through the day. this afternoon across the south—east, lots of sunshine, but we are prone to some of those thunderstorms anywhere from west london all the way across the m4 corridor down towards devon and cornwall. also, the southern half of wales is not immune to those. they will be heavy, thundery, and also have some hail embedded. they could lead to issues of surface water flooding. north wales, most of the midlands and north—west england and northern ireland, as well as most of scotland, will see a sunny and dry
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day. the remnants of this morning's rain across the north—west of scotland, but across the far north and north—east there will be a bit more cloud. that will depress the temperatures. as we come further south again into north—east england, heading towards the wash and east anglia, lots of dry weather and some sunshine. through the evening and overnight, those thunderstorms start to migrate north. we will also have some in the west. it will not be as cold as it was last night. we will increasingly see more sea fret and hoarin increasingly see more sea fret and hoar in the north of scotland and north—west england. some of the showers tomorrow will be heavy and thundery, with some hail, but drying up thundery, with some hail, but drying up across southern england. through the course of the day, especially in the course of the day, especially in the afternoon, we will see more coastal fog coming up the afternoon, we will see more coastalfog coming up on shore across the north—east of the uk, as far south as north—east england, and there will also be some hill fog. saturday will start on a cloudy note
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in northern ireland in scotland, but that rain will fragment and we will see sunshine and heavy showers developing. england and wales, a day of sunshine and showers. a later weather front coming in from the west will produce rain, drifting across our shores overnight and clearing into the north sea during the course of sunday. behind that, we are back into sunshine and showers. if you are desperate to see some rain, some of us will definitely be seeing it in the next few days. great to hear. and you look glorious and that sunshine, carol. and good choice of coat. as always. thank you, charlie. it is 719 a.m.. it's 20,000 words spread over 51 pages. stamped through each and every one of them, in capital letters, the word "confidential." last night labour's draft manifesto was leaked to several national newspapers and the bbc.
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it gives an insight into the party's vision for government. there are plans to scrap university tuition fees in england, nationalise the railways, and to ban zero—hours contracts. andrew gwynne is labour's national elections and campaigns coordinator and joins us from westminster. thank you for your time this morning. just take us through what has happened. how did the leak come about? i don't know, and this isn't how i planned to spend my morning today. but it gives us an opportunity, doesn't it, to talk about the kind of britain that we wa nt about the kind of britain that we want to see afterjune eight, the kind of return that labour believes m, kind of return that labour believes in, which is a fairer and more equal society. a britain for the many and not a few. there are some good ideas in this document. of course, it is not the labour manifesto, because we have the small matter of a clause five meeting. sorry to sound technical so early in the morning. but the labour party is a dim aquatic party, so today the reason
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why i am not in greater manchester with you but down in london is because the shadow cabinet is meeting with the national executive committee, the parliamentary committee, the parliamentary committee of a bench mps, and trading and is, to go through the d raft trading and is, to go through the draft manifesto. —— backbench mps and trade unions. after today's meeting we will have a clearer picture of what is actually the manifesto. but there are some great ideas in doubt. we will come to the policies in a second, but if i can bring you back to the fact that it has been leaked, one of the criticisms of the labour party, and you be aware of this, is that there is an element of disunity. lots of people acting against one another. the problem, in a way, is that this suggests that somebody did it, even at this stage in a general election campaign, that possibly somebody did it maliciously, of whatever reason, they just wanted to it maliciously, of whatever reason, theyjust wanted to cause trouble for the party from within. look,
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leaks happen. they always happen. they probably always will. the point is, there is an opportunity now. we are talking about labour's policies are talking about labour's policies a week in advance of when we would relaunch in them. so, you know, i a week in advance of when we would relaunch in them. so, you know, lam looking at the positives here. there are great ideas. i think it shows the direction of travel. britain does not have to be like it is today. we want to change britain for the better, a country that looks after our elderly and looks after our young people and gives them the best start in life. britain under the tories has gone backwards. we are being held that. we want a different division, a different society. you can see from this draft document some of those ideas would transfer the way that people live their lives in this country, and i think it is a great opportunity to flag up the direction of travel undera flag up the direction of travel under a future labour government. let's talk about some of the specifics. renationalise in the railways. —— renationalising. it has
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been talked about for a long time, it is going to be in the manifesto, i think we can take it that is one of the things that will not be changed. is your pledge to the nation that a ticket to ride on the ra i lwa ys nation that a ticket to ride on the railways will be cheaper and the service will be better? absolutely. we believe that is the case, that by bringing the railways into public ownership we can have a much better service for the customer. but, look, it shouldn't come as a surprise... ifi it shouldn't come as a surprise... if i made, the question was, will they be cheaper and better? —— if i may. will the prices come down, to travel on the railways, under ray labour government? it is clearly our vision to have a cheaper, more affordable, more accessible public transport network in this country. so, you know, that is part of our vision. we know that state—owned
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railways can work. look at the east coast railway. it was the best served rail system when it was under state control, until very recently. so, you know, that is a real... ok, let me, we are going to stay with this subject, if we may. it is useful to target some things sometimes. a lot of vertical parties might say that their vision is to create a better, cheaper travel system people can use. lots of people might say that is their vision. what might differentiate you? we are at that point in the campaign went differences are becoming more clear. what might differentiate you from the tories is that you are saying it is a pledge, you would guarantee that going on a train journey, today, you would guarantee that going on a trainjourney, today, people commuting, they will know that when a labour government comes into power, that journey will a labour government comes into power, thatjourney will be cheaper and better. is that a pledge, or just a hope? well, let's see what is in the manifesto... we know what is in the manifesto... we know what is in the manifesto, you can't say that any more. the point is that under
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the tories, we have a railway system whereby the profits don't get ploughed back into reinvestment in the railways. the profits go to the private companies that are running the railways. that is not in the interests of customers crowded on trains. you haven't answered my question. that is not in the interests of customers paying through their noses for ever—increasing train fares. we want to make sure that the drain system works for the many, not the few. —— train. that means we have a train system, a public transport system, in which the profits that are made are reinvested into the infrastructure of this country. i think most people agree with that. certainly when you ask people, do you want your railways to be owned by you, and working in your interests rather than the interests of some shareholders often onstage nationalise train companies from other countries, most people say,
