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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 27, 2017 8:00am-9:00am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. three more arrests are made by detectives in manchester investigating monday's terror attack. two men in their 20s have been detained in the early hours on suspicion of terrorism offences. police across the uk mount a major operation to protect the public on the bank holiday weekend. arrangements for 1300 events have been reassessed. all 22 victims have now been named — most recently, tributes have been paid to 15—year—old megan hurley from merseyside. good morning. first, our main story. good morning. world leaders agree on measures to tackle terrorism but they are still struggling to reach a
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deal on climate change. and good morning from wembley on fa cup final day, where 90,000 fans were packed into this famous stadium this evening with the world watching on. iam in evening with the world watching on. i am in the chelsea end but i have got the red flag and scarf of arsenal. for the managers, got the red flag and scarf of arsenal. forthe managers, it got the red flag and scarf of arsenal. for the managers, it is double or quits. antonio conte against arsene wenger. in scotland, celtic are going for the trouble. and the age of the great adventurers revealed. we look at rediscovered footage filmed by explorers in the early decades of the 20th century. and darren has the weather. good morning. many of us have been kept awake by the heat and perhaps some thunderstorms. these storms will push north today. high temperatures. still the chance of more rain over the rest of the weekend. join me later. thanks. good morning. police investigating the manchester suicide bombing have arrested three more men in the last 12 hours during raids in the city.
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11 people are now in custody. across the country, security arrangements for events planned for the bank holiday weekend have been reassessed. extra officers are expected to be on duty at football cup finals in england and scotland and the great manchester run. sarah smith reports. armed police on the streets of hull. the security at the festival taking place here this weekend has been reassessed, as it has at hundreds of other events. the operation in manchester may be making good progress, according to counter—terrorism detectives, but the threat level remains at its highest. as well as radio one's big weekend in hull, a strict security will be in force at the fa cup final at wembley, the scottish cup. hampden park and sporting events in liverpool and manchester. in the city centre, the floral tributes keep coming. police have praised the
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spirit of the people. and they want to assure everyone that progress is being made. 50 to assure everyone that progress is being made. so much has been achieved in that period of time. we have made huge grounds in terms of the investigation but there is still a lot of work to do. 0fficers the investigation but there is still a lot of work to do. officers and other agencies are working with us around the clock. to make sure we do that. the arrests keep coming. three more in the city overnight. location is being urged around manchester include a flat in this block rented by salman abedi several months ago, which may have been a bomb factory. another flat here in central manchester is where he is understood to have put the bomb together in the hours before the attack. his 22 victims have all now been named. most recently, a 15—year—old megan hurley from halewood in merseyside. the principal at her school described her death as a huge loss
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to them all. last night, pink balloons were released in memory of all who lost their lives. and while the threat level remains critical, the threat level remains critical, the message was, go out, enjoy the weekend but remain vigilant. sarah smith, bbc news. catreena renton is in st ann's square in manchester this morning. many people still paying tribute to those who lost their lives and were horrifically wounded and injured after the attack? good morning. you can see the number of people still coming here, a real mixture of emotions. there are armed police here as well. people continue to come here to pay tribute. there is a mixture of emotions. sadness, of course. you can mixture of emotions. sadness, of course. you can see mixture of emotions. sadness, of course. you can see the individual tributes to each of the 22 who lost their lives, and the victims, some of them horrifically wounded. we see
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there is anger being expressed. people still outraged at what happened on monday night and will continue to be so. and defiance. people wanting to stand together with the people of manchester. 0ver there is a football shirt that says, we will never walk alone. that coming from liverpool fans supporting people in manchester. the chief constable came down last night to show people that he is working ha rd to to show people that he is working hard to keep them safe. that is important this weekend because there is the great city games, which started yesterday. the great manchester run, which happens on sunday. and what concerts this evening at old trafford. ariana grande has tweeted that music is supposed to heal us, bring us together and make us happy. she wa nts to together and make us happy. she wants to do a tribute gig for the victims. she says she will continue
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to support the people of manchester, too. thank you. saint anne 's square, work tributes are being paid to the victims of monday's type. —— attack. in a few minutes we'll speak with former m16 assistant chief nigel inkster about how the security services are tackling the investigation. leaders of the world's leading industrial nations, the g7, have agreed a new action to counter—terrorism in italy. they agree internet companies need to do more to tackle the spread. but they we re more to tackle the spread. but they were unable to reach an agreement on climate change. james reynolds is in sicily for us. for such an important meeting. talk us for such an important meeting. talk us through these counterterrorism measures and what did emerge from this meeting? they agreed to cooperate as much as they can. bear in mind they say that since
