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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 14, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and sian lloyd. the investigation continues into the cyber attack that caused chaos in the nhs — security experts warn workers to prepare for a new wave of attacks. almost all of the affected health trusts are back up and running. but problems persist at a handful of organisations, with some patients told to expect further disruption. good morning, it's sunday the 14th of may. also ahead — the conservatives promise powers for councils to build more homes for rent. labour says the plan lacks detail. a week after his election victory,
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emmanuel macron will be sworn in today as france's new president. in sport, saracens are champions of europe again. they beat clermont auvergne to become only the fourth team in history to win back to back european titles. # meu bem, ouve as minhas preces. portugal wins eurovision for the first time, as luciejones delivers the uk's best performance for six years. and in case you did not get enough of it last night we will have all the details. helen also has the weather for us. good the details. helen also has the weatherfor us. good morning. an optimistic picture today with some rain in the east to clear but once we do, plenty of rain sun to come through. good dry sunny weather was
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strong sunshine. more for you and around 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. all most of the health organisations in england and scotland that were affected by a global cyber attack are back up and running, but some patients face continued disruption with six trusts in england still affected. security experts are warning workers to protect their devices, in case of a new wave of attacks, as our correspondent richard galpin reports. this unprecedented global cyber attack hit the nhs hardest, leading to cancellations and delays at hospitals and gp surgeries across england and scotland. but ministers attending a meeting of the crisis response team cobra yesterday concluded that the situation was back under control and the nhs was working as normal again, for the most part. and nhs officials insisetd that the disruption was not because they were using old microsoft computer operating systems vulnerable to attack. the nhs has some of the most
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up—to—date technology in the world. if you look back to december 2015, about one in five devices were using xp but now it is less than one in 20. although the worse may be over for now, several hospitals like this one here in york are warning that the disruption will continue beyond the weekend. in the wake of such a virulent cyber attack, security experts are calling on everyone to take simple measures to protect their computers from hackers demanding ransoms to unlock their computer files. the first one is to make sure that your security software patches are up—to—date. the second is to employ proper and good antivirus software and the third and most important for ra nsomwa re protection is to backup your data. but britain was just one of over 100 countries hit by the cyber attack. russia was apparently targeted the most while european telecommunications and car companies were also targeted as were schools
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and universities in china. let's speak now to andy moore who is outside the royal london hospital, part of barts health trust, the biggest in the country. six only yet to be up and running. what are you hearing where you are? still some problems here but the good news, generally, according to amber ride is that 97% of nhs trusts in england are working normally. there are a handful still with problems and here at the royal london hospital there are handwritten notes on the entrance to emergency behind me saying that the it system is still down and it is being treated as a major incident with ambulances being diverted. a similar from with ambulances being diverted. a similarfrom —— a similar problem in lost off. another nhs trust say they
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are cancelling routine surgery tomorrow. 13 health boards affected in scotland. the scottish governments are some of those computer systems are operating as normal which means that some of the marmont that they expect all systems will be operating fully and com pletely will be operating fully and completely as they should buy tomorrow. thank you very much, andy. we will talk more about some of the implications on what people can do to protect themselves and, crucially, however happened and how they managed to control the spread. it is later here on breakfast. the conservatives say they'lljoin forces with councils and housing associations to build thousands of new homes for rent — if they win the general election. theresa may says she wants to fix a broken market. it's not clear how much money the tories would invest, and labour have dismissed the announcement as spin. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. it is my great pleasure to hand that over to you. mrs thatcher became famous
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for selling off council houses. but this conservative prime minister is now pledging to help local authorities build more of them. if re—elected, theresa may would give councils new powers to purchase derelict land and buildings at below market value. housing associationsa well as local authorities could then use these to build more homes for rent. some homes would be sold off after ten to 15 years. tenants would have first option to buy and then proceeds used to fund more rented housing. the policy is aimed at voters who might not be traditionally conservative supporters, including some of the million people on on housing waiting lists. while the conservatives say thousands of new homes would be provided, a precise figure is yet to be given and they have not said how much extra funding would be given. labour pledges to build 100,000 homes a year for rent and sale by the end of next parliament. the party says that conservative policy is spin, not substance, as some of the details are yet to be revealed. let's get more on this now. good
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morning. is the conservative announcement short on detail at the moment? it is a little. we are told they will not be a target on the number of social homes to be built. rather, councils should explain why there is a shortage of social housing in their area and apply. number 10 say they expect there to be instant take—up in birmingham and manchester. this scheme is also lacking in detail about funding, how much money will be put into it. what is clear is that this is definitely an attempt to decrease the waiting list for social housing and, also of ian said, a chance for the tories to park their tanks on labour's law.
