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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 15, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. a warning of fresh disruption from the global cyber attack, when workers switch on their computers for the first time at the start of the working week. microsoft says the attack should be treated as a wake—up call. it is still causing serious issues at seven nhs organisations. good morning, it is monday 15 may. also this morning: theresa may will pledge time off to care for relatives and expansion of workers‘ rights if her party wins the general election. average pay will go up just 1% this year, the lowest rise in three years. so, if we are feeling the squeeze, what does it mean for the economy? in sport: hull city are relegated from premier league following defeat to crystal palace, and it was an emotional day at white hart lane, as tottenham say farewell to their home of more
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than 100 years. he is the sky diver who has broken a world record byjumping out of a plane at the age of 101. and matt has the weather. good morning. certainly not whether for skydiving. it is a wet start to the week for many of you but i will see if i can find some sunshine in the forecast to get you through the next few days. all the details coming up inis next few days. all the details coming up in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: there is a warning of fresh disruption from the global cyber attack this morning, when workers switch on their computers for the first time at the start of the working week. microsoft has described the attack, which began on friday, as a wake—up call, and criticised customers who didn't keep their systems up to date. let's take a look at where things stand this morning. it is thought there are more than 200,000 victims of friday's cyber attack, but that figure may
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rise as people return to work this morning. organisations in 150 countries were targeted, including germany's rail network, spanish telecommunications operator telefonica, french carmaker renault, and russia's interior ministry. the cost of the attack to date is unknown, but bbc analysis of three accounts linked to the ransom demands suggest hackers have already been paid the equivalent of £22,080. 0ur correspondent richard galpin reports. the computer virus which first hit the health service on friday is still causing serious problems at seven hospitals and other nhs organisations in england, particularly the ability to diagnose medical conditions. the images from mri and ct scanning machines, as well as x—rays, can no longer be sent via computer to operating theatres. but the other big worry
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this morning is what will happen when medical staff, especially at gps' when medical staff, especially at gps‘ surgeries, return to work and switch on their computers for the first time since friday. organisations that were did on friday and over the weekend might find that some of the problems have spread. that is not to say that the attacks are new. it is a repercussion of what happened on friday. this map shows how the malicious software has spread across the world. there are now 200,000 victims, including large businesses and organisations in more than 150 countries. and microsoft, whose popular computer operating systems we re popular computer operating systems were the target of the attack, has warned governments of what happens isa warned governments of what happens is a wake—up call. particularly for those governments deliberately keeping quiet about software vulnerabilities so they can exploit these themselves. there are fears that more medical
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staff may discover their computers are affected when they switch them on this morning. let's get the latest now from our reporter holly hamilton, who is outside york hospital, one of those affected by the cyber attack. it has certainly been a busy weekend for them. what do we know this morning? good morning. that's right. i think morning? good morning. that's right. ithink our morning? good morning. that's right. i think our problem this morning is that we just don't quite know the full extent of this attack on the nhs, and out of those 47 in england that were affected there are seven nhs trusts still struggling this morning. 11 in scotland. and bear in mind that this attack happened on friday so they will be thousands of nhs staff who will be returning to work this monday morning, locking back onto pcs and devices for the first time since this attack. —— logging back on. so perhaps we may get some indication how far this has spread. this caused huge problems over the weekend, causing major backlogs in appointments. many ambulances had to be diverted to
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other hospitals. here in york, as you mentioned, they have been working around the clock to try and get those appointments back to normal. and they have told us that they are hoping this morning those will return to normal. and in york, at this trust alone, some 6000 systems were affected and trying to look at every single one of those devices and machines has been extremely time—consuming. i mean, if operations alone were affected here, 30 on saturday a loan, and this is a trust that did have the right operations in place. they did have the right systems. they had invested in patches to prevent an attack like this happening. but this morning the advice from health officials in scotla nd advice from health officials in scotland and england is if you do have an appointment, please do attend as normal. this is an attack which was unprecedented in its scale but they are hoping that things will return to normal, and i think the issue now this morning is that there will be a backlog. gp practices are
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already saying to attend as normal but the issue with that is that some of those systems are online, there are people who are struggling to see the appointments, if you have made an appointment online you may not get through. so this will be a very difficult day for the nhs and with this huge backlog in operations and appointments, this may have an effect for days to come. thank you very much, we will see you a bit later on. so what you should you be doing if you are going into work this morning, and turn on your computer for the first time since friday's attack? the bbc‘s technology reporter chris foxx is here. you will be out here throughout the morning, and if you have any questions, you will be here throughout the day as well. so if you see that screen that we have seen over the weekend, what should you do? for the majority it will be business as usual. you will probably go to work today and see nothing different at all. you might at most have an e—mail from your it department telling you what to do. my department telling you what to do. my first piece of advice is know who
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to call, get there straightaway in the morning and find out who to call if you see that screen pop up. if it does pop up, taking action quickly as the key. a reminder of what some people have been seeing this week. that is the screen shot there. get on the it straightaway, they might have more advice in terms of shutting down your computer so it can't spread further. the reason it might pop up again today is because computers have been switched off all weekend and if there is something lurking back, when people go back to work, it could continue spreading. luckily it managers had all we can to do overtime and patch the systems, if they can. and cyber criminals have had a whole weekend to develop new versions which can continue spreading. a lot of people working harder than ever, trying to sort this out. and we will be available to answer any questions about this. you can get in contact by the normal e—mail, social media, all the normal business. we will be talking to the minister responsible for cyber crime and security, ben wallace, at 7:40am.
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theresa may will today promise the biggest expansion of workers' rights of any conservative administration if her party wins the general election. the prime minister will outline a series of pledges described as a new deal for workers, but labour said mrs may is taking people for fools. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. iain, is this a conservative party pitch for labour voters? imean, i mean, this is an interesting one. we have heard theresa may talk in the past about workers' rights. what is different about this? it is a bigger package of workers' writes, as we spoke about. she is repeating this idea of having workers sitting on company boards, something she mentioned when she first became prime minister, distancing herself from david cameron. she is making a pitch for votes by offering rights which the last labour government didn't get around to doing. you mentioned the year off if you want to look after a relative, but also new rights or bereaved parents to ta ke new rights or bereaved parents to take time off legally from work, something that wouldn't be at the
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behest of their employer. so there isa behest of their employer. so there is a package of rights that, but i think she is also trying to reassure people about the brexit process as well and saying we are not going to become some kind of bargain basement economy, as she suggests, because you will still have the same rights as you have under the european union. ina as you have under the european union. in a sense she is making this pitch for labour territory, labour playing on seipt territory today, talking about the nhs, jeremy corbyn speaking to nurses in liverpool telling people he will lift their pay cap and offering more money for the nhs, including £10 billion for a whole range of new projects. including, very releva ntly, whole range of new projects. including, very relevantly, i suppose, upgrading the it systems. interesting, and of course an important time for that. we will be talking to you later as well. workers in the public sector will receive an average pay rise of nearly £780 if the liberal democrats win the general election. the party is pledging to abolish a cap which has seen pay rises for nurses and teachers limited to 1% since 2012. labour's manifesto is also expected to include a promise to get rid of the cap, but the conservatives
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say it is needed to help reduce the deficit. north korea says the missile it tested successfully on sunday was a new type of rocket capable of carrying a nuclear warhead. the north korean news agency said the launch involved a mid—to—long—range ballistic missile known as hwasong—12. it said the leader, kim jong—un, personally oversaw the launch. the united states called for further sanctions in response to the test, calling north korea a flagrant menace. but, speaking in seoul, this south korean resident says she isn't feeling panicked. president trump has been urged to hand over any recordings of conversations between him and sacked fbi directorjames comey to the authorities. senior opposition politicians continue to pressure the president over allegations russia meddled in last year's election. they warn destroying any tapes, if they exist, would be against the law. the gritty police drama happy valley was among the winners at last night's bafta television awards in london. the bbc nature series planet earth ii won twice,
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including prize for best television moment, for a chase involving newly hatched iguanas and racer snakes. here is our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. it was an evening when the bbc dominated, winning more than three quarters of the night's awards. its strongest showing in recent years. ..happy valley. hgppy happy valley was a double award winner. the yorkshire—set crime drama won best drama series and best actress for sarah lancashire. it is the most demanding piece i have ever done as an actor. it is the most demanding piece i have ever done as an actorlj it is the most demanding piece i have ever done as an actor. i pray forjustice. damilola, our loved boy a moving drama about the murdered schoolboy,
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also won two prizes, including best supporting actress for wunmi mosa ku. i want to thank the tailors for your courage and your honesty. best actor went for a drama about so—called honour killing, murdered by a father. everyone knows! best supporting actor, for the night manager. the bbc victoria derbyshire programme won the news award. there were a couple of awards for planet earth ii, including that for the moment of its snake—versus—iguana chase. best live event went to her majesty's 90th birthday celebrations. she has never won a
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ba fta. celebrations. she has never won a bafta. she was given an honorary fellowship of years ago but she has never won a bafta. so tonight the queen has finally won a bafta. and actress joanna lumley queen has finally won a bafta. and actressjoanna lumley received a standing ovation as she presented with bafta's highest accolade, the fellowship. yes, chairs, sweeties, thanks a lot. —— cheers. fellowship. yes, chairs, sweeties, thanks a lot. -- cheers. in recognition of a career which spanned almost half a century. during that you have produced the most amazing bafta stat. you get a free spray tan as you go into the baftas, apparently. in the build-up? on the night you could get a bit sticky, but yes. so you have to look around? no, it isjust very few want to. that is an insight into the world of showbiz. we will watch that
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again and see if they look tanned. we will have all the weather very shortly. john is here with a look at the weekend's sport. and mixed emotions all round. at the top in the bottom. there is not long to go and you can see by that picture, hull city are down, which means they are joining sunderland. and middlesbrough. but for tottenham as well, they were saying goodbye to their stadium after 100 years. great scenes. real highs and lows in the premier league yesterday. hull beaten 4—0 by crystal palace, meaning they willjoin sunderland and middlesbrough in the championship next season. very different emotions at white hart lane, as spurs said goodbye to their home of 118 years, beating manchester united 2—1. that secures second in the table. elsewhere, liverpool are up to third after a 4—0 win over west ham. lewis hamilton has trimmed the gap on sebastian vettel to six points
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at the top of formula one's drivers‘ championship. he was second for much of the race, but overtook in the closing stages to secure his second race win of the season. geraint thomas's hopes of winning the giro d'italia have suffered a major blow, after he dislocated a shoulder in a crash on yesterday's ninth stage. this was him on the tarmac. he got back up to finish, but trails the overall leader, nairo quintana, by more than five minutes. a bit ofa a bit of a sad end, with still some 11 stages to go. he was doing really well but that crash has put in com pletely well but that crash has put in completely out of it. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. the headline says it all. we will
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see rain at some point today. some of more than others. across the hills of north wales and north—west england, some of you will see more rain in the next 2a hours than you have done in the past six weeks. let's look at the details. not the start of the week that you want but we do need the rain. it is courtesy of this area of cloud pushing up from the south—west. it brings increasingly mild air to take us through the day but that my dad brings moisture. —— mild air. north and east scotland, a dry start, i few glimmers of sunshine. around murray first, some of the warmest conditions today. not too bad. —— rain across wales, south—west england. a dry enough start to the day across eastern counties of england where we have sunshine and a
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chilly start. here, only a few splashes of rain. the breeze will be freshening up. a few breaks of cloud around the moray firth. because it averages in the high—teens across north—east england. we stick with a lot of clout. outbreaks of rain coming and going. —— cloud. extensive missed and low cloud —— mist. note the temperatures into tomorrow morning. it will be a mild night. mid—teens tomorrow morning. another great start. some warm and tie to the eastern flank of this weather front. brighter tie to the eastern flank of this weatherfront. brighter conditions for scotland, northern ireland. they will still be a scattering of showers around. lots of cloud for england and wales. east anglia,
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south—east, a bit of sunshine tomorrow. you could see temperatures, on the outside chance, up temperatures, on the outside chance, up to 24. further north and west, to bridges in the upper teens. more sunshine to the north and west on wednesday across southern and eastern parts, some very heavy rain stop the heaviest we have seen for quite a while. we will keep you up dated. we do need to rain, after all. i liked that we had a 24 in death. short on! —— in there. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: let's take a look at this morning's papers. if you have any questions about what has happened with the web hackers,
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sending your questions. a lot of papers picking up on the election ma nifestoes papers picking up on the election manifestoes coming out. the conservative party says workers will be allowed to take a year's sabbatical to care for sick relatives. i will be talking to them later on about that. poldark is on the front page of the sun and there story is about the moors murderer being on his deathbed this morning. the front page of the times, workers rights. may give all workers new rights. may give all workers new rights to time off. do labour feel under attack from mrs may and the conservatives this morning? oh, sorry i ignored the french kiss. that is emmanuel macron and his wife. he is named french president this morning. we talked a lot about
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fa ke this morning. we talked a lot about fake news. in the financial times, they say the main parties are pointing at facebook is their most potent weapon. there are some interesting quotes if you read into it. a labour source saying lots of lights are an effective digital campaign. they can engage younger voters three social media that they are putting a lot of budget into facebook this year. a quick story in the guardian. they could be a shortage of all sorts of fruit because of the frosty start to april. it is no good that the warm weather is coming now. it was so damp because they could have been a shortage of apples, pears, plums and bananas. it it while you can. i'm allergic to bananas. allergic? yeah, they give me a... too much
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information for everyone at brea kfast. information for everyone at breakfast. i ate a kiwi once. with the skin. i found breakfast. i ate a kiwi once. with the skin. ifound out i breakfast. i ate a kiwi once. with the skin. i found out i was rather allergic to the skin. my lips swelled up. says it getting any work done on your lips. —— saves you. how done on your lips. —— saves you. how do you follow that? we saw the pictures of white hart lane yesterday. an emotional day for totte n ha m yesterday. an emotional day for tottenha m fa ns. yesterday. an emotional day for tottenham fans. how emotional would you have to be to kiss the grass at the stadium. you can imagine stealing a blade of grass but would you ever imagine lie yourself facedown on the turf to kiss it? did he not just facedown on the turf to kiss it? did he notjust trip up? i was thinking that was orchestrated. can you imagine leaving your house and going into the garden to kiss the grass.
