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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  May 11, 2017 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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the next couple of days has a teens. the next couple of days has a fairly humid feel to things with some potentially thundery showers. today at 5pm: labour's election manifesto has now been formally approved by the party leadership, and will be published within days. after a four—hour meeting, jeremy corbyn said the policy programme had been unanimously agreed, and said it contained very popular proposals. an offer that will transform the lives of many people in our society and ensure that we have a government in britain onjune the 8th that will work for the many, not the few. but earlier, mr corbyn had failed to attend labour's big poster launch, amid confusion over a leaked version of the labour manifesto. we'll have the latest on the labour manifesto, we'll be looking at some of the policies in more detail, and we'll have reaction. the other main stories: the bank of england downgrades its forecast for economic growth this year, with a warning of a squeeze on consumer spending. this is going to be a more challenging time for british households.
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over the course of this year real income growth, to use our terminology, will be negative. to use theirs, wages won't keep up with prices. three women, including a mother and daughter, appear in court charged with terrorism offences and conspiracy to murder. a marketing company is given a record fine of £400,000 for making nearly 100 million nuisance phone calls. all right, where do you want me? bouncing on my knee. where do you think i want you? and rather mixed reviews for david beckham, following his cameo role in the new film king arthur. it's 5pm.
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our main story is that labour's election manifesto has been formally approved by the party leadership, and is set to be formally launched within days. but some of the main parts of the manifesto have already found their way into the public domain, after a version of the document was leaked overnight. it included proposals to renationalise the railways, and to scrap university tuition fees in england. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell said it was a "modern and progressive" set of proposals. a short while ago, the party leader, jeremy corbyn, said the manifesto had been unanimously agreed and all its contents were carefully costed. our political correspondent sean curran reports. senior labourfigures senior labour figures spent the day putting the finishing touches to the pa rty‘s putting the finishing touches to the party's general election putting the finishing touches to the pa rty‘s general election manifesto, after a d raft pa rty‘s general election manifesto, after a draft version was leaked to the media. our manifesto will be on offer, and we believe the policies
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in itare offer, and we believe the policies in it are very popular, and offer that will transform the lives of many people in our society and ensure that we have a government in britain on june the ensure that we have a government in britain onjune the 8th, that will work for the many, not the few, and give everyone in our society a decent opportunity and a decent chance. but the leaks meant that labour's day did not go according to plan. this morning, jeremy corbyn pulled out of an event to launch a campaign poster. we will have to wait to see what is in the final version of the manifesto, but the lea ked version of the manifesto, but the leaked draft includes proposals for a price cap on gas and electricity bills and the setting up of at least one publicly owned energy company in every region of the uk. it also includes plans to scrap university tuition fees in england, £8 billion towards social care over five years, and plans to take the railways and the postal service back into public ownership. the labour leader
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believes his policies are popular. what do people in the west midlands make of them? it's a good idea, they should nationalise everything, bring it back to how it was. jeremy corbyn generally has the right idea so if he thinks it is a good ideal generally has the right idea so if he thinks it is a good idea i am willing to listen. another gravy train run by left wing think tanks, people in london. labour says it can pay for its proposals. we will publish the costed version, so every policy will have a costing and funding source identified. the leak and speculation about who was to blame highlighted tensions in labour ranks. some in the party do not think the proposals add up to a winning message. the tories are 20 points ahead in the polls. it is the tory manifesto people need to be focusing on, seeing what they are doing in government. we are trying to save as many good labour mps as possible so we have a semblance of an opposition afterjune the 8th. as
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seniorfigures left the an opposition afterjune the 8th. as senior figures left the meeting an opposition afterjune the 8th. as seniorfigures left the meeting in london, labour said its election ma nifesto london, labour said its election manifesto had been unanimously agreed and would be published in the next few days, and that they would bea next few days, and that they would be a leaked enquiry reporting back after the election. our chief political correspondent vicki young is outside the manifesto meeting. we will come to some of the controversy about what happened overnight but first, what do we understand has happened this afternoon with this document? they have told us it has been unanimously agreed. iam have told us it has been unanimously agreed. i am told there have been some amendments, some changes, but they are simply tinkering. so it seems that this very eye—catching d raft seems that this very eye—catching draft manifesto, and we will have two assume that most of what was in the leaked draft is going to appear in the formal document next week, that that has gone through. and i think it shows very much that this isa think it shows very much that this is a manifesto which is very much
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belonging tojeremy corbyn, his vision, his principles which he has held and stuck to over many years. and they believe it has very popular policies which will be able to be sold on the doorstep. things like rail mache migration, for example, the abolition of tuition fees, a clear exa m ple of the abolition of tuition fees, a clear example of labour trying to engage younger voters. i think some of this is about trying to get off theissue of this is about trying to get off the issue of brexit. because of theresa may's desire to make it a brexit election there has been a lot of talk about the eu. labour wants to talk about policies, issues they believe are important to people, such as health. they want to boost health spending significantly. they wa nt to health spending significantly. they want to talk about jobs, health spending significantly. they want to talk aboutjobs, education, to get off the other issues and try to get off the other issues and try to inspire people to get out and vote. at the moment, with the exception of the issue of trident, which will be renewed it will say in the manifesto, apart from that, this is very muchjeremy corbyn's vision,
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and it will be tested at the election. it is a strange set of circumstances because the launch is not until next week but because of what happened overnight with the lea ked what happened overnight with the leaked version of the document, we have a pretty good idea what is in it. so has there been a negative reaction to that, even within the party, given the failure to manage that process? yes, there will be some critics, and of course the conservatives, who say this shows com plete conservatives, who say this shows complete chaos, how could somebody vote for a party that cannot even keep its manifesto under wraps? the leaking of the entire potential document has never happened before. a word of warning. there will be many people out there for whom this will be gone tomorrow, the idea that it was leaked. it has caused arguments within the party and there will be an enquiry, but for most people by the time we get to polling day, it is the policies themselves that will be the most significant