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yes, we want a train system that works for us. and that is what labour's odyssey is all about. we sometimes get hung up on some of the technical details, but this is about ordinary people. this is about making the system work for them. whether it is transport, whether it is the nhs, whether it is educational looking after elderly people, you can see that there is a real vision here for a different kind of society. something quite exciting. ok, thank you for your time this morning. that was andrew greene, national elections and campaign co—ordinator for the labour party. —— andrew gwyne. steph is out and about this morning, talking about trade. she is in a mill where they weave and make up all three fabrics. i have my eye on new fabric for the sofa. it has to be read. do they have any red? do you know, the sofar that you are on
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at the moment is actually fabric that was made by this company? they just told me that. new zealand lambs wool is what our sofa is made of. it isa wool is what our sofa is made of. it is a bit shabby looking at the minute. i might get some cut—offs from here and jazz it up. it is a fascinating place. they make products sent all over the world. they make about 8 million metres every year fabric. lots of it you will recognise, because they make it fall us seats and qube seats and other things you might be sitting on. “— other things you might be sitting on. —— make it for bus seats and tube seats. something like 80 different countries they sell their products do. about 50% of what they make is exported. that is why we are here today, we are talking about trade. the latest figures are coming out about 9:30am. we are currently ina out about 9:30am. we are currently in a trade deficit, meaning we import more than we export. of course, the ideal is that we do not have that deficit, so that we can
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exportjust as much have that deficit, so that we can export just as much as we import. that puts a lot of pressure on companies. i will be talking to them here about what they can try to do to increase exports across the uk. first, let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london newsroom, i'm sarah campbell. a motorist from hackney, who chased and ploughed into a cyclist, causing him serious injuries, has beenjailed for three years. the cctv images may disturb some viewers, so we've paused them just before the point of impact. it can viewed on the bbc london website. 25—year—old justine henshaw—bryan, who's now pregnant, struck damien dowty after he confronted herfor using a mobile phone whilst driving. police say they're growing increasingly concerned about a missing 14—year—old girl from kent. scarlett king was last seen at her home in rochester yesterday morning and has connections to the north cray area of south—east london. officers are asking anyone with information to get in touch. motorists are calling for quicker
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response times from councils to fix potholes. more than 18,000 drivers were questioned — 70% said potholes should be filled in within a week and 18% thought 24 hours is the maximum time repairs should take. councils are expected to fill the most dangerous potholes within a few hours. last month, a coroner urged surrey county council to reconsider how it rates the severity of potholes after a cyclist died due to an ineffective pothole repair. let's have a look at the travel situation now. let's take a look at the tubes this morning — minor delays on the central line between heynault and leytonstone via newbury park. traffic on the a40 is building london bound from the polish war memorial towards the a31—2 at the target roundabout. northbound, traffic on the blackwall tunnel‘s southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. 0n the a3, the southbound entry slip is down to one lane atjunction ten of the 25
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at wisley due to an accident, but traffic is coping well. —— the m25. in central london, whitehall is closed northbound from parliament square to horse guards avenue for works. now let's check on the weather. good morning. a few changes in the weather today. over the next few days it will turn quite unsettled, but at last we will get up showers for the parks and gardens. yesterday was lovely with lots of sunshine. today that sunshine will be hazy. we are going to see some warm and humid air pushing up from the south. that will happen through the course of the morning, but it is a chilly start for the northern home counties. lots of brightness around first thing, then the sunshine turns hazy with the arrival of the high cloud and humid air. one of two light showers in the morning, threatening to turn heavy, particularly towards western areas, into the afternoon. top temperatures today maybe 22 celsius. not everywhere will see a shower through the late afternoon, but i think showers will be quite widespread
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overnight tonight, so your garden is more likely to get a watering through the night into tomorrow morning. a humid start tomorrow, 12 or 13 celsius. more risk of showers tomorrow, especially in the afternoon when they could turn heavy wa nts afternoon when they could turn heavy wants more. quite warm and humid not just tomorrow but also for the first pa rt just tomorrow but also for the first part of the weekend. by the time we get to sunday it will be feeling fresher, with some sunny spells and against heavy showers. iam back i am back with the latest in half an hour. 30 more on our website at the usual address. now it is back charlie and sally. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. labour's draft election manifesto has been leaked to the press a week before its official launch date. due to be finalised today, the document outlines plans to scrap tuition fees, ban fracking and create some publicly owned energy companies as well as introducing a price cap. labour says it would not comment
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on the leak but the conservatives have called it "a shambles". meanwhile the liberal democrats are to announce that they'd accept 10,000 refugees from syria every yearfor the duration of the next parliament. party leader tim farron will also say that he is committed to reopening the dubs programme for unaccompanied asylum seeking children stranded in europe. james comey has made his first public comments since president trump sacked him as the head of the fbi on tuesday. in a farewell letter to colleagues, mr comey said he wasn't going to "spend time on the decision or the way it was executed." democrats say they suspect the dismissal is linked to the fbi's investigation into alleged links between the trump campaign and russia. mr trump said mr comey was fired "because he was not doing a good job". three women are due to appear in court in london today, charged with preparing a terrorist act and conspiracy to murder. they include 21—year—old rizlaine boular, who was shot by police during a raid at a property in willesden two weeks ago.
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seven other people, arrested as part of the investigation, have been released from police custody. young people on the latest hiv drugs now have a near—normal life expectancy according to a new study. researchers from bristol university new drug treatments mean many people are now living ten years longer than those who started treatment in the mid 19905. their findings show a ten—year increase in life expectancy since anti—retroviral drugs became widely available two decades ago. david beckham has made his big screen debut. he was met with cheers at the premier of the new film king arthur: legend of the sword in los angeles, but the reception for his cameo performance as a soldier in the movie has been a bit more mixed.
