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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 19, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. brexit dominates the first big tv debate of the election campaign. leaders of five parties — but not theresa may orjeremy corbyn — go head to head for the debate on itv. this morning we have the first of our leaders‘ interviews with nicola sturgeon and tim farron on the breakfast sofa. good morning. it's friday 19th may. also this morning — new figures suggest thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. the first uk airport to replace its control tower overlooking the runway, with a virtual centre 100 miles away. whether it's cool beers in crete or ice—creams in ibiza — the cost of a break this half term is up almost 10%. i'll be looking at what's pushed up
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prices, and what you should do if you still want to book something. and in sport, leicester are given a caning. the outgoing champions are hit for six by tottenham, as harry kane scores four, and is now favourite to finish the season as the premier league's top scorer, and matt goes back to the jurassic period in birmingham for the weather. yes. good morning. my guest may be prehistoric but it is all about the weekend forecast. it contains a little bit more rain and sunshine as well. details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. brexit dominated the televised leaders‘ debate, which was held last night despite the absence of theresa may and jeremy corbyn. the itv event saw little disagreement between the lib dems, green party, plaid cymru and snp as they repeatedly clashed with ukip's paul nuttall. our political correspondent tom symonds reports. five party leaders took part. four
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support britain remaining in the eu. and in the absence of theresa may and jeremy corbyn, they turned on the one leader who did not, paul michael. attacking his support for a ha rd michael. attacking his support for a hard brexit and his tough line on immigration. theresa may not have the guts to be here tonight but her spokesman in the form of paul marshall seems to be here tonight. i know immigration is a difficult topic for politicians. people have understandable concerns. when we speak about european migrants, we talk about people who work in the national health service, whose service in our restaurants. people who make a contribution. the ukip leader said brexit would offer britain enormous trade opportunities and controlling immigration would free up pressure on and controlling immigration would free up pressure on resources. and controlling immigration would free up pressure on resources. one of the reasons that wages have stagnated in recent years and had probably stagnated since about 2004
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is because of immigration levels. we have an oversupply of labour in this country. it is as simple as that. the leader of the greens said there was no question for which the answer from ukip was not immigration. as for labour,... from ukip was not immigration. as for labour, . .. not from ukip was not immigration. as for labour,... not only did they give the tories a blank cheque for the hard brexit they gave them to lift to the bank and help them to cash it in. the liberal democrats are offering a second vote on whether britain should a future brexit deal. their leader believes it is better that people decide than theresa may. she is putting together a plan which appeases poor muscle and nigel farage that damages the future of our children. that is why you should have the final say on brexit. the leader of plaid cymru was concerned that restrictions on trade protest brexit could harm wales's aerospace companies by introducing stiff tariffs. 6500
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well—paid jobs in wales that you are prepared to lose. we have a huge trading deficit... twice under fire, poor muscle confuse the names of his tormentor. audience members asked how the leaders would invest in schools, hospitals and social care in the future of younger people. there was general agreement — money would need to be found. when you get‘s poor muscle insisted there would be a financial benefit to britain leaving the eu this was the reaction... 0ver talk. a reference to the infamous idol bust and the promise of £350 million for the nhs. will that bus come driving past at any minute? brexit continues to dominate this unexpected election race. we're joined now by our political correspondent eleanor garnier.
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the leaders' debate was last night, but the front pages are all about the tory manifesto. unsurprisingly. we think a few things stand out from the manifesto yesterday. yes, we sought to reach a position in her party firmly in the centre ground with her distinctive agenda. we saw a string of policies for working families and for those on low incomes. a cap on energy prices and stronger protections for rights and the work place, help for those who are poorer and paying for social care with that means test threshold raised up to $100,000 —— pounds. it was a clear break from the david cameron is a with the pension lock on the tax lock on, the winter fuel payments pull back a bit. but this positioning as risky
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as well, taking away benefits from some older people. theresa may and her team will be aware of alienating some traditional tory voters. and labour this morning as saying that the conservatives this morning have returned to being the nasty party again. they say 10 million pensioners could lose their winter fuel payments because of the ideas that theresa may want to put in place. they it a shameful attack on older people. the tories say, actually, they are have yet to cost and work out the means testing for these winter fuel changes.” and work out the means testing for these winter fuel changes. i am tempted to say thank you, naturally. but instead, thank you, ellen. we'll be speaking to lib dem leader tim farron just after seven and snp leader nicola sturgeon after eight. if you have any further questions, do let us know. thousands of police officers across the uk have not had
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up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. bbc analysis of figures obtained under a freedom of information request show that 90% of officers in one force have not been properly vetted. if a planned programme of retrospective vetting is due to start but the inspectorate is urging forces to address the matter urgently. the man who drove a car along three blocks in new york has killed an 18—year—old woman and injured 22 others. the man had been arrested twice before for drunk driving. police said he claimed to hear voices. he is now in custody. the mayor of new york said there was no indication was an act of terrorism. american warplanes at operating over syria have attacked a convoy carrying pro—government militia forces. the us—led coalition said it was moving towards a base, used by western special forces near the border with iraq. last month, the americans fired 59 cruise missiles at a syrian government air base.
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but washington has insisted its latest military action does not mean it is stepping up its role in the syrian war. the japanese government has approved plans to allow emperor akihito to step down — the first abdication for two centuries. the cabinet has backed draft legislation, which will now be sent for parliamentary approval. the emperor, who's 83, indicated last year his desire to abdicate because of ill—health. he's been on the throne since 1989. instagram and snapchat are the worst social media platforms for young people's mental health and wellbeing, according to a new survey. almost 1,500 people aged 14 to 24 were asked to rate sites on their impact on anxiety, depression, loneliness, bullying and body image. the royal society for public health said youtube had the most positive impact on mental health, followed by twitter and facebook. a bbc investigation has found flaws in hsbc‘s biometric bank security. its voice id system recognises customers' speech patterns to grant access to their accounts. hsbc says every person's
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voice is unique and that makes its system secure. but the click technology programme has shown that it is possible for someone to log into an account that's not their own. dan simmons reports. passwords, key fobs and apps have all been used to protect us. but over the last year, a new gold standard insecurity has emerged — biometrics. like fingerprints, the human voice is unique to each of us and hejust human voice is unique to each of us and he just these are, along with other banks, has started using voice of its customers as their password. they say it's secure. but a simple experiment with my nonidentical twin brother... proves otherwise. my financial details and the ability to tra nsfer financial details and the ability to transfer money wide open. i'm absolutely shocked. under no
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circumstances should to different people be able to access the same bank account with voice biometric authentication. every voice is unique but it is up to the system to differentiate between voices and it is not done so in this case. unlike a password, a voices public. and experts worry that artificial intelligence software can synthesise voices so well that it would soon be able to clone a voice from a sample of 30 seconds or less. a tool which could make the hacker‘sjob much easier. in response to our terms to the bank said... most experts agree that by making security more personal, you make it more secure. but if your voice can be copied that unlike passwords, it may be difficult to get a new one.
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dan simmons, bbc news. take a look at this painting. it's by the american artist jean—michel basquiat — and it's just sold at auction for more than £84 million. the 1982 piece, which is untitled, sparked a bidding war at the sale in new york before securing the highest price ever paid for a work by an american artist. iam glad i am glad you said it was an titled because i just spent the last five minutes trying to find online what its title is. you know what it's worth, but not what it is called. it looks like an angry face. it draws you in, doesn't it, but it is quite angry. £84 million and you could buy angry. £84 million and you could buy a decent football player. or three average ones. which would you rather have? just one footballer, just a
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kick around the garden with. you would have no chance. and harry kane, on fire to be the top scorer once again. harry kane edges closer to the premier league golden boot award . he scores four goals taking his season tally to 26 as tottenham thrash leicester by six goals to one. celtic were also in high scoring mode — they hit five past partick thistle, extending their unbeaten run in scotland and lifting their season tally to a record—equalling 103 points. diving orfeigning injury could now be punished with a ban if officials don't spot it during the game. it's one of a number of reforms voted through by the fa yesterday. and johanna konta's time in rome comes to an end. she's beaten in three sets at the italian 0pen, by seven—time grand slam winner venus williams. the second grand slam of the year, the french open, begins on monday. we will return in a moment with the
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newspapers including what sort of body shape you are, charlie. whether or not you are the same as david beckham. it applies to all men. isn't that rather personal?” beckham. it applies to all men. isn't that rather personal? i have worked it out already. an inverted triangle. it is subjective. we will find out more in a moment. in his dreams, that is. i'm confused now. the body shape thing, we have been distracted. we have some unusual body shapes with matt this morning. good morning. good morning. say hello to my friend, trust me it will come into action shortly. i am at the birmingham botanic gardens, in the birmingham botanic gardens, in the midlands. these dinosaurs will be here, rain or not, over the coming month, as we see the
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exhibition begins. it starts its tour around the uk. more of these dinosaurs corrupt the morning. looking at the details for today, quite a bit of rain across some parts of the country. there is more to come for some of you today, especially in eastern parts of the uk. it's not as —— especially wet here. clouding over quickly towards these. and east and west split. the best of the brightness towards lancashire and cumbria. east of the pennines outbreaks of rain. affecting the midlands, east anglia and the south—east. the heaviest rain further north. towards the south, you overnight rain clears away, with brighter skies developing towards the mid—morning. further west into the sunshine, a chilly start. scotland, parts of south—west england and wales. frost on the grass. maybe a couple of showers in devon and cornwall, but most darting
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dry and sunny. chilly start in northern ireland. make the most of the morning sunshine. gradually cladding over. a few showers around. the odd heavy one. eastern scotland turns cloudy through the afternoon. wet, misty and murky in the north—east of england. across much of england and wales heavy, potentially thundery, showers developing. in the sunshine of 217 degrees. 11— 12 drew some parts of eastern scotland and north—east england, where it stays wet. —— through. the cloud of outbreaks of rain through the night will become more confined to scotland. still a few showers in england, wales and northern ireland in particular. with clear skies in between it will be on the cool side. it could rule out a touch of frost in the saturday morning across the rural parts of england and wales in particular. we start the weekend in scotland with cloudy weather tomorrow. 0ccasional rain and drizzle, which will come and go all day in the far north of
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scotland. elsewhere we have sunshine drew the morning, then shower clouds develop. some of them will be heavy and thundery. you could be a bit of hail mixed in. some of you avoid the showers altogether. the best of the sunshine around coastal districts in the south and west. temperatures much like today, into the mid or high teens across many areas. coolest of all in northern parts of scotland. a cool start to sunday. a dry day on sunday. some rain initially northern ireland, spreading west of portland. away from that, long spells of sunshine. —— west of scotland. the better chance of dry weather on sunday. with winds in a southerly direction it will feel warmer. temperatures reaching 20 degrees in some southern and eastern parts of england. more details on that corrupt the morning and more from my friends as well once they kicked into gear. we can't wait to hear what they have to say! you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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the main stories this morning: party leaders clash in the first tv debate of the general election campaign. brexit was high on the agenda, but both theresa may and jeremy corbyn stayed away. a bbc investigation finds thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. sean is here with us now. we have been talking about you. i don't know if any of you stayed up last night to watch the leader's debate. i don't think the papers did. there is one story really dominating. the images of theresa may. the conservative manifesto launched yesterday, the mail says, not afraid to be honest with you. looking at some of the proposals in
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the conservative manifesto. interesting to see how the different papers have covered the manifesto. the tory manifesto is shock, talking about the number of old age pensioners who will be due to lose the winter fuel allowance. clearly they do a lot of work. the politicians on what images are going to come across. that one of the daily telegraph, you can see what the party was trying to get across. holding a manifesto. should they have thought this one through better? times. you can see the open arms. that's the image she wants to betray, but she has got the extra arms in that shadow. —— portray. a lot of thought goes into them. but not everything! what have you got? i've being com pletely what have you got? i've being completely distracted by whatever mike's got. in the guardian today, there is this story saying that 80%
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of people expect price rises this year and they've seen sales rise in menswear, healthierfood year and they've seen sales rise in menswear, healthier food and sales for her removal products and bread. but on the whole people are expecting prices to kick in even more than they have this year. so we are trying to eat more healthily but we are getting more hairy? yes, and into less bread. very specific! one other one i wanted to get him. we've been talking about this digit —— fidget spinners. apparently she couldn't afford the patents, the creator, so she has been missing out on millions. apparently it is in loads of schools at the moment. back in 2005, she had the chance to patents it, she is from florida, she didn'tand patents it, she is from florida, she didn't and the next thing you know, 12 years later, everybody is buying them. such a simple thing as well. but what a legacy to leave. there we
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go. never mind the money. a quick reflection on the fa. changing rules. 0n a quick reflection on the fa. changing rules. on monday in future they can look upon footage from the weekend as part of a panel and decide to give a player, if they think a player has died or cheated, a match ban. at the moment is hard to tell. so they can do that retrospectively. in the mirror they reckon a study has been done to show the five shapes of man. apparently 4296 the five shapes of man. apparently 42% of british chaps are the same as david beckham, rectangle. apparently david beckham, rectangle. apparently david beckham, rectangle. apparently david beckham has the rectangular torso. then have the triangle, the daniel craig, the rumble —— romboid. sort of level. the triangle means you are wider at the top, at the
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shoulders. is this your natural body? yes, your natural body. the five types, rectangle, triangle, romboid, or in inverted triangle. just the way you are. 0n the subject of missing out on things. air miles, did you know you could put them in your will? no. they die if you die, unless you've made specific provisions for them, according to this story. many people would think putting air miles in your will is laughable, but it's a sensible thing to do because they can be kept. did you know that? i didn't know that. i will be in touch with anybody i know who collect air miles! thank you very much. one of britain's airports
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is moving its control tower around 100 miles away from the actual runway. london city airport is to become the first in britain to bandy birds eye view of the runway and use technology to monitor planes remotely. —— ban its birds eye. modern airports are dynamic and fast flowing. hundreds of pieces being moved around every minute. and all of those movements must be tightly choreographed to keep it safe. this is london's city airport and that's just one of the 300 or so takeoffs and landings that happen here every day. until now, all of those flights have been co—ordinated by a group of controllers who look out of these windows here. but in future, those windows will be replaced by these high definition
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tv screens. controllers won't just see the airport, they'll be able to hear it as well. the thing is, this digital control tower is 120 miles away from the airport. we've been shown this simulation, but by 2019 controllers will be sitting here directing traffic for real. using pictures fed from a new camera tower next to the runway. unlike the old tower, they can zoom in for a better view. they can also put radar data onto the screen to track aircraft. critically, for safety, the cameras can pick out rogue drones near the airport and light the runway at night. my my initial reaction was sceptical. it gives the controller more information in terms of what they can see and hear, how they can identify and track targets. the awareness the controller gets is all about being heads up, not down. it makes the job much easier. now, i know exactly what you're thinking.