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factor in all of this. along with the idea of costing, which will be crucial. john mcdonnell insists it will be completely costed. in the past, labour have been under attack from opponents for spending too much public money, not having a grip on the economy. so they will have to a nswer the economy. so they will have to answer those questions. they are insistent that they will. and there is the broader issue of leadership. we heard from some labour candidates who are clearly uncertain that jeremy corbyn is the person to put that across, and they are concerned that across, and they are concerned that the issue of leadership comes up that the issue of leadership comes up on the doorstep, and they worry that will stop people voting for labour because people will be looking to choose the next prime minister. those issues are still there and those close tojeremy corbyn hope that this whole thing about policy will now be the main discussion in the campaign. thank you for bringing us up to date. one of the main policy areas in labour's leaked manifesto is education, and a pledge to abolish university tuition fees in england.
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here's our education correspondent gillian hargreaves to explain more. cheering they've got cause for celebration, because if you're a graduate, you earn around £200,000 more in your lifetime than somebody who didn't go to university. which is one of the reasons why the coalition government raised fees to £9,000 a year for students in england. but when they did, there were riots on the streets, and now labour promises to scrap fees altogether. so what do students think? i reckon it's a good idea for the students, but for the treasury, not so much. up until now, my education has been free. why now? why do i have to pay at 18 onwards, nine grand peryear? well, perhaps some students would say that. but labour's plan is going to cost. when 7% of the population went to university, the government could afford to pay tuition fees,
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but now more than half of all 18—year—olds enter university each year. if the government paid for all of their tuition fees, the bill would be huge. well, abolishing tuition fees adds to borrowing in the short run by about £10 billion. of course, the government is already paying for student fees, it's just getting that money back, well, two thirds of that money back from graduates in the long run. so the long run cost to the government of abolishing fees is still really pretty significant. when it comes to paying for university, labour is heading in the opposite direction to the tories, but there's little detail yet on how and when it would introduce the change. gillian hargreaves, bbc news. the conservatives have said that if they win the election, they will increase defence spending by 0.5% more than inflation, every year. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, also said
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the conservatives would continue to meet the pledge to spend at least 2% of national income on defence. it's a growing defence budget, it's properly financed. we meet the nato 2% target and we think it's right to commit to that for the rest of this parliament, so that our armed forces have the equipment that they need to keep this country safe. the green party have launched their election manifesto in london. in a speech, the party's co—leader caroline lucas said that britain's prosperity depends on the natural world. we're the only party that puts the environment at the heart of all of our policies. and we do it quite simply because a prosperous, thriving future will be green or not at all. snp leader nicola sturgeon has visited st andrews university this afternoon to highlight the importance of eu nationals and european research funding to the success of scotland's higher education.
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our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is there for us. north east fife has a long liberal tradition, a very prosperous area of scotland, but this is one of the seats which the snp won in the general election two years ago and they will be hoping to hold onto it again against the bhui a strong push from the liberals to win it back. nicola sturgeon was here to highlight what she sees as the potentially damaging effects of brexit on higher education in scotland. saint andrews university is here. i will give you a sense of the eu's effect on the university. one third of the students here come from the eu, one third of the research staff, too. and around half
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of its current funding comes from eu sources. there will be big questions here of how brexit will play out on the university. nicola sturgeon, going in hard today on what she calls the potentially devastating effects of a so—called hard brexit on the scottish economy, and in particular today she was highlighting what she fears may be a potentially devastating effect on the university sector. interesting to compare and contrast what we have been hearing about labour's projected manifesto, which we expect next week, side—by—side with what the first minister has been saying today. yes, she had interesting thoughts on the leaked first draft of the labour manifesto, with the qualification that she has not seen it herself. she drew attention to some areas where she said labour were mirroring snp policy. it's a bit unusual to said labour were mirroring snp policy. it's a bit unusualto have said labour were mirroring snp policy. it's a bit unusual to have a manifesto leaked in its entirety
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days before it is due to be published. but one of the striking things from what i have seen of it is how many of the policies labour are putting forward is our policy is that the snp scottish government has already introduced. tuition fees being free for students, getting rid of hospital car parking charges, some of their ambitions around climate change and renewable energy. these are things the snp government is already doing, which says to me that scotland is leading the way and that scotland is leading the way and thatis that scotland is leading the way and that is why it is important to make sure people keep strong snp representation in the house of commons. i asked what she thought of a couple of the other highlighted areas in the leak, the idea of renationalising some industries. she said perhaps more state intervention in certain areas might potentially bea in certain areas might potentially be a good thing. when asked what she thought of labour's position on
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trident, of course, scottish labour has a different position from the uk party, she said that shows what a mixed and muddled message labour are sending, and that they are not a party ultimately that are fit to govern, and that only the snp will be standing up, she said, for progressive policies in scotland's interests. thank you. and a reminder, you can keep up to date with all the developments throughout the campaign, and live events, on the bbc news website, bbc.co.uk/news. and if you're on the move, you can follow the election via the bbc news app. the bank of england is predicting only moderate growth for the uk economy this year, with a squeeze on households' incomes, as wages rise more slowly than prices. interest rates have been kept at 0.25%. as our economics correspondent andrew verity reports, the value of the pound is playing a crucial role in consumers' purchasing power.