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where do you want me? bouncing on my knee. where do you think i want you? hands on the hilt, stupid. we were trying to think of other sports stars previously. he lay, of course escape to victory. how about others? eric ca ntona course escape to victory. how about others? eric cantona who has been in loads of movies. and another chelsea player. obviously it is a french thing. they have the flair, the artistry for isn't that like david in king arthur? he has all of that, doesn't he? not according to the critics. arsenal are having a late surge. many people wrote off their season and their coach but are they about to prove the critics wrong? arsenal are closing in on the top four in the premier league after a two nil win away at southampton last night some nimble footwork from alexis sanchez gave arsenal the lead in the second half
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while an olivier giroud header made sure of the points for arsene wenger‘s in—form side in the second half i believe that going forward they looked dangerous and dynamic and i am pleased with the performance. do you feel that nine points from your last three matches would do it? i do not know. the only thing i do know is that we give our best to win every game and we will start again on saturday. holders real madrid reached the final of the champions league after a 4—2 aggregate win over neighbours atletico. they had to resist a fightback though with goals from saul niguez and antoine griezmann putting atletico 2—0 up after quarter of an hour. but isco's away goaljust before half time effectively won real the tie, even though they lost 2—1 on the night. a5
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asa as a mourinho says it is the biggest night in the history of manchester united as they defend a one nil lead against the spanish side celta vigo, but the captain insists he doesn't want to move out of the club i would like to play more. that is the way it has panned out and, you know, and i am happy to help the team on and off the pitch. i haven't made a plan nor a big fuss but, of course, i am a football player and i would like to play football. he does not sound happy, does he? england batsman alistair cook scored his second century in three matches in the one day cup. the former england captain hit 109 for essex against sussex — essex won by 10 runs.
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britain's geraint thomas and adam yates remain second and third overall after the fifth stage of the giro d'italia. but the stage was rather embarrassing for slovenian cyclist luka pibernik. he was leading as it entered messina in sicily. unfortunately for him he celebrated his victory a lap too early. the rest of the peleton came behind him and overtook him. if you listen carefully you can hear the bell ringing to say you have one more that to go in the rest of the group catching up, overtake him and he finished in 148. in the worst thing for him, he has to go out and do it all again today. he will not make the same mistake again. do it all again today. he will not make the same mistake againm do it all again today. he will not make the same mistake again. it is rather funny, however. it is ratherfunny, however. a telemarketing company that bombarded people with unwanted calls about ppi compensation and road traffic accident claims is facing a record fine from the information commissioner. keurboom communications has been issued with a £400,000 fine for making the cold calls.
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more than 1000 complaints were made about the company over an 18 month period as they made almost 100 million calls. in the past year 23 companies have been fined for making nuisance calls by the ico, making it their busiest year dealing with unwanted marketing calls. here with us now is simon entwisle, the deputy commissioner of the information commissioner's office to tell us how big a problem this is. ican i can see already it is quite a big problem. it is huge and has been for some time. forfive problem. it is huge and has been for some time. for five years, since we had the power to levy fines, we have been working with others in a concerted campaign to try and do what we can to stamp out this scourge of nuisance calls. last year was our busiest year was 23 fines
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and although this power fine is the biggest ever, it is not that far ahead the one below are which is for £350,000. this company made almost 100 million nuisance calls in 18 months. is the fine even big enough was to mark the maximum we can hit is 500000 and this is significant. the money is only part of the problem. sorry, part of the solution. this company has gone out of business so they will not be making any more nuisance calls to individuals. how will they pay their fine? it is a challenge to get the money back when companies go out of business. we will do the best we can, insolvency practices and whatever to get money from them but we may not be successful. however, what the ico was pushing the government to do is to introduce a new offence so that the directors of these companies are personally liable and we feel that that will help us get the money back and act
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asa help us get the money back and act as a deterrent to those who feel they can set up the company and then put it into insolvency when they get fined. this is point for a vague pence for every call they made. might some companies think it is worth anyway? not 100 million people received a call, not all calls are connected. the answer machines, some bounce back. but you are right, companies like this make a business decision. they decide whether or not this is worthwhile to do. and what we are here to do is play a part in saying that, actually, if you do breach these rules there is a potential significant fine and the end and that should help them think twice about taking action. we have had a huge response from people at home this morning. one main complaint is that the information from these cold callers is sold on to insurance companies and then sold on again. is that something you think should be banned?m
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on again. is that something you think should be banned? it is definitely a problem and definitely something that there is laws to brit vent and protect again and an area we are also active in. we have a strea m we are also active in. we have a stream of work looking at the tra nsfer stream of work looking at the transfer and sale of personal data between organisations. some of it is legitimate but some is not. we may need to tie back to other companies that feed into the cycle of information being shared and it gets to companies like keurboom communications to use it to phone people. this whole cycle is part of the work stream that we do. people arejust sick the work stream that we do. people are just sick and tired of nuisance calls. there are things they can do about it. what can they do? you can get a call blocker. you need to be careful about the information you give to people when you give them
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your phone number, particularly your landline number. you could leave your answer machine on so you wait and hear who you are receiving a call from. and let us know about the phone calls you have received, there isa phone calls you have received, there is a form to fill in on our website that information feeds into the information we got last year that helps us to track down these callers, identify the numbers that we use as evidence to issue the fines. it has annoyed many people. the time now is 7:42. a main stories this morning... the draft manifesto for labour has been leaked a week before it was due to be published. we revealed plans to nationalise ra i lwa ys we revealed plans to nationalise railways and scrap tuition fees. a
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cold calling for home has been given a record fine of £400,000 after making the 100 million nuisance calls. let's have a look at the weather this morning. carol is out and about for us this morning. this is just and about for us this morning. this isjust outside and about for us this morning. this is just outside the studio here and there is some pale sunshine, clearing up. it is meant to be a nice day here. i'm guessing the carol can tell is for sure. you are absolutely right. this is kenwood house and look at these little goslings. they are so cute. there are egyptian geese at the front and canadian geese at the back. the pa rents a re canadian geese at the back. the parents are quite protective of their babies. behind me you can see a bridge but it is not as it seems because that is not actually a bridge, it is a facade to make it look like this pond is actually a la ke look like this pond is actually a lake which flows under the bridge.