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maybe he is a bit embarrassed. he should be a bit embarrassed. you can't really make out who he is. gender neutral uniforms. one of england's leading private schools is consulting people on a mixed matched design that way be called girls or boy stressed. —— dress. a girl who wa nts to boy stressed. —— dress. a girl who wants to play football, that's fine. ora boy wants to play football, that's fine. or a boy who wants to go into ballet class. just allow them to explore and experiment without thinking and reacting. some say it's a great idea and others are saying well, just allow them to give a bit of direction that let them do what they want. young boys and young girls experimenting. plenty to talk about. we could talk about it for quite sometime. thank you very much. the votes of 18—24 year olds could be crucial in deciding
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who will walk through the door of ten downing street onjune 8th — but the number of those signing up to vote when the leave school has fallen by a third in the last three years. that's according to the electoral reform society. with one week to go before the deadline to register to vote our reporter nesta mcgregor has been to meet some of the six million young people eligible to cast a ballot. i'm very excited to vote. it will be asked that will be the next politicians, the next mps. this is the first time this six people have met. aged between 18 and 24, they have agreed to a chat during their lunchtime. the only thing on the menu is an meaty discussion about politics. there is a massive distrust between young people and most institutions and spend government being the institution of institutions. two of them are first—time voters, one would be voting and the rest are undecided. one thought kept coming up, politics
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and politicians seem an million miles away from their everyday lives. it's so complex. in the run—up to this, especially for young people, it should be able to have a google search and know exactly what voting for. have an app. as a poster going through all the government papers. you would probably know where you find these things! young people don't feel they are in control feel that their vote is going to matter, regardless. any politician... is it yourjob to engage politicians? widowed walk outside and young people think we are to young to be affected —— we don't. a lot of people may not even the use these things again after. if you start teaching them about politics and it will be there throughout their entire lives, it
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works the politicians as well.|j throughout their entire lives, it works the politicians as well. i did algebra at school but i never used it again, so... analysis of the last general election shows that 18 to 24 —year—olds that voted was just over 40%. compare that to the number of over 65 is where that figure was just under 80%. their names have been wiped. immigration database is black. bbc comedy the thick of it satirises the inner workings of government. its creator is trying to get a clear message across in order to the young people to get their voice heard it important to be part of the process. the politicians will just respond to those who vote. that's all they will respond to. if that number gets fewer and fewer, you will end up web politicians are responding to fewer and fewer people, getting elected and then governing countries as a whole on the basis of a tiny minority. the
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offices of the charity by the ballot. they aim to get more young people registered to vote. you go from being a 16 or 17—year—old and ask for permission to go to the toilet and then one year later you are given this big decision or challenge, pete who is going to run the country. —— pick. challenge, pete who is going to run the country. -- pick. with one week to go before the deadline to register to vote. there are almost 6 million young votes potentially up for grabs. something to look forward to. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: they're some of the most famous images ever taken — we'll take a look round the new home of some of the world's most well known photographs — all 80 million of them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm katharine carpenter. the father of a young boy damilola taylor has urged people to be careful on the streets. as john appeal to these young people on the streets killing themselves. parents are crying. the surge of killing has gone up recently in the city of london. a ——i make you all to stop this unnecessary killing of people. this weekend saw more violence — an 18 year old man died
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following a mass brawl in enfield and a 41—year—old was stabbed and shot in bow on saturday. patients under barts health nhs trust — including the royal london hospital — are being advised that their appointments may still be cancelled today, following the cyber attack last week. it says its hospitals are still experiencing it disruption and it's reducing the volume of planned services — but that all remain open for emergency care. barts and other hospitals across london affected by the attack say they will contact patients directly if their appointment has been cancelled. fresh talks aimed at resolving the year—long dispute over the role of conductors on southern railway are to be held today. in that time there have been 31 days of strike action protesting the changes. the dispute between the rmt union and southern's parent company govia thameslink has affected thousands of commuters. in recent weeks it's also spread to routes in northern england. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads this is bayswater road — looking fine now but it is due to be closed near to lancaster gate from 8am — part of planned works over the next fortnight. in snaresbrook, hollybush hill is closed from the a12 roundabout
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to the tube station for roadworks. lets have a check on the weather now. good morning. it may be a dry start for some. it won't stay dry. at brea ks for some. it won't stay dry. at breaks of rain moving in from the west quite quickly this morning. if you do have a bit of brightness in the east, its short lift. the cloud and rain arriving. we will get some prolonged spells and heavy rain but thenit prolonged spells and heavy rain but then it breaks up with the afternoon. a breezy afternoon as well. you may get a glimmer or to a bright weather. maximum temperature a around 17 or 18. overnight tonight, it stays rather muggy. still one of two outbreaks of rain that a dry night compared to today. the minimum tablature barely dropping, at very warm 1415dc. at the start tomorrow morning. —— 14 or 15. still a lot of clout, outbreaks of rain. let so than today and if we get a break in the cloud in the afternoon, temperatures could reach up afternoon, temperatures could reach up to 23 celsius. a warm day for tuesday. this low pressure stays
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with us for wednesday. further outbreaks of rain and potentially under reid, heavy showers overnight and into thursday. once it clear, some slightly fresher air comes in. it will be warm and muggy for the next few days and not particularly dry. some are press of rain for today, tomorrow and wednesday. —— outbreaks. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and steph mcgovern. it is 6:30am on monday 15 may. coming up on breakfast today: pay rises are set to be the worst on offer for more than three years. they are on average 1%. ben will be here to explain why. also this morning, we will be joined by the minister for state and security, who will give us the latest on the global hacking crisis, which has so far affected more than 200,000 victims, including the nhs. and, aged 101 years and 38 days, d—day veteran verdun hayes has broken a record to become the world's oldest sky diver. he willjoin us later on the programme.
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all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news: there are concerns that the global cyber attack could cause more problems this morning, as people switch on their computers for the first time after the weekend. it is thought there are more than 200,000 victims of friday's cyber attack, which included nhs england. microsoft described it as a wake—up call, criticising customers who didn't keep their systems up to date. let's get the latest now from our reporter andy moore, who is outside one of the hospitals affected, the royal london hospital, part of barts health trust, which is the biggest in the country. so what exactly is happening there this morning, and how much of an impact hazard had on the weekend? well, problems still continuing here
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—— has it had on the weekend. problems still continuing, longer than expected waiting list send some ambulances being diverted. a lot of our patients coming in today. the hospital says where it needs to cancel those appointments, hopefully they will be in touch with patients, but they can't guarantee it so some people might be turning up here and finding they can't be treated. it should be put in context. the vast majority of the nhs was not hit in the first place and a lot of hospitals have solved their problems. where they still experiencing problems, they are quite severe in a handful of trusts. we have heard for example from northumbria trust, who are still trying to get their computers up and running, and they say patients may not have access to test results and scans, so problems are carrying on. we will be talking to the minister responsible for cyber crime and security, ben wallace, at 7:40am. theresa may will today promise the biggest expansion of workers'
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rights of any conservative administration, if her party wins the general election. the prime minister will outline a series of pledges, including worker representation on company boards and the legal right to take leave to care for family members. labour has dismissed the plans, saying mrs may is taking working people for fools. labour says it will spend an extra £37 billion on the nhs in england if it wins power. the party's new deal for the health service includes a pledge to take a million people off waiting lists, and to upgrade it systems following the cyber attack on the nhs. the conservatives said they were already increasing health funding. a father has died after falling while walking with his daughter on a mountain in wales. rescue workers say the man, who is believed to be from the south of england, slipped in snowdonia. he was airlifted to
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hospital where he was sadly pronounced dead. the new french president, emmanuel macron, is expected to name his prime minister today, on his first full day in office. mr macron, who was inaugurated as the country's youngest president yesterday, will also travel to germany today for talks with chancellor angela merkel. president trump has been urged to hand over any recordings of conversations between him and sacked fbi directorjames comey to the authorities. senior opposition politicians continue to pressure the president over allegations russia meddled in last year's election. they warn destroying any tapes, if they exist, would be against the law. joanna lumley received bafta's highest honour, the fellowship, at the bafta television awards in london last night. the gritty bbc one police drama happy valley came away with two awards, best drama and best actress for sarah lancashire. damilola, our loved boy was another big winner, picking up best single drama and best supporting actress, while planet earth ii's infamous "snakes chasing a baby iguana" won best tv moment.