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attackers, not just in in mind they say that since attackers, notjust in manchester but other attackers, cross borders, so but other attackers, cross borders, so intelligence sharing should cross borders as well. this was a chance for theresa may and donald trump to repair damage caused by last week's lea ks. repair damage caused by last week's leaks. theresa repair damage caused by last week's lea ks. theresa may repair damage caused by last week's leaks. theresa may once particular powers to be imposed upon internet companies, and social media companies, and social media companies, so that they would block threatening behaviour. and crucially, they would report this behaviour. that brings up a set of questions about whether these powers may be abused and whether it would bea may be abused and whether it would be a threat to civil liberties. essentially this is the beginning of that discussion. we might have expected that agreement on areas to do with security. climate change is the other topic under discussion. this was always going to be more difficult? yes, because there is clear division between a lot of the leaders. 0n the one side, six out of
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the seven want everyone to stick to the seven want everyone to stick to the paris accord of 2015, which limits on carbon emissions, to keep the... on the other side, donald trump believes climate change is a hoax. he has threatened to withdraw the united states. 0ne hoax. he has threatened to withdraw the united states. one of his advisers has said his position is evolving. that gives the other leaders hope that some compromise may be reached. a couple, believed to be in their 805, have been murdered in county armagh. a relative found their bodies at their home in portadown yesterday afternoon. they are reported to have been stabbed. a a0 year—old man has been arrested. theresa may has accused jeremy corbyn of making excuses for terrorists, after the labour leader suggested british military interventions overseas may encourage attacks at home. the general election campaign is back underway this weekend. ellie pricejoins us from our london newsroom. good morning. yes, the general
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election ten, 11 days away. but every politician is mindful of, what we are all mindful of, is the national security level after monday? yeah. in view of what happened on monday in manchester, of course it is going to be a key issue. last night, jeremy corbyn did an interview with andrew neil. he was unable to give his personal support to the renewal of the trident nuclear weapons system. that is interesting, because although we know thatjeremy corbyn has, for decades, been against it, it is labour policy and of course he is the leader. it came a few hours after he made another controversial speech in which he said the uk foreign policy under him would be one that would reduce rather than increase the threat to the country. he said that like many experts there
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was a link between military intervention abroad and the terror threat back home. he said it wasn't about making excuses for terrorists but about looking at the causes of terrorism. theresa may jumped but about looking at the causes of terrorism. theresa mayjumped on that both in terms of the timing, being so close to the attacks in manchester, and the content of that speech. she said jeremy corbyn simply isn't fit to be prime minister. she returned early from the g-7 minister. she returned early from the g—7 meeting of world leaders. that was a meeting where they talked among other things about terrorism. her particular focus was about tackling extremism online. she is backin tackling extremism online. she is back in london today. we understand she is back in government —— on government business. she will be meeting with her election team. the election is just ten days away. many candidates back on the campaign trail today but security and terrorism is a key issue. thank you. president trump's son—in—law and senior advisorjared kushner discussed opening a secret communications channel with the kremlin, according
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to us media reports. the fbi is investigating mr kushner as part of a wider investigation of russian involvement in the election campaign. according to these latest reports, jared kushner, as well as being presidentjohn's son—in—law is one of his closest advisers, discussed establishing a secret communications channel between the trump transition tea m channel between the trump transition team and moscow, in order to discuss syria and other policy issues. he is alleged to have met last december with the russian ambassador to the us last december. and michael flynn to discuss the matter. general flynn was forced to resign in february after it emerged that he had misled other administration officials about the extent of his contact? with the ambassador. in the end, the communications channel was not set up. it was reported yesterday that
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mr kushner had a separate meeting with the head of a russian bank that has been subject to sanctions imposed by the 0bama administration. reuters news agency is saying he had several telephone from conversations with sir guy casilla yet. mr kushner is being investigated by the fbi as pa rt is being investigated by the fbi as part of their enquiry. this does not necessarily mean he is suspected of a crime. the national autistic society says it's deeply concerned about proposals by nhs bosses in south west london to reduce the number of children diagnosed with autism. health commissioners want to focus on the most severe cases. they say it will relieve pressure on their teams. construction has started on the world's largest telescope, if at the top of a 3,000 metre—high mountain in the middle of the chilean desert. when completed, the european extremely large telescope — or elt — will be five times larger than the biggest instruments in use today, and its backers say it has the potential to transform our understanding of the universe.
