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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 24, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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the prime minister raises the threat from international terrorism to its highest level in the wake of monday's suicide bombing here in manchester. the work undertaken throughout the day has revealed that it is a possibility we cannot ignore, that there is a wider group of individuals linked to this attack. it means that from today, military personnel will be deployed on the streets of the uk to support police. a fourth victim is named, as the mother of olivia campbell posts a tribute to her "precious" daughter. and here in the heart of a city still coming to terms with the tragedy, a vigil is held in a show of solidarity for all those affected. this is our 9/11. this is our 7/7. sadly, this is something that we will never forget. good morning, it's wednesday 2a may.
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we've a special breakfast this morning, with charlie out in manchester and me in the studio as we assess the impact of monday's terror attack which left 22 dead. we'll be hearing the latest on the investigation, the thoughts of those affected, and we'll have the latest on that heightened terror threat from the home secretary. and in sport, manchester united have expressed their shock at the terrorist attack in manchester, holding a minute's silence before flying to stockholm ahead of tonight's europa league final. and carol has the weather. good morning. a mild start to the day. it will be a warm day generally. a fair bit of clout around, but that will break and some
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of us will see some sunshine. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. good morning from the centre of manchester. our main development this morning is that the uk terror threat level has been raised to its highest level, meaning further attacks may be imminent. the move came after prime minister theresa may said investigators were unable to rule out whether the manchester arena bombing suspect salman abedi acted alone. military personnel will now be deployed to protect key sites. it will be a visible sign of the change. our correspondent wyre davies has the latest. the day after the worst atrocity of its kind in britain for more than a decade, thousands of mancunians
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gathered to remember those who were so gathered to remember those who were so brutally killed and injured. they we re so brutally killed and injured. they were also here with a message to the world, that such a heinous crime must never be allowed to alter the nature or the spirit of this great northern city. we will pull through the events of last night because we will stand together, stand together whatever our background, whatever oui’ whatever our background, whatever our religion, whatever our beliefs 01’ our our religion, whatever our beliefs or our politics, we will stand together. among those who lost their lives were eight—year—old saffie roussos. she had been so excited about being at her first pop concert. 19—year—old georgina callander, and added band of ariana grande. and 28 your old john atkinson, described by friends as one ina atkinson, described by friends as one in a million. and this morning, confirmation from her family, although not yet from police sources, that 15—year—old berry schoolgirl olivia campbell was also killed. —— bury. the investigation
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is moving fast. police have named the bomber is 22—year—old son and a bd. homes in the area where the manchester born former student may have lived were raided by antiterrorism units who were taking no chances, and 23 man has been arrested. what they do not know is if salman abedi acted alone, or if he had helped designing and deploying his suicide bomb. that is why the government made this rare move. it is now concluded on the basis of today's investigations that the threat level should be increased for the time being from severe to critical. this means that their assessment is not only that an attack remains highly likely, but that a further attack may be imminent. that decision is not being taken imminent. that decision is not being ta ken lightly. but imminent. that decision is not being taken lightly. but it should mean more help, including from the military. the first thing they are
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going to do is free up officers who are on static guarding duties at key locations. we can put them on the streets, protecting the public, and put the military in those locations. the second is to augment patrols. ten shall be transport hubs and key events. we have many big events gci’oss events. we have many big events across the country in the coming weeks. we will be working closely with organisers to review security, stewa rd i ng with organisers to review security, stewarding arrangements, policing arrangements, and make sure that decisions are taken that events only go ahead when it is sensible and safe to do so. while the hunt for the bombers' compasses or sympathisers is a security priority, at hospitals across greater manchester, wounded, many of them children, are still being treated, with some of them in a critical condition. —— accomplices or sympathisers. agonisingly, there are still families who do not know if their children are missing, injured 01’ their children are missing, injured or dead. it is an impossible situation to imagine. in a moment we'll speak
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to jayne mccubbin who is outside manchester royal infirmary, and eleanor garnier, who is in downing street. but first let's speak to wyre davies who is outside greater manchester police's headquarters for us this morning. it has been a fast moving investigation. ring us the latest this morning? —— bring. investigation. ring us the latest this morning? -- bring. we had a lot of details yesterday and the police have yet to give a formal police —— press c0 nfe re nce have yet to give a formal police —— press conference this morning. the priority for them is establishing whether the bomber had an accomplice. they have come to the occlusion that —— conclusion that such was the sophistication of the device that such —— that he must have had assistance in getting the device to the scene and setting it. that is why they raided those two addresses in south manchester yesterday, arresting a 23—year—old man. there is still concern here in
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manchester and perhaps across the country that if salman abedi, the bomber, if he did have an accomplice, if he did have help, there could more trouble ahead. this investigation is not over yet. thank you. let's go to jane mccubbin, outside manchester royal infirmary. bring us up to date about any information in connection with the victims. well, overnight we have had confirmation from the mother of 15—year—old olivia campbell that her daughter is amongst the dead. the death toll is at 22 and her mother has posted a moving tribute to her overnight, saying that her precious daughter has lost her life. that means that also, the other people who have renamed at eight—year—old saffie roussos, 18—year—old georgina callander, and 28—year—old john atkinson. but year at manchester royal infirmary and out seven other hospitals across greater manchester,
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there are 89 people who have life—threatening injuries, and on top of that, there are 12 people still missing. —— 59 people who still missing. —— 59 people who still have life—threatening injuries. we will update you as we get information through the morning. thank you. let's go straight to downing street, eleanor garnier is there for us. that decision by theresa may to increase the terror threat to critical was made just before ten o'clock last night. it is rare, the first time in ten years that has happened? that's right, and we can expect the prime minister to hold another of the government's emergency cobra committee meetings this morning. that is with senior ministers, top police officers but also security officials as well. it was after last night's cobra meeting that theresa may revealed the uk's terror threat level was being raised from severe to critical. that is the highest possible level. it means an attack could be imminent. as you
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say, charlie, it is pretty rare. it has not happened in more than a decade. theresa may said that as a result the military would the working with the armed police, protecting the public in key locations, places like sports events, concerts, things like that. there could be tighter security at places like train stations. we can expect the prime minister today to continue dealing with and handling the response to the attack. the general election campaign has been suspended, and all the main parties last night said that campaigning for them today would be out of the question. thank you. our team will be reporting for us throughout the morning this morning. we are live in the centre of manchester this morning at albert square. you can see some of the tributes left ear. there was a vigil held last night, and we spoke to many people here. it was a very moving and very emotional moment in many ways. we will hear
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some of the voices who were here a bit later on this morning, and we will be speaking to many of the politicians directly involved, including amber rudd, the home secretary, who will be speaking to us secretary, who will be speaking to us later this morning. very good morning to you. just to keep you up—to—date, we will of course be covering all of that, our programme very much dominated by that here on bbc breakfast this morning. we will catch up with other things as well, and of course carol will have the weather in about five minutes. in the meantime, let me tell you about some of the other day's news. a 37—year—old man has been arrested at stansted airport on suspicion of preparing for acts of terrorism. he was held before boarding a flight to turkey. officers are now searching two residential addresses in north london. scotland yard say the arrest was not linked to monday's manchester arena bombing. donald trump will meet pope francis at the vatican this morning on the latest leg of his first foreign tour as us president. this will be mr trump's first meeting with the pope. during last year's presidential election campaign, pope francis attacked mr trump's plans to build
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a wall along the mexican border, saying they weren't christian. mr trump described the comments as "disgraceful." the james bond star daniel craig has joined tributes to the actor sir roger moore, who died yesterday. a picture of the two together was posted on the official james bond twitter account, along with the words "nobody does it better — love daniel". sir roger, who played bond in seven films in the ‘70s and ‘80s, died after a short illness at the age of 89. sir rogerjoined us on the breakfast sofa in 2015 and reflected on his years as the smooth—talking spy. very lucky. i had a wonderful time. marvellous crews, marvellous directors. marvellous crews, marvellous d i rectors. lovely marvellous crews, marvellous directors. lovely actors and actresses. what more could you want? they give you lovely clothes and you
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take them home at the end of the film. and they pay you! sir roger moore, speaking to us here on bbc breakfast. taking a quick look at the front pages of the newspapers this morning. the pictures, most of them are of this young girl, just eight years old, saffie roussos. the youngest so far of those 22 people who died in that warming at manchester arena. —— bombing. many of you will be familiar with her picture. and also georgina callander, a big fan of ariana grand, 18 years old, pictured with her idol, also killed in that bombing. —— ariana grande. in the coming days we will learn more about the identities of those who died. the front page of the daily mail, they are talking about soldiers being on the street. we know that the threat level has been raised, we will be talking about that throughout breakfast this morning. and on the front page of the times,
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they are talking about various different theories, one that the manchester bomber flew in from africa recently. we will be talking about that throughout the morning here on bbc breakfast. another important thing we will be doing this morning is talking about how we should be discussing this, having conversations with our children, as well as the many of you who will be watching with children this morning. it is 613 a.m.. the main stories this morning: soldiers are to be deployed on the streets after the official uk terror threat level was raised to the highest possible category of critical. the mother of olivia campbell has named her daughter as the victim of monday night was mac bombing, writing on facebook, she paid tribute to her precious 15—year—old daughter. —— monday night's bombing. you are watching bbc breakfast. carol is going to take us through the
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weather. a muggy start to the day. temperatures at the moment are widely between 11 and 15 celsius. ahead of the day, we are looking at a warm day generally after the muggy start, afair a warm day generally after the muggy start, a fair bit of cloud. the problem will be chasing the holes in the cloud. there will be some sunshine. in the north and the western parts of the south we have a fair bit of cloud some murky conditions. here and there, some dampers. a cloudy start across south—west england and wales. coastal fog as well. you can see that cloud extending towards the midlands and hampshire, moving further east under brighter skies, clearer skies. northern england also seeing afair clearer skies. northern england also seeing a fair bit of cloud. the odd spot this morning of the south—west scotland. quite a bit of cloud in northern ireland. showers coming across north—western scotland. scotla nd across north—western scotland. scotland seeing a fairly cloudy start in general. through the course of the day some of that cloud wolffdene and breakup. shower re—
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add breaks pushing up into the northern isles. one or two showers mainly in parts of the north. for most of us it will be dry, but wherever you are at is going to be warm, with temperatures into the low 20s, possibly up to 26 in london. that will lead us into way muggy night tonight. some pockets of sea fog coming in around the bristol channel and the english channel, and some drizzly bits and pieces across the far north of scotland. that is how we begin the day tomorrow, with the drizzle and the showers moving out of orkney but staying in shetland. more sunshine around tomorrow, then we are looking at today, and as a result the temperatures will be higher. 17 in the north, high temperatures of 25. locally we could see about 36. heading into the weekend, what we haveis heading into the weekend, what we have is high pressure dominating the weather. it drifts further east, so you can see we start to pull in
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thursday and friday and saturday this milder airfrom the near continent. we have a fly in the ointment in the shape of this weather system, which looks like it will bring some thundery downpours in from the west. temperatures by saturday could reach dirty, possibly a little higher in parts of the south, but widely, once again, we are looking at temperatures into the mid to high 20s. on saturday itself, lots of dry weather around. again, some sunshine. this is where we have the weather front ringing in some rain, some of which will be heavy and possibly thundery. behind it, looking at the temperatures, something fresher coming our way. as we head into the bank holiday weekend we have that hot and humid start. we will have that thundery brea kd owns start. we will have that thundery breakdowns coming in from the west and moving north. then we will see some fresher conditions to follow, some fresher conditions to follow, so the bank holiday weekend will by no means be awash out at this stage. thank you.