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i still get edgy when i see that. i still get edgy when i see thatm was the thing that everyone was talking about the next day. you were absolutely screaming for the iguana. talking about watching eurovision over the weekend? i haven't seen it but apparently i look like the hungarian violinist. there was a horse on a ladder, a guerrilla dancing but portugal were the winners and their first—ever eurovision winner has returned home. adoring fans back in portugal. normally reserved for sporting heroes, when portugal won the euros it was like this. a national hero after his triumph in kiev. 2000 fans
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cheered his return. that is why we don't win eurovision, because of luciejones had don't win eurovision, because of lucie jones had won, don't win eurovision, because of luciejones had won, it would be a handshake and a journalist at the airport. this is what it means to the people in portugal. it was a ballad as well. it was a moving ballad. when it was announced at the end as the winner, he got his sister up end as the winner, he got his sister up and she sang it alongside him as well. a 101—year—old war veteran from devon has become the oldest person in the world to complete a skydive. verdun hayes, who fought on d—day, jumped 15,000 feet from a plane along with three generations of his family yesterday afternoon. he beats the previous record, set by a man 35 days younger. look at that, though. i wouldn't even do that now, let alone at 101. i would have a go. i thought you we re i would have a go. i thought you were a bit of a daredevil, steph! if
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it involves aeroplanes, you are not keen. maybe not. it is one of those monday mornings when various fans are waking up thinking that is not the weekend for me. they cling on with such hope that you are going to get out of this difficult period you are in, but the damage was done for hull early in the season. even before the season got under way when their manager, steve bruce, he left, mike phelan came in, that didn't last long. he left, and marco silva, their latest manager, a good manager, did well but left too big a job, i think, in the end. a real mix of highs and lows, as we will show you this morning. manager marco silva unable to work his magic to keep them in the league. they needed a win to give them any realistic chance of survival, but made the worst possible start, conceding after two minutes, going on to lose 4—0. the result secured top—flight football for palace, but leaves hull with some rebuilding to do, and no idea if their manager will stay on to lead
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the team next season. it isa it is a sad day for us, of course, for ourfans. for our it is a sad day for us, of course, for our fans. for our boys, it is a sad day for us, of course, for ourfans. for our boys, for the club. it is not a good moment to the club, and now is the moment the club will take the next step, and start to understand why this happened again, and why the club had many, many problems this season. spurs celebrated their final game at their old white hart lane ground with a 2—1win against manchester united. they made the perfect start, an early goal from victor wanyama and harry kane securing the club victory and second place in the table. they will play home games at wembley next year, after 118 years at the lane. we will miss a lot, because white
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hart lane a special, but at the same time, with the new stadium, we will move on and i think we will be very happy with time, the star to play in the new white hart lane. —— to start to play. liverpool are back up to third and just one win away from securing champions league football next season, after they thrashed west ham 4—0. philippe coutinho scored twice. forest green rovers will play in the football league for the first time in their history, after beating tranmere rovers 3—1 in the national league play—off final at wembley. kaiyne woolery scored twice, with all the match‘s goals coming in the first half. the forest green players celebrated with the trophy. and the team from nailsworth, in gloucestershire, with a population of under 6,000, can now look forward to a first season in the efl. there was a thrilling barcelona grand prix, lewis hamilton winning, to trim the gap on sebastian vettel
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to six points at the top of formula one‘s drivers‘ championship. the briton was second for much of the race, despite starting on pole, but overtook vettel‘s ferrari in the final stages. vettel and hamilton have two race wins each as formula 1 rolls on to monaco next weekend. rafa nadal has continued his impressive clay—court season with another win, this time at the madrid masters. the world number four beat dominic thiem in straight sets. it is his third consecutive title, with the first grand slam of the season, the french open, just a week away. ian poulter hopes to use his second place at golf‘s unofficial fifth major, the players championship as a stepping stone for the rest of the season. the englishman finished three shots behind south korea‘s kim si—woo, but he was lucky to be there at all. poulter only played 13 tournaments last year because of a foot injury, and had slipped to 197th in the world, but will now be back
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into the top 100, after playing some excellent golf. hopes of a first british winner of cycling‘s giro d‘italia are effectively over, after a crash on the ninth stage. team sky‘s geraint thomas and orica—scott‘s adam yates were both caught up in a collision with a stationary police motorbike, on the roadside, nine miles from the finish. the pair, who were second and third going into sunday‘s stage, now trail new overall leader nairo quintana by five minutes. this was the ninth stage, still 12 stages to go but that crash means it is all overfor him. stages to go but that crash means it is all over for him. which must be frustrating, because he was going so well. now —— narwhals, the sea mammals known
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for their long tusks, are thought of as one of the most enigmatic creatures in the sea. now, for the first time, scientists have filmed them using the tusk to catch food. canadian researchers working in the arctic saw them hit and stun fish. in the footage, you can see the narwhal, often called the unicorn of the sea, swishing its head to knock the fish, and then scooping it up as it swims. it doesn‘t look like much of a scoop, it is too pointy! and how would you get it... they scoop it in and move over and hoover it up. and how do you know so much about them? i should have been studying at your school, clearly. it is the basics,
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you have to know what your narwhals are about. and you have to watch the octonauts. they have a narwhal. if you were hoping for a pay rise this year, you might be disappointed. it could be a big election issue, paid, and the fact we are not getting paid as much as we are not getting paid as much as we thought we would. people who are actually in work, working hard, but not feeling any better off for it. the cipd says average pay rises will come in at 1%, lower than inflation, which means we will probably feel worse off. we will talk to those behind the report in just a worse off. we will talk to those behind the report injust a minute. first, we caught up with one
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business who told us it is hard to get the balance right. the cost of living is going up but at the same time we have our customers, and we have the rates that we charge and what customers will pay so is much as people say inflation is there and we should put our wages up, we can inflation is there and we should put our wages up, we can only do that if we can charge more revenue and get more revenue to the business. for us it is about what the employer can add in terms of value, so we don‘t subscribe to everyone get a pay rise every year, subscribe to everyone get a pay rise every yea r, we subscribe to everyone get a pay rise every year, we look at every employee and think how can they bring skills to the business, in which case we will pay them more money and if they can‘t bring additional value, then there won‘t be additional pay for that. iamjoined by i am joined by a member of the team of employment experts behind that report. good morning. we heard it is really difficult for employers. they are struggling to pay more but at the same time their staff might go elsewhere if they don‘t. first of all, why our wages not rising? the underlying problem facing the uk economy is our poor productivity record which is limiting firms‘
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ability to be more generous in basic pay awards. that is why wage growth has been sluggish since the financial crisis. more recently we have seen labour costs increase, including the introduction of a levy last month, and that has tipped the balance in a downward direction. and when you talk about productivity, that means we are putting in the hours but not making as much and therefore we are not producing as much, not being able to sell as much, not being able to sell as much, and that means businesses are making less money. is that the issue? that's right, and what they are having to do is employ more people to generate the same level. if you employ more people there is less money to go around the workforce that you have got, which is why it awards have been so disappointing. so i guess it is about improving the productivity, and we have talked about the productivity puzzle, that is not easy to do. at the same time, is this a long—term problem? are we all going to be stuck on sluggish wages for quite awhile? well, it has been
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stubbornly, resist and the low over the last few years. certainly some commentators have expected growth to sharply from next year, and they are expecting productivity growth but what we need is some kind of skills revolution in the uk, and there are a number of steps the government can make to achieve that. one of the things that we are calling for his for the apprenticeship levy to be broadened into a training levy to ensure that employers are making the best use of their skills. at the same time employers really need to increase their investment in skills, which is very disappointing in relation to our oecd competitors, and employers really need to up their game. the stuff might go elsewhere and businesses are stuck in a tough place. —— staff. businesses are stuck in a tough place. -- staff. the evidence we have picked up is that they want higher wages. we see these job to
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job flows, people moving from one job flows, people moving from one job to another and that is it —— increasing. many are increasing the number of hours that people work but also looking at wider groups within the labour market whose potential is not being maximised until recently, in young people, apprentices, women returning from maternity leave and they will tap into those resources before we see any pressure to raise the pay. we will keep an eye on it. will be talking more about pay coming up. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather.
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i was looking forward to another dreary rain shot but you have some lovely picture there. take along long ——a long look at it. there is more rain forecast that we need it. it has been piling up from the south—west overnight. it could give more rain today than we have seen over the past six weeks. there is still some brightness to be found across the of scotland. we could see some of the warmest weather around the moray firth. the rain is spreading to edinburgh. it is turning wet across parts of northern england. across much of wales,
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south—west england and into the midlands, the rain more sporadic. you have another hour or two of brightness. patchy rain and mainly light. it is turning murky around some of the coasts later on. it is a south—westerly wind bringing increasingly muggy air. the bit of brightness, could city of it is up to 21 degrees. most in double figures even with the grey skies. temperatures won‘t drop overnight very much. outbreaks of rain mainly across western areas. lots of mist and low cloud around the hills. confirmation that temperatures would drop much. still in the mid teens as we start tuesday morning. a warm enough commute but are fairly grey one. still some rain on the cards. this cold front is responsible. eastern and southern parts of
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england, particularly muggy air. a few breaks in that may boost the tablature. few breaks in that may boost the tablatu re. —— temperature. few breaks in that may boost the tablature. —— temperature. scotland and northern ireland, still not too many showers. still into the high—teens but a little bit of brightness, east anglia, we could potentially get to 24. some very heavy rain, the heaviest we have seen. time. bright conditions to the north and west. —— we have seen for some time. more updates throughout the morning. the whole programme is live from bristol and that map did not look good. get your brollies out. doctors, teachers and members of the armed services have all seen their pay rises capped to 1% for the last five years. the conservatives say it is needed in order to reduce the deficit. however today, the liberal
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democrats has joined labour in calling for that cap to be removed. sir vince cable, the treasury spokesperson for the liberal democrats, joins us from our westminster studio. there are about a million in the wider public sector, people are employed on different kinds of pay arrangements, some involve government. our estimate based on what the government itself says, taking account of inflation, we are talking about the cost of 1.4 billion per year. we believe this is necessary. public sector employees
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being squeezed. to get around the recruitment problems, we have two approach public sector pay in a more positive way. it has now been frozen effectively since the financial crisis. you are saying it will cost 1.4 billion but harmony people will eat directly affect? will it help 5 million? people are on different arrangements. it could potentially affect the whole of the public sector. so what is the 1.4 billion figure based on? the larger number and the government‘s own estimate of what public sector pay costs them. there is the red book reduced every year and beauty treat this as a
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flight year and beauty treat this as a flight plus 1% or if you look at it with a higher rate of inflation, you get higher numbers and that‘s where the1.4 get higher numbers and that‘s where the 1.4 billion comes from. you mentioned about the cap coming in after the financial crisis in 2010 which is of course when you were in the coalition. you guys brought this in. actually, it was first introduced by the labour government. it did apply through the coalition government, i was there, it was tough, it wasn‘t popular. but the financial situation of the country was extreme and we had to apply this. we are now almost one decade on from the financial crisis. we are now ina on from the financial crisis. we are now in a different situation where inflation is moving up. it was roughly flat and is now moving up. partly because of the re—evaluation in place after the brexit vote and we have to take account of that. we have to take account of the fact that where there was a serious unemployment at that point, we are now close to full employment and
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there are serious recruitment issues and a different approach to public sector pay now these to be adopted. —— needs to be. in terms of the rises, public sector pay rises have large behind the private sector. —— lagged. but here is a quote, on the whole, public sector employees have higher salaries than their private sector people. the private sector has some people who are extraordinarily well paid and people ona extraordinarily well paid and people on a subsistence level wage. there isa on a subsistence level wage. there is a big red in the private sector. we have these core services, health, education. unless people are properly paid, the services are simply not going to be delivered because it will be delivered —— difficult to recruit people. you
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think you are getting through to voters even the problems that labour are facing with popularity? these are facing with popularity? these a re early are facing with popularity? these are early the stages of a very long campaign. it becomes increasingly apparent that this isn‘t really a contest but a correlation. the labour party are not seen by large numbers of people as electable. there is increasing anxiety that the conservative government are looking atan conservative government are looking at an alternative. our resources are concentrated in parts of the country where we can win seats. we have to do that because of the weight the system operates. —— the way. we are optimistic. thank you for your time this morning. we have a bit of a treat. we
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mentioned that the aquinas versus snakes —— iguana versus snakes. let‘s see this footage. this beat ed balls on strictly come dancing. it is all about the aquinas. with most of them killed by the snakes at that guy managed a miraculous as gate. a beautiful shot. look at his legs go! —— miraculous escape. it was incredible. he got away. well, we assumed he got away. it was a
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standout moment of tv. award—winning. we need planet earth good morning from bbc london news, i‘m katharine carpenter. the father of schoolboy damilola taylor has begged young people to stop killing each other on the capital‘s streets. richard taylor made the plea at last night‘s bafta ceremony where a drama about the death of his ten year old son won an award. a stronger appeal to these young people on the streets killing themselves. parents are crying. the surge of killing has gone up recently in the city of london. i beg you all, stop this unnecessary
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killing of innocent people. this weekend saw more violence — an 18 year old man died following a mass brawl in enfield and a 41—year—old was stabbed and shot in bow on saturday. patients under barts health nhs trust — including the royal london hospital — are being advised that their appointments may still be cancelled today, following the cyber attack last week. it says its hospitals are still experiencing it disruption and it‘s reducing the volume of planned services — but that all remain open for emergency care. barts and other hospitals across london affected by the attack say they will contact patients directly if their appointment has been cancelled. the latest attempt to resolve the year long dispute over the role of conductors on southern railway is due to get under way later. there have been 31 days of strike action over the issue so far but in april talks with the rmt union were adjourned when the two sides failed to reach an agreement. let‘s have a look at
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the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads the a406 is slow towards wembley from edmonton to arnos grove because of a broken down lorry. in snaresbrook, hollybush hill is closed from the a12 roundabout to the tube station for roadworks. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it may be a dry start for some. it won‘t stay dry. outbreaks of rain moving in from the west quite quickly this morning. if you do have a bit of brightness in the east, its short lift. the cloud and rain arriving. we will get some prolonged spells and heavy rain but then it breaks up with the afternoon. a breezy afternoon as well. you may get a glimmer or two a bright weather. maximum temperature a around 17 or 18. overnight tonight, it stays rather muggy. still one or two outbreaks of rain but a dryer night compared to today. the minimum tablature barely dropping, at very warm 14 or 15dc. a muggy start tomorrow morning. still a lot of clout, outbreaks of rain. less so than today and if we get a break in the cloud
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in the afternoon, temperatures could reach up to 23 celsius. a warm day for tuesday. this low pressure stays with us for wednesday. further outbreaks of rain and potentially thundery, heavy showers overnight and into thursday. once it clear, some slightly fresher air comes in. it will be warm and muggy for the next few days and not particularly dry. some outbreaks of rain for today, tomorrow and wednesday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. a warning of fresh disruption from the global cyber attack when workers switch on their computers for the first time at the start of the working week. microsoft says the attack should be treated as a wake—up call. it is still causing serious issues at seven nhs organisations. good morning, it is monday 15 may.