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it is allan lake which flows under the bridge. it is all an illusion. there are some big fish in there this morning as well. we have cloud cover coming over us here in london but generally speaking for most of us it is going to bea speaking for most of us it is going to be a sunny day that will increasingly turn humid and we will see further as thunderstorms develop. this morning what we have isa develop. this morning what we have is a chilly start if you are just stepping out. a lot of blue sky with cloud around. that will melt away and then we have a few well scattered thunderstorms, not many at this stage of the day. we go through the morning because in the sunshine that temperature will skip up quite quickly and we have also got a weak weather front in the north of scotla nd weather front in the north of scotland producing patchy rain. in the afternoon, to the west of london along the corridor somerset into the south—west of england, the southern half of wales were to see the thunderstorms develop. the south coast itself will more than likely stay dry and north of that line of
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thunderstorms it will be dry with a fair bit of sunshine. sunshine across north wales, the midlands and into north—west england it also across north—west ireland is to scotland. we will have a couple of spots of rain in the north—west from this morning and look at cloud across the far north and north—east coastline of scotland which will keep temperatures pegged back. as we come back into the north—east of england down towards the wash and east anglia were returned to sunshine. through this evening and overnight there is heavy standard downpours migrating northwards it will not be as cold as the night just gone and, increasingly, we see cloud build that we will have fresh aircoming in across cloud build that we will have fresh air coming in across the north—east. tomorrow, we start off at the right good old array of thunderstorms. like today some will be heavy and sundry with hail and it could lead to surface water flooding issues. in between there will be sunshine and it will dry out across southern counties. temperatures are quite similarto counties. temperatures are quite similar to what we are looking at
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today, around about the 20, maybe just over 20 mark as our highest temperature but, increasingly, we see more cloud, across the north and east of the uk. 0n see more cloud, across the north and east of the uk. on saturday, scotla nd east of the uk. on saturday, scotland and northern ireland will start of cloudy with rain. that will fragment into sunshine and heavy showers stopped in england and wales a day of sunshine and showers and then into sunday we have a line of rain moving from the west to the east through the course of the night, clearing into the north sea via the afternoon on sunday and then behind that, sunshine and showers once again. does anybody looking for rainfor once again. does anybody looking for rain for the garden, well, there is some on the horizon. it looks so calm and peaceful there. by it looks so calm and peaceful there. by way of contrast, we are taking you to a textile mill, which is pretty noisy. that is where steph is today. we have new figures coming out today which are all about imports and exports. checking your hat, you are looking good. you are great. awkward! good morning,
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everybody. let me explain where i am this morning. i am everybody. let me explain where i am this morning. lam in everybody. let me explain where i am this morning. i am in a brilliant textile mill. you can see ahmad here, just re— threading this machine. what a job, trying to get that sorted. this is a business which makes something like 8 million metres of fabric every single year. it is the kind of fabric you would see on bus seats and cubes. you might even be sitting on some today. it isa might even be sitting on some today. it is a business which exports a lot. that is what we are talking about at the moment, trade, and how we can increase the trade we do around the world. it is a big issue for the election and brexit. leslie bachelorjoins us from the institute of exports. what are your thoughts about how we are doing in terms of trade? i think we are holding our own. iam trade? i think we are holding our own. i am surprised it has gone as well as it has. it has been hard for some of the manufacturers that are importing, and the cost of freight,
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because of the dollar et cetera. it has been quite challenging. but exporting is all about challengers. this business is growing 10% year on year. doing incredibly well, exporting to 80 different countries. how do we replicate that? well, i was speaking to grant earlier, and he talked about how much research it does, and how he is careful before he gets into any new market and find out everything he can about what is going on. i think that is a habit we have to get back into, finding out all the detail, notjust the surface. that is hard for businesses, when they have lots going on. it is, but we mustn't forget that there is a lot of help out there. the government have got the department from international trade now, we are always out there, the institute is a waste happy to help people. there is more help than you realise. thank you. i am going to zip you through here so you can see more of the factory. the reason we are talking about this is because we are talking about this is because we have got the latest trade figures
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out this morning. you should see some of those facts appearing on your screen beneath me as well, because we are currently in a trade deficit, which means we import more goods and services than we actually export them to sell abroad. of course, that means it can put lots of pressure on the economy in terms of pressure on the economy in terms of our alliance with other countries, and currencies around the world. —— reliance on other countries. paul here is from the ce ntre countries. paul here is from the centre of the cities. you have done lots of research on this. who is good, and who can do better? sunderland comes out on top, partly because of a nissan. we see places like worthington doing well as well, she is perhaps not what you would expect. we do see places like huddersfield and other cities across yorkshire not doing very well, and there is an issue there about how much they are exporting, what that means thejobs much they are exporting, what that means the jobs and what it means the money and people's pockets. what could those areas that are not doing so well do to be better at it. what is the difference? the key thing for
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places like huddersfield is that there are not enough businesses like this which are exporting. you have to ask why that is. what's of it comes down to skills, do we have enough people with the right skills? you mentioned sunderland. they have obviously got nissan. that can make a big difference, just one business, but then that is a bit of a worry if you are just relying on the one as well. indeed. when you talk about trade deals as well all around the world, it becomes sensitive, in terms of not getting the right deal for one company, which can have a big impact on one place. with ink about how we can export more. we can actually export more through a range of different industries. and we think about doing different trade deals with think about different sectors, not just one deals with think about different sectors, notjust one sector, because we export across lots of different areas. obviously we are in... (inaudible). particularly when we see some of the more successful cities in the greater south—east, they exports of services rather than
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exporting lots of goods, and we have to think about how to encourage that. encourage places which are not doing very well in terms of exports, to get more businesses and export more of those services to. thank you for your time. let's go look at them re— threading the machine before we go. it is fascinating to see all of this, how quickly everything moves. i wonder if you can see the threads? they are so white, it might be tricky to see it on tv. i will be showing you the actual fabrics that are at the end of the production line, at the other end of the factory. more from me a bit later on. a fascinating place. that factory is so tidy. much tidier than our newsroom. it certainly is. now, when you talk about scary characters in movies, the next one has to be one of the most. never mind the shark from jaws. the alien, the space creature from the alien film series. that thing gave me nightmares for yea rs. that thing gave me nightmares for years. so many people will remember