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the metropolitan police commissioner has said in an interview the investigation is fast—moving and they cannot guarantee the attacker was working alone. more from the interview now. as we said in the last 2a hours, the critical requirement for arts is looking at whether the terrorist was acting alone or was part of a group. —— us. 24 alone or was part of a group. —— us. 2a hours in, we have critical lines of enquiry we are tracking down. but there is a bit of uncertainty meaning we have to raise the level to critical, meaning a further attack made the imminent. that happens rarely and only for a little bit of times over —— may be. the public are expecting us to do our best. the first thing we do is
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stretch police resources. we have mobilisation plans, we cancel leave. but on top of that, over the last few years, looking at experiences over europe, we need to plan with the military and have the army step forward to support us in our work. plus operation temperer. i asked theresa may and cobra for permission for that to go forward. they have supported that. that means all of the police officers we are putting on the streets already will be augmented by military support. those military will go to key locations and free us up to move to other locations. we could even use military support police at key locations and events. so, an extraordinary step, but it is well practised. it is all about protecting the public. the last thing i would say is anyone with any
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fears and concerns about what is going on in their area, someone they are worried about, please, please, please, don't hesitate, and call us on 0800 789 231. that is the terrorism hotline. you are assessing it step—by—step. the threat level has been raised to critical, which is highly unusual. it means another attack is imminent, or at least that is the categorisation. do you believe another attack is imminent? it is not myjudgement that matters. it is not myjudgement that matters. it is not myjudgement that matters. it is important to have analyst networks doing this assessment. the uncertainty currently flowing from the investigation downwards have come to the view that while we chased down, it makes sense to raise the threat level to critical. as i said, we respond to that by putting extra protection resources around
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the public and thinking about the military support i have discussed. do you have specific intelligence that has led you to suggest these moves, or is it a case of actually a lack of intelligence, if that makes sense, a case of unknowns?” lack of intelligence, if that makes sense, a case of unknowns? i think eve ryo ne sense, a case of unknowns? i think everyone will understand, in the middle of a live investigation, i am not going to discuss the why and therefores and details of that. we are moving at pace and searching, but unsurprisingly, there are gaps in our knowledge, and when we chased them down, on a precautionary basis, based on uncertainty, we will respond to that decision. that was the assistant commissioner, mark reilly, speaking late last night. —— rowley. last night, thousands went to centre manchester in a show of support were charlie is this morning for those
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who were hurt. —— where. charlie is this morning for those who were hurt. -- where. thank you. we are in the centre of manchester in abbot square. this is the scene where many thousands of people gathered last night in a stirring ceremony with a lot of the spirit of manchester talked about to be people came here for a variety of reasons. we have the ongoing investigation and many developments. but the other side is the emotional side and how families are coping. i will show you a few of the flowers. there are some here and some on the other side. many have been laid here. on almost all of them there are messages. one of them here reads to all of the angels have and has gained, made you rest of their while we fight through this pain. —— rest up there. quite a few have come through this morning. take a moment to look and have a little think. for many of the people
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directly caught up in the events on monday, the past 2a hours has been very difficult to cope with. graham satchell has been speaking to the mcnally family. at home in wales, the tickets to see ariana grande were a surprise gift and a dream come true. you can see the supremejoy and a dream come true. you can see the supreme joy on lucy's face. she is really, really pretty, and she is a really good role model. and she is just perfect. lucy, being my daughter, she sung every single song, as did the majority of the audience, in such a happy and joyous occasion. for it to end in such tragedy is horrific. what happened at the manchester arena was most shocking because it was children, teenagers, who were targeted. they we re teenagers, who were targeted. they were terrified and scared. everyone
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was. it just went were terrified and scared. everyone was. itjust went bang, and we were all walking quietly up the stairs and then everyone started screaming. people were climbing over each other and pushing each other down the stairs. i had a very good idea that it was a bomb. straightaway? yeah. yeah. from the explosion. i thought, is this it? it is hard enough for adults to try and understand the full horror of monday night's attack. how do you make sense of it attack. how do you make sense of it at 13? it should not have happened. and i don't know, i don't understand, why it did happen. i just don't understand why they would be so horrible to other people. there were 21,000 people in there and some parents would have done
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exactly the same as me, taken pictures of the children with the tickets. and some of those parents are walking away today where that is the last photo of their child. and i just, you know, i can't comprehend, umm, what they must be going through. but, no, icannot in umm, what they must be going through. but, no, i cannot in any way whatsoever understand why anyone would do this to other people. as well as lucy, ann marie has two boys, both with learning difficulties. she is tried to be strong to make life as normal and positive as possible. —— trying. strong to make life as normal and positive as possible. -- trying. we wa nt to positive as possible. -- trying. we want to send out our hearts to those who were not as lucky. we are both very lucky to be alive in this situation. and, you know, we and, asked two, aren't going to be able to stop this terrorism, but we have
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to stop this terrorism, but we have to learn to live alongside it and be brave and vigilant along the way. —— aren't, us. they will continue to talk about the atrocity on monday and work through it together. we will be fine, won't we love? yeah. it is interesting hearing that family talking about how they are coping with their emotions to be so many we have spoken to in manchester who came last night to the vigil that has taken place reflecting the idea of resilience. there is a lot of emotion and resilience and the spirit of this city. we will hear more of those voices later on in the morning. right now it is time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news.
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as we have been hearing, commuters heading into work are likely to see an increased police presence and even soldiers in some locations this morning. that is following the official raising of the threat level from terrorism to the uk to critical. the army may also be stationed at government buildings and busy public places. firms are set to become more reliant on temporary workers in the coming months to plug a shortage of skilled staff. that's the conclusion of a report by the recruitment and employment confederation. a survey of over 600 employers showed virtually all were planning to increase or maintain their temporary workforce. almost half questioned said they expected a shortage of workers for certainjobs, especially in construction, engineering and health and social care. in sport, sam allardyce has resigned as crystal palace manager five months after hejoined the premier league club. he led them to eight wins in 21 games to guide them to a 14th—place finish. in a statement, allardyce said he had no ambitions to take up another job. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on the tubes at the
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moment as you can see. replacement buses due to a broken down train. that is because of a police incident. and now for a check on the weather. good morning. lots of sunshine around for the week ahead. lots of dry weather as well until we get to the weekend. more on that in a moment. a sunny morning this
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morning. largely dry as well. the cloud in the night should move away early on and leave us with decent sunshine this morning. more cloud building in the afternoon. sunny spells through the evening. watch out for the high uv levels. a day for sunscreen. reaching 25 degrees. cloud sticks through the night. clear spells. mild. lows cloud sticks through the night. clearspells. mild. lows of 15—16. tomorrow, even more sunshine around. there will be cloudier spots. for some of us, wall—to—wall sunshine. feeling very warm indeed. 25 degrees, maybe even more than that tomorrow. we hold onto that hot weather. it looks like it was stay dry for much of the week until we get to saturday when it sparks off some thundery showers. sunday, well, it may start off on a fresh note, becoming more humid later on. uncertainty about sunday at the moment. it does look like we can see
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more of those showers on monday. i will be back with another update in halfan i will be back with another update in half an hourfrom the bbc london newsroom. plenty more on the website of the usual address for now. goodbye for now. good morning. we are live in the city centre of manchester this morning, in the aftermath of monday's suicide bombing attack. the main development this morning is that the uk terror threat is to be raised to its highest level, critical. that announcement was made by theresa may last night. what that means is that they believe a terrorist attack may be imminent. in practical terms that means we will see military personnel on the streets at key sites, alongside police. the reasoning given by the government and by police is that they are unable to rule out, at this stage, weather the manchester bomber was working alone. —— will weather
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the manchester bomb. the police have asked for authorisation from the secretary of state for defence to deploy armed personnel in support of their officers. this request is part ofa their officers. this request is part of a well—established plan known as operation temperer. in which both the armed forces and the police forces involved a re the armed forces and the police forces involved are well—trained, and well—prepa red to forces involved are well—trained, and well—prepared to work in this kind of environment. the secretary of state for defence has approved this request, and operation temperer is now in force. this means that armed police officers responsible for duties such as guarding key sites will be replaced by members of the armed forces, which will allow the armed forces, which will allow the police to significantly increase the police to significantly increase the number of armed officers on patrol in key locations. you might
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also see military personnel deployed at certain events, such as concerts and sports matches, helping the police to keep the public say. i do not want the public to feel unduly alarmed. we have faced a serious terrorist threat in our country for many years. and the operational response i have just many years. and the operational response i havejust outlined is a proportionate and sensible response to the threat that our security expertsjudge we face. to the threat that our security experts judge we face. that was the announcement from the prime minister last night. let's discuss some of the implications of that decision. joining me now is andy redhead, a former national capital firearms advisor and security consultant. we were just hearing from the prime minister. this is a significant decision, to raise the threat level to critical. significant, yes, and inevitable yes, i believe. recently they have in announcements about how they have in announcements about how the metropolitan police have in struggling to ramp up the armed firearms response capability through
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natural training and selection. that in itself is one of the reasons, i am sure, the army being deployed on static positions releases firearms, fight police officers to carry out the roles that they need to do. they are looking potentially for cells or teams of people, and they need the resources . teams of people, and they need the resources. the easiest way to get those resources released is to bring the army in. that was an issue raised directly by the prime minister, and also by the police come in connection with the investigation. as you said, at this stage they cannot be certain. in the past we have spoken about lone wolves, the idea of somebody working on their own. at this stage the concern is that there may be a connected cell. absolutely. and also, the game changes all the time. every time there is one of these atrocities, we had this atrocity on monday evening, with an ied. it was not a straightforward ied. it is thought that there was training and skill but went into producing a device like that. we cannot rule out
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that they may have already been more devices produced, stored somewhere, and they might be other people willing to sacrifice their lives to use those devices. interesting listening to the announcement by theresa may last night. in amongst what many people would see as worrying developments, the threat level being raised and the idea that they could be a cell, she did make they could be a cell, she did make the point that she didn't want to unduly alarm people. always the call goes out for people to co—operate, to come forward with information. goes out for people to co—operate, to come forward with informationm the last few years, in interviews i have given to the bbc and the media, i have always said that we all have a responsibility. we live in a very peaceful country, considering the state of the world. it is a concern for all of us as parents, brothers, sisters, etc, but we have a duty of ca re sisters, etc, but we have a duty of care responsible law—abiding citizens. if we are concerned about somebody, whether we think they are being radicalised or educated in such a way, we have that duty to inform somebody and let them know so
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that we can nip it in the bud is before somebody then takes the next step and we have a situation like this or the other evening. andy, thank you. we will be live here in the centre of manchester throughout the centre of manchester throughout the morning this morning. we will be talking to a lot of people down here this morning, reflect in a locked on what happens. —— reflecting a locked. and we will be speaking to home secretary amber rudd later on in the morning. for now, that is all for me. we will also be discussing how we talk to our children about this kind of thing as well. that will be in about five minutes time. you are watching bbc breakfast. let me remind you of some of the other headlines today. a 37—year—old man has been arrested at stansted airport on suspicion of preparing for acts of terrorism. he was held before boarding a flight to turkey. officers are now searching two residential addresses in north london. scotland yard say the arrest was not linked to monday's manchester arena bombing. donald trump will meet pope francis at the vatican this morning on the latest leg of his first
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foreign tour as us president. this will be mr trump's first meeting with the pope. during last year's presidential election campaign, pope francis attacked mr trump's plans to build a wall along the mexican border, saying they weren't christian. mr trump described the comments as "disgraceful." the james bond star daniel craig has joined tributes to the actor sir roger moore, who died yesterday. a picture of the two together was posted on the official james bond twitter account, along with the words "nobody does it better — love daniel". sir roger, who played bond in seven films in the ‘70s and ‘80s, died after a short illness at the age of 89. sir rogerjoined us on the breakfast sofa in 2015 and reflected on his years as the smooth—talking spy. you are watching bbc breakfast. of course, our programme today is dominated by events in manchester. we will speak about sport in a moment, but manchester is a football
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city, and they have been paying tribute? yes, and we saw at the vigil last night, both —— both sides of the city, manchester united and manchester city, coming together and throwing the rivalries aside. this isa throwing the rivalries aside. this is a wonderful picture from last night. manchester united are in stock on for the roper league final tonight. and of course they are paying tribute to the victims. this is then gathered in the centre circle, a moment of silence before training. lots of the papers this morning have this fantastic picture from yesterday, before they left for stockholm. this is the players at carrington, before they even started training. after they heard the news they gathered together and took a moment of silence. very much affected by the events in manchester the other night, and in fact the manchester united manager, jose mourinho, says the hearts and minds of everybody at the club is with those affected by the horrific attack. in the wake of the incident, uefa accepted united's request to cancel their press conference ahead of the europa league final,
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while the team held a minute's silence at training before flying to sweden. our sports correspondent andy swiss reports from stockholm. asa as a solemn jose as a soleanose mourinho arrived with his team in stock on, he said the victims of the manchester attack we re the victims of the manchester attack were in their minds and their hearts. —— stockholm. before flying out, the players held a minute's silence. tonight, the whole stadium will do so, in memory of those who died. words do not really do justice for how we all feel. we are numb. the events were sickening. all of our thoughts at the moment i would victims and the families affect their divided. —— are with the victims and the families affected by it. tonight promises to be an emotional occasion. what was originally just emotional occasion. what was originallyjust a emotional occasion. what was originally just a football emotional occasion. what was originallyjust a football match has become an expression of sporting solidarity. manchester united supporters here now want to win not just for their team but for their city. but of their mood is muted.