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the number one question i've been asked by everybody i have told about this is, what if the tv screens go down? what if the system is hacked? how secure is it? so, highly secure. the system has been independently stress tested by security specialists. we have three defences in place between the airport and the control centre, so if one of those was to fail, there is always a backup. if that fails, there's another cable. they are all routed, taking different routes, between the airport and here. london city is convinced the new operation will make it more efficient and safe. the idea of a control tower miles from the airport may seem odd, but it isn't far away. it is really quite challenging, there are so many questions.
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i know very little about that sort of thing, but it sounds scary. if i am on an aeroplane taking off, i wa nt am on an aeroplane taking off, i want the control tower to be right there. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: if you're jetting off for the may half term, have you had to pay more than last year? we'll have some top tips to save money on that sunshine break. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a fourth day of garrard excavations have still not found any trace of the murdered schoolgirl who went missing in 2001 on the way to school. her uncle was convicted of her murder. a body was neverfound. the police search was prompted after someone tipped them off about unusual activity at the site around the time of her disappearance. south—eastern is putting up some of it's off—peak rail fares,
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despite an outcry from passengers. a 3.4% increase comes into effect this sunday, meaning some off—peak returns to and from london will rise by more than a £1. south—eastern says the increase is necessary, but the campaign for better transport says its totally unacceptable. chiswick house is giving beatles fans the chance to follow in the footsteps of the fab four. gardeners at the venue have recreated the famous cover of sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club. their design, based on the one 50 years ago, will be unveiled later this morning. visitors can also see the locations where paperback writer and rain were filmed. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there is a good service on all lines, with a part suspension of tfl rail. there's disruption between gidea park and shenfield. that's also affecting greater anglia services. elsewhere on the trains, and major disruption too between luton and st pancras which is affecting thameslink and east midlands trains due to a signal failure.
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all lines are currently blocked. 0n the roads, the limehouse link tunnel is closed westbound due to accident at the tunnel entrance, traffic being diverted via the exit slip onto west india dock road. the m25 anti—clockwise, one lane closed on the entry slip atjunction 2 for the a2 due to a broken down vehicle. and finally in sidcup, temporary traffic lights on high street at elm road due to burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. it is a wet start to the day. great weather if you are gardner, but not much good for anybody else. a continuation this morning of the rain we saw last night. further outbreaks of rain and surface water on the road and pavement. a dismal start the day. temperatures in double figures and a lot of low cloud around. if it is dry where you are, the rain would be far away for at least the first half of the day. in the second half we
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may see it dry and brighten up, especially in southern areas, but they will be heavy showers developing. further south there will be some thunderstorms around. top temperatures between 14 and 16 celsius. some drier interludes into the evening. a few showers around overnight will stop tonight it will feel cooler than it did last night. temperatures away from the town possibly dipping down into single figures. it is looking a lot nicer over the weekend. tomorrow we should have good spells of sunshine. temperatures will respond. up to 18, 19 degrees in the afternoon. showers could develop towards northern areas of the capital in particular. sunday is looking dry and with the southerly wind it will feel warmer. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning — it was one of the most horrifying cases of child sexual
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abuse in recent memory. as the bbc drama based on the stories of the rochdale victims concludes, we'll speak to one of the real—life survivors of a grooming gang. also on breakfast, they're fast, furious and draw huge crowds but are mass video game events a sport? they're being included in the 2022 asian games so could the olympics be next? and it's 50 years since englebert humperdinck‘s record—breaking hit ‘release me‘. he‘ll be on the sofa to tell us how the song still holds a special place in his heart. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning‘s main news... brexit dominated the first televised leaders‘ debate, which was held last night despite the absence of theresa may
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and jeremy corbyn. plaid cymru leader leanne wood, who backed remain in last year‘s referendum, said welsh interests must be protected during brexit negotiations. we have been pretty much ignored since the referendum. gibraltar has had more attention than wales has had. so it is vital we have a strong tea m had. so it is vital we have a strong team of plaid cymru mps to advocate for our national interests and to make sure that the tories do not get away with an extreme except that would cause serious harm for many of the people in many of our communities right throughout the uk. american warplanes operating over syria have attacked a convoy carrying pro—government militia forces. the us—led coalition said it was moving towards a base, used by western special forces near the border with iraq. last month, the americans fired 59 cruise missiles at a syrian government air base. but washington has insisted its latest military action does not
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mean it is stepping up its role in the syrian war. the japanese government has approved plans to allow emperor akihito to step down — the first abdication for two centuries. the cabinet has backed draft legislation, which will now be sent for parliamentary approval. the emperor, who‘s 83, indicated last year his desire to abdicate because of ill health. he‘s been on the throne since 1989. instagram and snapchat are the worst social media platforms for young people‘s mental health and wellbeing, according to a new survey. almost 1500 people aged 14 to 24 were asked to rate sites on their impact on anxiety, depression, loneliness, bullying and body image. the royal society for public health said youtube had the most positive impact on mental health, followed by twitter and facebook. rolf harris will be released on bail to appear in court next week. the
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former entertainer denies four cou nts former entertainer denies four counts of indecently assaulting three teenagers. the jurors counts of indecently assaulting three teenagers. thejurors had been told that he was jailed for other offences in 2014. a bbc investigation has found flaws in the voice—recognition security used by one of britain‘s biggest banks. hsbc‘s system analyses customers‘ voice patterns to allow them access to their accounts. the bank says every person‘s voice is unique and that makes its system secure. but the click technology programme has shown that it is possible for someone to log into an account that‘s not their own. scientists searching for so—called miniature sea monsters in the pacific ocean have released these amazing pictures. they‘ve sent camera probes up to four kilometres below sea level, to capture images of some of the world‘s most elusive creatures. it‘s part of a month—long exploration to assess how marine life has adapted to life in the deep. i would love to know how tiny these
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creatures are. they are quite scary. they do always looked alien, don't they? like from doctor who. the big squid. do you remember those? they live down there as well. they look like a cross between a pig and a squid. they were cute. like a cross between a pig and a squid. they were cutelj like a cross between a pig and a squid. they were cute. i remember you mentioning that before. was it a real thing? yes. we found a picture, remember? let‘s talk about harry kane, shall we? that was way too vague a link... it would have been a forced link, i think. vague a link... it would have been a forced link, ithink. harry vague a link... it would have been a forced link, i think. harry kane is anfire again. harry kane is in pole position to become the premier league‘s top scorer after bagging four in tottenham‘s 6—1 thrashing of leicester last night. spurs were already assured of second place in the table — and kane helped them to their biggest ever away win in the league.
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he now has 26 for the season — two clear of his nearest challengers with one game left. i was delighted to get these girls so it was a good moment. there has been built up during the week about the golden boot race and i would like to have gotten a least one or two today to put the pressure on so to get four is an amazing feeling. celtic equalled their record points tally in the scottish premiership, thanks to a 5—0 win at partick thistle. they‘re on 103 now — so even a draw against hearts on sunday and celtic will break the record for a 38—game season — and they‘ll go unbeaten in the league for the whole term. any budding goalkeepers out there will now you can either be a hero or a pantomime villain. imagine how this goalkeeper feels. a pantomime villain. imagine how this goalkeeperfeels. he a pantomime villain. imagine how this goalkeeper feels. he sent the ball into his own net to end the
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season long dream of his team and sent at blackpool to play exeter. it‘s infuriating, isn‘t it, seeing a player dive orfeign injury and go unpunished. well english football will follow scotland‘s lead and introduce retrospective bans, under a new offence of "successful deception of a match official". the fa say incidents will be reviewed by a panel of three and a unanimous decision will result in a two—match ban. but not everyone approves. i think it‘s rubbish because what about the lad that gets booked who did not die of? what will they do? ring technology in and we can look at it on the day. bring a symbian in so we can put them in the sink in for ten minutes and return to the feel. stock paying these money to create rubbish situations in the
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game. the outgoing chief executive of the rfu, ian ritchie, says the england coach doesn‘t have to be english. ritchie helped appoint australian eddiejones to the role in 2015 — and he believes quality should always be the overriding factor. you need the best coach that you can get and the most important thing is, friendly, whether he be kiwi, australian or martian, you need the best coach that you can get because what happens is that success on the pitch out here with the england team has an undoubted impact on 8—year—olds playing rugby on sunday morning and you want that to be successful. you want it to be vibrant. johanna konta‘s run at the italian 0pen is over, after she lost to venus williams in rome yesterday. the british number one recovered from a set down against the seven—time grand slam champion, but eventually lost in three sets. the lawn tennis association admits that not everyone will agree with their decision to give maria
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sharapova a wildca rd their decision to give maria sharapova a wildcard for the classic in birmingham in the run—up to wimbledon. they said they did not make the decision lightly. sharapova has returned from a 15 month doping ban and is trying to work her way back up the world rankings. birmingham would be a chance for her to ta ke birmingham would be a chance for her to take a step on the road to try and get into wimbledon. 0bviously she still has the talent, she has been on a good run after coming back from her ban. it was a controversial decision. quite tricky, really. we we re decision. quite tricky, really. we were speaking about teeny tiny scary sea creatures, weren‘t we? let‘s multiply that by, i don‘t know, 100, and go to match who has the weather for us. he is there with some giant plastic dinosaurs. good morning. good morning. you do not often see the botanical gardens looking like this, do you? animated dinosaurs, this one just beside me. this is... let me
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get this right... aae... iforgot it already. its name means armoured head and it is among the animated dinosaurs here, on a tour around the uk. trust me, when they get into gear they make a lot of noise as you can hear. causing a bit of noise this morning as the rain dripping down. if we have a look at the forecast for this morning across the uk in it is one which will contain rainfor uk in it is one which will contain rain for some of us. not everywhere, however. sta rt rain for some of us. not everywhere, however. start strike scotland this morning with frost around. there is a sunshine is what to do with it. cloud over eastern areas. to the use of the pennines, outbreaks of rain will continue off in yorkshire. a damp start through the midlands. the rain will be light after heavy bursts in the night. things will
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gradually brighten up. in the south—west and wales this is where we have sunshine at the moment. a little bit of frost as well. there could be an odd shower but most places starting dry. northern ireland has some sunshine and a little bit of frost around as well. wind is like for many at the moment that there is a breeze blowing across eastern counties. that will continue through the day with outbreaks pushing into scotland. an extensive mist and low cloud to go with it. sunshine elsewhere, yes, but heavy and potential thundery showers in the afternoon. some of those showers could be on the nasty side. in between no showers, temperatures will reach around 18 or 19 degrees. tonight, the rain becomes confined to parts of scotland, and is tonight to come here with outbreaks of rain. clear skies elsewhere, a couple of showers and afine skies elsewhere, a couple of showers and a fine start for many on
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saturday, start with claggy outbreaks, in the northern half of scotla nd outbreaks, in the northern half of scotland later on, elsewhere in china showers will take through the rest of the day. if the showers through the southern and western coasts. into sunday that looks like a dry day by and large. we will have rain in northern ireland and western parts of scotland. but we will start to see a lot of sunshine develop across the southern and eastern areas. 0n across the southern and eastern areas. on sunday looks at the driest weather will be across england and east of scotland and will see wind coming from the south on sunday it will start to feel a little bit warmer as well. but on sunday could reach around 20 degrees. essentially for today, rain across the east, sunshine and showers elsewhere. warmer and drierfor sunshine and showers elsewhere. warmer and drier for many sunshine and showers elsewhere. warmer and drierfor many by sunshine and showers elsewhere. warmer and drier for many by sunday. that is how it looks. i need to try and remember the names of my dinosaurs. i will hanker back now.