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the originalfrom 1979, years. so many people will remember the original from 1979, with the creature bursting out ofjohn hurt, of course. the latest film in the alien series stars michael fa55bender and is directed by ridley scott, who is the nature of the original back in 1979. when they we re original back in 1979. when they were deciding who should go and meet michael fa55bender, they didn't pick me. they chose you. by his own admission, michael fa55bender does say that he gets upstaged, of course, by the creature that is the alien. let's have a look. firstly, ridley, there is something about the alien movies which gets people very excited. it narrows down to one very special thing, the alien itself. i think the term or mac is very primordial, disturbing, and it has got no eyes. —— the alien itself is very. the original alien had eyes in the design. we were staring at it and weep at a plastic bit over its head, and then hr giger said, no
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eyes, very good. so we have an aspect forehead. for meters above you. how far do you go back with the alien story, michael? did you watch it when you were younger?” alien story, michael? did you watch it when you were younger? i guess i was around ten, i think. ten years old! i think so. you was around ten, i think. ten years old! ithink so. you must was around ten, i think. ten years old! i think so. you must have was around ten, i think. ten years old! ithink so. you must have been very frightened. i was, i old! ithink so. you must have been very frightened. iwas, i remember not moving very much. just being transfixed. maybe i was a bit older. ijust remember transfixed. maybe i was a bit older. i just remember that feeling transfixed. maybe i was a bit older. ijust remember that feeling of thinking, this was different than anything i've seen before. did you have to learn some new tricks to play this role? the flute, and a bit of piano. how has that gone? the flute was ridiculous because itjust
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sounded awful. we were in australia, shooting the movie, and i was staying in this place in tamarama, and my neighbour, i kept thinking, god, the neighbours are going to hear this. and i god, the neighbours are going to hearthis. and i heard god, the neighbours are going to hear this. and i heard the neighbour go, i hate listening to somebody learn how to plan instrument. so from then on i put a bit of sellotape over the peace. so i was playing silent flute. michael, ridley is sitting next to you right now, but i understand he is quite a perfectionist onset. is that true, is ita perfectionist onset. is that true, is it a rumour? it is more than that. it is about, i think, his understanding of a set. so especially with these kinds of films, they can move very slowly. there is a lot of dead time on a set. idle hands are the devil ‘5 workshop. that is where people get into a funky mood and you need people to be on their game. ridley shoots really fast. it is like for five cameras on the go at once. and
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everybody is on their tiptoes. michael, inevitably in this film there is quite a bit of running away. quite a bit of running and running away. is running a skill that you already have? you have done some running before.” that you already have? you have done some running before. i am pretty good at running. that was the one thing i was good at in terms of sports when i was young. so you are pretty good at that anyway. you know, it is probably the worst thing to do, to run away from a creature like that. you can't outrun it. you can't climb, either. hold on, you giving us the guidelines of what to do if faced with the alien? neil on the ground, like with they are. if you do that, it will have a good sniff and then maybe go away. somebody once told me with some wild animals, if you run away in a zig—zag formation... animals, if you run away in a zig-zag formation... that is a crocodile. is it? yeah, yeah. they can go 30 miles an hour on dry land, but only in a straight line. where is the alien has all the tricks. but only in a straight line. where is the alien has all the tricksm has everything. the alien gets you either way. i love it. thank you. thank you very much.
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it is not short on big, scary moments. the film, or the interview? the film. it does deliver. now you know, don't zig—zag away from aliens. we are here to inform, educate and entertain, and you certainly educated us. alien cove na nt certainly educated us. alien covenant opens in cinemas this weekend. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc‘s london newsroom, i'm sarah campbell. a motorist from hackney, who chased and ploughed into a cyclist, causing him serious injuries, has beenjailed for three years. the cctv images may disturb some viewers, so we've paused them just before the point of impact. it can viewed on the bbc london website. 25—year—old justine henshaw—bryan, who's now pregnant, struck damien dowty after he confronted herfor using a mobile phone whilst driving. police say they're growing increasingly concerned about a missing 14—year—old girl from kent. scarlett king was last seen at her home in rochester yesterday morning and has connections
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to the north cray area of south—east london. officers are asking anyone with information to get in touch. motorists are calling for quicker response times from councils to fix potholes. more than 18,000 drivers were questioned — 70% said potholes should be filled in within a week and 18% thought 24 hours is the maximum time repairs should take. councils are expected to fill the most dangerous potholes within a few hours. last month, a coroner urged surrey county council to reconsider how it rates the severity of potholes after a cyclist died due to an ineffective pothole repair. let's have a look at the travel situation now. looking at the tubes this morning, minor delays on the central line between heynault and leytonstone via newbury park. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel‘s southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. 0n the m25 on the m25 it 0n the m25 it is slow antique like
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ways towards junction 24 following an earlier accident and rolling roadblocks. clockwise delays on the m25 towards junction 10 at wisley following an accident on the a3 southbound entries that. the a3 is queueing from paynesville. in central london, whitehall is closed northbound from parliament square to horse guards avenue for works. let's check the weather now. good morning. some changes in the weather today. in fact, good morning. some changes in the weathertoday. infact, overthe next few days it will turn quite u nsettled, next few days it will turn quite unsettled, but at last we will get proper showers for the parks and gardens. lovely yesterday with lots of sunshine. today it will be hazy. warm, humid air pushing up from the south. that will happen through the course of the morning. a chilly start towards northern home counties. lots of brightness here first thing. then the sunshine turns hazy with the arrival of high cloud and humid air. watch out for one or two light showers through the morning. the showers threaten to turn heavy, particularly in western
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areas towards the afternoon. top temperatures today might reach 22 celsius. not every level see a shower through the late afternoon but i think the showers will become quite widespread overnight. —— not everywhere will see. so your garden is likely to get watered overnight. 12 or 13 is likely to get watered overnight. 12 or13 and is likely to get watered overnight. 12 or 13 and humid tomorrow morning. the risk of showers around, particularly through the afternoon when they could turn heavy once more. still quite warm and humid, not just tomorrow but for the first pa rt not just tomorrow but for the first part of the weekend. by the time we reach sunday it will be feeling fresher, with a weekend of sunny spells and again some heavy showers. i will be back with the latest from the london newsroom in half an hour. in timor on our website at the usual address and more all day on the busy news london. —— plenty more on our website. goodbye for now. good morning it's thursday, the 11th of may. a record fine for a company that made 100 million cold calls injust 18 months. today i am talking about trade, an