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let's talk about labour and their robin hood tax. there has been talk of this before, right? there is talk in the eu of a similar scheme which has not got up and running yet. the city of london did not want to take pa rt city of london did not want to take part because of all the trading that happens. this is what labour want to do. they want to tax people in the city billions of pounds so they can give the money to public services. they will do that this way. for example, last year they raised £3 billion with a small tax on the trading and buying of shares. they wa nt to ta ke trading and buying of shares. they want to take that tax and apply it to bonds and derivatives in the city. they say that will raise £26 billion overfive city. they say that will raise £26 billion over five years and they wa nt to billion over five years and they want to crack down on tax avoidance. the robin hood tax, the billions of pounds for public services, has been criticised by many in the city who say people willjust trade elsewhere or the cost will be passed onto
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consumers. the conservatives say it willjobs in this country. a formal liberal democrat said it was more of a mickey mouse tax than a robin hood tax. at least four people have died and five others have been seriously injured after a passenger train derailed in northern greece last night. the train was travelling from athens to the country's second—largest city, thessaloniki. around 100 passengers were aboard the train when it hit a house. it's unclear what caused it to come off the rails. leeds bradford airport has re—opened after police carried out a controlled explosion on a suspicious package. incoming flights were diverted, and departing flights were delayed, while the item was dealt with after eight o'clock last night. police say the incident is not believed to have been malicious or terror—related. nursing leaders have warned the nhs in england is ‘dangerously‘ short of the nurses it needs. the royal college of nursing has calculated as many as a0 thousand posts are unfilled. the union, which is currently
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considering strike action, blames the situation on stress and pay, but the conservatives say that while they've been in government, the number of nurses has risen. we will be speaking to the chief executive of the royal college of nursing in about 10 minutes' time. north korea has carried out another ballistic missile test, four days after a new president took office in the south. the us military has confirmed a missile was launched near north—western kusong which flew more than 400 miles, before landing in the sea ofjapan. south korea's president, moon jae—in who campaigned on a platform of better engagement with the north condemned the test as a reckless provocation. emmanuel macron will be sworn in as french president today. the former banker, who has never held elected office, won a landslide victory last sunday but will face intense challenges to his promised reforms. his first duties will include appointing a prime minister and flying to berlin to meet the german chancellor,
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angela merkel. portugal has won the eurovision song contest for the first time in the history of the competition. salvador sobral lifted the trophy after winning over both the international juries and tv viewers. the portuguese singer, who is awaiting a heart transplant, described his win as a victory against "fast food music." the uk's lucie jones came 15th out of 26, the country's best result in six years. # now you can see how far you have war# of # now you can see how far you have war # of the mountains climbed... we re war # of the mountains climbed... were you aiming for a particular place? no, i did not want to come last. so actually i did quite well.
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it has come to something when a sign of winning is not coming last, isn't it? she did quite well, to be fair. all credit to her, it was a wonderful song. we will talk more about that later. nhs nurses could move a step closer to holding an all—out strike for the first time today when the results of a royal college of nursing poll are revealed. details of the survey will be outlined at the rcn conference, where nursing leaders are warning about pay restraint and staffing levels. their chief executive and general secretary janet davies joins us now from liverpool. good morning to you and welcome to brea kfast. good morning to you and welcome to breakfast. you have been warning here about staffing levels within the nhs. i wonder if you could outline your particular concerns? what we are finding is that there are so many what we are finding is that there are so many vacancies in the nhs at the moment. we have done a freedom
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of information act and have spoken to directors of nursing and we have found that there are around 40,000 vacancies in england alone. what we also find is that, actually, many more healthcare assistance and support to registered nurses are being employed instead to fill the gaps. we are concerned about the diversion of skills as well as the numbers themselves. why are there so many vacancies? a number of reasons. we have not trained enough nurses for yea rs we have not trained enough nurses for years now so we are not getting new nurses into the nhs to replace those who are retiring. we also see an increasing number of nurses leaving the nhs for various reasons including pay and trying to make ends meet. are your figures are at odds with what the government says. the conservatives say there are 12,000 more nurses than there were in 2010. you don't agree with that? it is an interesting story, really, because there are extra nurses and