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on the name, we are informed there is also the very large telescope. these are official titles. when the next telescope is made, if we have got very large and we have got extremely large, what is the next one? where will you go? thoughts on a postcard. maybe not! mike is at wembley today ahead of the fa cup final. we will be catching on with him later. and darren will keep us up—to—date with the bank holiday weather. as we've been hearing police officers investigating the manchester suicide bombing have arrested two more men in their twenties in manchester on suspicion of terrorism offences. despite the threat
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remaining at critical, assistant commissioner mark rowley said police had "got hold of a large part" of the terror network they believe bomber salman abedi was part of. joining us now from our london newsroom is former mi6 assistant chief nigel inkster. good morning. given your knowledge of the security services, can you give me your assessment of the phrase the police are using, that they have got hold of a large part of this network? yes. well they have obviously moved very quickly. at the big question in the immediate aftermath of the bombing was whether indeed there was a network at all. they're normally is something in these situations. in this case the extent of the network seems quite significant. and this raises, i think, a problem that has been evident for some time that is coming
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into stark relief, that of latency. the extent to which there are a lot of people in this country who may potentially engage in jihadist activity. but for long periods of time aren't doing anything that would justify taking action against them. could you give us a sense from your knowledge of the re—sources are available? we have heard quite a lot of talk about this, specifically in relation to police resources and also in relation to the intelligence services. what can the government draw on at this time? well, the security at sub —— service itself, about 3000 people. it is able to draw ona about 3000 people. it is able to draw on a lot of technical resources provided by gchq. there are specialist terrorist police units working with the security service and the other intelligence agencies.
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whether these entities have the manpower needed to deal with the scale of the problem is always a debate. i think until recently, it has been felt that he's —— these agencies have been reasonably well resourced. police numbers have been reduced as a result of austerity. but it is not clear whether this has any particular impact on the situation. i think the problem is that a specialist counterterrorism expertise doesn't grow on trees, it can't be recreated, it can't be created overnight. it takes time, training, experience to get people up training, experience to get people up to speed. there is also the question that if you expand an organisation very quickly, can you infect keep control of it? do you risk the problem of diminishing returns if you expand to quickly?
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more numbers doesn't necessarily translate into more outputs and greater effectiveness. let's talk about some of the potential threat of individuals. newspapers say there could be up to 23,000 potential extremists in the uk. a lot of people thinking, just how is it that it is so easy for someone to go to somewhere like libya, maybe fight in places like syria, and then come back, apparently with very few questions asked about their movements and what they have been doing and how it may have changed them? that is a very good question. of course, it depends what the ostensible roots of these individuals has been. not all of them necessarily go to their end destination or travel back from them. that is a problem. i think anybody who goes through any airport
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in the uk will realise that border controls are, to put it mildly, somewhat haphazard. and this, i think, is a challenge. it is something that will have to be dealt with, as with so much else in this, bya with, as with so much else in this, by a combination of intelligence, by technology, and maybe yes, more people on the ground at border points. thank you very much. former mi6 chief counterterrorism specialist. let's find out what is happening with the weather this weekend, with darren. good morning. two fine days and a thunderstorm. typical british weather. this is probably my favourite weather watchers picture so far this morning. lightning and lovely colours helped by the low
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sun. some storms in the early hours of the morning. we have had them pushing northwards away from the south—west. storms becoming fewer the s w. of ff'fii j?! it will be. again, scotland it will be hot agalnr and around the - firth, .,e,a,,% close to 30 degrees. temperatures close to 30 degrees. storms later in the west. storms developing in northern england in the heat. not much heat in northern ireland. it determines whether through the day. there would be a cool breeze and more cloud for wales and the south—west. high temperatures in the sunshine following those early showers in eastern england, where temperatures could be 28 degrees. storms moving up could be 28 degrees. storms moving up from northern england into scotla nd up from northern england into scotland to end the day. they fade away. the rain eases off. we hang on
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toa away. the rain eases off. we hang on to a good deal of cloud. it will be one again. temperatures 13 or 1a degrees. tomorrow, for many, if you are up early, it will start cloudy. there will not be much rain left in scotla nd there will not be much rain left in scotland but there will be much more cloud. it brightens up for england and wales. later in the day, heavy and wales. later in the day, heavy and sundry showers from the south—west. 0ne conditions in the sunshine for england and wales. cooler than today in scotland. 0vernight, we see those showers, some of them heavy and sundry, working northwards. it will be cooler. further south, some sunshine and a bit of warmth. notjust hot. thank you. did you know some divorcees are charged more for car insurance than if they were still married? one woman told radio 4's money box programme that her premium went up by more than £300 when she told her insurer her marital status had changed. surprising, isn't it?