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if somebody just started watching your weather forecast halfway through they would have thought you we re through they would have thought you were having a loud tummy rumble because of all the dinosaur roaring. at this time of morning, that certainly is possible. go and have your breakfast. thank you. growing numbers of banks are using voice recognition for customers to access their accounts. in theory you get a high degree of security without having to remember a pin number. that there is questions this morning about whether or not the system is as safe as the banks claim. we speak to dan simmons from leak. can you explain to us, what your trial showed. what happened ? what happened? i decided to get my nonidentical twin brother to try to copy my voice and break into my bank account. my real bank account with hsbc. he needed my account number
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and my short code and date of birth. he knows that, of course, but those are not regarded as secure information. bits of information to get in. so with those bits of information all he had to do was say my voice is my password fairly similarto my voice is my password fairly similar to how my voice is my password fairly similarto howi my voice is my password fairly similar to how i might say it and on the eighth attempt of trying he managed to break in. well... i don't think we can hear your two voices but you tell me — how similar are your voices? that is the first thing people want to know. we are kind of alike but on the day we did it he had a nightmare overnight and did not sleep, nothing like that. some people will wake up this morning feeling exactly the same when you through those creaky and you are uncertain. we did not think this would work, because of that. we do not sound too alike and we have had
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experts saying any system should be itself apart regardless. this has been trumpeted as a secure system but in what is a low—tech trial, he seemed were broken in. it is important to say that in the majority of cases biotechnology and biometrics which measures something about what you are which is something like your fingerprint or your voice, for example, is very secure. but it is not infallible. and when we hear reports of a bank saying that we should rely on this and it was secure. in this counter was the only factor we really needed to get in. when it does fail, that is serious. when we speak about issues to do with security, we think about things like people stealing identities and social media, issues around that. what about the notion of people cloning voices? what about that becoming a legitimate
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criminal... well, as a legitimate, you know, a criminal activity. that could be possible. google are looking into this. adobe are looking into it. we spoke to a company called firebird in canada who are all looking at mimicking voices and there is some concern that they could get so good, especially with artificial intelligence, this whole biometric system could be fooled a lot more in future. and, remember, you change your password of something like this happens. you cannot change your voice. something like this happens. you cannot change your voicelj something like this happens. you cannot change your voice. i am looking at the statement from the bank and it was their system, hate sbc, they say that the safety and security of their account is most important. voice recognition is a secure method for our companies —— customers. many companies using this? this is the way will go,
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regardless of the flaws that appear? it about managing risk, isn‘t it? how it about managing risk, isn‘t it? h ow ofte n it about managing risk, isn‘t it? how often does it happen and can they manage it. they take the liability of someone goes wrong you might say that these sort of 0k. as a privacy issue there, i think there isa a privacy issue there, i think there is a protection issue, to be fair. berkeley is and another bank in this country are both using voice biometrics. a different system, but they do use it. citibank in the united states uses it. over they do use it. citibank in the united states uses it. 0ver1 million customers there. it is coming, if you do not have already, along with a of other biometric test. the risk at the moment is on the side of the bank as far as money is concerned. i could not withdraw money out, by the way, we could not do that in a test but that may be coming further down the line in future. so there are a few initial warning signs that we have discovered with this investigation we did for our technology show. and you can see more on this on click, here on breakfast
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tomorrow at 6:50am. half term is approaching and if you are one of the families lucky enough to be heading abroad. but the cost of doing so is creeping up. sean has more. we‘ve spoken a lot about prices going up generally, but this holidays and little bit faster than everything else. we spoke about inflation, if you look at the cost ofafamily inflation, if you look at the cost of a family holiday last year competed this month costs are up about 8%, about £280 on average. what‘s going on? zoe dawes is a travel expert and joins me now. m&s bank say it is about the weak pound. is itjust that? it is, but there‘s a general situation in the world where people are changing their holiday plans, so certain places have become less popular and others therefore become more popular. uncertainty about brexit. soa
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popular. uncertainty about brexit. so a condonation of a lot of things that has made this happen. so the areas that are becoming more popular, for whatever reason, whether terrorism or exchange rates, are the more popular areas more expensive? yes. even places like, for instance, spain, turkey is becoming less so, so popular resorts like spain and greece have gone up. but also some of the resorts are getting really expensive, so it‘s about searching out lesser—known places. we are hearing a lot about... we know wages aren‘t going up about... we know wages aren‘t going up as quickly as prices. is that having an effect on where people are deciding to go on holiday as well? yes. i mean, the holidaymaker is becoming more discerning and they will have to because of the way prices are rocketing. it isn‘tjust 8%, i had a look at something recently where there was one
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particular holiday, i think to the us, it was over half term and it was 800% more than it had been out of season. so it is the combination of the two. 0n season. so it is the combination of the two. on that, is there anything about it being half term, are they still putting up prices even during that period? yes. as any parent out there knows, i knew when my son was in school, they‘ve got you over a barrel because it‘s a market led thing. definitely more expensive. that doesn‘t seem to be easing off either. thank you very much. there you go, prices up pretty much a percent at least. 800% compared to out of term time. —— 8%. the big issue for parents. it doesn‘t seem to be budging. thanks very much. competitive computer gaming, or esports, has rocketed in popularity in recent years. and as audiences increase, so do calls for it to be included in world—wide sporting events
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such as the olympics. this weekend some of the worlds best gamers are gathering at the 02 in london for the vainglory spring championships, one of the biggest events in the calendar. breakfast‘s tim muffett is there. you look like you are having too much fun already! good morning. iwas much fun already! good morning. i was pretty good at pacman when i was a kid, what i‘m not sure about vainglory. the gaming industry is huge, worth billions of pounds, but did you know that people will gather places like this, thousands of people, to watch people playing games? as i say, competitive gaming, orat playing games? as i say, competitive gaming, or at esports, playing games? as i say, competitive gaming, orat esports, to playing games? as i say, competitive gaming, or at esports, to give it its umbrella term, is now an absolutely huge deal. this weekend at the 02, the vainglory championships. people are playing from their own living rooms. i met up from their own living rooms. i met up with one team as they prepare to
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do battle themselves. eyes, fingers, brains. primed and approaching peak condition. we've been practising a lot. team eminem feature some of the uk‘s top gainers, who are living together in a house for one month, training eight hours a day. how is it going? going good. this boot camp will prepare them for the league of legends european championship. there is also going through your games and video analysis, so you can point out where errors are at something you could work on, where you could have done the game better. we are just trying to use this pressure instead. cani trying to use this pressure instead. can i briefly interrupts? what are you talking about? it sounds a gobbledygook. we are talking about that kind of level that the average
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person would see and feel in again. league of legends is a fantasy battle game. this is a recording of a recent team victory. i, however, are not very good. i think i died again. you died again. the tournament will see teams across europe compete online. like many esport competitions, many fans are expected to just log on and watch. some people don‘t want to play the game, theyjust some people don‘t want to play the game, they just want to watch others. like mainstream sports, i love watching cricket. i am not much ofa love watching cricket. i am not much of a cricket player. it is ageing how it has grown. it will end rivalling mainstream sports! say it is already doing just that. life esport tournaments come up like this one in poland, attract thousands of fans. at london‘s 02, teams from the us and europe will compete for this trophy and more than £100,000 in prize money. the game they will be
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playing, vainglory. it is insanely pressurised. jasmine is a tournament referee, taking short play is fair and rules are enforced. it is definitely a sport. it might not a like physically taxing or new, but mentally, for you to work as a team, for you to train for hours and hours on end, reaction speeds and all of this, these are all elements that you find in actual sports. what an incredible fight coming in! i kindly to see what they will do next. these commentators travel the world to events like this. he can't find it! some of the games are so complicated different to what usually expect, you need people to be able to translate that. the impact and growth of esports is getting bigger and bigger. and it is thought more than 300 million people across the world regularly watch or play esports and
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that number is expected to double by 2020. a huge deal. james, you have organised this event. how big is esports now? as you say, since about 2020 we are finding the participation and viewership is getting large. we go from national tournaments of about 250,000 the finals, all the way up to 47 million over a weekend. it is really getting a place in the industry. this weekend you‘ve got teams from america and europe competing in vainglory, the game i have here. how does the uk compared to those teams? we area does the uk compared to those teams? we are a little bit behind. although we have a huge player base, the uk market is the second—largest gaming market is the second—largest gaming market in europe, but unfortunately the professionalism isjust not there yet. we are doing our best to get that sorted. we have been running forfive get that sorted. we have been running for five years already in
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the uk and we are getting at him now that can potentially qualify into one of the really big leagues. will people be playing this game, because it is mobile, and it will be projected on the big screens, so the crowds can just watch people playing a game. isn't that odd? absolutely not. this is the cream of those players. the moves, the way they played, the strategy is all supre —— super interesting. a lot of people have this conundrum about screen time, especially if they have kids. should they be looking at their phones playing games. you are making this harderfor phones playing games. you are making this harder for parents? there is that legacy, i suppose. this harder for parents? there is that legacy, isuppose. but this harder for parents? there is that legacy, i suppose. but i work in an office and i probably look at a screen even more than a game. so it is part of everyday life and we have more than one screen in our lives. and some of these games are making billions of pounds a year in prize money and sponsorship. absolutely. the top players are in multimillions in terms of revenue, not just from
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multimillions in terms of revenue, notjust from prize money but also they stream online. they are a personality, a celebrity. a fascinating world. thank you. i am going to keep practising. i convinced my parents when i was younger that i would be allowed to play video games. they said to get away from the screen. if i kept going i could have been rich! we will be back with tim later. isn‘t it extraordinary? those guys are together in a house one month to practise. they need to get out of that occasionally. it can‘t be good for them! it could be, if their fortunes are being made! we have the leader of the liberal democrats coming up, at about 7:10am. let us know if there is any particular question you want us to ask, especially after the leader‘s debate last night. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alex bushill. a fourth day of garage excavations
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in thurrock has still not found any trace of murdered schoolgirl daniellejones, according to police. the 15—year—old went missing injune 2001 on her way to school. her uncle stuart campbell was convicted of her murder, but her body was never found. the police search was prompted after someone tipped them off about some unusual activity at the site around the time of her disappearance. southeastern is putting up some of it‘s off—peak rail fares, despite an outcry from passengers. a 3.4% increase comes into effect this sunday, meaning some off—peak returns to and from london will rise by more than a £1. southeastern says the increase is necessary, but the campaign for better transport says its totally unacceptable. chiswick house is giving beatles fans the chance to follow in the footsteps of the fab four. gardeners at the venue have recreated the famous cover of sergeant pepper‘s lonely hearts club. their design, based on the one 50 years ago, will be unveiled later this morning. visitors can also see the locations where paperback writer and rain were filmed. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there is a good service on all lines,
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with a part suspension of tfl rail. there‘s disruption between gidea park and shenfield. that‘s also affecting greater anglia services. elsewhere on the trains, major disruption too between luton and st pancras, which is affecting thameslink and east midlands trains due to a signal failure. all lines are currently blocked. 0n the roads, the limehouse link tunnel has reopened westbound after an earlier accident. queues still past preston‘s road roundabout and on the a13 to blackwall tunnel approach. the m25 anticlockwise — one lane closed on the entry slip atjunction 2 for the a2 due to a broken down vehicle. and finally, in sidcup, temporary traffic lights on high street at elm road due to burst water main let‘s have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. well, it‘s a wet start to the day. great weather, again, if you are a gardener or a duck,
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but not much good for anybody else. a continuation this morning of the rain we saw last night. further outbreaks of rain and lots of surface water on the roads and pavements. a rather dismal start to the day. temperatures in double figures, a lot of low cloud around. if it‘s dry where you are, the rain will never be too far away for at least the first half of the day. in the second half we may see it dry out and brighten up, especially in southern areas, but there will be heavy showers developing. further south there will be some thunderstorms around. top temperatures between 14 and 16 celsius. so some drier interludes as we head into the evening. then a few showers around overnight. tonight, it will feel cooler than it did last night, with temperatures away from the towns possibly dipping down into single figures. it‘s looking a lot nicer over the weekend. tomorrow we should see some good spells of sunshine. temperatures will respond. up to 18—19 degrees in the afternoon. watch out for some showers that may develop towards northern areas
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of the capital in particular. sunday is looking dry and with the southerly wind it will feel warmer. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. brexit dominates the first big tv debate of the election campaign. leaders of five parties — but not theresa may orjeremy corbyn — go head to head for the debate on itv. this morning we have the first of our leaders‘ interviews with nicola sturgeon and tim farron on the breakfast sofa. good morning.