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some of our hospitals. what we see here are many where there are not. the amount of house there is also rising. healthcare is not static, are getting older and living longer and we require more nurses than we did. what we're really seeing is the decrease mental health and community services. those of those areas that keep people healthy. very important services which prevent people from having acute episodes and coming into hospital. that is the problem as you see it. how would you resolve it and get more people back into nursing as a profession and nursing to the quality and standard you would expect? we need investment. we need investment in our health service more generally because what we also find with this report is that, actually, there isn't enough money in the system. the trusts are in deficit and to save money they do not fill those vacancies. if you look at the amount of money available in the number of nurses needed, it does not add up. we need
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an investment into nursing as well is increase investment in student nurses so they can go to university and work on our wards which is what the courses do frown nurses, to get far more into the nhs. many people wa nt to far more into the nhs. many people want to be nurses and we want to make it easier for them. you have held a poll of your members to determine whether or not there would be enough support for strike action. could you tell us what support that have? we can not at the moment. we tell a medicine nine o'clock and it is important for us that the people have taken part in a poll hear the news first and they hear it from us so there will be an announcement at nine o'clock this morning. so there will be an announcement at nine o'clock this morninglj so there will be an announcement at nine o'clock this morning. ijust a while i have you, i would like to talk about the cyber attack on the nhs because it is something that will affected your members, people struggling to do theirjob because of the attack on the systems. what information do you have from your staff? how badly affected were they? they say it has been difficult but
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the thing about nurses is that they can carry on with their work and keep our patients safe and make sure they are well cared for. i am confident, from what we hear from the nurses, that that has been the case. having that information is important, having the systems, it demonstrates how reliant we are on technology which has made a huge difference to healthcare. how important it is to keep that investment going on the security measures up investment going on the security measures up and make sure you do not have attacks like this in the future. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: many of the health trusts in england and scotland affected by friday's global cyber attack have had their it systems restored. but security experts say workers should protect their devices in case of a new wave of attacks. emmanuel macron, the winner of last weekend's french election will be inaugurated as france's next president in paris later today. and coming up on the
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programme: he's one of showjumping's all—time greats with an impressive medal haul including two olympic golds, we've been speaking to nick skelton to reflect on his sporting achievements as he and his brilliant stallion big star prepare to bow out. here's helen with a look at this morning's weather. a bit damp but a bit warm? yes, a bit damp buta bit warm? yes, a mixed bag. it is needed rain across eastern areas in particular. it is a really positive picture today. particularly with what's coming our way for the new week so stay with us. this was sent in from norfolk, showing the rain to start the day. it has already cleared in northern
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ireland, wales, the south—west of scotla nd ireland, wales, the south—west of scotland that it will hang into the south—east for the next couple of hours. mid—morning, by the time most of us finished breakfast getting out for a stroll, it should have cleared. it should take rather longer across the north—east of scotla nd longer across the north—east of scotland and linger in the isles for the afternoon but on the whole, once it clears away, it will be a much, much brighter prospect for scotland from lunchtime on. there are showers already developing so it went the plain sailing and stop there will be big showers developing. a lot of dry weather around and good spells of sunshine. it's strong sunshine, i have to point out, it is on par with latejuly, early have to point out, it is on par with late july, early august. have to point out, it is on par with latejuly, early august. high category from anywhere we are seeing the sunshine. it materialises across the sunshine. it materialises across the of scotland. you can see, the
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showers are also developing and there will be a fair few across the highlands. sharp ones. some they will be congregating. most places will be congregating. most places will have more dry and bright weather than showers today. hence the positive outlook. fresh air for the positive outlook. fresh air for the north and east but it is an optimistic picture it turns pretty wet across the western side of the country. the rain is there to greet us on country. the rain is there to greet us on monday morning. it looks particularly wet tomorrow across south let's pass —— south—west parts of scotland. very few places escaping the damp and grey weather. you are watching breakfast. time now for a look at the newspapers. entertainment journalist emma bullimore is here to tell us what's caught her eye. there is a lot of eurovision in your
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list. they stayed up very late. half 50% of us are of no religion. it will come as no surprise to people that we are becoming more and more secular but the observer is saying that this might be as secular as we are going to get for now. most people have decided not to be religious and now and that's it for now. they are saying that now, if you are likely to convert, it would have happened already. immigration numbers in london? yes, london is different to the rest of the country. it's interesting when you start looking at those numbers. it is different to what you might