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important issue in the run—up to the election. i am at a textile manufacturers to find out how good we are exporting. in sport — it's not over yet for arsenal they're up to fifth in the premier league after beating southampton, just outside the champions league places. and we will have the story of the u nfortu nate cyclist and we will have the story of the unfortunate cyclist who celebrated his wina unfortunate cyclist who celebrated his win a lap too soon. and the aliens are back — director ridley scott tells us how he came up with the look for space's scariest monster. the original one had eyes, and i put a plastic bucket over its head. he said, no eyes, very good. and more weather on the way, carol is bringing the sunshine? good morning from kenwood house in london. a beautiful, tranquil start to the
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day, but chilly across many areas. but most will have a dry day with some sunshine, increasingly turning humid from the south and we will see some thunderstorms. but not all of us. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. labour's draft election manifesto has been leaked more than a week before its official launch. the 51 page document was obtained by the bbc and several newspapers. it includes proposals to nationalise the railways and the postal service and a plan to create publicly owned energy companies in every region of the uk and the introduction of price caps. and there's a commitment to abolish tuition fees and reintroduce maintenance grants. the proposals are expected to be discussed by senior labour figures including the shadow cabinet at a meeting later today. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. good morning. how on earth did this get out in the first place? well, it
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is certainly not what the party planned. it is very embarrassing for labour. i think a big clue as to how we know they did not want this to happen, right across the document, all 20,000 words of it, it says d raft, all 20,000 words of it, it says draft, confidential. clearly, they did not expect the bbc, the daily telegraph or the daily mirror to get their hands on it. hearing from labour'sjoint their hands on it. hearing from labour's joint elections national coordinator, it clearly wasn't how he wanted to spend his morning. this is not howl he wanted to spend his morning. this is not how i planned to spend my morning today. but it gives us an opportunity to talk about the kind of britain that we want to see after june the 8th, the kind of britain that labour believes in, a fairer, more equal society, britain for the many, not the few. with this series of lea ks, many, not the few. with this series of leaks, it shows the division within labour, but also a lack of discipline, just four weeks from polling day. in terms of the
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policies themselves, are there any surprises? plenty in here, loads and loads of detail. it stretches right across big infrastructure projects, national and domestic policies, but loads of detail like banning certain pesticides to protect bees, free wi-fi, pesticides to protect bees, free wi—fi, public transport. there are many policies that will be popular, capping energy prices and renationalising railways are not as controversial as some might say. there is no target on cutting immigration, guarantees that rather than cutting welfare, some will see payments going up. lots of detail, but also lots of expensive commitments. i think social care getting £8 billion, reversing the cost for tuition fees, lots of welfare commitments, i think opponents and critics will want to see more detail to back—up labour's promise that this will be a fully co5ted manifesto. we'll discuss this at 8:10
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with journalist paul mason, and kate mccann, political correspondent for the telegraph. staying on the election, and the conservatives say they will honour the nato commitment to spend at least 2% of economic output on defence if they're returned to office. they'll also increase the budget by at least 0.5% above inflation in every year of a new parliament. james comey has made his first public comments since president trump sacked him as the head of the fbi on tuesday. in a farewell letter to colleagues, mr comey said he wasn't going to spend time on the decision or the way it was executed. democrats say they suspect the dismissal is linked to the fbi's investigation into alleged links between the trump campaign and russia. mrtrump said mrcomey was fired because he was not doing a good job. three women are due to appear in court in london today, charged with preparing a terrorist act and conspiracy to murder. they include 21—year—old rizlaine boular, who was shot
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by police during a raid at a property in willesden two weeks ago. seven other people, arrested as part of the investigation, have been released from police custody. young people on the latest hiv drugs now have a near—normal life expectancy according to a new study. researchers from bristol university say new drug treatments mean many people are now living ten years longer than those who started treatment in the mid 19905. their findings show a ten—year increase in life expectancy since anti—retroviral drugs became widely available two decades ago. a cold—calling firm has been fined a record £400,000 for making almost 100 million nuisance calls. keurboom communications made unsolicited automated calls relating to road—accident and ppi compensation. keith doyle reports. phones ringing most of us have received them — cold calls offering anything from help with ppi claims or road accidents, to investing
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in some sort of scheme. the cold callers play the numbers game, bombarding people in the hope that some will bite and take up their offers. and the numbers are staggering. this one company, keurboom communications, based in bedfordshire, made almost 100 million automated phone calls injust 18 months. the calls were about a variety of subjects, including ppi and road traffic accidents. people got numerous calls, often on the same day, often late at night. companies are allowed to make marketing calls, but only if you've given permission, such as ticking a box on a form. this company didn't have permission, and so got a record £400,000 fine from the information commissioner. the maximum we can go to is 500,000. this is a significant fine. i think
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the money is only part of the solution here. this company has actually gone out of business, so they will not be making any more nuisance calls to individuals. you can avoid many nuisance calls by signing up to the telephone preference service. new laws which will allow the directors of cold call companies which broke the rules to be fined should also mean fewer nuisance calls in future. keith doyle, bbc news. later today dyson, the engineering and design company, will find out if its appeal to the european court ofjustice to change the way vacuum cleaners are tested is successful. the company claims the present system is misleading as it tests appliances in a pristine condition without dust inside. melanie abbott from the you and yours consumer programme reports. the argument is all about dust and whether it should be used when a vacuum cleaner‘s performance and energy consumption is measured. dyson says its tests using this industrial grade dust give a clearer picture of how the machine works in the home, but the standard energy rating is based on lab tests
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with the vacuum empty and no dust present. currently because the vacuum cleaner is tested clean and with no dust, essentially the performance does not drop off. with a number of competitor machines, as you load the dust the bags have pores which clog and that reduces the flow rate and makes it harder for the consumer to clean. who wouldn't want to do their cleaning this way? this test in this laboratory has proved conclusive but two years ago the european court ofjustice ruled that this couldn't be reliably replicated in other laboratories throughout the eu. later this morning the company dyson will find out if its appeal against that has been successful. but other manufacturers are quite happy with the current system, saying it provides consistency and no one uses a vacuum cleaner with the same level of dirt in it. if dyson does lose today, it may well lobby the uk government for change after brexit.