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it‘s friday 19th may. also this morning — thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. the final episode of the three girls. we will discuss some of the issuesit girls. we will discuss some of the issues it raised and speak to the prosecutor who featured in the drama. the first uk airport to replace its control tower overlooking the runway, with a virtual centre 100 miles away. is it better to buy a brand new home or do they they not make them like they used to? a row is brewing about which is better made — new builds or old builds. i‘m taking a look. and in sport, leicester are given a caning. the outgoing champions are hit for six by tottenham, as harry kane scores four, and is now favourite to finish the season as the premier league‘s top scorer, and matt‘s out with the dinosaurs in birmingham
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for the weather. i certainly icertainly am. i certainly am. from birmingham botanical gardens and the weekend forecast its better for many or you view after a wet day today. a bit warmer by sunday. this little fellow, not too impressed with the forecast but he is certainly not happy at all. i will have the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. brexit dominated the televised leaders‘ debate, which was held last night despite the absence of theresa may and jeremy corbyn. the itv event saw little disagreement between the lib dems, green party, plaid cymru and snp as they repeatedly clashed with ukip‘s paul nuttall. 0ur political correspondent tom symonds reports. five party leaders took part. four support britain remaining in the eu. and in the absence of theresa may and jeremy corbyn, they turned on the one leader who did not, paul nuttall, attacking his support
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for a hard brexit and his tough line on immigration. theresa may not have the guts to be here tonight but her spokesman in the form of paul nuttall seems to be here tonight. i know immigration is a difficult topic for politicians. people have understandable concerns. when we speak about european migrants, we talk about people who work in the national health service, whose serve us in our restaurants. people who make a contribution. the ukip leader said brexit would offer britain enormous trade opportunities and controlling immigration would free up pressure on resources. one of the reasons that wages have stagnated in recent years and had probably stagnated since about 2004 is because of immigration levels. we have an oversupply of labour in this country. it is as simple as that. the leader of the greens said there was no question for which the answer from ukip was not immigration. as for labour...
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not only did they give the tories a blank cheque for the hard brexit they gave them to lift to the bank and help them to cash it in. the liberal democrats are offering a second vote on whether britain should have a future brexit deal. their leader believes it is better that people decide than theresa may. she is putting together a plan which appeases paul nuttalls and nigel farages that damages the future of our children. that is why you should have the final say on brexit. the leader of plaid cymru was concerned that restrictions on trade post—brexit could harm wales‘s aerospace companies by introducing stiff tariffs. 6500 well—paid jobs in wales that you are prepared to lose. we have a huge trading deficit... twice under fire, paul nuttall
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confused the names of his tormentor. audience members asked how the leaders would invest in schools, hospitals and social care in the future of younger people. there was general agreement — money would need to be found. when you get paul nuttall insistint there would be a financial benefit to britain leaving the eu this was the reaction... overtalk. where‘s the bus? a reference to the infamous battle bus and the promise of £350 million for the nhs. will that bus come driving past at any minute? brexit continues to dominate this unexpected election race. we‘re joined now by our political correspondent eleanor garnier. the leaders‘ debate was last night, but the front pages are all about the tory manifesto. there was a running joke that ukip
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we re there was a running joke that ukip were there to represent the conservative party but the absence of theresa may in jeremy conservative party but the absence of theresa may injeremy corbyn did loom large. that is right. that is why today‘s papers and most of the gender and attention is still focused on the tory manifesto which was launched by theresa may in halifax yesterday. a few things stand out from the manifesto. yes that was the positioning by theresa may, firmly putting the conservative party across the centre. we have had distinctive agenda. we saw more protections for working families, for those in the workplace. we saw a cap on energy prices, all aimed at lower income families. poorer families as well, paying for social ca re families as well, paying for social care with the means test threshold that the tories wish to increase to £100,000. they ditched the tax on the pensions lock and pulled back on the pensions lock and pulled back on the winter fuel payment. this was a
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clear move away from the era of david cameron and george osborne. that positioning is also risky. pulling back some of the benefits for pensioners could be difficult and theresa may and her team now that they will be aware of the danger of potentially alienating some traditional tory voters. that is what labour are focusing on this morning. they say this is the conservative party returning to become the nasty party. they say 10 million pensioners could be hit and lose their winter fuel payments as a result of the changes that theresa may wants to bring in. labour called ita may wants to bring in. labour called it a shameful attack on older people. the tories will say they have yet to work out the details of how the means testing on the winter fuel allowance will work and as yet do not know how many people will be affected. a reminder our first leader interviews kick off today. we‘ll be speaking to lib dem leader tim farron in about five minutes and snp leader nicola sturgeon after eight. many of you have been sending us
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questions for both of them. please do keep talking to us. we have some wonderful questions coming in. thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. bbc analysis of figures obtained under a freedom of information request show that 90% of officers in one force have not been properly vetted. in 2012, the association of chief police officers recommended a thorough background vetting for all police officers and community support officers. it is a process that takes several months and checks on all aspects of the person‘s background. it is designed to ensure that nobody unsuitable is employed. peter bunyan was a port officer, jailed for misconduct in 2013 after using the police database to contact women. an investigation by the
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independent police complaints commission found he would have been rejected if he had undergone proper vetting. the devon and cornwall police forces still has 100 frontline staff who are yet to be checked according to the latest guidelines. the bbc made a freedom of information request, asking other forces are what the situation in the area was. it found that a total of almost 14,000 police officers had yet to undergo thorough checks. in northumbria, almost nine from ten police officers, around 3000 people, had yet to be properly vetted. the force said a retrospective programme of vetting was about to start. her majesty ‘s inspector of constabulary said forces needed to address this matter urgently, while the police federation, which represents rank—and—file officers, said it was disappointed to see such a huge backlog. instagram and snapchat are the worst social media platforms for young people‘s mental health
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and wellbeing, according to a new survey. almost 1,500 people aged 14 to 24 were asked to rate sites on their impact on anxiety, depression, loneliness, bullying and body image. the royal society for public health said youtube had the most positive impact on mental health, followed by twitter and facebook. a bbc investigation has found flaws in hsbc‘s biometric bank security. its voice id system recognises customers‘ speech patterns to grant access to their accounts. hsbc says every person‘s voice is unique and that makes its system secure. but the click technology programme has shown that it is possible for someone to log into an account that‘s not their own. dan simmons reports. passwords, key fobs and apps have all been used to protect us. but over the last year, a new gold standard in security has emerged — biometrics. like fingerprints, the human voice is unique to each of us and hsbc, along with other banks, has started using the voice of its customers as their password.
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they say it‘s secure. but a simple experiment with my nonidentical twin brother... phone: welcome to hsbc. ..proves otherwise. my financial details and the ability to transfer money wide open. i‘m absolutely shocked. under no circumstances should two different people be able to access the same bank account with voice biometric authentication. every voice is unique but it is up to the system to differentiate between voices and it has not done so in this case. unlike a password, a voice is public. and experts worry that artificial intelligence software can synthesise voices so well that it would soon be able to clone a voice from a sample of 30 seconds or less. a tool which could make the hacker‘sjob much easier. in response to our terms to the bank said... most experts agree that by making
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security more personal, you make it more secure. but if your voice can be copied, unlike passwords... it may be difficult to get a new one. computer: dan simmons, bbc news. we have your weekend whether in about ten minutes time. the time now is 11 minutes past seven. this time in three weeks we should have result from the general election as it edges coats. we will speak to all the party leaders here on breakfast. first up we have tim farren from the liberal democrats. have you recovered from last night?m liberal democrats. have you recovered from last night? it was a late night last night. it was good fun and this was a period of time where you do not have time for rest
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but there is plenty of time for that afterwards. quickly looking through the papers this morning, read and if you can see these, the front page of the telegraph, theresa may is on the front. 0n the front page of the times, on the mirror, and the mail, are you a little bit disappointed that what you were talking about last night did not make enough impact to make it onto the front page today? i thought the debate went well last night and i thought that the most obvious thing was the fa ct that the most obvious thing was the fact that neitherjeremy corbyn nor theresa may goes to be there which is an insult to everybody out there who will cast a vote in a few days time. it is also a reminder, however, theresa may approaches his election as if she has already won, she is taking everybody for example. you wouldn‘t decide to not turn up toa you wouldn‘t decide to not turn up to a debate if you thought that you had any respect for those people who will cast a vote. the conservative ma nifesto will cast a vote. the conservative manifesto came out yesterday and it was some things. people should think
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very ha rd was some things. people should think very hard about giving a blank cheque to the tory party, not less the new tax, an enormous hit on people, for people who have dementia. the impact on schools, taking away free school meals for infa nt taking away free school meals for infant schoolchildren, that is heartless and cruel. the kind of thing that a party does if they think they will win anyway. thing that a party does if they think they will win anywaym thing that a party does if they think they will win anyway. it is important that we hold them to account. doesn‘t the tax reduction only apply to people being cared for in their own home? people who go into homes have to pay that anywhere you, it means everybody gets hit. what the liberal democrats wish to do is set a cap of £72,000 above which the state would help you. what theresa may is doing is making sure that if you get dementia, you will lose your house. you will have nothing to pass on. and that seems to me... it is not fair. for the first time your home is there to be cashed in if you need help, just in your own home. it sounds grim but if
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your own home. it sounds grim but if you die of a heart attack then you have nothing to pay. but if you spend five or ten years or more living with dementia and needing ca re living with dementia and needing care at home you will be clobbered by the conservatives. it is utterly heartless and the actions of a party that since it has already won the election and does not need to do anything else. here we are this morning, the morning after the debate and we are talking about the tory manifesto. let‘s talk about some things they spoke about yesterday. you are right. the papers are picked up this morning on some of the policy in the manifesto of that are really quite surprising to many people, things like the winter fuel allowance and a triple lock on pensions. 0lder fuel allowance and a triple lock on pensions. older people, perhaps, you know, the core of the conservative heartland, if you like, who will be affected by these tory policies. what will the liberal democrats offer? first of all, we will keep the triple lock. that was our policy when we were in parliament. margaret thatcher got rid of the upgrading of pensions in the mid—19 80s and took
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the lib dems in howard put that right. and now, nearly two years afterwards, the conservatives have gone back to type and are hitting pensioners, particularly the polaris ones. all of this is based upon government and the conservatives realising that will have less money to spend. their own figures now show that they will have £15 billion a year worse off because of their extreme version of except that they had chosen becausejeremy corbyn back in. the key thing for us in this election is to say that one at once the british people voted to leave the eu, they did not vote for this new deal cars we do not know what it is. we believe the british people should have the final say on this and if you do not like the deal that to revisit may receive, we have the right to reject it and to remain in the european union. the people hit by the dementia tax are poor and middle income people who are