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lot of us have friends that were either nearby are actually at the concert, in some cases. it is not wa nt concert, in some cases. it is not want you want to hear. we came out here to have a party and enjoy the football but it has affected the occasion a little bit. we are here to play a game of football and hopefully go on to win it for manchester, not just the hopefully go on to win it for manchester, notjust the manchester united, but the manchester. security will be tight. stockholm is still recovering from its own terrorist attack last month. tonight, once again, sport will be put firmly in perspective. in response to monday's terror attack, sporting events and venues are conducting major reviews of security plans. the great city games is due to be held in manchester city on friday and will go ahead, according to organisers. a final decision on the great manchester run on sunday is expected later today. sam allardyce has resigned as crystal palace managerjust days after ensuring the club's premier league survival. allardyce signed a 2.5—year deal last december replacing alan pardew. but he has said in a statement that he has no ambitions now to take another job.
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two time wimbledon champion petra kvitova could still play at wimbledon this year. she suffered injuries to her hand in a knife attack in december but her representatives says her recovery is on track and could even play at the french open which starts next week. and finally, riders in the giro d'italia paid their respects to the victims of the manchester attack yesterday. the cyclists held the silence before the start of the 16th stage, and also paid tribute to former motogp champion, american nicky hayden, who died on monday. so, that is just about it from me, and we will have more information about that run in manchester which is due on sunday. we will have confirmation late on about whether
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or not that will take place. and so many people would have been planning to watch that run, there is so much in the papers, i am looking at this piece by ryan giggs. again, he was not there, neither were his children, but that moment when he thought his child might have got a ticket to the manchester arena. if you live in the north—west, if you live anywhere near this wonderful city, so many people, that is where they go. and also, this is as far north as ariana ground was going to go. that is why we are seeing that lots of people from scotland, from the north—east, from yorkshire, they had all travelled to manchester for that event. lots of parents will be able to emphasise —— empathise with what ryan giggs is saying there. thinking my daughter my son really liked this particular artist, might they be there, might their friends be there? he also talks about the spirit of manchester as well, saying it will not break. of course, you will be keeping us up—to—date with all the sporting fixtures. it is
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6:a1am. the main stories this morning: soldiers are to be deployed on the streets after the official uk terror threat level was raised to the highest possible category of critical. the mother of olivia campbell has named her daughter as a victim of monday night's bombing. writing on facebook, she paid tribute to her precious 15—year—old daughter. ijust want daughter. i just want to keep you up—to—date with the weather. karalee is here with the weather. karalee is here with all the details. —— carol. a muggy start for many of us. temperatures between 11— 15. there is some low cloud, mist and fog around. as we go through the day we will be chasing holes in the cloud, but we will see some sunshine, regardless of weather you are under the cloud in the sunshine, it is going to feel warm. the exception is
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if you are stuck underneath low cloud. the cloud is largely in the north and the west of the uk. some coastal fog around the bristol channel, getting across the english channel, getting across the english channel as well. some of that could lap on shore as we go through the morning. cloudy through hampshire and most of wales. as we move through the east midlands come into east anglia and kent, parts of north—west england, we are back into the sunshine. north—west england, northern ireland and scotland, fairly cloudy. some dampness in the area cross western scotland in the shape of some drizzle. a few showers flirting with the northern isles. through the course of the day, some of the cloud that we currently have full breakdown. more sunshine developing. we will see some fairweather cloud developing as well. temperature wise, the temperatures will be higher than they were yesterday. up to about 26. showers across scotland, one ought to make getting into northern ireland and possibly the far north—west of england. as we have good evening and overnight, lots of dry weather around. lots of clear
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spells as well, and some clear coastal fog around the bristol channel and also being the channel. you can tell from those temperatures it will not be too cold. the overnight low in london will be 17. quite a sultry night ahead. that leads us into tomorrow, when there will be more sunshine around. today we will see some more fair weather cloud developing through the day, and asa cloud developing through the day, and as a result the temperatures will be higher more widely across the uk. we are looking at a high of 26 on the chart. we could see a smidgen more of that, perhaps 27. a little bit cooler as we push into the northern isles. friday, not much happening with the weather. lots of dry weather around. what's of sunshine as well. high temperatures, some sea sunshine as well. high temperatures, some sea fog in the north sea. you mightjust occasionally some sea fog in the north sea. you might just occasionally see some sea fog in the north sea. you mightjust occasionally see that flapping on shore. but it is unlikely. we'll see some sea breezes as well and it will feel cooler on the coastline. on the weekend, high pressure will still be in charge of our weather but it is drifting further east, which means the error
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around it is coming up from the warm capa around it is coming up from the warm cap a continent across our shores. —— warm continent. that weather front on saturday will bring in some front on saturday will bring in some front reran, moving north through the weekend. ahead of it, it is going to be quite sultry. temp reaches as high as 30 celsius in parts of the south. —— temperatures. behind all of that we will see fresher conditions coming our way. thank you. this is bbc breakfast. the manchester arena attack will have affected many young people perhaps too young to fully understand the situation. so, how do you begin to explain what's happened to children? our reporter, ricky boleto, spent the day with a class in manchester. good morning, everyone. has everyone heard the news? yeah. it is the
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start of the school day. and for these primary schoolchildren in south manchester, there is a change to normal lessons. these 11—year—old pupils have been given the chance to talk about what happened at the manchester arena. all over the uk, teachers are trying to explain to their students what happened on monday night. many schools in manchester have been offered extra counselling to help children over the next few days. i was quite scared because, like, it would happen even more closer to us.|j always speak to an adult about any worries i have a mainly my mother. but maybe if she is not available and it is late at night, i have a teddy bear that sits at the end of my bed. it makes me feel a lot better. i talk to my dad and he said
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it would be all right and police office rs it would be all right and police officers would investigate and everyone is helpful. how do you feel about what you have heard this morning? for teachers, sharing this news is never morning? for teachers, sharing this news is never easy, morning? for teachers, sharing this news is never easy, but they said they are reassuring the children as much as they can. all of these children involved, it makes it even more difficult for children to understand, and it makes it even more important for us to talk about it to reassure them and help them feel safe, because, you know, lots of them go to the manchester arena and see concerts. it is somewhere they would no. it becomes really real for them. i think it is really nice that people in such a horrific events can show such positivity. what does that say about manchester, do you feel? everyone is kind and it is nice to live here and we have a
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caring community and we care about everyone else. that is what has come out of these last 2a hours, this sense of caring. with me now isjenny barksfield, from the personal, social, health, education association, which is issuing guidance to teachers on how to talk to their pupils about this news. you so much forjoining thank us. it isa you so much forjoining thank us. it is a very difficult conversation to have as a teacher, as a parent. where do you start? you probably don't even need to start it because so many children are so aware of what is going on. it would have been impossible to shield children from this. they would have heard about it everywhere. they would have heard adults talking about it, in the playground, social media, the news. the important thing is to talk about it. yesterday we heard from schools had chosen not to discuss it. that is sad to be the most important thing is to be reassuring and allow children to talk about everything.
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by children to talk about everything. by not telling them, you might be shielding them from something that is horrific. as i said, you cannot shield them from the fact of what has happened. actually, managing your feelings around something out of your control is an important part of your control is an important part of growing up and learning about life. and it is much better that children get factual and reliable information from trusted adults than hearing speculation and rumour and, for want of a better phrase, they can use. we need to navigate them through that. —— fake news. presumably that can spread through a playground like wildfire. absolutely. on social media with a lot of fake information yesterday. —— we saw. not that all adults can
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do it, but they need to be able to discern and tell the difference. i think it is important to be honest with them and be factually accurate and tell them what we know and don't know. right. and you need to give them the ability and space in some to ask questions. definitely. that is why it is important to be talked about at school as well as at home. in our lessons we can provide that safe 5 pa ce in our lessons we can provide that safe space where children can voice their opinions, asked the questions that they have got, not feel that, umm, that, you know, they are asking a silly question, they can talk about anything. and it is tricky for teachers, but it is important we do that and not shy away from it. and we need to listen to their worries and let them voice them. do you have any advice for children, and pa rents, any advice for children, and parents, especially those with young children? it is important to be led
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by the child. there is no minimum age. you need to start from where they are. you need to find out what they are. you need to find out what they have heard and start from there in an age—appropriate way. they have heard and start from there in an age—appropriate waym they have heard and start from there in an age-appropriate way. it is difficult because it strikes at the heart of all parents, doesn't it? difficult because it strikes at the heart of all parents, doesn't mm isa heart of all parents, doesn't mm is a fear that all parents share. does that make it a more difficult conversation to have? i think the fa ct conversation to have? i think the fact that, you know, this is common to all parents, all children, does not necessarily make it more difficult. in fact, not necessarily make it more difficult. infact, it not necessarily make it more difficult. in fact, it is easier to explain. mums and dads are worried about you, but these things are very rare and they don't happen very often. it is awful that it has happened. but this is what has happened. but this is what has happened. tell us what your feelings are and what your worries are. and just having that open conversation. be there to answer their questions.