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here's one element of the cost of living that's shooting up. the wholesale price of butter has doubled in the last year, according to dairy farmers. producers and shops are passing on some, but not all of that to us, the consumers. at the last count, the retail price of oils and fats like butter was up by 15.5% compared to last year. for the price of butter as for the whole economy, the big question is, is this inflation temporary, or will it last? i think for the bank of england, they are really trying to work out how persistent the rise that we are seeing in inflation at the moment is going to be, and juggle that against the context which is a uk economy that is weakening, a housing market that is looking a little bit soggy, certainly in terms of activity, people looking for new houses and properties coming onto the market. and a uk economy that is also facing brexit headwinds. the official consumer price index measure of inflation got down below zero in 2015.
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but now, it's back above the 2% target. the bank of england is now predicting it will carry on rising, peaking later this year at 2.8%. the wages that people are getting are not going to be sufficient to compensate for the rises in consumer prices, the prices in the shop. and so this is going to be a more challenging time for british households over the course of this year. one big reason for higher price rises is the pound. because it dropped in value both before and after the referendum, we need more pounds to get hold of the dollars and euros we need to buy imported goods. and most of our goods are imported. the projected inflation entirely reflects the effects on import prices of the fall in sterling since late 2015. a depreciation caused by market expectations of a material adjustment to the uk's medium term prospects as it leaves the eu. the bank's confident prediction is that the effect of the weaker
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pound will peter out next year and that workers will not seek to beat inflation by demanding much higher wages. on that basis, interest rates may have to rise a little in the next three years, but only very slowly. the headlines: labour's election manifesto has now been formally approved by the party leadership, and will be published within days. the bank of england has downgraded its forecast for economic growth this year, with a warning of a squeeze on consumer spending. three women, including a mother and daughter, have appeared in court charged with terrorism offences and conspiracy to murder. andy murray losers at the madrid open, knocked out in the last 16. the world number one has failed to
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reach the quarterfinals in two of his last three tournaments since returning from injury. ross barkley has been given ten days to signa ross barkley has been given ten days to sign a contract that everton or the manager says he will sell him. he has a year left on his current deal. and alex hales piles on the runs at trent bridge. having made in england record score there last year, he hits a century for nottinghamshire in the one—day cup. more on those stories just after 5:30pm. we are going back to the content of labour's manifesto. one of the key pledges is to be nationalised railway network. just how could this work if the plans were implemented? with me is michael holden, who was the chief executive of directly operated railways. it was set up by the former labour government in 2009 and ran the east coast mainline for five years, until it ceased operating in 2015 when east coast was passed from public to private hands. he's now a railway
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management consultant. a long introduction but important understand the background, and good to see you. thank you for coming in. your broad response, first of all. so much interest in this policy not just from commuters but others. your broad thoughts on whether that kind of ambitious policy is realistic and practical? my sense of it is that who owns the railway companies is less important than how they are run. i think franchises, which we are talking about, are capable of being run in either the public or private sector. if you are going to bring in the private sector, it can doa bring in the private sector, it can do a very good job, but what you have to do if you are the government, this is a public service, you have two specify carefully what it is you want the companies to deliver on. if you get it right, by and large the companies will do well. get it wrong and we have problems down the line. will do well. get it wrong and we have problems down the linem
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will do well. get it wrong and we have problems down the line. is at the lack of specialisation that has led to problems, some of them high profile? east coast was a great success profile? east coast was a great success in public sector ownership. i probably would not advocate doing it that way as a general rule. i think it worked because it was an exception, rather than the rule. we worked hard with civil servants at the department for transport to make it work but it was essentially a stopgap whilst the re—franchise and operation was carried out. returning to your other point about other franchises which are in difficulty, if you look at southern rail, it has had a really difficult time in the last year, but the root of the problems is really in what they were asked to do by the government. i am not saying that was wrong because i think it was right to overhaul the way that trains accrued —— trains are crude. it was always going to be
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an industrial relations battle ground and it still is in other parts of the country. i do not think it is right to blame southern rail fall of the problems that have occurred on that franchise. going back to your point about east coast having worked well, albeit in exceptional circumstances, what would you say to people, including labour supporters, if it can work in those circumstances why notjust extend it, just as a principle, why not have it working well across the entire network? it is possible to do that. we have examples where local devolved administrations are letting concessions, typically, like in london, london overground and so on, these work well because the organisation letting these concessions is very proficient and knows what it is doing and gets a good deal. and the private sector is then delivering well. where we have problems elsewhere is largely
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because we do not have a proper specification of what it is we are asking the private sector to deliver. if you bring in the private sector to do public service, essentially their motive is profit, and you have to make sure they are incentivised to do what you really wa nt incentivised to do what you really want them to do, otherwise they will go off and make money for themselves because that is what the private sector does. that is the principle, which is why people are making a strong call in some areas, where they say, look, we don't want that element. we simply want a service funded by the state which is about providing a good service, and the profit element simply complicate that, and even worse, it might undermine those factors. my experience is that central government is actually not that good at carrying this through. it worked when it was the exception. if it became the norm, i think you would became the norm, i think you would be hard to get the long—term stability needed to run the railway system. a final question about cost.