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expect. the headline figure is different to what you might think of. eurovision. .. you different to what you might think of. eurovision... you have been promising it and here tears. the mail on sunday is talking about never giving up mail on sunday is talking about nevergiving up on mail on sunday is talking about never giving up on the eu, it never give up on you. lots of people thought that it was a plea to the eu. whatever my country has voted, i believe in the eu. she did so well. it was an amazing vocal performance, a great song and everybody got very overexcited. they thought you know what, we might be onto something and it turned out, or you won't. the staging of it looked great. a lot of the europeans spend so much time touring around europe therefore they are touring around europe therefore they a re really touring around europe therefore they are really familiar by the time it comes to the final. and we don't do that here. we then have the same
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relationship. she has been all around tried to push her song. she came 15th which is best us in six yea rs, came 15th which is best us in six years, not so bad. she said in a clip earlier that she won because she didn't come last. she gave it everything, she sang her socks off. we need more gold paint. talk us through this one. the papers are going matt scott peter middleton's wedding which is next week. —— the papers are going mad for pippa middleton's wedding. she wants more gold paint. it is the wrong shade, it needs to be better and they are working on it. middleton press offices says it was happening anyway. they were doing their
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refurbishment. absolutely. this is quite a small story compared to some of the other papers. this is one week before the wedding so next weekend... has she written a book about weddings? perhaps. you have chosen a lovely picture for us. peter shea has said he's car show. now he's doing an advert for a popular bread rant. he is channelling mr darcy and poldark and all of those heroes. it's going to be interesting to see it. whatever next? just when you thought eurovision wasn't weird enough. fresh from his election victory
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emmanuel macron will today be sworn in as the youngest ever president of france. it's an historic day for the 39—year—old, and his country, so let's find out what the mood is there this morning, let's cross to karin giaonnone who's at the elysee palace, the president's official residence. this is the as close as we can get to the palace. the street is in lockdown. all we can see here, really, a police and the worldmedia. journalists are here from all over the world, as you can imagine. it will be a couple of hours until emmanuel macron arrives stop people going that the police —— the palace. he will be handed france's nuclear codes. there will be a grand ceremony in the ballroom of debt palace and after that, he will
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emerge as france's next president. —— the palace. this talk about this some more with a french commentator and journalist. as it's sunk in for the french that they have 39—year—old, the youngest president ever? think a lot of people have been out and about celebrating. since then, they are also aware that the president has an immense task ahead in effectively getting into the nitty—gritty. he is aware of it himself, in a sense. it's usually the first to support task is to win an election and then governance follows but in his case, he won in the most convincing circumstances possible and now the difficulty is starting in putting together candidates to stand up for him in the national assembly to represent his new movement. that parliamentary election is coming up injune11,
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the challenge is very, very close. how familiarfor the the challenge is very, very close. how familiar for the french will the ceremony today look? considering how unconventional this rise to politics has been. dilemma this will remain a very traditional and conventional inauguration. it's a very important moment. —— this will remain. inauguration. it's a very important moment. -- this will remain. there isa moment. -- this will remain. there is a lot of pomp and circumstance but over the years, it has become less formal. it is important, not just because it will be a straight handover of power at some point but it will be followed by a nick hyde day of parades, speeches, a civil and military tribute and honour —— and military tribute and honour —— an entire day. security is extremely tight. we all is remember that france's under a state of emergency. indeed. you see an awful lot of riot police officers on the street but
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also officers on plainclothes, making sure everything will go as smoothly as possible. to people like to turn out these sorts of things? we have seen the crowd to build down the street. do the french come out and watch their presidents become yes and when it comes to the predominantly ministry —— military honours. it has to be said, emmanuel macron was there last week that he had innocence rehearsed. an interesting point is that unlike francois hollande, emmanuel macron has never served in the military but he has a strong sense of history and the legacy of french military legacy. he will put his heart into this particular part of the ceremony. a huge day of events here in the centre of paris. remember, just a week ago, 11 million people
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didn't vote, they voted for his rival marine le pen of the far right so one of emmanuel macron's biggest challenges is to try and reunite the country. a big day in paris. the andrew marr programme is on bbc one this morning at nine o'clock. andrew, what have you got coming up? from their election to our election. it has been the battle for the patriotic working class vote. i am joint head to head with emily thornbury, labour's shadow secretary. for those who think it is london centric cobber i will have nicola sturgeon live in the studio. --i will nicola sturgeon live in the studio. ——i will have nicola sturgeon. stay with us — headlines coming—up. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and sian lloyd. coming up before eight helen will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. most of the health trusts in england