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thank you. absolutely. so many children at this vigil last night which was held in the centre of. charlie was there last night. he is there right now. what was the atmosphere like? yeah, it was very interesting hearing what you were talking about just then. interesting hearing what you were talking aboutjust then. i am at the town hall. this is where the vigil took place. many of the film crews we re took place. many of the film crews were here. this is the main entrance. quite a few of the people i spoke to last night were telling me the parents were saying it is actually the children who were saying we want to go, we want to go somewhere and share some of these feelings. a young lady called hannah is who i spoke to. 1a years old. her mother said it was her who said let's go and be around people and see how people are feeling. if you follow me down here, you can see a huge amount of flowers that were laid down. this has become, albert
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square, the centre of manchester, has effectively become the place where people can share some of their feelings. and it is interesting hearing how people were talking last night. so many people were saying this was an attack on children. everyone comes back to this same thing, how could someone attacked children, to target children, knowing they were at the concert last night. —— attack. it is part of people trying to square things in their own people trying to square things in theirown mind. people trying to square things in their own mind. there is a spirit about manchester. it was clear last night as people spoke just what that meant and how that might help people to recover. let us look at some of the ways that people here are trying to cope. ina in a city so vibrant and full of life, there is a real determination to respond to the atrocity of monday night. for some, giving to respond to the atrocity of monday night. forsome, giving blood offered a practical and a vital way to help. to give blood, it isjust, it is... it makes me well up thinking about it because it is such
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a tragedy. but if there is any positive we can get from it, it is how close people have come together from what has happened. how close people have come together from what has happenedm how close people have come together from what has happened. it is the same that happens everywhere. people just want to help. there is some goodin just want to help. there is some good in the world, itjust goes just want to help. there is some good in the world, it just goes to show that. we wants to beat them. manchester is famed for its music, and last night, the concert went on as simple mind played at the town hall. someone on duty the night before rapid arena and were here. anthony brought his 19—year—old son lewis for his first life experience. it is important with your child as well. we had a chat about it and decided to go ahead with it and come along. after such an act of barbarism, the kindness of strangers is apparent everywhere. the taxidrivers who offered free lifts, the businesses providing food and drink for the emergency services. the businesses providing food and drink for the emergency servicesm is important to look after manchester. seeing these police crew
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working all day and night, it makes an emotional. a bit of good and drink, it helps. the sense that the people of the city are together and united is everywhere you look. communities are determined to stand together. we have been working with local authorities, local police, with other muslim leaders and mosques and churches, to bring eve ryo ne mosques and churches, to bring everyone together. we have to stand together, united, at this difficult moment. and we have to do a lot of work to support the families of the victims. michael understands the human cost of terrorism. his brother david, an aid worker who was kidnapped and murdered by the so—called islamic state three years ago, he is now a tireless campaigner for peace and tolerance manchester... manchester should be proud. they showed us the way we stand together. we will not let hatred divide is. now, it does not
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matter your faith, your culture, your religion, your colour the mother doesn't matter. we are british. and we are not going to let these... people... divide our society. as the messages and the floral tributes grove on the city's streets, the grieving process is beginning. —— grow. but already, the stoicism, the determination, and the strength of the people of manchester, stands tall. john maguire, bbc news. his piece giving a sense of how people feel. we will hear more of those voices. i spoke to many people at the vigil that the base at the town last night. we will hear some of those soon. there is a fast—moving police investigation. we know that this morning the threat level in the uk rose to its highest level in the uk rose to its highest level critical. we will speak the
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home secretary, amber rudd, later this morning. for now, though, the headlines wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i am katharine carpenter. as we've been hearing commuters heading into work are likely to see an increased police presence and soldiers in some locations this morning. it follows the raising of the raising of the threat level from terrorism to the uk to critical. the army may also be stationed at government buildings and busy public places. detectives from the counter—terrorism part of the metropolitan police say the arrest last night at an airport was not related to the manchester incident. they were stopping someone escaping the syria. in sport, sam allardyce has resigned as crystal palace manager five months after hejoined the premier league club. he led them to eight wins
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in 21 games to guide them to a 14th—place finish. in a statement, allardyce said he had no ambitions to take up another job. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the trains, there are replacement buses between slough and windsor and eton central due to a broken—down train. a few problems on the roads too this is the m25 anti—clockwise where two lanes closed betweenj29 for romford and j28 for a12 due to accident and diesel spillage. tuesday's building collapse in bushey means the high street is closed between melbourne road and falconer road. these drone shots from the fire service suggest that will be an area to avoid. and finsbury, stjohn street closed between rosebery avenue and skinner street due to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather
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now. good morning. well, there's lots of sunshine around for the week ahead. and lots of dry weather as well until we get to the weekend. more on that in a moment. a sunny morning this morning. largely dry as well. much of the cloud in the night should move away early on and leave us with decent sunshine this morning. a bit more cloud building in the afternoon. but still, sunny spells through the evening. watch out for the high uv levels. definitely a day for sunscreen. reaching 25 degrees celcius. cloud sticks through the night. there will still be some clear spells. quite mild again. lows of 15—16. tomorrow, even more sunshine around. there will be cloudier spots. for some of us, wall—to—wall sunshine. feeling very warm indeed. 25 degrees, maybe even more than that tomorrow. we hold onto that hot weather. it looks like it was stay dry for much of the week until we get to saturday when it sparks off some thundery showers.
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sunday, well, it may start off on a fresh note, becoming more humid later on. uncertainty about sunday at the moment. it does look like we can see more of those showers on monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the sofa. bye for now. the threat from international terror is raised to its highest level, critical, in the wake of monday's suicide bombing here in manchester. the work undertaken throughout the day has revealed that it is a possibility we cannot ignore, that there is a wider group of individuals linked to this attack. as the investigation continues to find out if bomber salman abedi was operating alone, military personnel are deployed on the streets of the uk to support police. a fourth victim is named —
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olivia campbell, whose mother has paid tribute to her "precious" daughter. and here in the heart of a city still coming to terms with the tragedy, a vigil is held in a show of solidarity for all those affected. this is our 9/11, this is our 7/7. sadly, this is something that we will never forget. good morning, it's wednesday 2a may. we've a special breakfast this morning, with charlie out in manchester, and i'm here in the studio as we assess the impact of monday's terror attack which left 22 dead. we'll be hearing the latest on the investigation, the thoughts of those affected, and we'll have more information on that heightened terror threat
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from the home secretary. and in sport, manchester united have expressed their shock at the terrorist attack in manchester, holding a minute's silence before flying to stockholm ahead of tonight's europa league final. and carol has the weather. and although in some ways we have a different programme, of course we will keep you up—to—date with the weather. good morning. a mild start today. temperatures already between 11 and 15 celsius. what's of mist and fog, but there will be some sunshine. —— lots of mist and fog. it will be quite warm wherever you are. good morning. our base this morning is outside the town hall right in the centre of manchester, a city still reeling from monday's events. let's take you through the main development this morning, the news that the uk terror threat has been raised to its highest level, critical. what that means is that
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the terror attack may be imminent. in practical terms that will mean that there will be military presence on the streets, alongside military personnel. that announcement was made last night by theresa may. she said that investigators at this stage are unable to rule out whether the manchester arena bombing suspect, salman abedi, was acting alone, or whether he was part of a wider cell. with the latest on the investigation, we are davis. —— we are davis. the day after the worst atrocity of its kind in britain for more than a decade, thousands of mancunians gathered to remember those who were so brutally killed and injured. they were also here with a message to the world, that such a heinous crime must never be allowed to alter the nature or the spirit of this great northern city. we will pull through the events of last night because we will stand together, stand together whatever our background,
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whatever our religion, whatever our beliefs or our politics, we will stand together. among those who lost their lives were eight—year—old saffie roussos. she had been so excited about being at her first pop concert. 19—year—old georgina callander, and added band of ariana grande. —— avid fan. and 28—year—old john atkinson, described by friends as one in a million. and this morning, confirmation from herfamily, although not yet from police sources, that 15—year—old bury schoolgirl olivia campbell was also killed. the investigation is moving fast. police have named the bomber as 22—year—old salman abedi. homes in the area where the manchester —born former student may have lived or used were raided by antiterrorism units who were taking no chances, and 23—year—old man has been arrested. what they do not know is if salman abedi acted alone, or if he had helped designing
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and deploying his suicide bomb. that's why the government made this rare move. it is now concluded on the basis of today's investigations that the threat level should be increased for the time being from severe to critical. this means that their assessment is not only that an attack remains highly likely, but that a further attack may be imminent. that decision is not being ta ken lightly. but it should mean more help, including from the military. the first thing they are going to do is free up officers who are on static guarding duties at key locations. we can put them on the streets, protecting the public, and put the military in those locations. the second is to augment our patrols. potentially transport hubs and key events. we have many big events across the country in the coming weeks. we will be working closely
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with organisers to review security, stewarding arrangements, policing arrangements, and make sure that decisions are taken that events only go ahead when it is sensible and safe to do so. while the hunt for the bomber‘s accomplices or sympathisers is a security priority, at hospitals across greater manchester, wounded, many of them children, are still being treated, with some of them in a critical condition. agonisingly, there are still families who do not know if their children are missing, injured or dead. it is an impossible situation to imagine. in a moment we'll speak to jayne mccubbin, who is outside manchester royal infirmary, and eleanor garnier, who is in downing street. but first let's speak to wyre davies who is outside greater manchester police's headquarters for us this morning. wyre, this has been a fast moving
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investigation. can you bring us up—to—date with the latest? investigation. can you bring us up-to-date with the latest? of course, we learned rather a lot about the investigation, about the bomber and about his methods, yesterday. today, another warning from the police to the people of manchester, that they can expect further disruption as they try to get on top of exactly what happened, how this crime came about, what were the motives of the bomber. we have learnt that government advisers in mi5 learnt that government advisers in m15 and the other security services believe that he may not have in acting alone, but such was the nature and the sophistication of the suicide bomb which it was carrying, and which he let off in the arena with such devastating effect, that he may have had some help. he may have had help in arming the bomb, in getting the device together, and certainly in his operational abilities, to make and build such a bomb. that is their concern now. there will be disruption for the people of manchester, particularly on the roads and streets down near
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the arena, where the bomb went off on monday night. so the police investigation is still very much alive. wyre, thank you. jayne is outside manchester royal infirmary. we are looking at those injuries, have there been any updates on the conditions of those injured? no update on the condition of those who we re update on the condition of those who were injured. one person yesterday underwent surgery for 17 hours. we know from the prime minister herself that many of the 59 people who are injured have life—threatening injuries. amongst that 59 r 12 children. —— are 12. the death toll still stands at 22. overnight we had confirmation from the mother of one of those people that 15—year—old olivia campbell is one of the dead. she posted a moving tribute to her daughter on social media, confirming
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that she was amongst the 22 dead, calling her "precious daughter". we also know about the death of 18—year—old georgina callander, and eight—year—old saffie roussos, and 28—year—old john atkinson. police are still trying to piece together information on 12 people who are also missing. they are working with the casualties bureau to identify the casualties bureau to identify the people who are in hospital, the casualties who we know have died, and try to figure out to those missing people are. we expect more information from the police and the emergency services later today. jayne, thank you. eleanor garnier is in downing street for us this morning. the decision to raise the threat level to critical, this is the first time it has happened in a decade? that is right. we can expect
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the prime minister to chair another of the government's emergency cobra committee is later this morning. that is with senior ministers, top—level police officers and security advisers to. of course, it was after last night's cobra meeting that theresa may revealed intelligence officials, that is to say an independent group of experts, have raised the uk's terror threat level from severe to critical. that is the highest possible level. it means an attack could be imminent and it is a pretty rare move, it has not happened in the last ten years. asa not happened in the last ten years. as a result theresa may said the military would be helping armed police protect the public in key locations across the country. that could be at concerts, at sporting events, and there could also be extra security at train stations as well. as for today, i think we can expect the prime minister to continue dealing with the aftermath of the attack. the general election
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campaign has been suspended. last night all the main political parties said that campaigning for them today was out of the question. eleanor, thank you. alan gymea in downing street for us. jayne and wyre, thank you as well. we will keep you up—to—date with the investigation and any developments from downing street through the morning. let me give you a sense of where we are this morning, we are at the town hall in the centre of manchester. it isa hall in the centre of manchester. it is a place where people have come to pay their respects. you can see the flowers behind me, even as we have been standing here this morning, many people coming in have him pausing for a moment and reading some of those messages. yesterday evening many thousands of people gathered here for an hour. there were a few dignitaries, but it was very much an occasion where people could stop and think, there was a moment of silence, and many
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people had their own thoughts about the events of monday. there is hard times again in the streets of our city. but we won't ta ke streets of our city. but we won't take defeat, and we don't want your pity. because this is the place where we stand strong together, with a smile on ourface, and that unions forever, because this is the place in our hearts and our homes, because this is the place that's a part of our bones, because manchester gives us our bones, because manchester gives us such strength from the fact that this... is the place. applause . tell me why it was so important for you to be here tonight?|j for you to be here tonight?” watched in disbelief and horror everything that unfolded last night. ijust everything that unfolded last night. i just felt the overwhelming feeling that i just had i just felt the overwhelming feeling that ijust had to come, really.”