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fortu nate middle income people who are fortunate enough to have their own home. with spoken about that... will be people from poorer backgrounds. what about the winter fuel allowa nce ? what about the winter fuel allowance? the liberal democrats have called for that to be means tested. we believe that‘s right. the point is, you look at free school meals, schoolchildren are getting free school meals any more. getting brea kfast free school meals any more. getting breakfast instead. they will save £650 million. there will be no additional support for that. remember, primary schools around the country have invested millions of pounds in new kitchens and support because of the liberal democrat plan and they are up for that. the massive majority of children don‘t go infor massive majority of children don‘t go in for breakfast club. this is a conservative line to take food out of the mouths of children. let's pause that thought and talk about brexit. most people in this country
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voted for brexit. you seem to be taking a little bit of a gamble at the moment, hoping that those people, who either didn‘t vote or who were remainers, will come onboard with you now. but haven‘t we missed the boat, because brexit is happening? it isn't a gamble, the gamble is theresa may gambling with our children‘s future. as things stand at the moment you, me, theresa may, nobody knows what the outcome is going to be. will we be in a single market or outside the market where we sell half of our goods to? what kind of negotiating position would any government be in if they go to the eu saying, you see what you can offer us. this is what we would like and we will all vote again. you would get no deal. what will happen at the end of this is someone will sign off on the deal. either it will be the politicians or the public. i trust the people. i don‘t think it is right that our
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children will have to live with this for decades and it should be forced upon all of us without anyone having the finals day. if theresa may fails to get a good deal, it is right that the british people should be able to reject it and remain. pauline says, can you please ask him why you keep banging on about brexit affecting our children and grandchildren, as though those of us who can‘t wait to leave the eu don‘t care? we do and that‘s why we voted to leave. leave the eu don‘t care? we do and that's why we voted to leave. three quarters of the people voted on an extreme version of brexit that we survey has chosen. notjust theresa may, jeremy corbyn and his ministers voted for the extreme version of brexit. i respect people leaving and voting to leave, it won the referendum narrowly, that‘s the direction theresa may is going on, what she has no mandate for is to ta ke what she has no mandate for is to take us out of the single market and give us an extreme brexit. if we had bought a house, we wouldn‘t hand of
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the money before being given the keys and being told where the house was. surely any sensible situation would have the right to reject that. cannabis currently gets a fine of £90. you talk about children getting free school meals. would you be happy for your children to go up in a world where cannabis is freely available? as a father, a principal motivation in all this, and i don‘t think drugs are a good thing, they damage societies and people... you wa nt to damage societies and people... you want to legalise it. let's look at things to make society better. the lid, lib dems looked at serving chief constables and looking at making things better. —— the lid ends. the evidence is that if you separate cannabis from harder drugs then you protect people and the principal aim then you protect people and the principalaim in all of
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then you protect people and the principal aim in all of this is to protect the vulnerable and make sure criminal gangs have control ta ken back off them because they are the people exploiting us at the moment. do you think now people know who you are and to know your name? they know which box to tick? that‘s a good question. in the local elections we have the biggest increase in vote share. a membership nearly doubled in the last few weeks. the local elections were great for the liberal democrats. it looks as though the conservatives are heading towards a landslide, that‘s why theresa may called the election, and there needs to bea called the election, and there needs to be a decent opposition. everybody knows jeremy corbyn won‘t to be a decent opposition. everybody knowsjeremy corbyn won‘t be the next government, so people need to stand up for next government, so people need to stand upfora next government, so people need to stand up for a britain that has a good future. a reminder, after 8am nicola sturgeon will bejoining a reminder, after 8am nicola
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sturgeon will be joining us on the sofa. 0ver sturgeon will be joining us on the sofa. over to the weather. you are chasing dinosaurs this morning! yes, ime and every child and some adult‘s fantasy this morning! —— i"m in. this is a stag do soros. there are 30 animatronic dinosaurs here throughout the coming weeks. part of thejurassic kingdom throughout the coming weeks. part of the jurassic kingdom exhibition. they are noisy once they get up and running. the tour‘s round the country over the next few months. it is raining in birmingham and it really is raining for some of you this morning, especially around the eastern half of the country. a bit brighter weather around in the west. the chilly start, with some frost around. but the best of the sunshine will be across western parts of
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scotland. down in the north—west england we have a bit of brightness around this morning. east of the pennines and across eastern england, and birmingham, it is grey and cloudy and wet. the heaviest rain in north—east england. the rain turning lighter and patchier towards the south and east. showers gather later. towards the west midlands and towards south—west england and wales there will be the chance of sunshine. frost on the grass in parts of south—west england and wales. temperatures quickly on the rise. a few showers gather later. the same to northern ireland. frosty start for a few. while we have the sunshine and dry weather to start the day, there will be showers pushing on later. let‘s look at the details for the day across the uk. we have the cloudy as the weather in east. it will be raining on a doctor isa east. it will be raining on a doctor is a day in north—east england and eventually the eastern parts of scotland. a lot of grey, misty, low cloud. to the west and south of england as well as wales, and
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eventually western scotland, we have a bit of sunshine. we have a few showers developing. some of them will be heavy and sundry in the afternoon. tonight, most of the showers will fade from england and wales and northern ireland. across scotland, not as cold tonight. patchy rain and drizzle into the start of saturday morning. elsewhere, clearer skies. temperatures into single figures. 3-4 temperatures into single figures. 3—4 celsius in the royal park of england and wales. we start the weekend cool in southern parts of the uk. -- weekend cool in southern parts of the uk. —— rural parts of england. the story of sunshine to begin with. then heavy and thundery showers later. some of the missing the showers altogether. in scotland, after a cloudy start, the wettest weather confined to northern areas. even here we could have heavy showers to end the day. temperatures on saturday afternoon 18— 19 in southern and western areas. just into double figures further north.
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in the sunday it will be a dry day across the board. the exception will be northern ireland and western scotland. the bit of rain around. especially in the morning. sunniest of the south and east on sunday. with winds coming from south, temperatures will be on the rise little bit. we could have highs into the low 20s in some parts of south—east england and east anglia. that‘s how the weekend forecast is looking. we will give this little fella a morning coffee! don‘t give it coffee! that‘s the worst thing you can do. don‘t make it angry! we‘ve all been there. one of britain‘s airports is moving it‘s control tower — around 100 miles away from the actual runway. london city airport is to become the first in britain to abandon its birds—eye view of the runway and use digital technology to monitor planes remotely. they say it will make managing the planes safer and more efficient.
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0ur transport correspondent richard westcott has been given a special preview. modern airports are dynamic, fast flowing. hundreds of pieces being moved around every minute. and all of those movements must be tightly choreographed to keep it safe. this is london‘s city airport and that‘s just one of the 300 or so takeoffs and landings that happen here every day. until now, all of those flights have been co—ordinated by a group of controllers who look out of these windows here. but in the future, those windows will be replaced by these high definition tv screens. controllers won‘t just see the airport, they‘ll be able to hear it as well. the thing is, this digital control tower is 120 miles away from the airport. we‘ve been shown this simulation, but by 2019 controllers will be sitting here directing traffic for real
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using pictures fed from a new camera tower next to the runway. unlike the old tower, they can zoom in for a better view. they can also put radar data onto the screen to track aircraft. critically, for safety, the cameras can pick out rogue drones near the airport and light the runway at night. my initial reaction was sceptical. because i‘m used to being at an airport, it gives the controller more information in terms of what they can see and hear, how they can identify and track targets. the awareness the controller gets is all about being heads up, not down. the tower controller is paid to look out the window, so it makes the job much easier. now, i know exactly what you‘re thinking. the number one question i‘ve been asked by everybody i have told about this is, what if the tv screens go down? what if the system is hacked? how secure is it?
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so, highly secure. so the system has been independently stress tested by security specialists. we have three cables in place between the airport and the control centre, so if one of those was to fail, there is a backup. in the event that that fails, there‘s another cable. and they are all routed, taking different routes between the airport and here. london city is convinced the new operation will make it more efficient and safe. the idea of a control tower miles from the airport may seem odd, but it isn‘t far away. that‘s what you want, someone with binoculars. even with all of the technology, and you want one person with eyes on it. but the technology is making extraordinary advances. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i‘m alex bushill. a 20—year—old man‘s been stabbed to death in a car park at a shopping centre in east london. it happened at the brewery shopping centre in romford yesterday. four people have been arrested. a fourth day of garage excavations in thurrock has still not found any trace of murdered schoolgirl danielle jones. the 15—year—old went missing injune 2001 on her way to school. her uncle stuart campbell was convicted of her murder, but her body was never found. the police search was prompted after someone tipped them off about some unusual activity at the site around the time of her disappearance. southeastern is putting up some of it‘s off—peak rail fares, despite an outcry from passengers. a 3.4% increase comes into effect this sunday, meaning some off—peak returns to and from london will rise by more than a £1. southeastern says the increase is necessary, but the campaign for better transport says it‘s totally u na cce pta ble. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube there is a good service on all lines, with a part suspension of tfl rail.
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there‘s disruption between gidea park and shenfield. that‘s also affecting greater anglia services. elsewhere, on the trains there‘s major disruption too between luton and st pancras, which is affecting thameslink and east midlands trains. all lines are currently blocked. 0n the roads, lots of problems on the m25 atjunction 2 for the a2. eastbound a2 is closed before the m25 due to an accident, with congestion to dartford heath. the limehouse link tunnel has reopened westbound after an earlier accident. congestion, though, on prince regent lane to the a13. and, finally, godstone — the a22 is partially blocked southbound at the m25 due to an accident. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. well, it‘s a wet start to the day. great weather, again,
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if you are a gardener or a duck, but not much good for anybody else. a continuation this morning of the rain we saw last night. further outbreaks of rain and lots of surface water on the roads and pavements. a rather dismal start to the day. temperatures in double figures, a lot of low cloud around. if it‘s dry where you are, the rain will never be too far away for at least the first half of the day. in the second half we may see it dry out and brighten up, perhaps, particularly towards southern areas, but there will be heavy showers developing. further south there will be some thunderstorms around. top temperatures between 14 and 16 celsius. so some drier interludes as we head into the evening. then a few showers around overnight. tonight, it will feel cooler than it did last night, with temperatures away from the towns possibly dipping down into single figures. it‘s looking a lot nicer over the weekend. tomorrow we should see some good spells of sunshine around. temperatures will respond.