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and scotland that were affected by a global cyber attack have had their it systems restored. the attack, which affected thousands of computer systems in about 100 countries, has been described as unprecedented. security experts are warning workers to protect their devices, in case of a new wave of attacks. the conservatives say they'lljoin forces with councils and housing associations to build thousands of new homes for rent — if they win the general election. theresa may says she wants to fix a broken market. it's not clear how much money the tories would invest, and labour, who have committed to building a million new homes in the next five years, have criticised the announcement as spin. labour says it would raise billions of pounds for public services with a new tax on financial transactions — known as a "robin hood" tax. the party said extending
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the way shares were taxed would bring in up to 26 billion pounds in the next parliament, if they won the general election. the conservatives described labour's plans as a "shambles". nursing leaders have warned the nhs in england is dangerously short of the nurses it needs. the royal college of nursing has calculated as many as 40,000 posts are unfilled. the union, which is currently considering strike action, blames the situation on stress and pay, but the conservatives say that while they've been in government, the number of nurses has risen. actually, there isn't even enough money in the system. to save money, they are not filling some of these vacancies. if you look at the amount of money available and the amount of nurses needed, it doesn't add up so we need investment into nursing as well as an increased investment into student nurses so they can go to university and work on our wards which is what the courses do for our nurses to get far more into our nhs.
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at least four people have died and five others have been seriously injured after a passenger train derailed in northern greece last night. the train was travelling from athens to the country's second—largest city, thessaloniki. around 100 passengers were aboard the train when it hit a house. it's unclear what caused it to come off the rails. north korea has carried out another ballistic missile test, four days after a new president took office in the south. the us military has confirmed a missile was launched near north—western kusong which flew more than 400 miles, before landing in the sea ofjapan. south korea's president, moon jae—in who campaigned on a platform of better engagement with the north condemned the test as a reckless provocation. emmanuel macron will be sworn in as french president today. the former banker, who has never held elected office, won a landslide victory last sunday but will face intense challenges to his promised reforms. his first duties will include appointing a prime minister and flying to berlin to meet the german chancellor, angela merkel.
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egyptian archaeologists have discovered an ancient burial site holding at least 17 mummies, most of them fully intact, which could date back 2,000 years. the site was uncovered eight metres below ground near the nile valley city of minya, about 150 miles south of cairo. the mummies were elaborately preserved and therefore likely belong to officials and priests. work at the site, which is close to an ancient animal cemetery, is only at a preliminary stage, so the discovery could be much bigger. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9:00 this morning, and still to come this morning: the travel show team are in columbia this week, examining the legacy of one of the country's most controversial criminals. he's one of showjumping's all—time greats with an impressive medal haul including two olympic golds, we've been speaking to nick skelton to reflect on his sporting achievements as he and his brilliant stallion big star
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prepare to bow out. all that to come on the bbc news channel. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. lets get all of the sport news now. good morning. we will discuss saracens. back—to—back. a brilliant effort, back—to—back european champions. an amazing achievement, only the fourth club in history who have managed that. they are english champions as well. on top of that, 0wen farrell was also named european player of the year. so saracens can now claim to be one of the uk's most dominant teams in world sport with that 28—17 victory over clermont auvergne in yesterday's final at murrayfield. it was a hard—fought victory. but as patrick gearey reports sarries showed once again just why they are champions. edinburgh, city of performing arts
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and the stage for a team that has made performing its art. saracens, european champions last year, back to defend their title. this was the billed as the day they could achieve greatness. alex goode spotted chris ashton. down the runway, prepare for take—off. that made him the top try scorer in the european cup, this his signature in the record book. sarries were rampant, another try was coming, george kruis finished forcefully rather than photogenically. deja vu for those in blue, clermont have lost 13 major finals but remy lamerat gave them hope. saracens edged further ahead but clermont need something. nick abendanon, once of england, sent cheers echoing to the middle of france. 72 minutes, one point in it, just when saracens thrive. again alex goode saw a chance, the man who created the first try scored the decisive one. 0wen farrell's mastery of geometry improved the arithmetic.