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just feel devastated, shocked, heartbroken. when it happens on your doorstep, you hear about it all the time but you don't expect it to happen near you. targeting people that young, for such little, no reason, there is a need for it. —— no need for it. lots of people get great comfort from the solidarity, which is part of the reason people came here tonight. i think when we saw love, not hatred, that was really good. that is what we are all thinking. there has been a lot of pride displayed about the city, the spirit of manchester, alongside the sadness. i think we have a lot of love in manchester. that is a big deal with us. it won't scare us.” see you brought flowers with you? yeah, i brought flowers for the corner. why is that so important to you? well, it is important to me
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because as a grandmother, you cannot think it would happen to your family, as a person. it is really sad. it is also nice to bea it is really sad. it is also nice to be a part of it, and to know that we are not alone and people are all feeling the same. it doesn't matter, colours, religions, we are all sticking together as one and we are all feeling this pain. it is hard, isn't it, for parents to try to know what to say to their children, and in this case your daughter is just 14 years old. sometimes it is very ha rd 14 years old. sometimes it is very hard to know what to say. it is. i think being here somehow is help him. hannah is helping me, if you know what i mean. just being around people who are hurting and who are
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saying, we are here, and we are unbroken. manchester, manchester, manchester! introduced me to this little fellow. he is 18 months old. why was it still important for you and bilal to come down? why was it still important for you and bilalto come down? well, like his father, bilal is a mancunian, and we are a resilient bunch, and we mancunians will get together through this and build something bigger and better. this is something that we will never forget. yes, you can see some of the candles that were lit by people here last night, and during the morning people have been coming here as well. little bilal, you saw him with his dad. it is interesting hearing the reasons people chose to come along. they wanted to be amongst like—minded people. the atmosphere here last night was interesting. it was sombre, there was a lot of emotion, but it was uplifting as well. some dignitaries we re uplifting as well. some dignitaries were here sharing that moment. leading that vigil yesterday
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was the bishop of manchester, the right reverend david walker, who's with me now. good morning to you. thank you for your time. you, like good morning to you. thank you for yourtime. you, like me, experience that moment last night. what did you make of the emotions? it was one of the worst days in the history of manchester, but there was a sense of defiance and determination. celebration is not the right word, but there was a recognition of what brings us together in this diverse community. it is far more important than what divide. people trying to cause havoc and mayhem are a small number. that came across. so many people could have stayed at home in fear that they came to this city square. it was unbelievable. some people can ta ke was unbelievable. some people can take solace in faith. others cannot. others have different ways. one is by being close to people and sharing
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some of those emotions. they said that to me last night. yes. i know that to me last night. yes. i know that in the darkest moment god is with me. for those who do not have faith, at least they know others are with them so they can share feelings and understand what is going through their minds. there were symbolic meanings to this. i lit a candle last night during the vigil. today there are many candles, a symbol of hope, light shining in the darkness. quite a few people made reference to how hard it is to explain in this particular case when someone is actively targeting children knowing who was at that concert and the consequences. no terrorist attack, there is nothing good about any terrorist attack, they are all evil, but a lot of people are really struggling with that notion of so many young people targeted. that is the most shocking thing. this teaches us not just
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the most shocking thing. this teaches us notjust that human life is precious, but the lives of children, those who are too small and frail to look after themselves, are particularly precious. this was an awful attack. those injured, they will live for decades with the memories and mental and physical scars from that night. the memory of this will be a very living memory in the hearts of many for decades to come. yes, well, thank you for your time this morning. thank you very much. we will be at the town hall in manchester throughout the morning speaking to individuals. and we will keep you up—to—date with the police investigation which is fast—moving. and they will be more details on the terror threat in the uk which has been raised to critical. we will speak to andy burnham, the mayor of manchester, later this morning. and we will also speak to the home
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secretary, amber rudd, later on. i can also remind you of the other news today. a 37—year—old man has been arrested at stansted airport on suspicion of preparing for acts of terrorism. he was held before boarding a flight to turkey. officers are now searching two residential addresses in north london. scotland yard say the arrest was not linked to monday's manchester arena bombing. donald trump will meet pope francis at the vatican this morning on the latest leg of his first foreign tour as us president. this will be mr trump's first meeting with the pope. during last year's presidential election campaign, pope francis attacked mr trump's plans to build a wall along the mexican border saying they weren't christian. mr trump described the comments as disgraceful. an inquest into the sydney cafe siege almost two years ago has found extensive failings in the police and
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justice system. man monis held 18 people inside the cafe until 17 hours later the cafe was stormed. they said there were issues like not acting moments after a hostage was killed. in the last few minutes, marks & spencer have announced how they're doing in their latest results. sean's here with the details. it is not good news. no. this is since april last year. profits have gone down 10%. they still made £600 million that time. but clothing, home sales, the main thing is, they we re home sales, the main thing is, they were down 3% on last year. there is a new boss and he has seen that as a big thing for him. steve made a few changes. he brought injill
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macdonald to run the women's clothing division. it will be interesting to see what changes she makes to be the new chairman of marks & spencer is coming in soon. not good figures for that. thank you very much, sean, for bringing us up—to—date. the james bond star, daniel craig, hasjoined the james bond star, daniel craig, has joined tributes to the actor sir roger moore, who died yesterday. a picture of the two together was posted on the official james bond twitter account, along with these words. "nobody does it better." "love daniel." sir roger, who played bond in seven films in the 70s and 805, died after a short illness at the age of 89. sir rogerjoined us on the breakfast sofa in 2015 and reflected on his yea rs sofa in 2015 and reflected on his years as the smooth—talking spy. you might remember this. very lucky, i had a wonderful time. marvellous crews, marvellous directors. lovely actors and actresses. what more could you want? they give you lovely clothes and you take them home at the end of the film. and they pay you!
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sir roger moore. our programme today is different because of what happened in manchester. first of all, the weather. it will be warm. yes. good morning. by the end of the working week, it will be hot for some of us. 11— 15 across—the—board. mist and fog around as well and also some drizzle. showers in parts of western scotland and also northern scotla nd western scotland and also northern scotland and some sea fog which might end up on shore in the south—west. it is also travelling across the bristol channel. cloud in wales in south—west england, out towards hampshire. east of that, sunshine. feeling pleasant with
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temperatures this morning. northern england, a lot of cloud around, as in northern ireland. cloudy in northern scotland. dampness again. low cloud, drizzle, and a few showers. of the day, what will happen if some some of the low cloud will break up and we will see sunshine develop. the odd shower in south—west scotland, northern ireland, and some pushing up into the northern isles, clearing in the shetland. temperatures, 22— 26 celsius. warm wherever you are. even if you are under cloud. the exception is low cloud. the evening and overnight, blue skies. some more sea and overnight, blue skies. some more sea fog. also the eastern china will experience that. it will be quite a warm night. cloud will melt away tomorrow. more sunny than today. it
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will also be warm. 20s widely across the chart. 13— 17 across the far north of scotland. as we move from thursday into friday, a similar story in that friday will be dry. fairly quiet. seabreeze developing. cooler. you can see something else waiting in the winds. as we move into friday and saturday, we are pulling in all of this warm air from the continent. by saturday, the south could be 30 degrees. we also have to weather front introducing showery outbreaks. saturday, dry weather, feeling sticky. 30 degrees, especially in the south—east. this is the band of rain. behind it, fresh conditions come in. by no means is the bank holiday weekend a washout. back to you. thank you very
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much. the base of the coverage this morning is right here in the centre of manchester in albert square. you can see the town hall behind me to be many tributes were laid here. many thousands of people were in this square, and a lot of camera crews. “— this square, and a lot of camera crews. —— behind me. and we have a guest. tell us about the event and why it was so important to gather people last night. there was an outcry from people, from grassroots communities. people wanted to come together to see what could we do. there were people, taxi drivers offering free lifts, people opening up offering free lifts, people opening up flats and homes for people, taking in people and giving them shelter. there was so much emotion and good will as well. people wanted to come and do something. we thought we would hold a vigil in the centre
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of manchester. we thought it was something we needed to do. we contacted the mayors office and the police. it was a remarkable moment and it helped a lot of people. you will be well aware that at these times you see the best and the worst. you see the feelings people have and they were wonderful. the worst, of course, is the suicide bomber himself. we now know who he was. he was named. he was born in manchester and spent pretty much all of this life in manchester. you had a connection through the neighbourhood you lived in. tell us about that. he was from fallowfield. i found that he went to the same high school, in inner—city school communities. it is not like northern towns and cities were you have segregated immunities. the feeling was one of shock. many people are
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shocked that this person among us, northey street in syria, someone like that, our streets. northey street in syria, someone like that, ourstreets. —— northey street in syria, someone like that, our streets. —— not the streets. they feel we have to do something. and i think we will. we are ready to help and support people to make sure we drive these people out of our communities because they do not represent the muslim community here in manchester. clearly, salman abedi, the suicide bomber, there will be questions about how he came to the came to. so many people live the same life but end up in a completely different place. we don't know these issues when we see these people. people can act one way in the streets and be com pletely act one way in the streets and be completely different. i think we have to work with the authorities. it is not a problem with the muslim
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community, the mosques themselves. these people go on the internet, websites, and this is where they get radicalised. on line. hidden in rooms where people are by themselves. that is where it happens. often we do not see it. if we could see it i am sure we would help people coming forward and standing upfor help people coming forward and standing up for this. thank you for your time this morning. thank you very much. we are based in manchester this morning right in the centre of it all. we have spoken to people, some who were in the event, some whojust shared people, some who were in the event, some who just shared their feelings. the terror threat has been raised to critical, you will have heard that by now. there are investigation is ongoing. we will hear more about that and speak to the amount of manchester, andy burnham, as well. —— and speak to the mayor of. we will hear more about that since the first, the news, travel, and
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weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. as we have been hearing, commuters heading into work are likely to see an increased police presence and even soldiers in some locations this morning. we just wejust had this we just had this sense from king's cross. there is a heightened police presence in kings cross this morning. no soldiers i have seen on the streets yet. the aim for security here is to keep security up but keep the uk moving. there would be armed officers and soldiers at wembley for the fa cup final this weekend and also twickenham for the premiership final. detectives from scotla nd premiership final. detectives from scotland yard's premiership final. detectives from scotland ya rd's counterterrorism squad say the arrest of a man at standsted airport last night was not connected to the attack in manchester. the 37—year—old was stopped as he tried to board a
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flight stopped as he tried to board a flight to turkey on suspicion of trying to get to syria. police are now searching two in northern london. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. well, there's lots of sunshine around for the week ahead. and lots of dry weather as well until we get to the weekend. more on that in a moment. a sunny morning this morning.