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mr corbyn said this would be costed next week. your thoughts on what the kind of cost would be to government, to completely renationalise the entire network. the only way you could practically do that would be to allow current franchises and rolling stock contracts to come to an end and then replace them with something that is publicly specified and delivered. even so, that would bea and delivered. even so, that would be a low—cost initial option, but downstrea m be a low—cost initial option, but downstream you would suffer longer, higher costs in the longer term from trying to deliver it in the public sector, where the incentives would not be there to produce improvement. thank you for your view. three women have appeared in court in london, charged with preparing a terrorist act and conspiracy to murder. they include 21—year—old rizlaine boular, who was shot by police during a raid at a property in willesden two weeks ago. seven other people, arrested as part of the investigation, have been released from police custody.
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our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. two weeks ago, and armed police fired cs gas canisters into a flat in willesden, north london. and then, filmed from across the road, this was heard from inside the flat. a woman was shot by police. this footage shows her on the ground, after she has brought out, wounded. she is 21—year—old rizlaine boular. today, she was one of three women brought to court to face charges of terrorism and conspiracy to murder. the women appeared together in the dock. rizlaine boular is in the middle. on one side, with herface also covered, her mother, 43—year—old mina dich. on the other side, herfriend, khawla barghouthi,
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20. they are alleged to have been pa rt 20. they are alleged to have been part of a plot which, it is claimed, involved a planned knife attack in the westminster area. the raid a fortnight ago and their arrests followed a surveillance operation involving scotland ya rd's counterterrorism command. after this first brief hearing, the three women we re first brief hearing, the three women were remanded in custody. their next court appearance will be on the 19th of may at the old bailey. waiting times for a number of key nhs services in england were the worst in five years, according to analysis of figures for the year to the end of march. more people waited more than four hours to be seen in a&e, and cancer referral times also worsened. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson is with me. talk us through the figures. today we got figures for march, which gives us the whole year's figures. what the health foundation think
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tank has done is to number crunch and look back and compare them to five years ago. it found that for the whole of last year, 2.5 million patients waited longer than the four oui’ patients waited longer than the four our target patients waited longer than the four ourtarget in patients waited longer than the four our target in a&e. compare to five yea rs our target in a&e. compare to five years ago, the figure was more like 700,000, so quite a hike. in terms of other targets, cancer treatment, the target is to be seen within two months, 62 days. if you look at the numbers of people waiting longer than that, 26,000 patients waited longer. compare that to 2011—12, 14,000, just over. it is another jumper. in politicalterms, we are in an election campaign and there is sensitivity around claims and counterclaims, how does it feed into the argument about funding and the state of the nhs? it is clear the nhs is treating more people and that is what has always happen, and
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health economists say funding has to keep up with that. they have always said funding has to increase by 4%. since 2010, funding has increased by around 1%. so the labour party said today that the failure on the targets is about the funding, there is not enough of it. the conservatives said that if a labour government was in place, if economic policy is such that the nhs would be worse off, would have less money. the lib dems said they are the only ones with a clear strategy in terms of investment. thank you. michel barnier, the european union's chief brexit negotiator, has addressed the irish parliament, an honour usually only reserved michel barnier, the european union's chief brexit negotiator, has addressed the irish parliament, an honour usually only reserved for visiting heads of state. mr barnier highlighted the complexity of issues relating to the border with northern ireland, and what that means for brexit talks. michel barnier, the european union's chief brexit negotiator, our ireland correspondent chris page was listening. it has been a symbolic day for
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ireland, which is the eu state that will be most affected by brexit because of its ties to the uk. before today, the only people invited to address the irish parliament were presidents and prime minister is like nelson mandela, jfk, ronald reagan. by inviting michel barnier to make a speech, the irish government was sending a strong international signal about how seriously they are treating brexit. so michel barnier act knowledge that ireland is in a unique situation and talked about theissue unique situation and talked about the issue which is one of the most prominent and tricky issues facing ireland, the future of the land border, the only [and border between the uk and another eu state, the frontier between the irish republic and northern ireland. at the moment, you drive across and hardly notice it, but the question is, will that