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saracens had done it again. somebody asked earlier on, they said that to win back—to—back cups must be pleasing but for me it was the manner in the way we played today that was pleasing. it was hugely encouraging. this is a team that does not stop at the top. even as they lift this trophy, they are thinking of the next one. manchester city's dominance of the women's game continues after they won the fa cup for the first time. it means they now hold all three major domestic trophies following their 4—1 victory over birmingham city at wembley. jessica creighton watched the action. the women's game is making a lot of noise these days. for the third year running, record numbers of fans marched to wembley for english football's showpiece competition. manchester city are growing superpower. lucy bronze showed her strength from the first goal before setting up a second.
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then it was the turn of manchester city's star player to shine. birmingham out of the game but at least their fans had something to cheer about. man city were not finished. jill scott wrapped up their third trophy in a few months. these are big players who play on big occasions and our performance today was unbelievable. for so long, this is the competition that manchester he said he wanted to win. and now they can add the fa cup to their super league and league cup titles. they have proven here today that they are now the dominant force in english women's football. joy then for manchester city's women at wembley, and don't forget voting for the annual bbc women's footballer of the year award closes on monday morning at 9am. five superb players from around the world are waiting for your vote so go to bbc.co.uk/womensfootball
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and choose your favourite chelsea clinched the premier league title on friday, of course, so the scramble at the top is for those champions league spots. manchester city moved a step closer to securing one, they're back up to third after a narrow 2—1win over leicester — the goals came from david silva and a gabrieljesus penalty in the first half. leicester got one back and looked to have rescued a point with this riyad mahrez penalty but the referee spotted that he had kicked the ball twice and disallowed the goal. arsenal closed the gap on the top four, they're nowjust one point behind fourth—placed liverpool after a comfortable four—one win at stoke. 0livier giroud scored twice. all the pressure now then on liverpool who play west ham later. swansea had a crucial win, they moved four points clear of the drop zone with a 2—0 win at sunderland. paul clement's side were four points adrift at the bottom of the table when the manager took over
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injanuary, but kyle naughton's strike means they could be safe from relegation by the end of the day. coming into weird, our motivation was much higher. although sunderland gaveit was much higher. although sunderland gave it a great effort, what it meant to us was much more. use all that in our performance, particularly in the first half. so there are three fixtures today in the premier league. as already mentioned, liverpool travel to west ham needing a win to strengthen their hold on a champions league spot. before that, hull face a pivotal trip to crystal palace — they must win to stand any realistic chance of avoiding relegation. and the late game is tottenham's last at white hart lane, they host manchester united. fulham and reading drew the first leg of their championship play—off semi—final at craven cottage. jordan 0bita struck for reading after 53 minutes. but fulham fought back and tom kairney levelled. reading later had a man sent off but it remained 1—all. the second leg is on tuesday. today huddersfield play sheffield wednesday in the other semi final. rangers have secured third place in the scottish premiership.
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they beat hearts 2—1 at ibrox. barrie mckay with the winner in the second half. hearts played most of the match with ten men after prince buaben was sent off. elsewhere dundee helped their survival chances with a point against ross county. motherwell are out of the relegation play off spot after they won at hamilton. kilmarnock will stay up, after beating inverness. and a win for stjohnstone confirmed european football for them next season. mercedes‘ lewis hamilton edged out title rival sebastian vettel to take pole position ahead of the ferrari for today's spanish grand prix. hamilton clocked his quickest lap early on in q3, and despite a last second attempt by vettel to surpass him, the german could only manage second — 0.051 seconds slower. valterri bottas was third. that was very good. the first two
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we re that was very good. the first two were 0k in the last one was so so. i can see my supporters here, thank you, guys. it is always a morale boost when you come to... it is not your home and you see support, you quys your home and you see support, you guys really make the atmosphere what it is. ian poulter has rediscovered his form at the players championship in florida. poulter only played 13 tournaments last year because of a foot injury and he's slipped well down the rankings but he's just three shots off the lead going into the final round after shooting a 71. americanjb holmes and kyle stanley share the lead on nine under par the women's tennis federation has said that ilie nastase's presence at yesterday's madrid 0pen trophy presentation was "irresponsible and unacceptable". romania's fed cup captain is under investigation following his behaviour during his last month's tie with britain. meanwhile in the men's tournament, rafael nadal is through to the final after beating novak djokovic in straights sets. nadal is unbeaten in all of his 14 matches on clay this season. he'll play austrian dominic thiem in the final. britain's double 0lympic