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also this morning: theresa may will pledge time off to care for relatives and expansion of workers‘ rights if her party wins the general election. yeah, cheers, sweeties, thanks a lot. top gongs forjoanna lumley, happy valley and planet earth at last night‘s baftas, but netflix hit the crown failed to take home an award. don‘t call us, we will call you. a new campaign wants to make it mandatory for employers to give feedback after job interviews, rather than just saying no, feedback after job interviews, rather thanjust saying no, thanks. but with employers back the scheme? —— will employers back the scheme? in sport: hull city are relegated from the premier league, following defeat to crystal palace.
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and it was an emotional day at white hart lane, as tottenham say farewell to their home of more than 100 years. the skydiver who has been setting a new world record byjumping out of a plane at the age of 101. and matt has the weather. good morning, and the sky is not quite so blue. a soggy monday in store for many of you but a little bit of sunshine and warmth in the forecast. i will try and pick those bits out for you as well. see you in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: there are concerns that the global cyber attack could cause more problems this morning. as people switch on their computers for the first time after the weekend. microsoft has described the attack, which began on friday, as a wake—up call, and criticised customers who didn‘t keep their systems up to date. let‘s take a look at where things stand this morning. it is thought there are more than 200,000 victims of friday‘s cyber attack, but that figure may rise as people return to work this morning. organisations in 150 countries were targeted, including germany‘s rail network, spanish telecommunications operator telefonica, french carmaker renault, and russia‘s interior ministry.
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the cost of the attack to date is unknown, but in the last hour, we have had updated bbc analysis of three accounts linked to the ransom demands which suggest hackers have already been paid the equivalent of £30,000. our correspondent richard galpin reports. the computer virus which first hit the health service on friday is still causing serious problems at seven hospitals and other nhs organisations in england, particularly the ability to diagnose medical conditions. the images from mri and ct scanning machines, as well as x—rays, can no longer be sent via computer to operating theatres. but the other big worry this morning is what will happen when medical staff, especially at gps‘ surgeries, return to work and switch on their computers for the first time since friday. organisations that were hit on friday and over the weekend might
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find that some of the problems have spread. that‘s not to say that the attacks are new. it‘s a repercussion of what happened on friday. this map shows how the malicious software has spread across the world. there are now 200,000 victims, including large businesses and organisations in more than 150 countries. and microsoft, whose popular computer operating systems were the target of the attack, has warned governments what happened is a wake—up call, particularly for those governments deliberately keeping quiet about software vulnerabilities so they can exploit these themselves. we will try and keep you updated throughout the morning on breakfast. there are fears that more medical staff may discover their computers have been infected when they
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switch on this morning. let‘s get the latest now from our reporter holly hamilton, who is outside york hospital, one of those affected by the cyber attack. good morning. there has been a lot going on over the weekend to try and sort this out, but still there are problems this morning, aren‘t they are? that's right. out of the 47 nhs trusts in england, seven have been affected this morning, including here at york hospital, where staff have been working throughout the weekend, 24 hours a day, trying to get things back to normal. and that this trust alone some 600 systems we re this trust alone some 600 systems were affected. each of those devices, computers, machines, have to be looked at individually and investigated, and that is extremely time—consuming. on saturday alone that led to 30 operations being cancelled. now this is a trust, of course, that says that they did
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invest in antivirus software, that they have the latest technology in place. and yet this attack still affected them. now, the advice this morning is to attend appointments as normal. as staff arrive at the hospital they are being handed leaflets like this. they are being told if they have any doubts at all and they work in certain areas, do not switch on their computers under any circumstances, demonstrating how this is still having an effect here. the public are being told that waiting times could be longer than normal but if you do have an appointment, attend as normal unless you have been specifically advised not to do so. and of course we have medical practices across the country who are logging on for the first time and can‘t have access to medical records, for example, but they are still being told to come to gp practices as normal and they will try and get people seen as quickly
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as possible. but the concern now, of course, is that with that backlog of operations and appointments, this could still have an effect in days to come. important advice for everyone. so what you should you be doing if you are going into work this morning, and turn on your computer for the first time since friday‘s attack? the bbc‘s technology reporter chris foxx is here. thank you for coming back. i know you will be with us throughout the morning. a lot of questions coming m, morning. a lot of questions coming in, and people likejohn asking if ta nks in, and people likejohn asking if tanks have been targeted, and lots of people asking, like charles and many others, saying what about my home computer? will that be an issue, at home? most of the attacks have been in workplaces, haven‘t they? let's start with john. it is possible that banks have been hit, but with banking, it is their bread and butter to deal with this kind of thing and cyber security is important to them. more so than the nhs, who —— and they might not be
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using windows, with sensitive applications. with charles saying what about the home user, cyber security experts say if you are using wi—fi, yourwi—fi security experts say if you are using wi—fi, your wi—fi routers should lock these anyway, this particular attack. it hasn‘t really been affecting home users as much, but if you are worried at home the best thing you can do is turn off your internet this morning, back up your internet this morning, back up your files onto an external drive, so make a copy of anything important, any pictures, get them onto an external drive before you switch your internet back on, and then pop your internet tack on, and make sure your operating system has the latest security updates installed. and steph mentioned they have made £30,000, which seems like a small amount for an attack which has been so widespread across the world. they are asking for $300 worth of bitcoin ‘s, which is an online currency which is much harder to track where it is going to. that is probably a few hundred people who have paid, so it is very easy money,
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and cyber security experts will tell you don‘t pay, because there is no guarantee you will get your files back and it might be money down the drain. one thing to look out for today‘s you might get e—mails from security experts or even from your it team saying just so you know you have probably heard about this cyber security attack, here is something to download to protect yourself. criminals off the news very well—publicised attacks like we have seen over the weekend to launch a follow—up attacks. if you get a suspicious e—mail today from the it team, saying download this thing we have made to protect you, you might not want to do that. ring up your it tea m not want to do that. ring up your it team and ask them. it is so complicated, you don‘t know who to believe! it is not very nice, in the middle of an attack something saying download this to stop that, and that is part of the problem. and do carry on sending in your questions, because chris will be back for us. we will be talking to the minister responsible for cyber crime and security, ben
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wallace, at 7:40am. theresa may will today promise the biggest expansion of workers‘ rights of any conservative administration, if her party wins the general election. there would be a statutory right to a year‘s unpaid leave to care for a relative under the election plans. labour said mrs may is taking people for fools. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. iain, is this a conservative party pitch for labour voters? that‘s certainly a blatant attempt to try and get labour votes but i think the prime minister is trying to do another couple of things as well. first of all reassure people about the brexit process. she is saying she will write the conservative that people will keep the rights they currently enjoy as eu citizens, writes to paid leave, and things like that. she is trying to rebrand the conservative party is
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a different kind of party to the party run by david cameron, and she is putting into place a package of rights which last labour government at least didn‘t get around to. you mentioned the right to take time off, to care for relatives, bereaved pa rents would off, to care for relatives, bereaved parents would have a legal right to ta ke parents would have a legal right to take time off. she is indicating with not much detail that she will do more for people in insecure employment. labour say that the government is not implementing existing laws around trade union rights but although this is an attempt to invade labour territory, labour are playing to the home crowd, saying we are the party you can trust on the nhs. jeremy corbyn is talking to nurses, saying he will lift the pay cap in the public sector and saying that labour will invest billions of pounds in the nhs including £10 billion on projects to improve hospital buildings, but also given the current news story they are also saying that part of that funding will go into improving it
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systems and improving cyber security. a very timely pledge. thank you very much, we will see you a bit later on. workers in the public sector will receive an average pay rise of nearly £780 if the liberal democrats win the general election. the party is pledging to abolish a cap which has seen pay rises for nurses and teachers limited to 1% since 2012. labour‘s manifesto is also expected to include a promise to get rid of the cap, but the conservatives say it is needed to help reduce the deficit. steph was talking to servants cable about that just before steph was talking to servants cable about thatjust before 7am —— sir vince cable. the new french president, emmanuel macron, is expected to name his prime minister today, on his first full day in office. mr macron, who was inaugurated as the country‘s youngest president yesterday, will also travel to germany today for talks with chancellor angela merkel. the gritty police drama happy valley was among the winners at last night‘s baftas in london. the bbc nature series planet earth ii won twice, including prize for
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best television moment, for a chase involving newly hatched iguanas and racer snakes. here is our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. it was an evening when the bbc dominated, winning more than three quarters of the night‘s awards, its strongest showing in recent years. ..happy valley. happy valley was a double award winner. the yorkshire—set crime drama took home best drama series and best actress, for sarah lancashire. i pray forjustice. damilola, our loved boy, a moving drama about the murdered schoolboy, also won two prizes, including best supporting actress for wunmi mosaku. best actor went to adeel akhtar for a drama about so—called honour killing, murdered by my father. best supporting actor to tom hollander,
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for spy story the night manager. there were a couple of awards for planet earth ii, including must—see moment for its thrilling sna ke—versus—iguana chase. she has never been well—behaved, she is the non— conform‘s non— conform. portugal‘s first eurovision winner has returned home to crowds of adoring fans. in scenes usually reserved for global celebrities or sporting heroes, salvador sobral arrived back in lisbon a national hero after his triumph in kiev. around 2,000 fans cheered his return, after the singer led portugal to its first eurovision win, at the 49th time of asking. sobral said he was looking forward
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to a rest, and denied he was a hero, saying that position was reserved for cristiano ronaldo. he was very laid back. when they announced the most complicated voting system ever in the history of the world, is that said, is it me? we have one? hejust the world, is that said, is it me? we have one? he just strolled to the stage. very cool about it all. we are talking a lot today about cyber attacks and how to deal with it. many people back to work for the first time. it has been a big problem especially froggy nhs. —— for the nhs. a cyber attack at the heart of the nhs has once again re—ignited the debate surrounding funding for the health service.