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if you're having avocado with your breakfast this morning, you may want to think about how you're going to cut into it. it doesn't look dangerous, does it? when you use the knife to cut into it, you can cut your hand. avocado hand is your thing. it is a medical term? you are laughing, you don't believe me? more and more people are getting injured. what is the proper way to do it? simon eccles, a london—based plastic surgeon, says suchis london—based plastic surgeon, says such is the scale of the problem that the fruit should carry warning labels. you are warned! do not cut into this. i can't believe they gave mea into this. i can't believe they gave me a knife. the sport and weather is coming up in a few minutes. carol is out enjoying the sunshine. over 100,000 people have a stroke
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every year in the uk but this figure is about to change according to a new report by the stroke alliance for europe. research suggests the number of strokes is likely to rise by almost half in the next 20 years. the number of people who die as a result will increase by more than half. it also suggests that the number of stroke survivors is expected to rise by a third, placing enormous pressure on the nhs. here with us now is gp dr claire hutt and 80—year—old janet roger who suffered three mini—strokes in 2013. welcome, both of you. can i ask you, doctor, just explain this extrapolation of what they are talking about, the next 20 years, such a rise in the number. how do you understand that?” such a rise in the number. how do you understand that? i believe it is a reflection of an ageing population. strokes happen as you get older, people are living longer and the absolute number of strokes
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per year and the absolute number of strokes peryear in and the absolute number of strokes per year in the uk is going to rise. it is just per year in the uk is going to rise. it isjust one per year in the uk is going to rise. it is just one of the reflections of us having an ageing population. janet, what happened to you?” us having an ageing population. janet, what happened to you? i had had a stressful week, it had been very hot weather. my husband is a musician and had been playing at a concert. we were home late. i had only been in bed about three hours. i found i was too hot and i tried to throw the duvet off, and it wouldn't go. i thought i was pushing it off, but it wouldn't go. i managed to wriggle out of bed and everything was ok. i thought, i don't think i should go back to sleep, really. however, i did stop half an hour later, i woke again and needed to go to the bathroom. i got out of bed and fell over. i walked across the bedroom and fell over again, i fell over three or four times. when i
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came out of the bathroom, it was all right, it had corrected, it was right, it had corrected, it was right again. that was two minor strokes. you had a series of minor strokes ? strokes. you had a series of minor strokes? there was two. my husband took me to hospital. they said they could not look after me there and then, i would could not look after me there and then, iwould have could not look after me there and then, i would have to go to salford. they sent me to salford royal, where i had thrombolysis, a clot busting drug. an hour later, they said it would take an hour to go through my system. my husband was supposed to be playing at a church service that morning and had to fly home, and ring the minister to say he couldn't do it. he came back's excuse me. i
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said i've got my speech back, until then, my leg, arm and speech were all affected. he said, you've got your face back. i had no clue that my face had slipped. everything was fine. how important was it, in this case and many other cases like this, to get treatment very quickly? absolutely, that is the most important thing. the thing that will predict your outcome and how well you will do with how quickly you can get to hospital. that is why there has been a big campaign, the fast campaign. the f is for yourface, the a
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i have no problems any more, except igoto i have no problems any more, except i go to bed earlier than i did. it mightjust be an age thing. i was left with no symptoms. i felt very frail for quite a few weeks. i sat around the house, reading papers quite a lot. but now, i could, i clean, wash, do gardening at the moment. that is good to hear. in terms of advice, the principles remain the same? absolutely. the things you need to do to keep you healthy, with an ageing population those things become more important. the main things are things we can all do. a
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healthy lifestyle, exercise, keeping your weight in target, not smoking, all of those things will decrease your likelihood of having a stroke by more than anything a doctor can do. it is really all about the lifestyle. thank you very much for coming in. i am lifestyle. thank you very much for coming in. iam glad lifestyle. thank you very much for coming in. i am glad you are feeling so much better. i am glad you are feeling so much better. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. labour's draft manifesto's been leaked more than a week before it was due to be published. it reveals plans to nationalise the railways and scrap tuition fees. a cold calling firm's been given a record fine of £400,000 after making nearly 100 million nuisance calls. about half an hour ago i said it was sunny and carol was promising as sunshine all morning. shall we have a look? what has happened? good morning. there are showers in england and
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south wales they are so scattered. but we are at kenwood house this morning, it is right behind me there, our beautiful magnolia tree in front of it that is 100 years old. kenwood house has been used as the setting for many films. part of notting hill was filmed here. swing time was filmed here and recently hamstead has been filmed here. that will be released injune and it is about harry hallows who squatted on hampstead heath for 17 years. there is more interest attached to it now. there are some showers across the south. but for many it will turn humid through the cause of the day, particularly from the south, and we will see heavy thunderstorms developed. this morning it is a chilly start with a lot of dry weather around and a lot of
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sunshine. where we have cloud it will be thin, but we still have those scattered showers, some of them fading. a5 those scattered showers, some of them fading. as we head into the afternoon, we will see some big thunderstorms forming. in the south—east there will be a lot of dry weather in the south east and southern counties close to the coast, but in berkshire, hampshire, gloucestershire, heading into somerset, devon and cornwall is where we are likely to see them. the southern half of wales also has some heavy, thundery downpours. in northern ireland, north wales, north—west england and scotland we are looking at dry conditions. some patchy rain across the far north of scotla nd patchy rain across the far north of scotland will ease through the course of the day. but on the east coast there will be a bit more cloud around. a5 coast there will be a bit more cloud around. as we come south once again in north east england towards the wash, the midlands and east anglia,
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we are back into the sunshine. overnight the thunderstorms will migrate northwards and there will be further showers developing in the west. however, there will be more cloud developing in the north and the east and some sea fog will come in. tomorrow morning we start off with all those showers, some of which again will be heavy and thundery. there is a risk of surfers water flooding. in thundery. there is a risk of surfers waterflooding. in between there will be some sunshine and later on in the day you will notice more cloud developing across the coastlines in the east of scotland and north east england. as we head into saturday for scotland and northern ireland we are again looking at a lot of cloud and rain and that leaves sunshine and showers and that leaves sunshine and showers and for england and wales which are also looking at sunshine and showers. but later in the west there
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will be rain and that will cross overnight from saturday into sunday, clearing the east coast in the afternoon on sunday, leaving behind ita afternoon on sunday, leaving behind it a mixture of sunshine and showers. already it is starting to brighten up here. it has stopped raining. did you see thatjogger? they it has stopped raining. did you see that jogger? they ran it has stopped raining. did you see thatjogger? they ran past you and into the woods. what a lovely place to go for a run. yes, there are a lot of people walking their dogs this morning. they have now gone into the pond for a swim. labour was due to launch its ma nifesto labour was due to launch its manifesto last week, but things have not gone to plan. a draft copy of the document has been leaked to the bbc and several national newspapers. this is how they've reacted. the daily mail says, dragging ass