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gold—medallist nicola adams continued her 100% record in her professional career. she beat mexico's maryan salazar with a third round stoppage in her home town of leeds. it was her first technical knock out since turning pro. adams will hope to move towards a world title fight next. britain's geraint thomas remains six seconds off the overall lead going through to the quarter—finals after a dominant win at thejungle castle. they ran in ten tries to win 53- castle. they ran in ten tries to win 53— ten, including a hat—trick. quite a 53— ten, including a hat—trick. quitea margin, 53— ten, including a hat—trick. quite a margin, isn't it? castleford at the top of super league what a win it is for them. don't go too far. i want to learn about your
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favourite thing ever... a lewd. absolutely glued. this is not richards favourite subject, eurovision. portugal has won the eurovision song contest for the first time in the history of the competition. salvador sobral, who is awaiting a heart transplant, lifted the trophy after winning over both the internationaljuries, and the tv viewers. the uk's luciejones delivered the country's best result in six years, as our correspondent steve rosenberg reports. he could not believe it. but salvador sobral had just won eurovision. his victory is portugal's first in the contest after 49 attempts. as for the song, amar pelos dois, his sister wrote it and it is very un—eurovision. no gimmicks, no video screens. just a melancholic melody
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and his charisma and charm. bulgaria came second. portuguese eurovision fans have been waiting for this moment for such a long time. they had grown so used to losing that winning sparked plenty of emotion. amazing. it will be amazing. it is like a dream come true. flying the flag for the uk was luciejones. a power ballad, never give up, placed 15th, our best result for six years. were you aiming for a particular place? no, ijust did not want to come last, so actually i did really well. and, of course, this being eurovision there was weird... there was wonderful...
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and what on earth was this?! but perhaps it won't be the music we remember. it's the mischief. during the interval act a man got up on stage and bared his bottom live on tv. a bum note indeed. an estimated 200 million people will have watched tonight's contest. the show always delivers high ratings. personally, i wish it would have delivered a few more points to the united kingdom. we would've liked to have had a more votes. we were discussing some of
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the dance moves. helen, what will the dance moves. helen, what will the weather be doing down there in south wayville? —— wales. a beautiful start today. you won't convinced that my optimistic forecast for today. lots of dry and bright weather around eventually but first thing, we have some rain. this was sent in from norfolk earlier on. just another hour or so of the rain to come. much of wales and the south—west of scotland, lovely sunshine this morning but there are a few more hours of rain to come across the far north—east of scotla nd across the far north—east of scotland and into the afternoon for the northern isles. but that clears away, for scotland, it will be a
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less grey day. much, much brighter. we already have the showers around across set no donee and the beacons. —— snowdonia. particularly today. around cardigan bay, up into the cumbrian coastline, dutiful sunshine. inland, you are more likely to catch a shower —— beautiful sunshine. there could be heavy ones with hail and thunder. 0utside heavy ones with hail and thunder. outside the showers, strong sunshine. the dry weather starts but doesn't last. a chilly night but for the start of the working week, enjoy the start of the working week, enjoy the sunshine because they will be rain to content with tomorrow morning. there is autumnal looking
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low pressure. it will bring strong winds as well as heavy rain. a couple of inches could fall across scotland. not too much rain in eastern areas but a little is better than nothing. it is warm rain. 16— 18 high. there is more away as we had three tuesday and wednesday looks particularly wet across the south and east. if not add news, we need the rain. but, it's south and east. if not add news, we need the rain. but, its may. if that looked depressing and damp, here is the travel show. coming up on this week's travel show: we're in colombia, exploring the legacy of one of the country's most controversial criminals. we're here at pablo's prison slash five star resort! 0oops! did ijust make that man crash? i hit the road in tokyo,
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taking tourists for a ride. they look a bit shell—shocked! hello and welcome to the travel show, coming to you this week from tokyo in japan, with me carmen roberts. a little later on in the show, i'll be trying my hand at pulling one of the iconic rickshaws that weaves its way through the streets here. but first... we're in medellin, in the north west of colombia. two decades ago it was one of the most dangerous cities in the world, as the notorious drug lord pablo escobar waged war against the government. now, the city has been transformed, but for many tourists who come here, the fascination with escobar endures. we travelled to his hometown to find out how tours about his life are dividing public opinion there. people are still scared,
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and still are scared to come to colombia, especially medellin. for a long time it was the most violent city in the world. we're here at la catedral, pablo's prison slash five star resort! la catedral was a jail that escobar built for himself and which was part of the agreement with the government that he would turn himself in, but he would come to his jail. in here, they've still got some of the remains of what used to be his bed. the frame...