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labour is today pledging a ‘new deal‘ for the nhs saying spending cuts are to blame for the hack. however, the conservatives said they have already pledged more money for health. labour‘s shadow health secretaryjon ashworth joins us from westminster. good morning. you are pledging more money for nhs it. we were always planning to announce an extra 10 billion for the industry —— infrastructure. it is to do with upgrading equipment as well. various nhs experts in recent weeks as the nhs experts in recent weeks as the nhs needs an extra 10 billion baht infrastructure. i am also announcing a new dealfor infrastructure. i am also announcing a new deal for patients infrastructure. i am also announcing a new dealfor patients in infrastructure. i am also announcing a new deal for patients in the infrastructure. i am also announcing a new dealfor patients in the nhs. substantial investment to reduce waiting lists by 1 substantial investment to reduce waiting lists by1 million. notjust putting money in and i‘m not expecting anything in return. we are
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producing even tougher waiting lists in the future, tougher standards. we are saying people need to be moved out of hospitals as quickly as possible. a new tougher standard on a end to it and when you have 26,000 people waiting for cancer treatment, we are saying that‘s not good enough. we want people to get their cancer treatment not in two months but four weeks. big money going into the nhs but in return we are asking for tougher standards of care because we believe patients receive the very best. cancer patients to be dealt with in four weeks. what is your pledge for amd waiting lists. -- ame. we believe it means treating an extra 1 million patients there. we wa nt an extra 1 million patients there. we want to go one step further. the most serious cases in a&e, you want
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to see them treated in one hour. by putting the money in, we think you can meet the existing targets which are being met under the tories but we wa nt are being met under the tories but we want to see tougher targets met in the future. we are putting money into the nhs that in return, we are asking for this level of reform as well. you said a lot about putting this extra money in. it seems to be another day in the election campaign and another day were a labour politician is sitting saying this money will come from corporation tax. how far can that money go? there seems to be so many labour policies funded from corporation tax. what you will see tomorrow is john mcdonnell and jeremy corbyn outlining their new tax plans. we are being clear and direct, people who are 80 thousand people on more, we are asking them to pay a little bit extra in tax and all that tax thatis bit extra in tax and all that tax that is raised will go directly to
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the nhs. every single piece of it will be given to improving patient ca re will be given to improving patient care fundamentally, we have a big choice now. it is a very direct offer to people that if people want to fund the nhs, if they do, we are saying whether money is coming from and we are prepared to put the money in. sure you've seen the this morning. many saying theresa may, she will boost rights for workers. this is classic labour territory, isn‘t it? the reason they are trying to give the tories a much broader appeal. —— theresa may. to give the tories a much broader appeal. -- theresa may. it is certainly not the £10 living wage that the labour party is putting forward in this election. if the
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conservatives want to broaden their appeal, they need to tell us why they are cutting the nhs next year. why they are cutting primary school budgets next year. the schools and the city that i represent a set to do something in the region of £700 per pupil under conservative cuts. that doesn‘t suggest to me a party broadening its appeal, it suggests to mea broadening its appeal, it suggests to me a party more interested in the few rather than the many. the polls suggest they are broadening their appeal. the opinion polls are very challenging for labour which is why iam challenging for labour which is why i am challenging for every single vote in ryan kelly people watching a show this morning that there is a big choice. invest in the nhs with labour or cut it with the conservatives will. —— if they persist in refusing to meet the waiting targets. leaked documents will show that waiting times will
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increase under the conservatives. we wa nt to increase under the conservatives. we want to be reducing waiting lists not see them go up. good to talk to you. john ashworth from the labour party. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning to you. this is the scene across norfolk in the last half an hour. now you have seen the sunshine. take a good look at it because you need to your brolly. the scene is typical this morning. this is taken in lancashire. across the uk at the moment, it is heading eastwards. it is raining miserably across northern ireland at the moment. western scotland, north—west england. the reign of it more sporadic as it pushes eastwards. —— the rain. taking a look at the rest
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of us for the rush—hour. it will get wetter across scotland. it eases off in northern ireland by the time we get to mid—morning but heady bursts to come later on. past of east scotland. the wet weather continues. we will see as much as 60— 80 millimetres of rain over the hills. it is more than we have seen over the past six weeks. it is a bit more hit and miss further south. a few millimetres a specially across east anglia and the south—east. nothing hugely soaking but it still reigns quite heavily on the heels and further low cloud developer. —— hills. we are talking chiefly a round the murray firth we could hit 21 degrees. —— moray firth. 90 degrees. but 19.
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the big story tonight and into tomorrow is just how mild and muggy it will be as we started tuesday. temperatures in the mid teens to start the day that it will be fairly grey. we have weather front on the charts for tomorrow and still a bit ofa charts for tomorrow and still a bit of a south—westerly breeze. to the east of that, the warmer air will be contained. cloudy across the rest of england and wales. outbreaks of rain pushing eastwards throughout the day. to the north and west of that, not as bright. there will still be a case of catering for sunburst of rain every now and again. temperatures fill into the high—teens but she could get close to around 24 celsius across east anglia in the afternoon. we will swa p anglia in the afternoon. we will swap the warm for the rain in east anglia on wednesday. some heavy burst of rain, heaviest for some time. it turns more fresh for the
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rest of the week with sunshine and showers in the mix. delivered with a smile but let‘s face it, loads of rain on the way. there was 124 and it was nowhere near where we live. —— one 24. we‘ve heard lots about the voice of the next generation not being heard in this election campaign. the number of 18—24 year olds signing up to vote when they leave school has fallen by a third in the last three years. that‘s according to the electoral reform society. with one week to go before the deadline to register to vote, bbc‘s nesta mcgregor has been to meet some of the six million young people eligible to cast a ballot. i‘m very excited to vote. it will be us that are going to be the next politicians, the next mps.
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this is the first time these six people have met. aged between 18 and 24, they have agreed to a chat during their lunchtime. the only thing on the menu is an meaty discussion about politics. there is a massive distrust between young people and most institutions and then government being the institution of institutions. two of them are first—time voters, one won‘t be voting and the rest are undecided. one thought that kept coming up — politics and politicians seem a million miles away from their everyday lives. it‘s so jargonistic and it‘s so complex. i think, in the run—up to this, especially for young people, you should be able to have a google search and just know exactly what you‘re voting for. or have an app, that‘s where young people are at. as opposed to having to look through all the government papers. i‘m just making this up, you‘d probably be better to know where exactly you find these things! young people don't feel like they're in control, they don't feel their vote is going to matter, regardless. i think any politician,
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they don't speak to me in any way or form... isn‘t it yourjob to engage your friends and engage people who won‘t vote? i‘m from a small seaside town. we‘re not london—based, we don‘t walk past house of parliament, it sort of doesn‘t... young people think we are to far out of it to be affected. english, maths and science gtses that a lot of people may not even use again after. wheras if you actually start teaching them about politics and something that will be there throughout their entire lives, works for education, it works for young people, it works for politicians as well. that's what you actually want to learn in school. i did algebra, i never used it again, so... analysis of the last general election showed that the number of 18 to 24—year—olds that voted was just over 40%. compare that to the number of over—65s where that figure wasjust under 80%. their names have been wiped. the immigration database is blank. bbc comedy the thick of it satirises the inner workings of government. its creator is trying to get a clear message across — in order for young people to get their voice heard, it‘s important to be part of the process.
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politicians will just respond to those who vote. that‘s all they will respond to. so if that number gets fewer and fewer, you will end up with a state where politicians are responding to fewer and fewer people, getting elected and then governing the country as a whole on the basis of a tiny minority. the offices of the charity bite the ballot. they aim to get more young people registered to vote. it‘s almost bizarre that you go from being a 16 or 17—year—old and having to ask for permission to go to the toilet and then a year later you are given this big decision or challenge, pick who is going to run the country. with one week to go before the deadline to register to vote, there are almost 6 million young votes potentially up for grabs. there will be an election special
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presented by tina to healy. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m katharine carpenter. the father of murdered schoolboy damilola taylor has begged young people to stop killing each other on the capital‘s streets. richard taylor made the plea at last night‘s bafta ceremony where a drama about the death of his ten year old son won an award. a strong appeal to these young people on the streets killing themselves. parents are crying. the surge of killing has gone up recently in the city of london. i beg you all, stop this unnecessary killing of innocent people. this weekend saw more violence —
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an 18 year old man died following a mass brawl in enfield and a 41—year—old was stabbed and shot in bow on saturday. patients under barts health nhs trust — including the royal london hospital — are being advised that their appointments may still be cancelled today, following the cyber attack last week. it says its hospitals are still experiencing it disruption and it‘s reducing the volume of planned services — but that all remain open for emergency care. barts and other hospitals across london affected by the attack say they will contact patients directly if their appointment has been cancelled. the latest attempt to resolve the year long dispute over the role of conductors on southern railway is due to get under way later. there have been 31 days of strike action over the issue so far but in april talks with the rmt union were adjourned when the two sides failed to reach an agreement. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now.
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there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads the a406 is slow towards wembley from edmonton to arnos grove because of a broken down lorry. in snaresbrook, hollybush hill is closed from the a12 roundabout to the tube station for roadworks. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it may be a dry start for some. but it won‘t stay dry. outbreaks of rain moving in from the west quite quickly this morning. if you do have a bit of brightness in the east, its short lift. the cloud and rain arriving. we will get some prolonged spells and heavy rain but then it breaks up with the afternoon. a breezy afternoon as well. you may get a glimmer or two a bright weather. maximum temperature a around 17 or 18. overnight tonight, it stays rather muggy. still one or two outbreaks of rain but a dryer night compared to today. the minimum tablature barely dropping, at very warm 14 or 15 celsius. a muggy start tomorrow morning. still a lot of cloud, outbreaks of rain. less so than today and if we get
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a break in the cloud in the afternoon, temperatures could reach up to 23 celsius. a warm day for tuesday. this low pressure stays with us for wednesday. further outbreaks of rain and potentially thundery, heavy showers overnight and into thursday. once it clear, some slightly fresher air comes in. it will be warm and muggy for the next few days and not particularly dry. some outbreaks of rain for today, tomorrow and wednesday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. companies around the world are braced for further problems with computer systems this morning, after the major cyber attack which hit parts of the nhs. it is thought there are more than 200,000 victims of friday‘s attack.
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microsoft described it as a wake—up call, criticising customers who didn‘t keep their systems up to date. let‘s get the latest now from our reporter andy moore, who is outside one of the hospitals affected, the royal london hospital, part of barts health trust, which is the biggest in the country. are they still on pens and papers and chalk boards? yes, they are. and then some other places around the country. the vast majority of the nhs is working as normal, and people should use it if they are due to today, but it is probably worth checking your local nhs website, and where there are still problems they are where there are still problems they a re pretty where there are still problems they are pretty severe. the nhs said there were seven trusts in england requiring extra support, not more than seven experiencing problems. and we are hearing of more and more as the morning goes through. for
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instance, southport and ormskirk, they are saying don‘t attend for surgery unless you hear otherwise. all outpatient appointment are cancelled. gp services are interrupted in north cumbria, where you may have made your booking online on a computer, so when you turn up they may not be expecting you. that is indicative of the sort of problems which may be experienced in parts of the nhs around the country today. thank you very much for that this morning. we will be talking to the minister responsible for cyber crime and security, ben wallace, at 7:40am. and lots of people asking questions about what it means for them, locking in at work and at home. chris, our technology correspondent, will be looking at that. one important it is that other attackers tend to attack at times like this, saying download this to protect yourself from attack. if that happens, check with your it provider, with the desk, and make
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sure it is not another dodgy e—mail which will install a virus on your computer. theresa may will today promise the biggest expansion of workers‘ rights of any conservative administration, if her party wins the general election. the prime minister will outline a series of pledges, including worker representation on company boards and the legal right to take leave to care for family members. labour has dismissed the plans, saying mrs may is taking working people for fools. labour says it will spend an extra £37 billion on the nhs in england if it wins power. the party‘s new deal for the health service includes a pledge to take a million people off waiting lists, and to upgrade it systems following the cyber attack on the nhs. the conservatives said they were already increasing health funding. the new french president, emmanuel macron, is expected to name his prime minister today ,on his first full day in office. mr macron, who was inaugurated as the country‘s youngest president yesterday, will also travel to germany today for talks with chancellor angela merkel.