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up to 18—19 degrees through the afternoon. but watch out for some showers that may develop towards northern areas of the capital in particular. on sunday, it is looking dry and with the southerly wind it will feel warmer. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. leaving the eu dominated the first televised leaders debate which was held last night. despite the ad dozens held last night. despite the ad d oze ns of held last night. despite the ad dozens of theresa may and jeremy corbyn. the leader of the green party said an opportunity had been missed for opposition parties to come together and challenge tory plans for a hard brexit. not only did labourgive plans for a hard brexit. not only did labour give them, the tories, a blank cheque for a hard brexit that they driven to the bank and help them cash it in. but if they could
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have worked with ours... not with ukip, but with others... we could have seriously opposed this catastrophic brexit. thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to server. bbc analysis of figures obtained showed that 90% of officers in one force, northumbria police, have not been properly vetted. they say a planned programme of retrospective vetting is due to start. the process checks on finances and employment histories we re finances and employment histories were searches for convictions. instagram and snapchat are the worst social media platforms for young people‘s mental health and wellbeing, according to a new survey. almost 1500 people aged 14 to 24 were asked to rate sites on their impact on anxiety, depression, loneliness, bullying and body image. the royal society for public health said youtube had the most positive impact on mental health, followed by twitter and facebook. rolf harris will be released on bail
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to appear in court next week. the former entertainer denies four counts of indecently assaulting three teenagers. thejurors had been told that he was jailed for other offences in 2014. a bbc investigation has found flaws in the voice—recognition security used by one of britain‘s biggest banks. hsbc‘s system analyses customers‘ voice patterns to allow them access to their accounts. the bank says every person‘s voice is unique and that makes its system secure. but the click technology programme has shown that it is possible for someone to log into an account that‘s not their own. scientists searching for so—called miniature sea monsters in the pacific ocean have released these amazing pictures. they‘ve sent camera probes up to four kilometres below sea level, to capture images of some of the world‘s most elusive creatures. that one looks like jaws. these
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creatures, i think, that one looks like jaws. these creatures, ithink, a that one looks like jaws. these creatures, i think, a teeny tiny. they are quite scary looking. it‘s part of a month—long exploration to assess how marine life has adapted to life in the deep. some of them look a little bit like alien from the alien films. do you know anything about this? no, not really. but tomorrow morning... tomorrow on breakfast i‘m tackling my own creatures of the deep, vicious ones that tackle you are under the water. water polo tomorrow in sport. what happens under the water stays under the water. but for now, it is all about harry kane. harry kane is in pole position to become the premier league‘s top scorer after bagging four in tottenham‘s 6—1 thrashing of leicester last night. spurs were already assured of second place in the table — and kane helped them to their biggest ever away win in the league. he now has 26 for the season — two clear of his nearest challengers with one game left. i was delighted to get these girls so it was a good moment. there has been built up during the week about
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the golden boot race and i would like to have gotten a least one or two today to put the pressure on so to get four is an amazing feeling. celtic equalled their record points tally in the scottish premiership, thanks to a 5—0 win at partick thistle. they‘re on 103 now — so even a draw against hearts on sunday and celtic will break the record for a 38—game season — and they‘ll go unbeaten in the league for the whole term. any budding goalkeepers out there will know you can either be a hero or a pantomime villain. imagine how this goalkeeper feels. he sent the ball into his own net to end the season long dream of his team and sent at blackpool to play exeter. his team and to clear the ball off the line but more got the final
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touch. it's infuriating, isn't it, touch. seeing a player dive orfeign injury and go unpunished. well english football will follow scotland‘s lead and introduce retrospective bans, under a new offence of "successful deception of a match official". the fa say incidents will be reviewed by a panel of three and a unanimous decision will result in a two—match ban. but not everyone approves. i think it‘s rubbish because what about the lad that gets booked who did not dive? what will they do? bring technology in and we can look bring a sin bin in so we can put them in the sink bring a sin bin in so we can put them in the sin bin for ten minutes and return to the feel. stock paying these money to create rubbish situations in the game. johanna konta‘s run at the italian 0pen is over, after she lost to venus williams
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in rome yesterday. the british number one recovered from a set down against the seven—time grand slam champion, and finally, the perils of being a sports reporter when a team wishes to celebrate. here is a presenter trying to interview a team who have just won a league title for the first time in16 just won a league title for the first time in 16 years. they pour champagne on the poorjournalist who tries to carry on. even the camera person does not escape. and look at this, the reporter finds person does not escape. and look at this, the reporterfinds himself underan this, the reporterfinds himself under an ice bucket but this chapter is not know he is beaten. he still tries to carry on with the interview. a second ice bucket comes down on his head rendering him speechless. he would probably like to protest and swear at those players but it is meant in good sport. 0h, players but it is meant in good sport. oh, that poor guy. it reminds me of alan partridge. i can‘t talk. my me of alan partridge. i can‘t talk. my tie was once cut in celebration in my trousers removed in the
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dressing room. that is cracking. it makes me fearful of the world cup in russia next year. such exuberant celebrations. thank you very much for that. just a reminder for you, we are interviewing all of the party leaders on breakfast in the run—up to the general election and nicola sturgeon will be with us after eight o‘clock this morning. of course, following last‘s leaders debate in the absence of both the tory leader and the labour leader, we will discuss that we will be speaking to nicola sturgeon and later on. if you have questions you would like us to address to her, please let us know this morning. and before that, we have the weather from matt was chasing dinosaurs in birmingham. good morning. good morning to you. it is not often you have the sound of 30 animated dinosaurs roaring around here in the birmingham
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botanical gardens. it is an unbelievable sight, part of the jurassic kingdom exhibition which begins here tomorrow and runs the a few weeks. and then it spread across other parts of the uk. this angry fellow behind me is a creature that used to roam in what is now north america around 75 million years ago. i think america around 75 million years ago. ithink any america around 75 million years ago. i think any child would be happy to come and see some of these in action. anyway... he is about as happy with the weather this morning asi happy with the weather this morning as i am. it is happy with the weather this morning asiam. it isa happy with the weather this morning as i am. it is a wet start here in birmingham and there is some rain around for a few of us this morning, particularly across the east of the country but it does not rain everywhere. not everyone will get wet today. the turnaround to begin with across much of scotland after it being chilean places on a frosty start. reasonably dry with a bright start. reasonably dry with a bright start in north—west england but if the pennines down across northern england it is great, damp and misty. heaviest rain will be around north—east england but it starts to ease off during the morning across parts of the midlands and east anglia. to the south—west through as
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well this is where we have, again, sometimes with a view to start the day but it frost on the grass that will melt away at the. utter bridger is on the rise, gentle winds across many western areas. as a start but a frosty start for some of you as well. an east—west split to start with and that rolled so must the day. staying where across the north—east of england for yorkshire southwards we should see the brightened through the afternoon. there will be showers across southern and western areas into the second half of the day and some may be heavy and thundery. not eve ryo ne some may be heavy and thundery. not everyone will see them, around the coast will stay dry and fine. in the sunshine with light winds it will feel quite nice. a cool breeze continues to blow across north—east england and eastern parts of scotland. into this evening and overnight the showers should gradually fade away for many. there area gradually fade away for many. there are a few on the go especially in
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scotland. this is where we will see the cloud become expensive with patchy rain and drizzle as wallace mist dinners over the hills. it is not quite as cold as last night to ta ke not quite as cold as last night to take this into saturday morning but a little bit chilly elsewhere. in some rural parts of england and wales in particular it could get down to three or four degrees as we head into saturday morning. for saturday we have sunshine and showers around through the country across england and wales and northern ireland in particular. heavy and thundery. across scotland it will be cloudy through the day, particularly in northern areas. the list here with temperatures into the high teens elsewhere. sunday by and large across the uk looking dry and warm as well. rain across parts of northern ireland and western scotland, at times during the morning. that is confined to the north—west of scotland later on. most of you will have a dry in the sunshine when you get it weakens it averages in the high teens and low 20s. some showers around this weekend by turning dry and warm into sunday. it is very much, matt. time
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now is jammed 741. the bbc drama based on the rochedale child sexual case concluded last night. the programme has been incredible and praised britain‘s lynching portrayal of what the victims themselves went through and has reopened questions about how the legal system actually deals with young people in the sort of cases. we will discuss it in a moment with the former chief crown prosecutor for the north—west. she played a significant part in charging the men involved and how that was evicted in the drama. a grinning gang survivor is also with us this morning. we will chat in a moment but first let‘s look at last night ‘s episode. moment but first let‘s look at last night 's episode. why did not the cps prosecute this case in 2008 when holly first went to the police? at that time it was considered that there was an unrealistic prospect of conviction. what changed? key
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evidence used in this trial you had in 2008. the perpetrators were allowed to continue offending screen other two years. why did the sepia stopped the case? is their initial around the ethnicity of the perpetrators? there was an issue around the witness, not the perpetrators. what happened is that, initially, a cps lawyer formed the view that the witness would not be credible. that is why the case did not progress to court. i came here la st not progress to court. i came here last year and i reversed that decision. i looked at it afresh and i formed a different view, that she was absolutely credible. would you say that holly was betrayed?” was absolutely credible. would you say that holly was betrayed? i have no difficulty in apologising to her. she was let down by the whole system and we were part of that system. that was the actor who played the man with us now and sammy with us he is survived a child grooming gang.
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it really was one of those rare moments of these days, a television moments of these days, a television moment when anybody who watched it last night over last few nights will be talking about this programme today. it was so shocking and, at times, terrifying to watch but, sammy, you lived a version of it, didn‘t you? sammy, you lived a version of it, didn't you? what happened to you? just after my 14th birthday i was at a local shop with a friend, as most teenagers do, going about my business when ian came in. we knew him asa business when ian came in. we knew him as a friend, he was not a com plete him as a friend, he was not a complete stranger. that was it. from that moment, nearly every day for two years that moment, nearly every day for two yea rs i that moment, nearly every day for two years i spent with him. he mentally, sexually and physically abused me and i never thought for a moment that he was a paedophile. he was 24, well—dressed, well groomed and the attention he gave is the attention that parents cannot give
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and friends and siblings... i have attention from people who came from good families, and it helps you to build up your self—esteem. the grooming process for me was the most fun but most damaging. a few things spring to mind. 0ne fun but most damaging. a few things spring to mind. one is your bravery, speaking about this, given what happened. you say you were 14, a child. 0ne happened. you say you were 14, a child. one of the things that we saw in this drama and what played out in real life is how people weren‘t listened to. what was your experience of that part of the process ? experience of that part of the process? i was never treated as a victim, always as equal, as his mistress. a police officer said to me that i would never be a reliable witness in court because i was part of his criminal gangs. i felt that for all of my life, up until about 2012. so this was a police officer talking to a child, saying you were a criminal, part of the problem, not a criminal, part of the problem, not a victim? yes, victims were blamed,
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we we re a victim? yes, victims were blamed, we were seen as part of the problem. we wa nted we were seen as part of the problem. we wanted it and were asking for it. we wanted it and were asking for it. we were children. these criminals are paedophiles, there‘s nothing equal about that. we saw from the programme your role in the case, which obviously changed things significantly. when you first took over, what were you aware of? what did you see? andrew norfolk had been doing something at the time, examining this case is around the country, and formed the view that they were not on the radar of the justice system and the policing, as justice system and the policing, as just indicated, they were taking it seriously. they may view is that... they keep begetting, they were children. assumptions that they want credible, unreliable, because they potentially had chaotic grounds, meaning they somehow wouldn't be
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believed in court. that was exactly why the perpetrators were picking on these young people, because they had chaotic and troubled backgrounds. and they made assumptions that the authorities wouldn't take them seriously. so they were doubly damped. they weren't being believed and at the same time the perpetrators knew they wouldn't be believed so they were targeted. sol wanted to decide to turn this 180 degrees and prosecute this case and we would provide all of the support we would provide all of the support we could do the victims to make sure that we get this case to court, as you saw in the film, and bring them tojustice. what it did do is change the landscape. this is before jimmy savile, before you tree, before everything that happened in mother and. —— yewtree. it changed the landscape. both of your experiences, given what happened, you think there
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has been a change in attitude, first of all from the point of view of the police? absolutely. there are specialist officers now that didn't exist before. lots of people who we re of exist before. lots of people who were of the old school. there are national guidelines. when i was part of the national prosecution service, we had the highest number of convictions in history. but right now somewhere a child is being abused and some perpetrator is getting away with it, so we have to be relentless in how we deal with these matters. sammy, you have done an incredible thing and wavered your anonymity. mostly children who are abused are protected by the law and you have decided to speak up, speak out and talk to us today and talk to other people as well about this. what was your motivation? how did you steal yourself to do that? for yea rs i you steal yourself to do that? for years i was speaking aboutjessica andi years i was speaking aboutjessica and i could he —— see how much it
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was helping people. asjessica i took it as far as i could. as sammy i could do so much more. i always felt my safety was the most important. i‘ve got that now. i know what to look for. so i will keep campaigning and! what to look for. so i will keep campaigning and i think i‘ve got a lot to give. i want other people to do the same. the more people to come forward to more of a difference we make. people talk about scars episodes like this leave on people. tell people a bit about life now. you‘ve got children of your own? tell people a bit about life now. you've got children of your own?” have. what age are your kids? they will be 16 and 11 in the next few months. i am quite lucky now because of the support i‘ve had, as a child i was failed but as an adult i have a good team. i‘ve got lots of support and that‘s enabled me to move forward. as a mother, you must reflect now, seeing your own children, a similar age as you were when all of this started, aldi
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reflect on children‘s vulnerabilities and how you protect them? —— how do you reflect. vulnerabilities and how you protect them? -- how do you reflect. my 16—year—old is so much like me as a child. people think because he is a boy they can‘t get involved in it, but this happens the boys too. one major issue that is not recognised is children getting groomed to commit crime. it happened to girls, it happened to me. toys are abused as well. it calls for changes in the law of course. at the time of the rothschild case we saw 11 barristers cross—examining you. that can't happen any more. judges control the proceedings to make sure that one advocate asks questions. we make sure that video interviews are taken by specialists. all of these things that weren't happening then, to make the experience more comfortable. we have to test it. i am absolutely
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satisfied that we've come a long way in six years. that said, i know there are children being abused now and we have to provide more support. it is tremendously courageous of sammy and others like her. the more that happens, the safer we will be. thank you very much. this prompted sony questions. the film is available on iplayer. —— so many questions. it is a legitimate picture of what happened. he did a greatjob. picture of what happened. he did a great job. details of organisations offering support are available at the bbc website. you can call for free at any time. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: party leaders clash in the first tv debate of the general election campaign. brexit was high on the agenda, but both theresa may and jeremy corbyn stayed away.
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a bbc investigation finds thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. when it comes to houses, are you all about the period features? new and brand spanking? tell us about the difference! good morning. it‘s a row between the home builders federation and housing tv expert kirsty allsopp about which is better quality when it comes to housing — old or new—builds? the home builders federation suggested it could cost around £50,000 to bring up an older house up to same standards as a new build. kirsty strongly disagrees and says many new builds aren‘t all they‘re cracked up to be. i had a nosey around a new build in manchester to see what all the fuss was about.