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largely dry as well. much of the cloud in the night should move away early on and leave us with decent sunshine this morning. a bit more cloud building through the afternoon. but still, sunny spells through the evening. watch out for the high uv levels. definitely a day for sunscreen. reaching 25 degrees celcius. cloud sticks through the night. there will still be some clear spells. quite mild again. lows of 15—16 celcius. tomorrow, even more sunshine around. there will be cloudier spots. for some of us, wall—to—wall sunshine. feeling very warm indeed. getting up to 25 degrees, maybe even more than that tomorrow. we hold onto that hot weather. it looks like it was stay dry for much of the week until we get to saturday when it sparks off some thundery showers. sunday, well, it may start off on a fresh note, becoming more humid later on. uncertainty about sunday at the moment. it does look like we can see more of those showers on monday.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the sofa. bye for now. fellow and good morning. you are watching bbc breakfast, and we are continuing our coverage of the events in manchester on monday night. our main development today is that the uk terror threat level has been raised to its highest level, meaning there are further attacks possibly imminent. that was raised by the prime minister, theresa may, yesterday. 22 people died in that attack, over 59 being treated in hospitals across greater manchester. a fourth person has been named as one of those who died. she has been named by her mother as 15—year—old olivia campbell. we also know a little bit more information about
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the man responsible for this attack. he isa the man responsible for this attack. he is a 22—year—old, salman abedi. obviously an investigation is going on right now to see whether or not he the loan. when that theresa may, the prime minister, raised the terror threat to critical last night. this is what she said. the police have asked for authorisation from the secretary of state for defence to deploy armed personnel in support of their officers. this is in support of a well—established plan known as operation temperer, in which both the armed forces and the police service is involved are and well prepared to work in this kind of environment. —— police services. the secretary of state has approved this request and operation temperer is now in force. this means that armed police officers responsible for duties such as guarding key sites will be replaced by members of the
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armed forces. which will allow the police to significantly increase the number of armed officers on patrol in key locations. you might also see military personnel deployed at certain events, such as concerts and sporting matches. they will be helping the police to keep the public say. i do not want the public to feel unduly alarmed. we have faced a serious terrorist threat in our country for many years. the operational response i havejust outlined is a proportionate and sensible response to the threat that our security experts judge we face. we will get more information, actually from the home secretary, amber rudd, on what exactly that means and whether or not we might see soldiers on the streets, how many, that is the information we are due to get from her at about 8:30 a.m.. we also have information coming in from reuters. this has not
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been confirmed in the uk yet, that we have heard that a polish couple died in that attack. this is from the polish foreign minister, saying that the parents came after the concert to collect their daughters, and unfortunately we have information that they have been killed. the children are safe. that is coming in from poland. we know that so far, four of those people, of the 22 died in the attack, has been officially named. we will of course keep you right up—to—date with all the information as it comes to us here on bbc breakfast this morning. also last night, thousands of people went to the centre of manchester, very close to where this attack took place, to hold a vigil. charlie is there now. louise, thank you. yes, iam in albert square, right in the centre of manchester. this was the location where many thousands of people congregated last night. the sun was shining, it was a beautiful evening, and there were a lot of emotions on
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display. lots of people said they would not be beaten. there was lots of emotion as well. you can get a sense of some of that from some of the flowers you can see laid out here. we have seen many people this morning passing by and taking a moment to think about some of those who have been caught up in this attack. some of the scriptures are very moving. this one reads, "together we will pull through, that is exactly what we shall do, while thinking of your faces". is exactly what we shall do, while thinking of yourfaces". many is exactly what we shall do, while thinking of your faces". many people saying, "manchester, we stand united". you can get a sense of some of the emotions you reading those comments. let's go back to the investigation. you will have heard the news this morning that the terror threat has been raised to the highest level, critical. with me as andy redhead. good morning. talk us through some of the practical implications. we heard from theresa may last night, saying that amongst other things we will see troops on
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location at certain sites, alongside police officers? absolutely. it is the right call. we need to release specialist firearms police officers from standing positions and other fixed points which the military is more than capable of covering, to release the specialist resource, so that they are available should there be further atrocities such as this, to make sure that the manpower is there to deal with it. at the moment, the investigation is trying to identify how many people were actually involved with this particular atrocity, because there may have been more than just the person who died. obviously the device that was used was a sophisticated device. this investigation may well unravel quite a network of people, and we will need the resources to deal with it. that was an important point made by the prime minister last night, when she said that they do not wish to alarm people unnecessarily, but they cannot rule out the possibility that
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salman abedi was working alone. there might be a wider network. very true. and on monday evening, you know, 22 deaths, dozens of people injured, the nation is appalled, all of us are appalled, but without unnecessarily further alarming people, the police have a job to do. there is a criminal investigation going on. on top of everything else that the security services and the intelligence services are dealing with on a daily basis, to try to prevent these atrocities from happening, we have got to have the resources , happening, we have got to have the resources, and raising the level and bringing the military and means that some resources are being freed up to help that investigation and the specialist response that is required. more details are emerging about salman abedi. we know a little bit more about what he was. born and brought up in manchester, we heard from somebody a moment ago he went to the same school as him. that picture is going to be key, isn't it, to getting some kind of
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understanding? i think we have to accept that people in this country, born in this country, lawful citizens of this country, not migrants, not immigrants, not anything of that nature, people born in this country are being radicalised. as a nation we need to understand that we have to tackle that as well, through education, through whatever means necessary, right from school age and upwards. we need to deal with that, we have to get a grip on that very swiftly. andy, thank you. as you probably saw, as we have been speaking, there are people arriving here and taking are people arriving here and taking a moment on their way into work and dropping off flowers as they go. one pa rt dropping off flowers as they go. one part of the story we are telling you this morning, of course, is about the investigation and the security alerts. the other is the emotional side of this. andy burnham, the mayor of manchester, will be joining us mayor of manchester, will be joining us later. he was at the vigil last night and will be speaking to him later on. thank you, charlie. we will be going back to charlie through the morning. we will also be keeping you
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up—to—date as much as we can on bbc brea kfast. up—to—date as much as we can on bbc breakfast. we will have carol with the weather shortly. sally is here as well. so many things have come out of this, and of course manchester is a big football city, isn't it? that is right. we have seen isn't it? that is right. we have seen the events on monday night, manchester united were due to play in the europa league final tonight. this picture is the minister called last night, —— picture is then in stock: last night. —— stockholm. this has had a significant effect on them. here is the telegraph with a lovely headline. manchester, united. the express has a similar one. you can see wayne rooney in the centre of that picture. the game goes ahead. manchester united manager jose mourinho says the hearts and minds of everybody at the club are with those affected by the attack on monday. in the wake of the incident, u efa monday. in the wake of the incident, uefa accepted manchester united's request to cancel their press
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conference ahead of the final, while the team held a minute of silence at training before flying to sweden. andy swiss reports from stockholm. as a soleanose mourinho arrived with his team in stockholm, he said the victims of the manchester attack were in their minds and their hearts. before flying out, the players held a minute's silence. tonight, the whole stadium will do so, in memory of those who died. words do not really do justice for how we all feel. we're numb. the events were sickening. all of our thoughts at the moment are with the victims and the families affected by it. tonight promises to be an emotional occasion. what was originally just a football match has become an expression of sporting solidarity. manchester united supporters here now want to win not just for their team but for their city. but their mood is muted. a lot of us have friends that were either nearby or actually at the concert, in some cases. it's not want you want to hear.
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we came out here to have a party and enjoy the football but it has affected the occasion a little bit. we are here to play a game of football and hopefully go on to win it for manchester, notjust for manchester united, but for manchester. security will be tight. stockholm is still recovering from its own terrorist attack last month. tonight, once again, sport will be put firmly in perspective. in response to monday's terror attacks, sporting events and venues are conducting major reviews of security plans. the great city games is due to be held in manchester on friday. that will go ahead. a final decision on the great manchester run is expected later today. sam alla rdyce has resigned is expected later today. sam
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allardyce has resigned as crystal palace managerjust days after ensuring the club's premier league survival. he signed a two and a half year deal last december, but has said ina year deal last december, but has said in a statement that he now has no ambitions to take anotherjob. two—time wimbledon champion patrick kvitova could still play at wimbledon this year. —— petra. she suffered injuries to her arm in a knife attack in december, but her representative said her recovery is on track. she might even play in the french open, which begins next week. and riders in the giro d'italia paid their respects to the victims of the manchester attack yesterday. cyclists held a moment of silence before the start of the 16th stage and also paid tribute to the former motor gp champion, the american nicky hayden, who died on monday. —— moto gp champion. thank you, sally. a little reminder as well, so far, officially four victims have been named, and we will
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just reflect on them just for a second. saffie roussos, who wasjust eight. georgina callander, a health and social care student, and in some ways a super fan of ariana grande, she was 18. john atkinson, he was 28. and olivia campbell, he was 15. her mother has said that she was also amongst those victims. in response to that attack, the terror threat level for the uk has now been raised to critical. that is full of first time in ten years, following the bomb attack at manchester arena, which killed, we now know, 22 people. we will remind ourselves just briefly how events unfolded on monday night. at 10:35pm there was an explosion in the foyer at manchester arena. neighbouring victoria station was then closed, and the surrounding area was cordoned off. emergency services to casualties to be treated at eight hospitals across greater manchester,
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and on tuesday, police executed wa rra nts and on tuesday, police executed warrants in two areas of manchester, one in whalley range and another in fallowfield, were a controlled explosion to face. joining me in the studio is the bbc‘s home editor, mark easton. good morning. good morning. there is so much that we do not know. let's begin with what we do know, and there are details emerging about this particular bomb, and the kind of implications that it's make might have? what we have to understand is that making a viable bomb that you can transport to the place you want to detonate it, to then be able to somehow secret it pass whatever security there is, and then detonate it on command, is not something that enamoured you can do. we have seen a number of ghastly terrorism attacks in recent times where the terrorists have used knives or cars, easily obtainable weapons, if you like. this was a bomb. bombs are hard to
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make. and i think, we know that this was clearly a viable on, a home—made device, but of course it is a home—made device. we understand that it was packed with shards of metal, nuts, bolts, reports of nails and ballbearings, in order to create as much loss of life as possible. now, i think when we understand that that warm was there, we have to ask ourselves, was this person operating alone? —— vat vat bomb was there. could an individual find alone? —— vat vat bomb was there. could an individualfind an information to make a device like that and conduct the operation up to the point where he arrived at manchester arena late on monday night, and i think that most people are now thinking that is really quite hard. there is more information about him. salman abedi, 22, and from salford.
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a local man in many ways. he comes across as a very normal boy, a young man, who went to a local school, supported manchester united. but his family were refugees from the gaddafi regime in libya. there have been reports that indeed his father had returned to libya and that he himself had been in libya until perhaps just a few days before the attack. this is again why there is so attack. this is again why there is so much concern about whether he had partners. is the travelling just before libya bringing a bomb? no, he cannot bring one on a flight. that is why people think he had a compass is. tell us about the terror level being moved to critical. —— accomplices. what does that mean? being moved to critical. —— accomplices. what does that mean7m
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actual terms, it means another attack is expected imminently. the prime minister said it may be imminent. it is the highest level it can get. the reason for that is that if the reason a bomb maker and perhaps a cell of terrorists who we re perhaps a cell of terrorists who were perhaps aiding salman abedi, you need to deal with that. that is a very dangerous situation. that is why they put it up to critical. they think it is quite likely. in terms of the everyday, life, i think we can expect more security going in and out of public buildings and other places. there will be troops at key points, transport centres. that kind of thing to be there will be more police activity. often they will be armed. it is important.
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although we have is very high threat level, we have been there before a couple of times. it is really important that people just live their lives in a normal way. don't be too frightened and don't be too alarmed. ina be too frightened and don't be too alarmed. in a way thatjust plays into the hands of the terrace. thank you very much for your thoughts this morning. —— terrorists. and now for the weather. it looks like it will be hot. good morning. good morning. it will be hot by the weekend. temperatures reaching 30 degrees. widely 12— 17 at the moment. cloud around first thing. some will break. sunshine leading us into another warm day. this morning we have a lot of cloud in the north and west. drizzle in north—western scotland, rain in the northern isles. look at the sunshine we also have. cloud continuing to break through the gate. more sunshine coming through. that will impact the temperatures.
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not as cool as yesterday. sea fog in the bristol channel. like for it to come on shore but it could. possibly higher than 24 in the south—east. big areas of cloud will break here and there. some sunny spells coming through. sunshine in northern england to be the chance of a shower in northern ireland, but mostly dry. to give you a broad overview of the temperatures, this is what we are looking at today. up to 26. locally, 27 is possible. through the evening and overnight, there will be a lot of dry weather around. coastal fog in the south—west and also the english channel. quite a sultry night as well tonight with temperatures not dipping below double figures in towns and cities. 17 in london. tomorrow, a muggy note. there will be more cloud...
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less cloud, i should say than today. more sunshine. it will feel much warmer as a result across—the—board. widely at temperatures in the 20s. in the north of the country, 13— 17 is still what we are looking at. thursday and friday and saturday. not much changes first of all on friday. lot of dry weather. a lot of sunshine. the sea breeze on the north coastline means if you are going for a stroll on the shore, it will feel cooler. inland, 20s again. higher than 26 on the chart. what is happening is we are starting to pull in this warm airfrom happening is we are starting to pull in this warm air from the happening is we are starting to pull in this warm airfrom the near continent across the shores. whitely, we are looking at mid to high 20s. in the south, 30. —— widely. a weather front coming in. it will break down moving north. sunday, more fresh conditions following on behind. now we will go back and join charlie in manchester.