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and some more news about narwhals. they are in a song by the b—52s. narwhals, the sea mammals known for their long tusks, are thought of as one of the most enigmatic creatures in the sea. now, for the first time, scientists have filmed them using the tusk to catch food. canadian researchers working in the arctic saw them hit and stun fish. in the footage, you can see the narwhal, often called the unicorn of the sea, swishing its head to knock the fish, and then scooping it up as it swims. you wonder why they don‘t poke each
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other in the eye. i'm sure they are aware they have a big thing sticking out. this is a very good point. a 101—year—old war veteran from devon has become the oldest person in the world to complete a skydive. verdun hayes, who fought on d—day, jumped 15,000 feet from a plane along with three generations of his family yesterday afternoon. he beats the previous record, set by a man 35 days younger. we will be speaking to him and his familya we will be speaking to him and his family a little bit later on in the programme. you would be gutted if you are the person 35 days younger. you would have to go again, wouldn‘t you? you think no one is ever going to beat that and someone beats you buy 35 days. joanna lumley received bafta‘s highest honour, the fellowship, at the bafta television awards in london last night. the gritty bbc one police drama
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happy valley came away with two awards, best drama and best actress, for sarah lancashire. damilola, our loved boy was another big winner, picking up best single drama and best supporting actress, while planet earth ii‘s infamous "snakes chasing a baby iguana" won best tv moment. we have to see this to the end. you have to see the iguana get away, and the beautiful moment when you think they have got him. in the build—up to the programme, most of the iguana is were newly hatched and they get nabbed by those racer snakes. and even the camera operators and producers were amazed how many snakes they were on that beach. the footage is brilliant. you are screaming for the iguana. you are saying come on, son. and his mates saying come on, son. and his mates say where have you been?”
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saying come on, son. and his mates say where have you been? i have a pint for you, dave. i love the idea ofan pint for you, dave. i love the idea of an iguana called dave. and the other one is called derek. imagine you are just hatched, and this is the first thing which happens to you, in your life. coming up on the programme: matt will have the weather. a p pa re ntly apparently the snakes look like they are acting as a team, but we spoke to one of those who knows about racer snakes and he says they act individually, they are all out for themselves. they need a bit of teamwork. sadly it hasn‘t really paid off for hull this season. what a link! sadly they have been relegated, marco silva, appointed backin relegated, marco silva, appointed back in january, came relegated, marco silva, appointed back injanuary, came into guide them to safety, and their home form has been very good, their away form
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not so much. and middlesbrough now save? manager marco silva unable to work his magic to keep them in the league. they needed a win to give them any realistic chance of survival, but made the worst possible start, conceding after two minutes, going on to lose 4—0. the result secured top—flight football for palace, but leaves hull with some rebuilding to do, and no idea if their manager will stay on to lead the team next season. it is a sad day for us, of course, for our fans, for our boys, for the club. it is not a good moment to the club. and now is the moment the club will take the next step, and start to understand why this happened again, and why the club had many, many problems this season. spurs celebrated their final game at their old white hart lane ground with a 2—1win against manchester united. they made the perfect start,
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an early goal from victor wanyama and harry kane securing the club victory and second place in the table. they will play home games at wembley next year, after 118 years at the lane. we will miss a lot, because white hart lane is special. but at the same time, with the new stadium, we will move on. and i think we will be very happy, with time, to start to play in the new white hart lane. liverpool are back up to third and just one win away from securing champions league football next season, after they thrashed west ham 4—0. philippe coutinho scored twice. forest green rovers will play in the football league for the first time in their history, after beating tranmere rovers 3—1 in the national league play—off final at wembley. kaiyne woolery scored twice, with all the match‘s goals coming in the first half.
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the forest green players celebrated with the trophy. and the team from nailsworth, in gloucestershire, with a population of under 6,000, can now look forward to a first season in the efl. there was a thrilling barcelona grand prix, lewis hamilton winning, to trim the gap on sebastian vettel to six points at the top of formula one‘s drivers‘ championship. the briton was second for much of the race, despite starting on pole, but overtook vettel‘s ferrari in the final stages. vettel and hamilton have two race wins each as formula 1 rolls on to monaco next weekend. hopes of a first british winner of cycling‘s giro d‘italia are effectively over, after a crash on the ninth stage. team sky‘s geraint thomas and orica—scott‘s adam yates were both caught up in a collision with a stationary police motorbike, on the roadside, nine miles from the finish. the pair, who were second and third going into sunday‘s stage, now trail new overall leader
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nairo quintana by five minutes. let‘s go back to our lead story now, and just how vulnerable is the uk is to another cyber attack in the days and weeks ahead? could more have been done to protect the nhs? and what is being done to protect us from more global security breaches? we are joined now by security minister ben wallace. thank you forjoining us. there has been a lot of chaos over the weekend, particularly for the nhs. this is a right mess. how did it
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happen? there has been a lot of commentary about it. the nhs followed some pretty good procedures they have in place and i would like to pay treatment to the workers, who have made sure they restore from backup the data and improved and put in place the security patches which are required to make sure that hopefully this is stabilised, and today and for the rest of the week service returns to normal. of course, this happened because of two things. out there is an internet which is incredibly vulnerable to cyber attack. it is global, as we have seen from the attack, that is why the government put in £1.2 billion to counter cyber attacks in the last sdsr. that is why we have been out there with campaigns like cyber aware, telling people and private businesses that this is something important and something you have to deal with. the national
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audit office did warn in november that taking away from it services in the nhs would leave them vulnerable. would you admit a mistake was made that? after that report, and indeed numerous occasions after incidents where there are cyber attacks, small or large or around the world, we pass on information to the trust and make sure they are aware of their vulnerabilities, and ask them to make sure they keep themselves up—to—date. what we don‘t do in the nhs is micromanage from the desk.“ they haven‘t got the money, it is ha rd they haven‘t got the money, it is hard for them to do what they need to do. there has been red herrings over the weekends focusing on windows xp, it has exploded systems in both windows xp, windows seven and windows 8.1. use the operating systems of a number of platforms and i spoke a trust which operate eight out of 4000 computers on windows xp. it is slightly a red herring. the real key is did they have in place regular backups to make sure they
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are regular backups to make sure they a re protected regular backups to make sure they are protected from people blackmailing them, and were they installing the security patches? some of the security patches were issued by microsoft back in march, and some trust absolutely loaded those to protect themselves. we have to ask ourselves why was it not uniform. just on that, the york trust deed, but they still were hit by this and had problems this morning. i can go back and find that the individual technical responses but the vulnerability this virus exploits was spotted earlier in the year, and a patch was issued by microsoft back in march in order to update systems, which is actually... this ransom threat, not this particular virus, what it has been around for a long time and the guidance has always been if you backup your data, if you change your passwords regularly, if you make sure that you upload the latest updates to your operating systems and all your apps on your iphone, and all your apps on your iphone, and you take other measures such as buying antivirus software, you will
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be very, very well protected, and it is important we invest in that.“ they have been red herrings over the weekend, and we have had so many people this morning asking us questions, why has there been no statement from your colleague jeremy hunt? why has there been no statement from the man who looks after the nhs? i think because this isa criminal after the nhs? i think because this is a criminal attack on an organ of the state, the nhs, it could have been on other parts of the state. when something like that or the defence of the realm comes into play, the home office takes over, the national cyber security centre that this government put in place a few months ago, takes what we call the incident lead. the national crime agency, which is under my portfolio, and indeed the home secretaries, they start the process of investigation around the world. and right now, as we speak, they are following lines of enquiry to try and get these perpetrators, both here and abroad. so it becomes effectively home office, it is defence of the realm. we have been
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saying over the weekend it is the nhs which is most affected. i understand this is a defence and national security issue, but people need reassuring from the man responsible for the nhs, and that hasn‘t happened this weekend, and thatis hasn‘t happened this weekend, and that is people‘s major concern this morning. jeremy hunt attended the cobber at meeting —— cobra meeting. we have been out there on the front foot saying this is about security, and the issue about whether it is particularly nhs, the reason it is important the government was broader in that messaging is what we have seen across europe is it his not just health services. therefore the onusis just health services. therefore the onus is on all of us, internally as government departments but also externally, private sector, businesses, individuals, to make sure that those steps which you can ta ke to
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sure that those steps which you can take to protect themselves, notjust the nhs, it would be wrong to say this only applies to the nhs. when your viewers go to their computer, those steps are the same steps that you need to take to protect yourself. and by the way, the criminal is targeting you as much as they are the nhs. do not pay the ransom. we will wait to see who they are busy few fund these people, you are usually funding organised crime, horrendous crimes elsewhere that those groups get involved in anti— just encourage them to go and do more. if you want to make sure you protect yourself, my own desktop computer, back up your system, back up your e—mails, backup your photos. if you get the icons on your smartphone and state, oh, i will put that off. update your
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system and your computers and spend the money on antivirus software. good advice. happy birthday as well. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. the rain is back? yes, what you want for me on a monday morning. rain for just about all of you through today that at least the guidance certainly need it. just about all of it gets the rain. the rain in certain areas. some will see more rain in the next 24 hours than you have done over the past six weeks. the details for the
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next rush—hour. rain becomes heavy and more extensive through southern scotland. probably one of the brighter spots will be shetland will stop heavy rain in northern ireland will ease off. more rain later. still raining across north—west england for the rush—hour. some of its making it to the east of the pennines. it stays soggy to the rest of the pennines. the rate is much more sporadic as it pushes eastwards. light and patchy. only a few millimetres. after what it has been a brute —— reasonably bright start. scotland, north—west england and western parts of wales. low cloud tends misty and murky. yes, we could see 21 celsius around the moray firth. higher than what we see on the coast of aberdeen. tonight,
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it will stay mild and breezy. further outbreaks of rain mainly in the west and murky across the hills and the coast. what started tuesday morning. temperatures around 14— 15 degrees on many. still a grey start. weather fronts on the chart. this one will be the focus for heavier bursts of rain. generally speaking, a brighter day tomorrow. some lengthy dry spells. the best of the brightness towards the north—east. outbreaks of rain pushing southwards and eastwards. heaviest birds —— verse. and eastwards. heaviest birds —— verse. you may and eastwards. heaviest birds —— verse. you may see and eastwards. heaviest birds —— verse. you may see close to 24 degrees. some of the warmest weather we have seen so far this year. elsewhere, still not bad. 18 or 19. southern and eastern parts including the midlands seen a lot of rain. one to showers. we will see the cooler
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conditions develop towards the end of the week. a quick snapshot, it is a story of sunshine and showers. if you apply for a job, have an interview but then don‘t get it — should the employer give you feedback? many don‘t — but there‘s a campaign to change it. ben‘s here. yes, it‘s a frustrating experience — you spend time and money preparing for an interview but then never hear back about what went wrong. and if it‘s happened to you — you‘re not alone — we asked these salford uni students the worstjob application feedback they‘d got — and whether they got any at all. my
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my worst feedback was that i was overqualified. i went for 20 jobs and in q4 overqualified. i went for 20 jobs and in 0419. overqualified. i went for 20 jobs and in q419. they don't reply. they don't e—mail you back. you are just waiting for a callback and don't get one. then you don't apply further anotherjob. the most frustrating thing i heard was that you were told you didn‘t promote or sell yourself enough. most of the time when i apply forjobs enough. most of the time when i apply for jobs at enough. most of the time when i apply forjobs at 80 anything back, it's really frustrating. disappointing. there is a campaign to force employers to give feedback and it has some high—profile backing. charlie and bonito with me. they are part of the team to change the rules. —— monique. you spend all that time preparing and you don‘t hear back. why? are employed as lazy? are not sure. i do think any
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interview i have been to other than when i have had a job at i didn‘t get feedback. it‘s notjust me. everybody i have spoken to has had a similar experience in think it‘s so important. it gives confidence to the candidate, they want to go and developers and i think so disheartening when you don‘t. a bit of respect for the employee to give it to you. —— employer. of respect for the employee to give it to you. -- employer. if you don't hear back from them, that biggest problem because you don‘t know what you have done wrong and what you might change beyond nextjob application. i was a student if you years ago and it reminds me of a driving test we do try so hard and you put a lot of operation in and then your instruction stayed completely quiet and you have no visibility as to where to improve or to do better next time. under mobile as we launched for student careers 1.5 years ago, we had 65 students
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using the app and 50 multinationals and when we spoke to them, they highlighted us as a problem and the economy. the chance of getting work on strengthening the economy. it's something all employers can do, provide feedback. we have heard from a lot of people. keep the comments coming in. one of the issues is the scale of the tasks. you have a job. rachel says her husband applied for ajob, rachel says her husband applied for a job, they had over 400 applicants that business couldn‘t possibly give feedback to everyone. where should they make the cut—off? people that just the interview? realistically, if you get a face—to—face interview, that‘s when you should be getting feedback. it is difficult for an employer if they have had 50,000 applications to go through and give every single person bit of individual feedback that if you have been selected to go for a