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remain the same after brexit, particularly as we now know that britain is leading the european customs union. michel barnier said he wanted to avoid the return of border controls but he also acknowledged that finding a solution to that could be difficult because of the customs issue. brexit changes the external borders of the eu. but i will work with you to avoid a hard border. the uk's departure from the eu will have consequences. we have a duty to speak the truth. we have together the duty to speak the truth. custom controls are part of eu border management to protect the single market, to protect our food safety and our standards. but, as i've already said many times, nothing in these negotiations should put peace at risk. nothing. the customs conundrum will continue
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to occupy minds from belfast to brussels and the detail of how that resolution might be worked out as the brexit process unfolds should be clear in coming months will stop at the moment, considerations are in place to monitor the system electronically rather than carrying out vehicle checks. we will have the headlines in a moment and the sport as well. we are talking a little bit more about the state of the election campaign so far. that is coming up. but let's go to the weather now. it has been a lovely day for large waves of the uk. but we are starting to seize changes drifting up from the south. that is a lot of cloud and rain, potential thunderstorms coming in on quite a warm, humid air
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strea m coming in on quite a warm, humid air stream from the near continent. showers up into northern ireland, wales, south—east england. much of northern england and scotland should be fine and dry overnight. pretty grey in the eastern side of scotland. great weather in north—east continues tomorrow as and thunderstorms drift northwards in many parts of the uk. bits of sunshine in between the showers. we have the warm, quite humid air in the likes of wales in particular. look at the temperatures and colin. 17 in the west, only 910 in the east where it is pretty grey. in the evening, the south east could try out. one into the weekend, there will be spells of sunshine but showers dotted around. things will be coming little bit fresher as we head towards sunday. —— turning a little bit. this is bbc news.
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the headlines... labour's election manifesto has been formally approved by the party leadership and is set to be launched within days. jeremy corbyn said he believed it contained policies that would be "very popular". an offer that will transform the lives of many people in our society and ensure that we have a government in britain onjune the 8th that will work for the many, not the few. the bank of england has downgraded its forecast for economic growth this year, with a warning of a squeeze on consumer spending. three women — including a mother and daughter — have appeared in court charged with terrorism offences and conspiracy to murder. a marketing company which made nearly 100 million nuisance calls has been fined a record £400,000 by the information commissioner's office. we're going to catch up with the
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day's sport and go straight to the bbc‘s sports centre. andy murray's difficulties since returning from injury have continued. he's been knocked out of the madrid open at just the third round stage. the world number one was beaten in straight sets by the croatian borna coric, who is the world number 59 and only qualified for the tournament as a "lucky loser". he broke murray three times in the opening set before going on to win 6—3, 6—3, meaning murray has now failed to reach the quarterfinals in two of his last three tournaments. everton boss ronald koeman says he's prepared to lose ross barkley if he doesn't sign a new contract soon. the england midfielder still has a year left on his current deal and koeman says the club must have an answer by the end of the season in ten days' time. he believes the longer it takes, the more doubts barkley must have, and koeman says he "prefers to work with players who want to stay." the fa chairman greg clarke has defended the rights of football clubs to pay agents whatever they see fit.
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clarke has spoken in the light of a fifa investigation into the £89 million transfer of paul pogba from juventus to manchester united last summer. they have written to united asking for clarification after allegations that pogba's agent mino raiola was paid £41 million for the deal. 22 of which, it's claimed, came directly from united. if manchester united want to pay an agent that much money, and i don't know, the fa knows, but i haven't looked into the transfer, that is what they will pay. they are accountable for their owners and to the fans. if they think it is good value for money, how much we should be the players and agents is a commercial thing. if that wants to change that and limit the money that agents get, we will have to sit down asa agents get, we will have to sit down as a game, led by the professional game, the premier league and efl cup clu bs game, the premier league and efl cup clubs and talk about that. manchester united will attempt to do something tonight they've never done before, reach the final of the europa league. they're defending a 1—0 lead from the first leg
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of their semi—final against celta vigo at old trafford. united managerjose mourinho won the competition with porto back in 2003. and he has made it his priority in recent weeks as winning the trophy would mean a place in next season's champions league. it was not a gamble. it was just a consequence of oui’ it was not a gamble. it was just a consequence of our situation. so, we're this situation now. and we have to fight for that. let's see if tomorrow we can do it and we can go tomorrow we can do it and we can go to the final. a host of england players are featuring in the one match of the day in the royal london one day cup. nottinghamshire playing durham at trent bridge. durham won the toss and put the hosts in to bat. england's alex hales made hay in the nottinghamshire sunshine, and managed to find the only window open in a radio commentary box with one of his sixes.