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back to the 19705. on the front page of the daily mirror, labour will nationalise energy, rail and the mail. let's do this side—by—side. you get an impression with the picture they are using as well. the daily telegraph is interesting because we will be talking to the journalist who wrote the front page. we'rejoined by journalist paul mason who supportsjeremy corbyn, and kate mccann, senior political correspondent at the telegraph. how was this allowed to happen? i have no idea. maybe kate could throw some light on it. i have been champing at the bit to go out and explain these policies. i do not know whether anyone remembers the 19705 in the studio. i do. my dad
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and grandad started out as minors, but i ended up as an economics editor in the bbc because i went to university for free. i cannot wait to get out in the evening and talk to get out in the evening and talk to people about labour's offer of a free education to every working—class child who wants it and free elderly care. this will be a game changer and i am glad they have got it out four days early, no matter the organisational chaos that surrounds it. that's top to kate and ask how did this come out? your front page has it in all its detail. yes, it does. this is not how labour wanted their manifesto to go down. one of the most important things about launching a manifesto is you get to handle how it looks to the public. you get to handle the pitch and that opportunity has been taken away from jeremy corbyn. we have heard quite a lot of this manifesto before. the energy and the education
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offerings are quite new, but a lot offerings are quite new, but a lot of this is about what jeremy corbyn has been talking about for a long time. but labour will be disappointed because they do not get the opportunity to set it out to the public because it has been leaked in this way. jeremy corbyn looks like he cannot keep a hold of this important document and keep it out of the press for four days. the conservative manifesto is being drawn up by a small group of people and we in the labour movement do it democratically. it has not been lea ked democratically. it has not been leaked from jeremy corbyn's offers. d rafts leaked from jeremy corbyn's offers. drafts of this have been flowing around, trade union leaders, labour women, thejewish around, trade union leaders, labour women, the jewish labour around, trade union leaders, labour women, thejewish labour movement, all the parts of this big party gets essayed today in a meeting that vote on whether this goes through. in fa ct on whether this goes through. in fact injournalism we on whether this goes through. in fact in journalism we ask who benefits? who benefits from this either people like me who won this
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ma nifesto to either people like me who won this manifesto to be radical, pro—working—class and to set what kind of country we come out of brexit as, as a fairer and more just society. there are a few people in labour who do not want a radical ma nifesto labour who do not want a radical manifesto like this. sorry to interrupt. there are a few people in labour who really do not want a radical manifesto. do you think may be somebody who does want a radical ma nifesto be somebody who does want a radical manifesto may have leaked this so it cannot be changed ? manifesto may have leaked this so it cannot be changed? if it is changed in the next four days, the divisions are there to see. i have no idea. what we are not seeing in the ma nifesto what we are not seeing in the manifesto is the costing. the interesting thing for me as a journalist and for cake as a journalist and for cake as a journalist is when we scrutinise it and find out what taxes are being used to pay for this. that is not in there and it would not have been because it is very sensitive. but the big bombshell is quite how much it is prepared to tax the
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super—rich, property speculators, big companies, to pay for all this andi big companies, to pay for all this and i do not think it is all there. your headline in the telegraph today said the manifesto will take britain back to the 19705. said the manifesto will take britain back to the 1970s. do you think it is fair? i think so, it is our headline, so i will stand by it. there is a lot in this manifesto that takes the country backwards, it opposed labour's manifesto of 1983 which did not go well with the public. renationalising things like the energy markets, the royal mail, the energy markets, the royal mail, the railways, are not particularly interesting or new policies for people who might be looking to labour as people who might be looking to labourasa people who might be looking to labour as a alternative to the conservatives. they are very expensive and there are no costings in this manifesto. that will be one of the key things we look to see over the next couple of days. another interesting thing is the influence of the unions on the manifesto. there are things about
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org reave, manifesto. there are things about orgreave, things about minors' pensioners in particular, quite specific issues on train drivers and strikes, which have clearly been written into the manifesto looking at which different groups labour has to satisfy in order to get this manifesto passed and proved before it goes to the public. i wonder how well those things will go down with the wider population, many of whom are not part of the labour movement. i know you will not tell me how it has happened, but i am curious how the telegraph gets hold of a labour d raft the telegraph gets hold of a labour draft manifesto, how a right—leaning paper gets this manifesto. how did those circumstances arise? paper gets this manifesto. how did those circumstances arise ?” paper gets this manifesto. how did those circumstances arise? i would say good journalism and a good journalist would never reveal their sources, so i cannot talk about how we came by that leak. it is good journalism, that is how it works. labour is about to have a huge conversation about is manifesto today were it decides with union
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leaders and members and other people at the top of the party exactly what goesin at the top of the party exactly what goes in that manifesto. that is the point, this has been circulated amongst a big group of people. but it is an interesting point you make, labour has done this before, but it is never leaked in full, and that does expose the deep split in the party at the moment. jeremy corbyn and his top team could not keep the manifesto under wraps. we have to leave it there, we could talk more. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, after days and weeks
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of dry weather, there are signs of change for the next few days. we are drawing up warm and humid airfrom the south and that brings with it the south and that brings with it the threat and possibility of some heavy showers. many places are going to be dry and there will be sunshine around. it is really coming up through the channel that we will see the showers into southern parts of england and wales. very hit and miss, a lot of places are still going to be dry. a5 miss, a lot of places are still going to be dry. as it warms up with some sunshine later on, we could spark some thundery downpours, and the possibility of localised flooding. the showers more likely to be aligned along the m4 corridor. 23 degrees is possible across the south—east of england. 20 or 21 further north where it is still going to be dry and there will be sunshine around. areas of cloud, around northern and eastern coasts of scotla nd around northern and eastern coasts of scotland it will be rather chilly. the heavy showers rumble on into this evening and then they will tend to fade away a little bit. then
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we will see more showers coming from the english channel, moving northwards into wales and possibly the midlands, some rain for northern ireland. a little more chilly, perhaps for scotland and the far north of england. 0n the whole, a warmer nights in the past few nights, with more cloud. we will see those showers working northwards, and that warms up across england and wales, this is where we will see thundery downpours in the afternoon. slow moving heavy rain. again, not guaranteed. it should be largely dry for scotland. not many showers for northern england and drying up in northern england and drying up in northern ireland. it is across northern parts of the uk that we will see most wet weather on saturday. another warm day, temperatures not far off 20 degrees. a weather front coming from the west, bringing fresh air and rain overnight. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson
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and tanya beckett. snap judgement — investors punish the firm behind snapchat as the messaging app's results disappoint, its shares plunging in afterhours trade. live from london, that's our top story on thursday, 11th of may, 2017. in its first results since listing, snap's net losses soar to billions of dollars as its struggles to attract new users. also in the programme: bt, the uk's biggest telecoms group, says it will cut 4,000 jobs worldwide over the next two years in a major restructuring.
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