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how are you doing? good. we are in one of your showhome is. why would you want to buy one of these over an old build? would question. the key features we have in this house is the high ceilings, the big windows, lots of natural light. you are buying space, not rooms, so this is a really nice open plan space, whereas traditionally older houses divide into more smaller spaces. the houseis divide into more smaller spaces. the house is actually also a smart home. so the lights, the hot water, the heating, they can all be controlled through an app on your phone. you can get all of these things in all the bills, kai choo? is not like these are the only places you can get them. -- can't you? you could fit into an older property. the beauty is the design is on paper, when you get the keys you are ready to go. but whatever happens you will fight over the telly, no matter
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what! that's true. robert reed is an estate agent and joins me now. when your customers come to you and are looking for an old bills, why are looking for an old bills, why are they going down that road? some people love older houses because of the way they look and feel. very often with an older house you don‘t necessarily buy it with your head. you might buy it with your heart. you might buy it with your heart. you might buy it with your heart. you mightjust you might buy it with your heart. you might just love you might buy it with your heart. you mightjust love the features and the look of the house. that is often what‘s in the mind of someone buying an older house. this argument from the home builders federation about a £50,000 figure over if you years that you might have to put into it to get it up to the standards of a new build, does that hold?” to get it up to the standards of a new build, does that hold? i think the home builders federation advert was generalising, to say that all new builds are essentially perfect and all old houses need over £50,000 spending on them. there will be the odd old house that needs that or
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more, but it is wrong to generalise. you might get a period house that is renovated extremely well and extended to a high quality. so i think it is too broad brushed to suggest that. people often feel if you buy an older house you need to do lots of checks before you buy it. with the new build, kennyjust assume everything will run smoothly? i don‘t think you can. i grew up in an older house and i house that‘s 12 months old, so i‘ve enjoyed both of them in different ways. new build is not necessarily perfection. there is a variable quality in the market. do customers have enough information? 0ften customers have enough information? often when you buy a new build you often don‘t get to see it or enjoy it until the day of completion. whereas when you have had an older house you probably get more checks. with the new house the checks will be done but by an external body. they will establish whether it is the benchmark quality, but you don‘t
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see it until the day you move in. with an old house you might have more of a chance to look around. thank you very much. if you are looking to buy a house, there‘s plenty out there, but make sure you do all of the work before you buy it. there‘s something about an older house, a bit crumbly and ragged around the edges, that i prefer. the cleaning! it reminds me of me. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alex bushill. detectives investigating a spate of moped enabled thefts in east london have released footage of one of them. this incident was filmed by the victim‘s helmet camera as he was travelling through ilford. he was attacked using a fire extinguisher as the thieves tried to steal his motorcycle. this gang is thought to be responsible for at least six similar thefts in the barking and dagenham area. a fourth day of garage excavations in thurrock has still not found any
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trace of murdered schoolgirl danielle jones. the 15—year—old went missing injune 2001 on her way to school. her uncle stuart campbell was convicted of her murder, but her body was never found. the police search was prompted after someone tipped them off about some unusual activity at the site around the time of her disappearance. southeastern is putting up some of it‘s off—peak rail fares, despite an outcry from passengers. a 3.4% increase comes into effect this sunday, meaning some off—peak returns to and from london will rise by more than a £1. southeastern says the increase is necessary, but the campaign for better transport says it‘s totally u na cce pta ble. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the piccadilly line has minor delays between cockfoster and arnos grove and a part suspension on tfl rail. there‘s disruption between gidea park and shenfield. that‘s also affecting greater anglia services. elsewhere on the trains and major disruption too between luton and st pancras, which is affecting thameslink and east midlands trains. all lines are currently blocked. 0n the roads, lots of problems on the m25 atjunction 2 for the a2.
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eastbound a2 has now reopened before the m25 after an earlier accident. and anticlockwise, the entry slip from the a2 westbound is closed due to a broken down vehicle. congestion to cobham services. and finally godstone, the a22 is partially blocked southbound at the m25 due to an accident. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. well, it‘s a wet start to the day. great weather, again, if you are a gardener or a duck, but not much good for anybody else. a continuation this morning of the rain we saw last night. further outbreaks of rain and lots of surface water on the roads and pavements. a rather dismal start to the day. temperatures in double figures, a lot of low cloud around. if it‘s dry where you are, the rain will never be too far away for at least the first half of the day. in the second half we may see it dry out and brighten up, perhaps, particularly towards southern areas, but there will be heavy showers developing. further south there will be some thunderstorms around. top temperatures between
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14 and 16 celsius. so some drier interludes as we head into the evening. then a few showers around overnight. tonight, it will feel cooler than it did last night, with temperatures away from the towns possibly dipping down into mid—single figures. it‘s looking a lot nicer over the weekend. tomorrow we should see some good spells of sunshine around. temperatures will respond. up to 18—19 degrees through the afternoon. but watch out for some showers that may develop towards northern areas of the capital in particular. on sunday, it is looking dry and with the southerly wind it will feel warmer. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to charlie and sally. hello, this is breakfast, with sally nugent and charlie stayt. brexit dominates the first big tv debate of the election campaign. leaders of five parties — but not theresa may orjeremy corbyn — go head—to—head for the debate. this morning we have the first
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of our leaders‘ interviews with nicola sturgeon joining us on the sofa. good morning, it‘s friday 19th may. also this morning... thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. the murder of rachel mckelvin 1992 shocked the country. the only witness was her two—year old son alex. 25 yea rs witness was her two—year old son alex. 25 years on comey talks about his experiences for the first time. his exgeriences for the first tititet his sxgeriencss for the first tititet us his sxgeriencss for the first tin-lg g ' ovsrlookinu the runwa¥ 100 miles away. four out of five of us are worried about the rising cost of living, and thatis
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about the rising cost of living, and that is changing what we spend our cash on. health food and snacks are in, white bread is cooked. and in sport, leicester are given a caning. they‘re hit for six by tottenham, as harry kane scores four — he‘s now favourite to win the premier league‘s golden boot. # please release me, can‘t you see... # please release me, can‘t you see... and the legend engelbert humperdinck will be here on the sofa celebrating 50 yea rs will be here on the sofa celebrating 50 years since the release of his most famous song. and matt‘s out with the dinosaurs to bring us the weather. iam in i am in amongst the animated dinosaurs here at birmingham‘s botanical garden, some more fearsome than others. the forecast today is better than at the moment, and the weekend has showers to begin with but then dry and warm. all the details can be few minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story. brexit dominated the televised leaders‘ debate, which was held last night despite the absence of theresa may and jeremy corbyn. the itv event saw little disagreement between the lib dems, green party, plaid cymru and snp, but they repeatedly clashed with ukip‘s paul nuttall. 0ur political correspondent tom symonds reports. five party leaders took part, four support britain remaining in the eu. in theresa may and jeremy corbyn‘s absence, they turned on the one leader who didn‘t, ukip‘s paul nuttall, attacking his support for a hard brexit and his tough line on immigration. theresa may may not have had the guts to be here tonight, but her spokesperson in the form of paul nuttall certainly appears to be here in her place. i know immigration is a difficult topic for politicians, people have understandable concerns, but when we talk about european migrants, we‘re talking about people who work in our national health service, we‘re talking about people who serve us in our restaurants, we‘re talking about people who make a contribution.
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the ukip leader said brexit would offer britain enormous trade opportunities, and controlling immigration would free—up pressure on resources. one of the reasons that wages have stagnated in recent years, and have probably stagnated since about 2004, is because of the levels of immigration. we have an oversupply of labour. that's the answer to everything, isn't it? we have an oversupply of labour in this country, it is as simple as that. the leader of the greens, caroline lucas, said there was no question for which the answer from ukip wasn‘t immigration. as for labour... not only did labour give the tories a blank cheque for a hard brexit, they basically gave them a lift to the bank and helped them cash it in. the liberal democrats are offering a second vote on whether britain should accept a future brexit deal. their leader, tim farron, believes it‘s better the people decide than theresa may. she‘s putting together a plan which appeases the paul nuttalls and nigel farages but damages our children‘s future. that is why you should
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have the final say on the brexit deal, not the politicians. the plaid cymru leader, leanne wood, was concerned that restrictions on trade post—brexit could harm wales‘ aerospace companies by introducing stiff tariffs. do you think they‘re going to stay there? no, of course they‘re not going to stay there. that‘s 6500 well—paid jobs in wales that you are prepared to just lose down the swannee. natalie, we have a huge trade deficit... i'm leeann. twice, underfire, mr nuttall appeared to confuse the name of his tormentor. audience members asked how the leaders would invest in schools, hospitals, social care, and the future of younger people. there was general agreement money would need to be found, but when ukip‘s paul nuttall insisted there would be a financial benefit to britain leaving the eu, this was the reaction. £350 million a week?! going to the health service, or where? where's your bus?
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a reference to the infamous battle bus and its promise of £350 million for the nhs. the bus is going to come driving past any minute! brexit continues to dominate this unexpected election race. tom symonds, bbc news. we‘re joined now by our political correspondent eleanor garnier. let‘s pick up on some of the things tim farron, whojoined us on the sofa as joe tim farron, whojoined us on the sofa asjoe time ago, he was talking about changes in social care and the financing, used the word is horrifying and crawl. that is right, i think the challenge for the liberal democrats, having been almost wiped out at the last election, is to try to re—gain some of the ground they lost in 2015 and tim farron is positioning the party as the place for those who want to stay in the european union to £100,000, but tim farron
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called it a dementia tax this morning, he said it was utterly heartless, the actions of a party that thinks it has already won the election. labour is also focusing on the conservative manifesto plans‘ impact on pensioners, focusing on the winter fuel allowance and the conservative plans to means test that, saying it was a shameful attack on older people and up to 10 million people could be hit by the plans to reduce the winter fuel allowa nce. plans to reduce the winter fuel allowance. theresa may yesterday did admit there were some big and difficult decisions to be made and she and her team will be aware of the risks these kinds of policies
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possibly alienating traditional tory voters. just a reminder that nicola sturgeon, one of those taking part in the debate last night, will be joining us on this over in a few minutes. thousands of police officers across the uk have not had up—to—date background checks to ensure they are suitable to serve. bbc analysis of figures obtained under a freedom of information request showed 90% of officers in one force had not been properly vetted. the process checks finances, employment history, as well as making a detailed search for any convictions. andy moore reports. in 2012, the association of chief police officers recommended a thorough background vetting for all police officers of a person‘s background. it‘s designed to ensure that nobody unsuitable is employed. peter bunyan was a devon and cornwall community support officerjailed for misconduct in the 2013 after using the police database to contact women.
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an investigation by the independent police complaints commission found he would have been rejected if he had undergone proper vetting. the devon and cornwall police force still has more than 100 front—line staff who haven‘t been checked according to the latest guidelines. the bbc made a freedom of information request asking other forces what was the situation in theirarea. it found that a total of almost 14,000 police officers hadn‘t undergone thorough checks. in northumbria, almost nine out of ten of its officers, that‘s around 3000 people, hadn‘t been properly vetted. the force said a retrospective programme of vetting was about to start. her majesty‘s inspector of constabulary, mike cunningham, said forces needed to address this matter urgently, while the police federation, which represents rank—and—file officers, said it was disappointed to see such a huge backlog. andy moore, bbc news. rolf harris will be released
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from prison today on bail to appear in person at his indecent assault trial next week. the former entertainer denies four counts of indecently assaulting three teenagers more than 30 years ago. the jurors had already been told that mr harris was jailed for other offences in 2014. american warplanes operating over syria have attacked a convoy carrying pro—government militia forces. the us—led coalition said it was moving towards a base used by western special forces near the border with iraq. let‘s speak to our reporter ben james, who‘s in beirut this morning. how serious is this? this is being played down by the defence secretary, saying it does not show a huge escalation in the united states engaging the syrian government but this is the second time that us forces have come into contact with forces allied to president assad, the first was that missile strike on the airbase in the
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aftermath of the alleged chemical attack last month. we understand one tank was destroyed and a number of vehicles as well in this convoy write—down in the south—east, near the border with iraq. it was repeatedly warned to turn around, it did not do so. we understand also that russian allies of president assad tried to dissuade the militia men from advancing further but that did not work. what a lot of people are saying is this shows a signal from the united states that if syria, russia, iran cannot restrain those militia forces that are a key pa rt those militia forces that are a key part of their support in this conflict, this complicated conflict in syria, the us will reserve the right to strike. then, thanks very much, benjones reporting from beirut this morning. a bbc investigation has found flaws in the voice recognition security used by one of britain‘s biggest banks. hsbc‘s system analyses customers‘ voice patterns to allow them access to their accounts. the bank says every person‘s voice is unique and that makes its system secure.