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hales went for 104, but his side's tally was boosted by 66 from billy root as nottinghamshire set durham a total of 298 to win. british riders geraint thomas and adam yates are still second and third at the giro d'italia, ten seconds behind bob jungels of luxembourg. it was stage six out of 21 today, the race has reached the italian mainland after passing through sardinia and sicily — no change in the battle for the overall lead because a small breakaway group managed to hold off the main bunch for the whole135—mile stage. a great day's work for swiss rider silvan dillier, who took his first stage win at a grand tour. and that is all the sport for now. much more at half past six. we will be back with your little later on. thank you very much. four weeks from today, britain will go to the polls on thursday the 8th ofjune. as we heard earlier, labour's leadership has formally
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approved its manifesto. jeremy corbyn most telling us a bit about that earlier. —— was telling us. it's set to be launched next week, but as we mentioned earlier, a draft version had been leaked overnight listing some policies including nationalising the railways and abolishing university tuition fees in england. last week's local election results brought heavy losses for labour and big gains for the conservatives, so what can we look forward to in the month ahead? before i introduced my guests, i wa nt to before i introduced my guests, i want to bring us right up to date with the state of the campaign. former prime minister david cameron is campaigning in nantwich today. it is campaigning in nantwich today. it is his first intervention, if you like, in this campaign. he is out there making points about the nature of the campaign and policies around. making points today about the labour ma nifesto making points today about the labour manifesto as well but specifically talking about brexit, which of course he was responsible for, in one sense, calling the referendum.
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this is what mist cameron has said. iama this is what mist cameron has said. i am a strong conservative and i wa nt i am a strong conservative and i want the team to win. i resigned after the brexit vote because i knew that the country needed fresh leadership. that is what theresa may is delivering and they want to have the biggest possible majority saw that she can deliver the best possible deal. the election is a straight choice between heart continuing us by minister of that important work. labour have put up a candidate who is not cut out to be prime minister. you would make a terrible prime minister. this election is important and that is why i am out david cameron, after he won the election in 2015, but now campaigning for theresa may. i'm joined by three former political advisors — jo—anne nadler, who worked for sirjohn major, nick clegg's former special advisor, polly mackenzie, and sam tarry, a former advisor tojeremy corbyn. it is great to have you all. i was with david cameron's
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intervention today, given it has just happened in the last few minutes. and for you, really, just happened in the last few minutes. and foryou, really, is this the kind of brexit ministerj that will make sense for conservatives? i do not think we saw nothing particularly controversial or unusual in what he said. it seems very own message and supportive. there was another bit where he said, he wants to help mrs may to stand up to those who want an extreme brexit either here or in brussels. that is a quote, extreme brexiteer or in brussels. the message is slightly more complex, isn't it. it is no surprise, clearly, because history has shown david cameron takes a very different view from perhaps the position mrs may finds herself in as a result of what happened last. again, ido a result of what happened last. again, i do not think that is particularly pointed. in fact, you will find people from within theresa may's camp saying the same thing.
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that was part and parcel of calling this election. it was to give for a broader conservative majority that reflected voices across the flat in —— party. so that she could not be held hostage by one particular brexit clique. your thoughts on the intervention... and when you have heard from nick clegg, he has been incredibly clear about the campaign when he thinks the lib dems should take. this is pretty much the loyal message, but it is hedging his bets. david cameron is much more of a moderate and campaign strongly for remain. the conservatives are more and more wanting to absorb that you can vote, strategically important for them. and implying that they may go for a slightly soft brexit is not in the script. it is not in the message. it might be what they want but it is not the doorstep message. the doorstep messages, we are out,
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we're going and we are tough. that is interesting because the other day whenjeremy is interesting because the other day when jeremy corbyn is interesting because the other day whenjeremy corbyn was interviewed, he found it difficult to say, look, a labour government will take the uk out of the eu. that is categorical. he seems to be hedging his bets until they clarified later. how does this intervention change the political bile? does it? tee—mac it does. if i was david cameron, i would be very frightened. he knows full well the reasons he campaigned for remain board. the consequence is the kind of brexit under theresa may must be frightening. i don't believe for one second that he wants to turbo—charge, absolutely, let's get out of europe at any costs. he knows andjeremy out of europe at any costs. he knows and jeremy corbyn knows that that would be total disaster for the uk economy. i do not buy the fact that theresa may says, i need a huge mandate to have a slightly more considered brexit. it doesn't add up. you have liam fox, priti patel,
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these hardliners. he is calling people in his own party extremists. that is quite clearly, if you're voting for a party that is having a serious and considered approach to brexit, setting out clearly red lines, and in the manifesto, actually saying, we will not have brexit at any cost but we are still committed to brexit on the terms of the british people rather than global corporations and all those things the tories are pushing for, it is clear that people should think about the choices here. we have to wait and see what the precise wording is brexit in the labour party manifesto. just a thought about a pretty eventful 24 hours. overnight, the leaked version of the labour manifesto. i cannot remember an entire manifesto being leaked before. salmonella last 25 years. —— certainly in the last 25 years. does this damage the impact of the