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face—to—face interview, you should be getting feedback. and when it comes to the issue of what feedback is useful. a lot of people getting in touch saying of course employers should give back the stock is totally possible. helen says there is nothing is disheartening as when you have taken the trouble to research and show up. should itjust be employers who have seen you are suitable? no, i'm the founder of the school start—up we interview every week and our resources are super limited. we provide feedback at each stage. our customers who have 50, 60,000 applications can‘t feasibly provide feedback early on that what we‘re saying is if students make it through all candidates it through to the penultimate stage of the face—to—face stage of an interview with a have put in four, five, six hours of research and there are a
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lot less candidates in the pipeline, they can afford, literally, a few sentences of feedback to improve their chances of getting a job and it will reduce the time for other employers. we have found from our research that four out of five of all candidates that we have serve eight never received any feedback at all. -- eight never received any feedback at all. —— never received. eight never received any feedback at all. -- never received. let us know on our website. we will talk later about it at about 830. that‘s all from me now. we have already had m essa g es from me now. we have already had messages coming in as you were talking. lots of people interested in that this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m katharine carpenter. the father of murdered schoolboy damilola taylor has begged young people to stop killing each other on the capital‘s streets. richard taylor made the plea at last
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night‘s bafta ceremony where a drama about the death of his ten year old son won an award. a strong appeal to these young people on the streets killing themselves. parents are crying. the surge of killing has gone up recently in the city of london. i beg you all to stop this unnecessary killing of innocent people. this weekend saw more violence — an 18 year old man died following a mass brawl in enfield and a 41—year—old was stabbed and shot in bow on saturday. patients with appointments at the royal london and other hospitals under the barts trust are being warned they could still be cancelled today, following last week‘s cyber attack. the trust says its hospitals are still experiencing it disruption so planned services are being reduced and any patients affected will be contacted. emergency departements are open as normal. let‘s have a look at
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the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads the north circular is slow towards wembley from edmonton to arnos grove because of a broken down lorry. the south circular is also slow because of a broken down lorry. it‘s slow from hither green to catford. and a reminder that very shortly bayswater road will be closed near to lancaster gate for planned works. it will be closing from 8am during the day until the 23rd may. lets have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it may be a dry start for some. but it won‘t stay dry. outbreaks of rain moving in from the west quite quickly this morning. if you do have a bit of brightness in the east, its short lived. the cloud and rain arriving. we will get some prolonged spells and heavy rain but then it breaks up with the afternoon.
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a breezy afternoon as well. you may get a glimmer or two a bright weather. maximum temperature a around 17 or 18. overnight tonight, it stays rather muggy. still one or two outbreaks of rain but a drier night compared to today. the minimum tablature barely dropping, at very warm 14 or 15 celsius. a muggy start tomorrow morning. still a lot of cloud, outbreaks of rain. less so than today and if we get a break in the cloud in the afternoon, temperatures could reach up to 23 celsius. a warm day for tuesday. this low pressure stays with us for wednesday. further outbreaks of rain and potentially thundery, heavy showers overnight wednesday and into thursday. once it clear, some slightly fresher air comes in. it will be warm and muggy for the next few days and not particularly dry. some outbreaks of rain for today, tomorrow and wednesday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to steph and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast,
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with dan walker and steph mcgovern. a warning of fresh disruption from the global cyber—attack when workers switch on their computers for the first time at the start of the working week. microsoft says the attack should be treated as a "wake up call." it‘s still causing serious issues at seven nhs organisations. good morning, it‘s monday the 15th of may. also this morning: theresa may will pledge time off to care for relatives and expansion of workers‘ rights if her party wins the general election. top gongs forjoanna lumley, happy valley and planet earth ii at last night‘s baftas — but netflix hit the crown
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failed to take home an award. don‘t call us, we‘ll call you... a new campaign wants to make it mandatory for employers to give feedback after job interviews, rather than just saying "no thanks". but will employers back the scheme? coming up in the sport, hull city are relegated from the premier league, and the nasty crash that effectively ended british hopes at this year‘s giro d‘italia. we‘ll hear from the skydiver who‘s been setting a new world record — byjumping out of a plane at the age of 101. this guy looks beautiful there. what is it looking like for us this morning? matt has the weather.“ is it looking like for us this morning? matt has the weather. it is looking great for us. a soggy monday on the way for wales, south—west scotla nd on the way for wales, south—west scotland and north west england but there is a bit of sunshine to be found as well. i will show you in 15
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minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. microsoft has described the attack, which began on friday, as a wake—up call, and criticised customers who didn‘t keep their systems up—to—date. let‘s take a look at where things stand this morning. it‘s thought there are more than 200,000 victims of friday‘s cyber—attack, but that figure may rise as people return to work this morning. organisations in 150 countries were targeted — including germany‘s rail network, spanish telecommunications operator telefonica, french car—maker renault, and russia‘s interior ministry. the cost of the attack to date is unknown, but in the last hour we‘ve had updated bbc analysis of three accounts linked to the ransom demands which suggest hackers have already been paid the equivalent of £30,000. our correspondent richard galpin reports. the computer virus which first hit the health service on friday
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is still causing serious problems at seven hospitals and other nhs organisations in england, particularly the ability to diagnose medical conditions. the images from mri and ct scanning machines, as well as x—rays, can no longer be sent via computer to operating theatres. but the other big worry this morning is what will happen when medical staff, especially at gps‘ surgeries, return to work and switch on their computers for the first time since friday. organisations that were affected on friday and over the weekend might find that some of the problems have spread. that‘s not to say that the attacks are new. it‘s a repercussion of what happened on friday. this map shows how the malicious software has spread across the world. there are now 200,000 victims, including large businesses and organisations in more than 150 countries. and microsoft, whose popular
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computer operating systems were the target of the attack, has warned governments what has happened is a wake—up call, particularly for those governments deliberately keeping quiet about software vulnerabilities so they can exploit these themselves. we‘ll keep you updated throughout breakfast. let‘s get the latest now from our reporter holly hamilton, who‘s outside york hospital, one of those affected by the cyber—attack. good morning, holly. good morning. yes, this is one of the 47 that was affected by the attack on friday. they are still trying to get operations up and running. they have been working throughout the weekend to return to some level of normality. i am joined to return to some level of normality. iam joined by to return to some level of normality. i am joined by the chief executive of the trust, patrick
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crowley. how mammoth task has this been since friday? wants the situation on folded it became clear it was engulfing the organisation. at the last count we had 2000 of our 6000 pcs out of action. clearly, thatis 6000 pcs out of action. clearly, that is quite disabling for clinical services in a health care environment. over the weekend we have been working around the clock to get pcs back online and now half of them are back. the most important thing for people here is that all of our services are pretty much back as normal this morning and people can expect to receive the good quality health care that they have done to date. we have had one or two clinics which have had to be cancelled in our community settings, but in our two main hospitals in york and scarborough it is all systems go. yesterday you were very hopeful to get back to normal but is there any advice for patients who might be
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concerned this morning? patients are advised that if they have any concern about their appointment, to call in, look on our website and look on the normal media channels. asi look on the normal media channels. as i say, the general messages please come in and we will be ready for you. two patients, it will seem like normal business in the main. for our staff they are working very ha rd for our staff they are working very hard in the background to ensure it feels normal for our patients. just a little bit of understanding, things may run slower. some services are still reliant to the degree on paper. so little bit of patience, understanding and huge appreciation for a huge army of staff who have done so well to get the services back online. thank you. that is the chief executive of the nhs trust here. as patrick said, things are slowly getting back to normal but there will inevitably be a bit of a backlog. some operations were cancelled over the weekend. this attack will continue to have an effect on the nhs for a few days to come. thank you, holly. that is holly hamilton outside york
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hospital. a lot of people have been getting in touch about what they should do when they get into work and turn on the computer. bbc‘s technology correspondent chris foxx is here. a lot of people are worried about what they should do when they turn on the computer and have this message? should be business as usual. you might have a message from your it department. make sure you know who to call if you see the ransomware message pop—up. you have to act quickly if you do. this is what it looks like. yes, if you are worried at home you should be protected from this particular attack going round. make sure you have antivirus installed and make a back—up of any important files you would not want to lose. we mentioned earlier that the people doing this attack are trying to make money out of it. so far they have only made £30,000 which is not much when you think
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about how massive it is. tom is asking what has been done to catch those responsible? that is a good question. we know the national crime agency, the fbi and european police, europol, are all investigating this. criminals can break into a home and cover their tracks and it is exactly the same online. they can cover their tracks and make it very hard to trace. but we have had stories before where cyber attackers have been rounded up and caught and we may find the same happens here. and other criminals can try and make the most out of this. when something has been widely publicised as this attack has been, cyber criminals can send out e—mails saying you have probably heard about the big cyber attack, download this to protect yourself. if you get an e—mail like that, don‘t download it. don‘t ever click links in unsolicited e—mails. this was not spread by e—mail but
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follow—up attacks might be. they may try and prey on you. chris, that is good advice. thank you. worth mentioning that our colleagues on rip off britain live will take more of your questions here on bbc1 at 9:15. ripoffbritain@bbc.co.uk is their email address. theresa may will today promise the biggest expansion of workers‘ rights of any conservative administration — if her party wins the general election. there would be a statutory right to a year‘s unpaid leave to care for a relative, under the election plans. labour said mrs may is taking people for fools. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. so labour responding to the tory promises but this sounds like a labour policy? i think that is why labour policy? i think that is why labour are responding so robust lee, suggesting the conservatives are
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taking people for fools, suggesting the conservatives are taking people forfools, that suggesting the conservatives are taking people for fools, that the conservatives will not even get around to police in existing labour laws. this is a pitch for labour votes rather blatantly from theresa may saying she will do things which the last labour government to get round to doing, including that time off for looking after relatives and if you are a bereaved parent, but you will get a legal right to take time off. she is doing something else as well, what she is also trying to do is to reassure people as she goes into the brexit negotiations, neighbour suggested she might want to create a bargain basement economy, off the shores of europe. she is then people will have the right to maintain everything they enjoy as eu citizens at the moment, and that will be a manifesto pledge. in addition to that, she is also suggesting more sadly that her party has changed since the days of david cameron, no longer a party led by an old etonian, somebody who wa nts to by an old etonian, somebody who
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wants to have a broader, wider appeal. labour have been critical and the lib dems have suggested that theresa may‘s party has restricted trade union rights so they cannot be taken at their words. labour are defending their own territory today, on an issue they are usually popular, support for the nhs. they are promising far more funding for the nhs, £10 million more for nhs buildings and given the current news, they are also suggesting part of that £10 billion would go to updating it systems and improving cyber security. that is quite releva nt cyber security. that is quite relevant this morning. thank you. the liberal democrats are talking about this as well. workers in the public sector will receive an average pay rise of nearly £780 if the liberal democrats win the general election. the party is pledging to abolish a cap which has seen pay rises for nurses and teachers limited to 1% since 2012. labour‘s manifesto is also expected to include a promise to get rid of the cap but the conservatives say it is needed to help reduce the deficit. a father has died after falling
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while walking with his daughter on a mountain in wales. rescue workers say the man, who‘s believed to be from the south of england, slipped on tryfan in snowdonia. he was airlifted to hospital where he was pronounced dead. the new french president, emmanuel macron, is expected to name his prime minister today on his first full day in office. mr macron, who was inaugurated as the country‘s youngest president yesterday, will also travel to germany today for talks with chancellor angela merkel. north korea says the missile it tested successfully on sunday was a new type of rocket capable of carrying a nuclear warhead. the united states says it would be prepared to impose more sanctions on the country if it continues to test ballistic missiles. the north korean news agency said leader kim jong—un personally oversaw the launch. it was the baftas last night and
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joanna lumley received the fellowship. night‘s bafta‘s in london. the gritty police drama happy valley was among the winners at last night‘s bafta‘s in london. the bbc nature series, planet earth ii, won twice — including prize for best television moment for a chase involving newly—hatched iguanas and racer snakes. do you ever name the animals and documentaries? i named them and give them voices, accents, the lot! i will have to come round to your house. that moment won the tv moment of the year, beating the likes of danny dyer and ed balls. it is good news for david the iguana. and also good news for portugal at the weekend. portugal‘s first eurovision winner has returned home to crowds of adoring fans.