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thank you very much. you can see from the pictures we are in the centre of manchester in albert square. this has been the place where many people have gathered. last night there was a vigil. many thousands of people came here to share their emotions in a city still reeling from the events on monday. let me give you a little look at some of the flowers here. many people passing by have been speaking to me this morning. theyjust plays to me this morning. theyjust plays to their flowers here with many m essa g es to their flowers here with many messages on them. —— placed there. this one says to all of the angels have an has gained, may you rest up there while we fight this pain. children's toys as well. so many people at the vigil last night said
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this had struck them so hard. you may well have seen the story in connection with olivia campbell, this morning, 15 years old, her family have confirmed her death. it is something many of us will feel connected with because of the appeals by charlotte campbell and her mother. her phone had gone dead. family were around that every hospital pleading for information desperately. this morning they confirmed that 15—year—old olivia campbell was among the 22 people who have died. a desperate circumstances anyfamily to have died. a desperate circumstances any family to be going through. graham satchell has been with people trying to deal with the aftermath of people caught up in the event on monday. at home in prestatyn in wales. her
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daughterjust 13. at home in wales, the tickets to see ariana grande were a surprise gift and a dream come true. you can see the supreme joy on lucy's face. she is really, really pretty, and she is a really good role model. and she is just perfect. lucy, being my daughter, she sung every single song, as did the majority of the audience, in such a happy and joyous occasion. for it to end in such tragedy is horrific. what happened at the manchester arena was most shocking because it was children, teenagers, who were targeted. they were terrified and scared. everyone was. itjust went bang... they were all walking quietly up the stairs and then everyone started screaming. people were climbing over each other and pushing each other down the stairs. i had a very good idea that it was a bomb. straightaway?
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yeah. from the explosion. i thought, is this it? it is hard enough for adults to try and understand the full horror of monday night's attack. how do you make sense of it at 13? it should not have happened. and i don't know, i don't understand, why it did happen. i just don't understand why they would be so horrible to other people. there were 21,000 people in there and some parents would have done exactly the same as me, taken pictures of the children with the tickets. and some of those parents are walking away today where that is the last photo of their child. and ijust, you know, i can't comprehend, umm, what they must be going through. but, no, i cannot in any way whatsoever understand why anyone would do this to other people. as well as lucy, ann—marie has two boys, both with learning
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difficulties. she is trying to be strong to make life as normal and positive as possible. we want to send out our hearts to those who were not as lucky. we are both very lucky to be alive in this situation. and, you know, we aren't, us two, aren't going to be able to stop this terrorism, but we have to learn to live alongside it and be brave and vigilant along the way. they will continue to talk about the atrocity on monday and work through it together. we will be fine, won't we love? yeah. graham satchell, bbc news. we will
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be speaking to more of those caught up be speaking to more of those caught up in the events. we are live in the centre of manchester, albert square. many gathered here last night for the vigil. we will be speaking live to amber rudd, the home secretary. that is coming up later. the headlines where you are now. good morning from bbc london news. the met office said the capital must bea the met office said the capital must be a hostile environment for terrorist. there will be police at key locations after the threat level moved to critical this morning. they urged londoners to be calm but
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alert. we were sent this from king's cross. there is a heightened police presence at king's cross this morning. no soldiers on the streets yet. the aim for security chiefs is to ratchet up security but make sure they keep london moving. there will also be a deployment of extra arms officers and possibly soldiers at wembley for the fa cup final this weekend and also at twickenham for the premiership final. in sport, sam allardyce has resigned as crystal palace manager five months after hejoined the premier league club. he led them to eight wins in 21 games to guide them to a 14th—place finish. in a statement, allardyce said he had no ambitions to take up another job. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on the tubes this morning. partially blocked. it is queueing to
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the dartford tunnel. now for the weather. good morning. well, there's lots of sunshine around for the week ahead. and lots of dry weather as well until we get to the weekend. more on that in a moment. a sunny morning this morning. largely dry as well. much of the cloud in the night should move away early on and leave us with decent sunshine this morning. a bit more cloud building through the afternoon. but still, sunny spells through the evening. watch out for the high uv levels. definitely a day for sunscreen. reaching 25 degrees celcius. cloud sticks through the night. there will still be some clear spells. quite mild again.
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lows of 15—16 celcius. tomorrow, even more sunshine around. there will be cloudier spots. for some of us, wall—to—wall sunshine. feeling very warm indeed. getting up to 25 degrees, maybe even more than that tomorrow. we hold onto that hot weather. it looks like it was stay dry for much of the week until we get to saturday when it sparks off some thundery showers. sunday, well, it may start off on a fresh note, becoming more humid later on. uncertainty about sunday at the moment. it does look like we can see more of those showers on monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the sofa. bye for now. the threat from international terror is raised to it's highest level, critical, in the wake of monday's suicide bombing here in manchester. the work under taken throughout the
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day has revealed that it is a possibility we cannot ignore that there is a wider group of individuals linked to this attack. as the investigation continues to find out if bomber salman abedi was operating alone, military personnel are deployed on the streets of the uk to support police. a fourth victim is named — olivia campbell whose mother has paid tribute to her "precious" daughter. and here in the heart of a city still coming to terms with the tragedy, a vigil is held in a show of solidarity for all those affected. this is our 9/11. this is our 7/7. sadly, this is something that we will never forget. good morning. it's wednesday, 24th may.
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we have a special breakfast this morning. charlie is out in manchester and i am here in the studio, as we assess the impact of monday's terror attack which left 22 dead. we'll be hearing the latest on the investigation, the thoughts of those affected and we will have more information on that heightened terror threat from the home secretary. and in sport, manchester united have expressed their shock at the terrorist attack in manchester, holding a minute's silence before flying to stockholm ahead of tonight's europa league final. and carol has the weather. good morning it's a mild start today, but for some of us a cloudy one. some of the cloud will break lead to go sunny spells and across—the—board it will feel warm, but i'll have more details later on. good morning. welcome to breakfast a special
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programme from the centre of manchester. a city still reeling from the events of monday. you can see many people gathering here this morning. there is a lot of media in attendance and many people passing by and just taking a moment either to lay flowers, orjust pause for thought about those victims of the suicide attack on monday night. let's bring you up—to—date with the latest developments. the uk terror threat level has been raised to its highest level meaning further attacks may be imminent. the move came after the prime minister, theresa may said that investigators were unable to rule out whether the manchester arena bombing suspect, salman abedi, had acted alone. military personnel will now be deployed to protect key sites. our correspondent, wyre davies has the latest.
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the day after the worst atrocity of its kind in britain for more than a decade, thousands of mancunians gathered to remember those who were so gathered to remember those who were so brutally killed and injured. they we re so brutally killed and injured. they were also here with a message to the world, that such a heinous crime must never be allowed to alter the nature or the spirit of this great northern city. we will pull through the events of last night because we will stand together. stand together, whatever our background, whatever our religion, whatever our beliefs and our politics, we will stand together. among those who lost their lives we re among those who lost their lives were eight—year—old saffie roussos, she had been so excited about being at her first she had been so excited about being at herfirst pop she had been so excited about being at her first pop concert, 19—year—old georgina callande a fan of ariana grande and 28—year—old john atkinson, described by friends as one in a million. and this
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morning, confirmation from her family, although not yet from police sources, that 15—year—old bury schoolgirl olivia campbell was also killed. the investigation is moving fast. police have named the bomber as 22—year—old salman abedi. holes in the area were in the manchester born former student may have lived or used were raided by antiterrorism units. they were taking no chances and a 23—year—old man has been arrested, but what they don't know if salman abedi acted alone or if he had help designing and deploying his suicide bomb. that's why the government made this rare move. suicide bomb. that's why the government made this rare movem is now concluded on the basis of today's investigations that the threat level should be increased for the time being from severe to critical. this means that their assessment is not only that an attack remains highly likely, but
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that a further attack maybe imminent. that decision has not been taken lightly, imminent. that decision has not been ta ken lightly, but imminent. that decision has not been taken lightly, but it should mean more help including from the military for police forces up and down the country at such a sensitive, critical moment. the first thing they're going to do is free up officers that on static guarding duties at key locations. the second thing is potentially patrols, transport services and key events. there are big events over the next few weeks and we will be working with the organisers to review the security and review their stewa rd i ng review the security and review their stewarding arrangements and review our policing arrangements and make sure that events only take place when it is sensible and safe to do so. when it is sensible and safe to do so. highly the hunt for the bomber's accomplices or sympathisers is a security priority, at hospitals across greater manchester, the wounded, many of them children, are still being treated with some in a critical condition. agonisingly there are still believed to be a few
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families who on monday night had waved their excited children off to a p0p waved their excited children off to a pop concert, but who still don't know if they're missing, injured or dead. it's an impossible situation to imagine. our programme is coming from outside the town hall in manchester. this is the town hall in manchester. this is the vigil last night. right now, jayne mccubbin is outside manchester royal infirmary. eleanor garnier who is in downing street but first let's speak to wyre davies who is outside greater manchester police's headquarters for us this morning. amber rudd saying that salman abedi was known to security forces up to a point. there is quite a bit of
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information coming out this morning. yes, well, that suggests that he was at least across their radar, now whether that is recently because he may have gone back to libya and he came to the attention of perhaps american intelligence services as well as british intelligence services and they would have noted his return to the uk perhaps, although, of course, he was a british citizen and had a british passport, we believe, but if he was across their radar we don't know to what extent, but it's clear that given the increasing terror alerts in the united kingdom, notjust here in greater manchester, that they believe that salman abedi may have had some sort of assistance, some sort of help in procuring and building a suicide device which he used, of course, to such devastating effect when 22 people were killed in manchester arena. yes, a lot of progress was made in the first 24
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hours, but greater manchester police and other police forces and other intelligence agencies in the uk are making it very clear that there is a long way to go before this country is safe again. before they are happy that not only of course was salman abedi killed in this suicide explosion but anybody else who may have helped him or may have helped procure the explosives is also accounted for and that for the police remains a priority. wyre, thank you very much. jane mccubbin is outside manchester royal infirmary. as you bring us details as you have them of the injured, i draw people's attention to the news we have this morning, many people will have been familiar with this already, 15—year—old olivia campbell, her mother charlotte had made very public appeals for her, herfamily this made very public appeals for her, her family this morning, made very public appeals for her, herfamily this morning, confirming that she is amongst the dead. so, what can you tell us from the hospital there? yes,
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what can you tell us from the hospitalthere? yes, she made the heartfelt appeal, desperate appeal for information yesterday, didn't she? confirmation that she is amongst the dead. we have had confirmation from the polish foreign ministry this morning that at least two poles are amongst the dead and one further polish person is being treated in hospital here in greater manchester this morning. here at manchester this morning. here at manchester royal infirmary there are some of those 59 wounded peoplement there are more people across greater manchester at other hospitals being treated in seven other hospitals. we know, of course that the youngest victim to be named so far is saffie roussos from lancashire and also 18—year—old georgina callande from lancashire and 28—year—old john atkinson, but let's just get more information right now on the 59 people who are injured and being treated in hospital. this isjohn, you're chief officerfrom treated in hospital. this isjohn, you're chief officer from greater manchester health and social care.
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you're responsible for nhs services here. tell us more about the injuries that you've been dealing with here? they have been the traumatic injuries that you would expect in terms of the type of device that was used, the proximity to the people who were injured and so to the people who were injured and so we're dealing with injuries to major organs, we're dealing with loss of limbs potentially, we're dealing with embedded objects, all the horrific injuries that you would expect from the event that happened. the prime minister yesterday warned us the prime minister yesterday warned us that, you know, notjust life changing problems, injuries here, but life threatening injuries? that's right. we've got 20 individuals who are in critical care across greater manchester which means they require the most urgent ca re means they require the most urgent care and are receiving round—the—clock treatment from doctors and nurses. thank you so much for your time this morning. i should say the camaraderie has been amazing. so many doctors and nurses
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came to volunteer their services yesterday. so many came that many of them were turned away. 12 people are still missing and we are yet to receive information from police about their identity. back to you. let's speak to our political correspondent eleanor garnier who is in downing street for us this morning. theresa may was in manchester yesterday and she spoke to a number of people and then made the announcement last night in connection with the terror threat and she gave us a little more detail then. that's right. we can expect then. that's right. we can expect the prime minister to chair another of the government's emergency cobra committee meetings later this morning. that's with senior ministers, top police officers, and security officials too and it was after last night's cobra meeting that theresa may revealed that intelligence officials and independent group of experts had decided to raise the terror threat level from severe to critical. that's the highest possible level.