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message and policies in anyway?” don't think it does. my phone started ringing last night. my first instinct was, or gay, i'm quite worried about this. but as the policies were clearly put out... —— was, ok, i am policies were clearly put out... —— was, ok, lam quite policies were clearly put out... —— was, ok, i am quite worried. but the policies are pragmatic, investment in the economy, the nhs, education system. it sets out very clearly what labour's programme for post—brexit britain is. i am quite excited about it and labourers back on the front foot. on popularity, mist corbyn jamaican said today, look, we tested these, asked people about them, they are popular policies. on the nationalisation, which we have talked about today a lot, loss of commuters —— lots of commuters are quite attracted to the thought, especially if they have had
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a dreadful experience on the red —— really is. what are your thoughts? theresa may's does not having an active state, i hope, will not be moving towards a corporate interventionist line and tacking to the left. because what then happens is that you can not present a principled platform of the liberal free—market and how that actually helps things to improve for people. it has slightly concerned me that the big policy announcement that we have heard from the conservatives so far about energy has moved... the cap. has moved from a better way to do with those problems, which is giving companies more freedom but making sure that they are regulated more actively on behalf of the consumer. why did she go in that direction, do you think? because i think it is a popular direction to go. to be fair, she has said she
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wa nts to go. to be fair, she has said she wants to appeal to a wider conservative base, if you like. but i think it is a bit short term working and that is my reservation. in this area, given what we have said unpopularity of policies, the lib dems in certain areas have made a virtue of the fact, not least in brexit, that they are pursuing posse which directly knives lots of people potentially will not like. —— they are suing a policy which they recognise. what is your thoughts on that? policy has only a role in politics. you want to govern so that you can do stuff, but it is the to send messages in an election campaign. what is amazing about labour's smorgasbord approach is it isa labour's smorgasbord approach is it is a deluge of unbelievably expensive promises. it starts to lose credibility. there was a time in the past of the lib dems when our
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manifestos were crammed with three sweeties, mostly for pensioners. but it was not enough because people we re it was not enough because people were looking for a bigger message. when the lib dems campaign for a second referendum to sign of the brexit bill, i think they can't be, yes, it divisive, but to send the message about values. because that is what policies foreign news campaign. ithink is what policies foreign news campaign. i think that is what theresa may is doing with the energy cap. the labour party has managed to make that look like unbelievably delicate intervention in the market because they want to stay at upstate energy firms. —— setup state. but the determination to disregard the details and get money to people who are just managing sends a message to people about what they are for. hopefully we will talk again in the weeks to come before the election, but watford you will be the main drivers of any changes in voting
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patterns gritter—mac —— but what will be. what will be the driving forces ? will be. what will be the driving forces? you mean in terms of the local elections? we know about the local elections? we know about the local elections, the tories had begins. but i mean in terms of policies and ideas. the kind of things that you think could or could not change the very big patterns we have seen in the last year or so. am not sure that a great deal will change. that said. —— that said, all the parties, particularly the meaning gush parties, are running on platforms which are absolutely right for willian at the moment. so although i fundamentally disagree with what we have heard about the labour party manifesto so far, i think it is absolutely the right ma nifesto for think it is absolutely the right manifesto for them at this moment. the lib dems have the right approach, which is to say that, what we need to do is make sure the
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conservatives do not have a massive majority. being practical and sensible at the moment. the conservatives, i have some reservation about the detail on policy. to go for this, there are no—one “— policy. to go for this, there are no—one —— there are no unreachable areas, it is the right platform for them. polly? she is right. once the policies out there, there is a second phase of the campaign post manifesto when people start to run on fumes of it. we have to remember that what we discussed in the campaign nationally is divorced from what happens on the ground in marginal constituencies. where you can get marginal swing is undetected by the balls. it is the unknown factors like someone being doorstep bya factors like someone being doorstep by a member of the public. it can throw things at different way. the unknown events are very often the most powerful ones. for weeks. unknown events are very often the most powerful ones. forweeks. if this manifesto is in the shape we
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expected to be from labour, what you think will be the most crucial thing is for labour to drive home in four weeks to come? the battle ground for labour is with the conservatives about who wins and who can pull in ukip former voters. in labour's case, people who went to ukip after ten years of new labour. back to the labour party. the manifesto is targeted at those sorts of people. communities are what dignity and pride restored to them. investment in manufacturing. they do not want to have zero hours contracts and a crumbling hospital. they want to actually have manufacturing jobs, skills and decent wages so they can plan for the future and allow their kids to plan for the future. maybe buy a house. that is the bread—and—butter issues. it says, brexit is happening, but our vision of brexit is so much more optimistic and tangible for people in those communities. if we can get that across, that will be a key battle ground. why don't we reconvene in
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two weeks and take the temperature? see if we have changed our thoughts by that point. thank you for coming m, by that point. thank you for coming in, all of you. we will have more debates in the campaign throughout the week and on the new channel. of course, we will be looking at backgrounds to some of the policies we discussed earlier. we will explore more policy issues of the weeks progress. some order on the day's news. phones ringing we've all had them, at any time of day or night. the call, the click on the line and then the recorded message, about ppi or a car accident. today, kerboum communications was fined £400,000 for making 100 million such calls. 1000 people complained.