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but the click technology programme has shown that it is possible for someone to log into an account that‘s not their own. as the election draws closer, we‘ll be speaking to all the party leaders here on the breakfast sofa. already this morning we‘ve had tim farron from the liberal democrats. now it‘s the snp‘s turn. first minister of scotland nicola sturgeon joins us. fresh from a lively debate last night. iam not fresh from a lively debate last night. i am not sure fresh is the right word, but i‘m here! night. i am not sure fresh is the right word, but i'm here! a curious eventin right word, but i'm here! a curious event in some ways? it was, i enjoyed it, it was a good debate because it had a lot of substance around some of the big issues but the fact that theresa may and jeremy corbyn weren‘t there at being changed the dynamic of the debate. for both theresa and jeremy it says two things, that they are not confident in the case they are putting forward, not enough to have it scrutinised, also it
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shows some contemptible voters because i believe all leaders in a campaign should be prepared to put their case to the public and take their case to the public and take the hard questions. one of the comments you made about theresa may last night was that she wants to crush the opposition, she wants a free hand. is it the pot calling the kettle black? that is exactly what you want in scotland, isn‘t it? kettle black? that is exactly what you want in scotland, isn't it? no, it is not, the snp does not have a majority, it is a proportional government, the tories last year ran a campaign based on needing a strong opposition. theresa may called this election in her own words because she wants to strengthen her hand, i think she wants to sweep away opposition so she can do what she wa nts opposition so she can do what she wants and my message to voters in scotla nd wants and my message to voters in scotland is we don‘t want theresa may to have unfettered control and the ability to do what she wants, we need to have strong voices, a strong opposition there. we know that labour is not strong enough to
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provide that opposition so certainly from scotland the only people who can do that the snp. let's talk about some of the issues arose last night. this is a time when your record is scrutinised andi time when your record is scrutinised and i know there are complications in relation to devolved issues but people don‘t necessarily think that way, they look at what the place they are in looks and feels like. education is one of the issues that have arisen, so important, people think of the health service and the next thing is education. the figures for scotland, less than half of 13 and 14—year—old is performing well in the most basic of skills, reading and writing. there record numbers of young but record numbers of young people are leaving with advanced a—levels, young people going to
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university the gap closing between the bridges and poorestmore young people going to university the gap closing between the bridges and is taking young people in the second year of secondary school and assessing them against the level they should achieve in the third year of secondary school but, yes, we have some challenges which is why we have some challenges which is why we are putting more money into the hands of head teachers, it is why we have the new national improvement framework focusing on literacy and raising standards. the word of those politicians use when there are no good answers. you say there are no good answers. you say there is a challenge which they clearly is but something has gone badly wrong and it has happened on your watch. i don‘t accept that characterisation because there are lots of things... forgive me, but if your child is one of those in that group, you saying you don‘t accept that characterisation, that does not work. we are assessing them in their second year against the standards they should achieve in the third
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year and we have statistics showing that by the time young people are in the third year 80% or more are meeting the standards they should achieve. what i am saying is that we wa nt to achieve. what i am saying is that we want to do better and that is why we have taken a number of steps investing more money in school education, giving headteachers more autonomy in how to use that money, making sure we are publishing much more robust figures and have more transparency around the performance of education so politicians like me can be held to account. we are also doing things i think are important, transferring the early years education, doubling the provision because the evidence says if you give young people the best start in life they will do better in school so we focused on where we have to do better and being frank about those challenges, if that is new politician like a word to use, but it is true, we are focused on addressing those challenges. momentum is so big in politics and if there is any in scotland it is with the tories. every poll says the snp is on course to win the
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election... but not quite what i ask, it is about increasing popularity and there are people who are turning to the tories. they are doing better, no getting away from it, largely at the expense of labour. what we have seen from labour in the past few years in scotla nd labour in the past few years in scotland is a collapse in their vote. why aren't they voting for you? much of the collapse has already turned to the snp and we‘re seeing labour losing a lot of its remaining support to the conservatives put my message is clear, this is a westminster election, about whom represent scotla nd election, about whom represent scotland in westminster and tory mps from scotland will be rubber—stamped for what theresa may wants them to do so if we want strong opposition standing upfor do so if we want strong opposition standing up for scotland and making sure our voice is heard, giving the big challenges that lie ahead not least on brexit, we have to make sure there are snp voices doing that. gillian has got in touch. not my sister gillian! she might have
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tough questions! it might not be your sister! can you ask nicola to stop using the phrase, i speak for scotland. i‘m scottish and i do not agree with many other policies and get quite angry when i hear that using the freight and she gives the wrong impression to the rest of the world, scotland is not nicola sturgeon. there is a truth in this, a lot of people in scotland who don‘t correspond with your views. specifically to do with the second independence referendum possibility and also brexit. of course and i readily accept that. i‘m the first minister of scotland, i was elected as such, and i have a job to do, but i don‘t pretend that everybody in scotla nd i don‘t pretend that everybody in scotland agrees with me, far from it, but i try to put forward the views and interests of scotland as best i can. and on brexit, the majority of people who voted in the
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eu referendum, scotland voted to remain, many voted to leave. that is right for much of last year i try to put forward compromised proposals, how we reconcile those views and what i suggested is that even though we will be leaving the eu we should try to stay in the single market to protect jobs and try to stay in the single market to protectjobs and investment and in this election, if people vote snp, whether they voted to leave or remain, it strengthens my hand in these brexit negotiations to influence it away from an extreme form of brexit that could put something like 80,000 scottishjobs on the line. let‘s try to find common ground between the different opinions that existed on the issue of the eu. influencing brexit, when was the last time you spoke to theresa may? i saw her in glasgow a matter of weeks ago, i can‘t remember the exact date. we had a conversation and you might remember that it was on the front page of the
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daily mail when they talked more about our legs than our policies but i don‘t think i‘ve spoken to her since then. thank you forjoining us. does that distract you, focusing on your legs? does it not get to you? we can laugh at it and it is the daily mail so probably we should, but i do have a concern that for women, if women politicians, prime ministers, first ministers, are reduced to how they look and what they wear and their legs, we are seeing something that bubbly we shouldn‘t be seeing about the status of women —— probably we shouldn‘t. thank you very much. matt‘s got the weather for us this morning. and he‘s walking with dinosaurs in birmingham today. good morning. it has been a bit of a surreal morning so far, the day began ina surreal morning so far, the day began in a car park by side of the
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tea bags and since then i have seen about 30 different dinosaurs at the birmingham botanical gardens. this is one of my favourites from it rumoured in north america around 70 million years ago. seven metres in length as well. quiet at the moment but when he starts to roar you can hear it. let‘s take a look at the forecast. and there will be rain across many parts of the uk this morning, particularly in eastern areas. eastern scotland and across some parts of eastern england, heaviest in the north east, but across a good part of scotland at the moment it is dry, reasonably sunny, a bit chilly with some frost around but a bright start in north—west england as well and in eastern england, outbreaks of rain but it eases off in the south through the morning. in the south—west and across wales, again some sunshine and some across many of these areas throughout the day. a
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bit frosty this morning but the sunshine is melting away nicely and in the west about the east there are much lighter winds so it will feel pleasa nt much lighter winds so it will feel pleasant in the sun. across northern ireland, it will be dry bit chilly with some frost this morning but the best and the driest weather will be with the sunshine and late on we will see a few heavy showers working their way in. the story of the data will be staying fairly cloudy, increasingly cloudy in eastern scotla nd increasingly cloudy in eastern scotland with outbreaks of rain, some heavy, missed and low cloud and h i llfo rt some heavy, missed and low cloud and hillfort and away from that, sunshine forjust hillfort and away from that, sunshine for just about everywhere with some showers —— hill fog. when the sun is out, given the light winds, it will feel reasonably nice with temperatures in the high teens. 0nly ten to 13 in eastern scotland and north east england. this evening and north east england. this evening and overnight the showers will gradually fade. we will see the dry
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weather develop across much of england and wales but northern ireland still has a few showers and in scotland, a fairly cloudy night installed with outbreaks of rain but temperatures will be up in the morning. elsewhere with the clearer skies, a chilly start to set a date with temperatures only three or 4 degrees in rural areas. call start the weekend, but generally a brighter day across eastern england the bed today —— a cooler start. so the bed today —— a cooler start. so the showers will be heavy and thundery, but scotland will have a fairly cloudy start, outbreaks of rain, staying cloudy through the afternoon as well and temperatures struggling compared to what we see further south. and on sunday, some morning rain in northern ireland which will continue into north and west scotland through the afternoon but bought most of us sunday it will be dry and sunny and warmer, particularly in southern and eastern areas with temperatures around 20 celsius. that is how the weather is
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looking. i will hand you back now to sally and charlie. it is matched against the dinosaur, i know who won! thank you. that‘s dinosaur was not happy! one of britain‘s airports is moving it‘s control tower around 100 miles away from the actual runway. london city airport is to become the first in britain to abandon its bird‘s—eye view of the runway and use digital technology to monitor planes remotely. they say it will make managing the planes safer and more efficient. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, has been given a special preview. modern airports are dynamic, fast flowing, hundreds of pieces being moved around every minute and all of those movements must be tightly choreographed to keep it safe. this is london city airport and that is just one of the 300 or so take—offs and landings that happen here every day.
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until now, all of those flights have been coordinated by a group of controllers who look out of these windows here. but in the future those windows are going to be replaced by these high definition tv screens. controllers won‘t just see the airport, they will be able to hear it as well. the thing is, this digital control tower is 120 miles away from the airport. we‘ve been shown this simulation but by 2019 controllers will be sitting here directing traffic for real, using pictures fed from a new camera tower next to the runway. unlike the old tower, it can zoom in for a better view, put radar data onto the screen to track aircraft. critically, for safety, the cameras can pick out rogue drones near the airport and light the runway at night. my initial reaction was sceptical because i‘m used to being at an airport.
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they give the controller more information in terms of what they can see, what they can hear, how they can identify targets, how they can track targets. the awareness that the controller gets, it‘s all about being heads up, they‘re no longer looking down. a tower controller‘s job is we get paid to look out of the window, so it makes thatjob much easier. now i know exactly what you‘re thinking. the number one question i‘ve been asked by everybody i‘ve told about this is, what if the tv screens go down, what if the system is hacked? how secure is it? so highly secure. the system has been independently stress tested by security specialists. we have three cables that are in place between the airport and swanwick in the control centre. if one of those was to fail, there‘s a back—up. and in the event that that fails, there‘s another cable. and they are all routed, taking different routes between the airport and swanwick. london city is convinced the new system will make their operations more efficient and more safe.
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the idea of the control tower miles from the airport may seem odd but it isn‘t far away. richard westcott, bbc news. is so true what richard said, that one question, what if! you want the human with the binoculars watching at all times! technology is changing everything. coming up, we have business light on the news channel but here on breakfast... humperdinck will be joining humperdinck will bejoining us on the sofa. you know the words to his songs! a throwback to your childhood! my dad used to seeing them! iam childhood! my dad used to seeing them! i am going to sing him later! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. 0ver over the last half—year in the uk the weather has been drier than normal but that trend has been
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smashed over the last couple of days particularly across parts of eastern england. faversham in kent picking up england. faversham in kent picking up 70 millimetres of rain over the last two days, way more than we normally see in the whole of the month of may. the rain just about clearing from here at the moment but continuing to work up the north sea so it will be a wet day for eastern scotla nd so it will be a wet day for eastern scotland and eastern counties of england with the rain to ease from the south as the day goes by. the best of the morning sunshine across western areas of the uk particularly northern ireland, wales and south—west england but through the afternoon we will see showers break—out, some of them heavy and thundery. particularly across wales, south—west england and parts of the midlands as well. in between the showers, not feeling too bad, temperatures probably reaching a high of 17 today but cooler under the band of rain still affecting north—east england. northern ireland will see showers as will west of scotland, cool weather working into the east of scotland with rain through the afternoon. wet weather
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to come today and overnight that of rain really dragging its feet but eventually we should start to see the rain turned more patchy across north—east england, the driest weather across western areas where under clear skies it will be chilly in ruralareas, under clear skies it will be chilly in rural areas, temperatures across western england and wales getting around to three or four degrees. 0n saturday, a day of sunshine and showers but drier weather forecast for sunday as high pressure influences the uk from the east. saturday‘s picture, rain clearing scotla nd saturday‘s picture, rain clearing scotland very slowly but lingering in the north—east, showers moving in fairly widely across most of the uk through the afternoon, some of them quite intense but in the sunshine highs of up to 80 degrees, not feeling too bad. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and susannah streeter. france gets ready for macron economics. but does the new president have the right formula to bring back jobs and growth?
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live from london, that‘s our top story on friday 19th may. never mind 100 days — how about 100 hours? french president emmanuel macron has been in the job for five days, but he‘s already got his work cut out ahead of the parliamentary elections in june. we take a look at what he hopes to achieve. plus — nafta nerves. tense times for mexico as its two—decade—old trade deal with the us is thrown into doubt.
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