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it means an attack could be imminent and asa it means an attack could be imminent and as a result theresa may said the military would be helping the police to protect the public in key locations across the country. it could be at sporting events and concerts, at key places in the capital too. like here in downing street, the palace of westminster, and in whitehall too. train stations, there might be extra security there too. as for the general election, well, of course, this is happening right in the middle of campaigning, but we can expect the prime minister today to continue handling the response to the attack. the general election campaign has been suspended and all the main parties last night confirmed that campaigning for them today would be out of the question. eleanor garnier and thanks to jane mccubbin outside manchester royal infirmary and wyre davies outside
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manchester police headquarters. with me now is the mayor of greater manchester andy burnham. thank you very much for coming down for us this morning. as we have been here this morning and we can see one or two people behind us now, many more people are arriving here, laying flowers and some people just taking a moment to think. yes. where are your thoughts this morning? we we re are your thoughts this morning? we were numb yesterday with shock and today i guess we're waking up to the enormity of what has happened, but i think people did take enormous comfort from what happened yesterday. it was our darkest hour, but also you saw the best of greater manchester yesterday. i was in the hospitals late last night and i was hearing stories that porters, cleaners, surgeons, nurses came in from not doing on shift to help out, the public were bringing in food and people really did pull together and i think we should take a great deal of pride in that. greater manchester came together. i want to ask you about the increased terror threat.
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it is at its highest level. how is that going to look and feel different? people won't necessarily see military presence here on the streets, but of course, they will see a highly visible police presence and of course, they will feel reassured by that at this moment in time. of course, the public need to be highly vigilant, but they should not be unduly alarmed. as much as possible we want to try and return to normality today. we have a big event happening in the city this weekend, the great city games. i will be working with the chief co nsta ble will be working with the chief constable and the lead are of manchester city council to make sure that as it stands that's going ahead and that's what we've got to do. people want manchester to get on with the job and we will. so many questions, salman abedi, the suicide bomber, himself, was born and lived in manchester. you talk about that people not being alarmed, but in the same breath the possibility now that they cannot rule out the possibility
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that he was not working alone, but that he was not working alone, but that he was possibly part of a cell. i know you're involved in the cobra meetings as and when they happen, what can you tell us about those concerns? i can tell people that they should have a high degree of confidence in our police, both here in greater manchester and nationally and our security services who have worked through the night and are making progress. i can't say a great deal more than that, but what i would also say is to echo the words ofa would also say is to echo the words of a woman from trafford who was on the radio this morning and it's an important message from everybody to hear, she said the individual who committed this unspeakable act of evil was a terrorist, not a muslim. i think that's an important message for people across greater manchester to hear over the coming hours and days. we can hear some of the voices of those that came. i spoke to a few people whose children had encouraged their parents to come along, to be ata their parents to come along, to be at a moment. a lot of people just
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wa nted at a moment. a lot of people just wanted to be around other people and share something. they do. i think it was right. people just share something. they do. i think it was right. peoplejust want share something. they do. i think it was right. people just want to share something. they do. i think it was right. peoplejust want to be with each other. they take a high degree of comfort from that. it has affected the children of greater magister. we have been there with our children, i have been to concerts, and we can picture that scene “— concerts, and we can picture that scene —— children of greater manchester. it is why today will be really calling for the greater manchester police, the incredibly generous greater manchester police, to donate to the fund set up today. people are rallying around, and truly last night, you saw the best of the people of great amount of, they came together. a bit of defiance, you will never beat us, we will not be broken. stand together. thank you forjoining us this morning. we are here this morning,
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right in the centre of manchester. we will talk to those caught up in events, and keep you up—to—date with all the developments in terms of the investigation and the changes to the terror threat. now at critical levels. we will find out what that means for all of us. we will speak to amber rudd here on breakfast after 8:30. we will keep you across all the developments. i will bring you up—to—date with other news. we're hearing news that five people have died in a collision on the m6 in staffordshire. the southbound carriageway between junction 15 for stoke—on—trent and 14 for stafford is closed. that is according to police in the last 30 minutes. we'll bring you more on that as we get it. a 37—year—old man has been arrested at stansted airport on suspicion of preparing for acts of terrorism. he was held before boarding a flight to turkey. officers are now searching two residential addresses in north london.
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scotland yard say the arrest was not linked to monday's manchester arena bombing. donald trump has arrived at the vatican this morning to meet pope francis as part of his first foreign tour as us president. this will be mr trump's first meeting with the pope. during last year's presidential election campaign, pope francis attacked mr trump's plans to build a wall along the mexican border saying they weren't christian. mr trump described the comments as disgraceful. marks and spencer have announced a 64% drop in profits in their annual results out this morning. sean is here with the details. 64% is not good news at all. which ever way you look at the figures, 64% ta kes ever way you look at the figures, 64% takes into account all the restructuring costs marks & spencer put in last year. they have had a tough few years. £400 million was spent, effectively, on changing the
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business around. they say profits we re business around. they say profits were down 10% if you compare the normal bit of the business, but let's see what happens next year. sales down as well, clothing and home division, steel ceiling falling sales, about 3% there. the food business is not doing well. i spoke to the chief executive about changing customer habits and how they affect change in sales. we respond to that across the business and made substantial changes to our ranges. the customers are noticing. it is about the economy. the economy is fragile at the moment, and the impact of currency on the business has been substantial. 80% of what we source comes from has been substantial. 80% of what we source comes from outside the eu, in terms of clothing and home, and we have had to phase into that. the team have done a fantasticjob in terms of sourcing. we have been able to mitigate and not pass them on.
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our prices came down last year on a large chunk of the range. he is trying to be positive, but they have a lot of new people in at marks & spencer is to turn it around. next year will be crucial to see if they can get sales enclosing up. we will go back to charlie in manchester this morning, where so many thousands of people went last night to the centre of manchester to pay tribute to all those killed and injured in monday night's attack on manchester arena. let's update you on the weather. carol is with us. it is going to be warm. in warm start for many of us. temperatures between 12 and 18. ploughed in some parts of the uk, others have seen sunshine and it is going to lead into a warm day, despite the cloud where you are.
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cloud in the north and parts of the west at the moment. murky conditions across western scotland, showery outbreaks in the northern isles, but for the rest of us, a dry start, and will continue so as we go through the day. with cloud, it will break up the day. with cloud, it will break up and we will see sunshine coming through. coastal fog in up and we will see sunshine coming through. coastalfog in the south—western approaches and the english channel. in the sunshine, temperatures will respond nicely, dorset and hampshire, temperatures in the low 20s. cloud cover, and looking at temperatures in the low 20s. wales, northern england, northern ireland, dry weather, one or two showers in northern ireland. southwest western scotland and the northern isles, that aside, it dry. across the board, 19—26, possibly 27. as we head through the evening and overnight, the cloud will break, coastal fog in the south—western approaches and also the english channel. it will be a muggy night as
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well, temperatures in towns and cities staging in double figures. a sultry night in england, 17 celsius, leading to a muggy start tomorrow morning. tomorrow, more sunshine than today. as a was, temperatures will pick up rapidly. tomorrow's maximum temperatures in the low 20s, some will see higher than this, 27 is possible. across the north, where it has been chilly, temperatures on the up. on friday, more of the same, dry weather and sunshine. sea breezes developing on the north sea coastline. if you prefer it cooler, thatis coastline. if you prefer it cooler, that is the place to head, it would be particularly cold, highs of 26 or 27. heading into the weekend, pulling the warm continental air across our shores, temperatures will be mid to high 20s, in the south, 30, but a weather front is coming
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in, bringing thundery rain. that will push northwards and eastwards overnight, saturday into sunday. behind it, fresh air conditions. so much to talk about here with regards to what happened in manchester. what we do know, 22 people were killed in the attack, 59 injured. but there are so many questions being asked this morning. specifically about the attacker, how and why he carried out the suicide bombing on monday. brooke rogers specialises in the impact of terror attacks. shejoins us. thank you specialises in the impact of terror attacks. she joins us. thank you for joining us. so much information we don't know. we know it was a young man and he came from a community that he chose to attack. what does that he chose to attack. what does that say to you? it is not is up rising trend in terms of the evidence we have and the number of
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case studies we have to look at. we don't truly know about the linkages that this young man might have two others in the community, but also to others in the community, but also to others beyond the community. we need to be careful about linking him to any terrorist group. we do know that the age range is pretty normal in terms of what we are seeing. the profile looks pretty normal, although we are cautious about saying that there is a terrorist probe not what about the psychology behind it? it seems so hard to even... it is incomprehensible. how do you explain the psychology? there are a number of different models that have been developed, and models that are used by organisations. the problem with those models is they can apply in so
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many different contexts. as i said, the different identities and different upbringings of individuals that move towards violence are quite varied. you can generic defined evidence for a number of drivers, in terms of looking for a feeling of belonging, the feeling that you are accepted belonging, the feeling that you are a cce pted by belonging, the feeling that you are accepted by a group. real identity drivers. but you can also say that we don't have a lot of evidence that points to anyone models specifically that says these are the reasons people move towards terrorist violence. what can we learn from something like this to stop it happening again in future?” something like this to stop it happening again in future? i think we can learn that it is not actually going to be seen on a grand scale, in terms of the number of people willing to go to the effort, and go to the trouble to undertake this type of attack. but that creates more of a challenge for us in terms of looking at behaviours that might
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be an indicator, or give an indication that someone is becoming more radicalised as they move towards radicalisation. one of the main lessons is that we need to open up main lessons is that we need to open up this dialogue to communities and families, and to friends, and ask them to be more aware of certain behaviours that don't always mean that someone is going to engage in an act of violence, but possibly moving along that pathway, changing social groups, possibly expressing extreme views in terms of online posting. we do see a lot of leakage behaviour, a lot of work coming from my colleagues, looking at so—called religiously inspired terrorism, over 50% of these individuals are leaking their intentions to friends and family. and we know police are asking for any information. thank you for your time this morning. we will go back to charlie shortly. we will go back to charlie shortly. we will hear from the home secretary amber rudd. stay with us for more information on that. time to get the
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news, travel and weather wherever you are watching us this morning. soldiers will guard buckingham palace and downing street to free up armed police to patrol elsewhere. scotla nd armed police to patrol elsewhere. scotland yard has urged londoners to remain calm, but alert now the terror threat has been raised to critical. our reporter sent this from king's cross. there is a heightened police presence here at king's cross this morning. no soldiers i have seen on the streets yet. the aim for security chiefs here really is to ratchet up security, but make sure they keep london moving. there will also be a deployment of extra armed officers and possibly soldiers at wembley for the fa cup final this
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weekend and also at twickenham for the premiership final. the travel situation this morning and there is a good service on the tubes at the moment as you can see there. on the trains though, we have now got the line re—open between slough and eton central. on the roads, this is the a40 where there has been an accident. two lanes are closed between junction 29 and junction 28. it is because of an accident and fuel spillage. it is cueing for eight miles and vehicles are taking around an hourto get miles and vehicles are taking around an hour to get through there. in barking one lane is blocked on the north circular at barking flyover. there has been an accident on new
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kent road. let's get a check on the weather. there is lots of sunshine around for the week ahead and lots of dry weather too until we get to the weekend. a sunny morning this morning. largely dry as well. any of the night's cloud should move away early on and leave us with decent sunshine the cloud building through the afternoon, but sunny spells through to the evening. watch out for the high uflt v levels. it is a day for suncream. there will be clear spells. quite mild again with lows of 15 or 16 celsius. and for tomorrow, even more sunshine around. there will be cloudier spots, but for some of us wall to wall sunshine so for some of us wall to wall sunshine so feeling warm indeed, getting up to 25 celsius and possibly above that tomorrow and we hold on to that hot weather, looking like it will stay dry for much of the week until
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we get to saturday when it sparks off thundery showers. sunday, we may start off on a fresher net and becoming more humid later on. there isa becoming more humid later on. there is a bit of uncertainty about sunday, but it does look like we could see more of those thundery showers for monday. that's all for now. i will be back before 9am. good morning from manchester. we are here this morning in the centre of the city in albert square. many media are alongside us and many people are just walking through the square and taking a moment to pause. if you look behind me where i am now, you will see many of the flowers that have been laid down and as we have been here this morning, a

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