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pretty big bed. if you look in here, there's a plaque on the wall with little white crosses. that's a memorial to, i think, the amount of people they think were killed here when pablo was here. so this is the view he would see over his domain. at that time, pablo ran medellin. medellin was his. this tour has become very controversial, even with the mayor here of medellin. i can understand that, because they lived through some terrible times.
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some people are trying to glorify this guy, and they actually have a name for it. they call it narco tourism. in the beginning i didn't want to come on the tour because i was like, should i go on the tour? it'd be giving money to something that created such devastation in the past. more tourists know about it, more around the world, so the more real it is. i think that the kids of colombia also need to learn about him, so i think it could actually be a school tour as well, possibly, notjust for tourists. now we are headed to barrio pablo escobar, and that's the actual name of the neighbourhood! he built 300 plus houses for these people, that were living in the city dump. he went and got them out of the dump, gave each one of these families their own house. as you can imagine,
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people here love him. you might not make it out of here if you come up here to talk bad about escobar. alright, here, we are at pablo's grave. this is the man right here, his final resting spot. pablo emilio escobar gaviria. as you can see, people here taking selfies... you can sit here all afternoon and you just see people coming and going, coming and going, to come and see the grave. it's part of the history here, i don't think we should forget what happened in that era and how that came about. now, come to tokyo and you're surrounded by so many
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iconic sights and sounds. but maybe none is more japanese than the hand pulled rickshaw! in other cities around the world, tourist rickshaws are sometimes seen as an unregulated menace. but here in asakusa, in tokyo, the hand pulled carts are a much loved symbol of the city. hi! i've come down to meet one of the city's few female rickshaw drivers. so how did you get into this career? i liked the marathon! i went to the hong kong marathon, vancouver marathon, many races, and one day i saw the rickshaw in asakusa and oh, i thought this is myjob! it felt like destiny! wow, 0k. yeah! the rickshaw, orjinrikisha as they're called here,
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was invented in tokyo in the 19th century. her boss told me how things have changed since then. translation: the rickshaw used to be like a taxi a long time ago but now it's more for entertainment. a good rickshaw driver needs to quickly feel what the customer wants to do. some people want to be entertained, some want to see the scenery, some want to listen to the guide. it depends on the customer. 0k, first we have to look the part. you've got me a uniform? yeah, this is our uniform. 0k. here we go. and to complete the look i'm wearing those traditional split toe shoes. it's more comfortable than running shoes! is it!? yeah! there we go. i might look the part, but i soon realise there's more to the job than just
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manoeuvring the rickshaw. how heavy is this? 100kg! what! wow, that's heavy! ok, you sit like this, hold maybe here, then stand up very slowly like this... 0k. because if you do it quick, the customer gets very scared. 0h, isee. now, i'll be slow, try not to scare you... 0k! wow, wow! ok, so they're two small children... but it still counts! they look a bit scared! slowly... up! these two are heavier than you! here we go! this isn't too bad, actually. once you get going you get a bit of momentum. they look a bit shell—shocked! highfive! i think it's safe to say it's best i leave that to the professionals, but if you're in tokyo
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and want to give a proper rickshaw tour a go, you'll find the drivers near the kaminarimon gate, near the exit of the asakusa metro station. ride time is agreed in advance, and the cheapest option is a ten minute jog around the neighbourhood for roughly 3,000 yen — that's roughly about £35. well, that's all we've got time for on this week's show. coming up next week: we're injaffa, in israel, to meet the actors who perform as part of the world's first ever deaf—blind theatre company. so do look out for that, and in the meantime sign up to our social media feeds so you can follow all the travel show team around the world, on theirjourneys, in real time. all the details of where to find us online should be on your screen now. but until next time, from me carmen roberts, and the rest of the travel show team here in tokyo, it's goodbye! hello, this is breakfast,
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with ben thompson and sian lloyd. the investigation continues into the cyber attack that caused chaos in the nhs — security experts warn workers to prepare for a new wave of attacks. almost all of the affected health trusts are back up and running. but problems persist at a handful of organisations, with some patients told to expect further disruption. good morning, it's 8am, it's sunday the 14th of may. also ahead: the conservatives promise powers for councils to build more homes for rent. labour says the plan lacks detail. we will be live in paris as emmanuel
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macron is due to be sworn in as france's new president. in sport, saracens are champions of europe again...
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