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one said, these calls disrupt my work, cause unnecessary anxiety and make me very angry. another, a victim of stalking, complained, "i am harassed by my ex—partner through calls and text messages, and so unsolicited calls cause me anxiety." companies can only call if they have our permission. kerboum didn't, but made the calls enemy. it has now gone bust, so may not pay the fine. the regulator wants more powers. if the director, who was responsible for the company, were liable, then we think we would have a much better chance of success, and we think it would be a better deterrent. it seems tougher action on rogue cold callers would be a popular move. i think it's rude to call people up and interrupt their day when they're in the middle of something. then the persistence, to keep on the phone, so i find it rude, i would never do that to someone else, so ijust think
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it's not ok. as soon as i put it down and say, no, or take me off or whatever, i want to be off this research, then they'll phone back. the industry itself welcomes tighter regulation. at the moment, it may well be in a bad place, and people don't really trust the calls coming through to their phone. but if we were able to get rid of the vast majority of these nuisance callers, then it would re—establish itself for sure. but some think fines are not enough, and only the threat of prison for company bosses will put a stop to the nuisance calls. angus crawford, bbc news. the party of the french president—elect, emmanuel macron, has unveiled his list of candidates for next month's parliamentary elections — more than half of whom have never held elected office. only 5% come from the outgoing parliament and women make up half of the 428 candidates selected so far. what does it tell us? our correspondent, hugh schofield, is in paris.
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i suppose, firstly, we would ask, what is the likelihood that emmanuel macron will get hundreds of his own people elected? very good question and onei people elected? very good question and one i can't possibly answer, because the mathematics are complicated. the ball is unclear. the national percentages mean nothing when it comes to constituencies. —— the polling is unclear. this is a new party that came out of nowhere and no—one really knows how the public will react to these newcomers. will they be positive about it, buying into macron's idea that regeneration, new names are new faces is what they want? or will the public stick with known faces from the two biggest existing parties? they will want to get the revenge in legislative elections. because this is a parliamentary constituency —based election, they have many candidates who are well dug in and will be very
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relu cta nt to who are well dug in and will be very reluctant to give up their seat. so we will have to wait and see. all we can say for sure is that macron has kept his word about having 50—50 male and female parity. and keeping 50% of people who are out of politics up until now. we have the country's most famous mathematician on the list, for instance. there are still a good number of people not named ina still a good number of people not named in a list and this is because they want to keep the option open next week to bring in people from the right. there are 24 x socialists, ex—socialist mps on the list. no mps from the right. it could be that macron is planning to appoint a centre—right prime minister next week, which would bring in some defectors from the right as well. thank you very much for the latest on emmanuel macron's plans. david beckham was greeted with cheers at the london premiere of the film king arthur: legend of the sword, although the critics' reception for his cameo performance as a soldier has been mixed,
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as our entertainment correspondent david sillito reports. david beckham. you could probably say he's got it all. the footballing talent, the looks, the global fame. and he just looks right on a red carpet. no wonder the movies have called. there are rumours, the legend of the sword of a king other than yourself. find him. this, an all—action retelling of the king arthur story. it is, of course, far from his first time on screen. he had a cameo in the man from u.n.c.l.e, and was the moody, silent star of this short film. however, there's more. i think people are going to love it. obviously, with guy's movies, you know what you're going to get, but there's a few surprises. one of them being, we both see and hear mr beckham's acting. right, where do you want me? bouncing on my knee. where do you think i want you?
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hands on the hilt, stupid! the reaction — more than a few critics have been a bit critical. let's have another listen. right, where do you want me? bouncing on my knee. where you think i want you? hands on the hilt, stupid! all these negative comments are terribly unfair, say his defenders. and the director. yeah, i love him. and i think he's great on screen. i find him very talented, yeah, i love him. stand by for bbc news at six. in the meantime, back to the weather. it has been a lovely day across northern parts of the uk in many areas but we are seeing changes for
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the south. a lot of cloud and enterprise of rain. even some thunderstorms drifting ever northwards. quite a warm, humid strea m northwards. quite a warm, humid stream of a from the new continent. showers in ireland overnight but in england and scotland, mostly dry. in the south, 12 of 13 celsius. scotla nd the south, 12 of 13 celsius. scotland tomorrow, we'll split. cold and grey on the eastern side, warm and grey on the eastern side, warm and sunny in the west. elsewhere, scattered showers, some thunderstorms and quite a one fuel —— warm feel to things. through tomorrow evening, it looks like showers will tend to fade away from the south—east. some areas still pretty grey and dam on the eastern side of scotland. into the weekend, some spells of sunshine but also some spells of sunshine but also some showers dotted around as well. after a couple of humid days, things will be coming a little bit fresher on sunday. —— turning.
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tonight at six — from the railways to royal mail, public ownership is at the heart of labour's leaked manifesto. after the party's top brass met to amend the draft document, jeremy corbyn spelt out what it could mean for britain. an offer that will transform the lives of many people in our society, and ensure that we have a government in britain onjune the 8th that will work for the many, not the few. labour unveils its election poster — but some in the party have their own thoughts on what actually matters. let's get real. the tories are 20 points ahead in the polls. it's the tory manifesto people need to be focusing on, seeing what they're doing in government. we'll find out what potential voters think of the new policies. also tonight: a warning from the bank of england — you'll feel the pinch in your pocket as inflation is set to rise.
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