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in scenes usually reserved for global celebrities or sporting heroes, salvador sabral arrived back in lisbon a national hero after his triumph in kiev. around 2000 fans cheered his return. that is the difference with us and the portuguese. if it was us who had one we would just say well done, lucie. a couple of people with flags. well done to him. he has kind of downplayed it. he did not see bothered. it was a low—key ballad. no horse‘s head, gorillas or funky stuff, it was a low—key ballad. no horse‘s head, gorillas orfunky stuff, he kept it simple. officials in japan officials injapan say 2,000 computers, at 600 locations have
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been experiencing a problem. as we‘re hearing this morning, the official advice if you‘re heading out to hospital or to see your gp today is to keep your appointment, and turn up as planned. but there does seem to be some confusion, with at least one hospital still advising patients to check online or call before setting off. let‘s try and get some clarity now from chris hopson, who‘s the chief executive of nhs providers, which represents health trusts and hospitals. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. certainly pa busy time. can you just tell —— certainly a busy time. can you tell us what is happening? over the weekend on friday we had about 48 nhs trusts that were affected. the majority of those are now back up and running. there are still a few that are still working on restoring their services. soi working on restoring their services. so i don‘t think the advice is confusing. the advice is really clear which is, i‘m not formally involved in dealing with the incident, but the advice is clear which is go on to the nhs choices
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website which has got very clear advice on what to do and what that saysis advice on what to do and what that says is turn up to your planned pointment unless the nhs has asked you not to. if you also want to double—check and it is a good thing to do, particularly if you‘re going into a hospital is just check the hospital‘s website. we know there area hospital‘s website. we know there are a few, a small number, that still are restoring services, but if you do those two things which is check the nhs choices website and check the nhs choices website and check the nhs choices website and check the local hospital website then effectively that will let you know for the organisations i represent about what you need to do. 0k. it's represent about what you need to do. ok. it‘s fairto represent about what you need to do. ok. it‘s fair to say it caused a lot of chaos and concern for patients who might have appointments. how is this able to happen? well, so we know this is a global incident. it has affected 200,000 different systems in 150 different countries. if you look at the kind of organisations that have been affected they include leading—edge
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companies who really completely rely on technology like fedex, nissan and telefonica, so it is not an entire surprise that the nhs like a number of other institutions has been caught up in this. though ijust make the observation... 48 trusts is not slightly caught up. it is a major crisis. it was declared a major crisis. it was declared a major incident? what would have happened is as you‘d expect. if there is a problem in an individual trust you will find that trust will quite rightly declare an incident to ensure that patient safety is protected. all i‘m saying it is 28% of nhs trusts that have been affected. i was concerned if you don‘t mind me saying about the weekend media coverage that seemed to imply that the nhs has been particularly failing in terms of what it is been doing, we have got 200,000 different institutions which have been affected including some who are at leading—edge of using technology. yes, the nhs has been
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affected, but as the home secretary said nhs managers have been doing everything they can over the weekend to get services back up and running and thanks to all the staff who have been working over the weekend to achieve that. so what happens now? well, so what happens now is i think as you‘d expect, everybody in the nhs is focussing on ensuring that systems a re nhs is focussing on ensuring that systems are back up and running. you heard in your news report the chief executive of yorkshire teaching hospitals explaining what they were doing in terms of getting their systems back up online, getting their computers back up online and clearly, what we will need to do as an nhs, given that some institutions in the nhs have been affected, but the majority haven‘t, we‘lljust need to learn the lessons of what was about about those institutions that was different and clearly there will be some issues that we will need to learn from and ensure don‘t get repeated going forward. when i spoke to the security minister earlier on in the programme we talked about the fact that the national audit office had warned in november of the vulnerability that
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the nhs, it projects were in. do you ee, the nhs, it projects were in. do you agree, were you left vulnerable? well, so i think what happened over the last couple of years is the nhs just like a whole load of other institutions has been subject to a number of malware institutions has been subject to a number of malwa re attacks institutions has been subject to a number of malware attacks and sshl the chief executives that i talk to have been very aware of the need to protect their organisations. i think the point that that‘s been raised in terms of the nao report is to make an important point which as has been proved over this weekend, the nhs can only work effectively if the underlining infrastructure, the buildings, the medical equipment, the it are all up to scratch and i think what the nao were pointing to which we would endorse is, we are at the moment in a five year period where we are robbing the nhs capital infrastructure budget to support day—to—day running costs. infrastructure budget to support day-to-day running costs. but the minister did say you have enough money? well, again, in the middle of a general election campaign, it‘s not myjob to play party politics.
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all i would do is point to the national audit office report that basically said you start to run risks if you don‘t properly invest in nhs infrastructure and that‘s what that nao report said. thank you very much for your time this morning. that‘s chris hobsob there. —— hobson there. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. grey skies for the majority. this one was captured a short while ago in barnsley. rain is on the forecast. more persistent rain, northern ireland, north—west england and into western parts of scotland. it isa and into western parts of scotland. it is a thoroughly soggy rush hour and continues to see the rain. it does ease off for a time during the middle part of the morning in northern ireland. but the rain sets
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in now across much of central and southern scotland. far north of scotla nd southern scotland. far north of scotland particularly for shetland, sunshine here and the moray firth shouldn‘t be too bad. the breeze picking up. rain in north—west england and spreading east at times, but we could see more rain in the next 24 hours. and we will see that occasional rain make it towards eastern coastal counties of england where it has been a fine start. grey conditions for most about all of the uk. the exception north—east scotla nd uk. the exception north—east scotland and particularly towards shetland. temperatures could get up to 21 celsius in the moray firth. temperatures not doing too badly considering the cloud and the rain, but it will turn misty in the west. the mist and murk gets more widespread through tonight across northern and western areas. some heavy bursts of rain at times. occasional rain further south and east, but the big story is just how
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far the temperatures will not fall. they‘re going to hold around 14 or 15 celsius for many as we go into tuesday morning. so mild morning commute tomorrow, but a particularly grey one with outbreaks of rain. the weather chart showing that we‘ve got weather chart showing that we‘ve got weather fronts straddling the uk, breezy conditions either side of it, but the warmest weather will be to the east of that weather front which will be pushing across england and wales and bringing cloud and rain. only a few spots of rab towards east anglia and the south east and it is here with sunshine through the afternoon we could potentially get temperatures into the low 20s. maybe 24 celsius possible. there will be rab for scotland and northern ireland and north—west england and western parts of wales, but it won‘t be quite as soggy a day as it will be quite as soggy a day as it will be today. i like the word, "soggy"! you have been moonlighting. every sunday night on the ten o‘clock news
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you‘re looking at a different issue, aren‘t you? you‘re looking at a different issue, aren't you? yes, it's called reality check. it was pensions the week before. this time it is pay. we have been looking at the analysis of pay and the cost of living. look at this. the cost of living is going up, but at the same time we have our customers, and we have the rates that we charge, and what customers will pay. even though we have seen wages starting to up over the last few yea rs, starting to up over the last few years, there is a lot of of catching up years, there is a lot of of catching up to do before the financial crisis average weekly earnings, when you ta ke average weekly earnings, when you take into account inflation, were £476, now they‘re down to £467. by
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their very nature the figures are averages so therefore they vary, of course, depending on what you do and where you live. look at this map because it shows the regional differences in terms of how much people are earning. the darker areas being where people on average are earning more and paul has been doing research. paul just earning more and paul has been doing research. pauljust explain why are there the differences? if you look at patterns of investment. the darker areas attract more high skilled type jobs, darker areas attract more high skilled typejobs, it, smartphone app development, cinema special effects, highly paid jobsment further north, those lighter areas are call centres, further north, those lighter areas a re call centres, lower further north, those lighter areas are call centres, lower skilled type manufacturing and are cheaper places to do business. different types of jobs and different wages as a result. i'm going to leave you to clea n result. i'm going to leave you to clean that up. while pay has suffered unemployment has risen and there is more people in work than ever before, but people are working more flexibly now and one of the
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controversial areas is zero hours contracts. this is where you‘ve got ajob, contracts. this is where you‘ve got a job, but you‘re not guaranteed hours which can put pressure on people‘s pay. dan, this is something you‘ve been looking at, isn‘t it? the pay squeeze is coming on the back of really significant falls in real wablings that we saw in the wa ke real wablings that we saw in the wake of the financial crisis. that means that sadly this decade looks like it will be the worst on record for rising pay packets in 2 hub yea rs. for rising pay packets in 2 hub years. dab, thank you very much. so why can‘t employers just pay people more money? we‘ve got andy here who isa more money? we‘ve got andy here who is a local businessman. andy, why can‘t you pay people more? is a local businessman. andy, why can't you pay people more? it's about sustainability, steph. if we pay too much then clearly our costs will be too much and we become unattractive to our customers and we‘ve got to get the balance right. so that‘s what businesses think, but what is does everyone out there think about their pay? it's really important that people are rewarded fairly for what they do and
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contribute and also they have got enough to live on because things are ha rd enough to live on because things are hard for people. ? it would be easier if they didn't pay people at the top so much. probably expand the business enough to be able to take on extra people. it'sjust striking a balance with something that i can live off as well as have some money to put on the side with having a good job as well. i can't be working five jobs a dayjust to make the living wage. at the moment, inflation and wage increases are following a similar pattern, but if you‘re working in the president—elect, you‘ll be feeling the squeeze even more. obviously tax and benefits play a part in people‘s income too. it looks bleak now, but the bank of england forecast that by next year pay packets should start to pick up again. look at you with your magic carpet. you‘ve got different hair for the ten o‘clock news. you‘ve got different hair for the
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ten o'clock news. that's my posh quiff. we get more... they wanted to call me stephanie rather than steph, but i refused. we will be back with stephanie mcgovern after the news, travel and weather where you are. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and sally bundock. microsoft points the finger at governments — as companies are warned more cyber—attacks could be on the way. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday 15th may. europol says the cyber—attack has affected 150 countries so far, but what can be done to stop the hackers? we‘ll hear from the boss of a leading internet security firm. also in the programme, we‘ll take a look at china‘s plans to revive an ancient trade route. president xi pledges
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billions to rebuilt ports, roads and rail networks.
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