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so is there a divorce penalty when it comes to insuring your car? 0r or is it 0ris ita or is it a marriage discount? money box presenter paul lewis joins us now this really took me by surprise. this really took me by surprisem took us by surprise. it was a very interesting story. it came from one case. a woman who got her renewal, £582, to renew her car. she noticed she was still down as married. she had got divorced. she wrote back to say she was divorced. and by the way, the second driver, still the same man but no longer related. rac came back to her and said her premium was going to be 999 ‘s instead of 582. that is nearly £3110 more. they initially said it was
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because of her change and marital status. how is this being assessed? i presume there are algorithms and risk assessments. it seems a little bit archaic? when we pursued this, we we re bit archaic? when we pursued this, we were then told it wasn't so much the change in her marital status, but because the second driver was no longer her husband. same bloke but he was not related. and then further enquiry, no, it was a technical glitch. and then further enquiry during the week, they eventually came back and went to give an answer but just apologised and came back and went to give an answer butjust apologised and said it was confusing. she got her original premium, £582. we did some research. 0ur researchers went online, putting the same details butjust changed married to divorce and a second driver from husband to unrelated. there is a divorce premium in those circumstances. we reckon about 20 to
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30%. £100, maybe £200. it is there. not all companies do it. the 3a we tried, 27 charged more for in those details were changed. this brings to mind that when a premium does change or you see a mind that when a premium does change oryou seeajump mind that when a premium does change or you see a jump in price, it is so worth challenging? it is. i don't know how far the woman would have got. she would have gone to the ombudsman. but the insurer was pretty firm at first about it. and when we asked insurance brokers, they said, well, there is a sort of marriage discount. that if it is a husband and wife as first and second driver, you get a discount. as soon as they stop being husband and wife, that discount disappears. the other thing that is something i didn't know, when you apply for insurance nowadays, they check your credit record. and if you are divorced, maybe you have moved house, maybe
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you have had some difficulty paying the bills, because divorce is expensive, that can affect your credit rating and increase your premium. there are also top reasons for it. but there does seem to be the danger anyway of the divorced penalty on car insurance. fascinating. thank you, paul. you can hear more on money box from midday on bbc radio 4. now it is time for a look at the newspapers. psychologist cary cooper is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. i was slightly distracted because i was thinking about what i was going to ask you first. i know you are going to look through the papers in a second. you have talked before about how people are affected by things. i want to give you —— i want a thought from you about what has
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happened here this week? a thought from you about what has happened here this week7m a thought from you about what has happened here this week? it is difficult for me. when they asked me to come in i thought, it is very emotional. i am a born—again mancunian. i have lived for a0 yea rs. mancunian. i have lived for a0 years. i found myself mancunian. i have lived for a0 years. ifound myself the mancunian. i have lived for a0 years. i found myself the following day going into the city and just wondering around talking to people. i know quite a lot of people. i went to the town hall and everything else. i felt weird. to the town hall and everything else. ifelt weird. it to the town hall and everything else. i felt weird. it was a weird sensation. it was emotional and yet i wanted to live a normal life. i stayed in the middle of the town. i did some radio interviews. what i liked about it is how people said, i'm not going to change my life. 0r sad and reflective. the way —— the thing you get out of this, the positives you get, is that homeless man who helped the kids. there are a lot of positives around. there is the muslim man with thejewish woman. a famous picture. that is
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what we should get out of this. we lead such frenetic lives that i don't think we ever really reflect on what it is all about. this is a one act play. we have to enjoy it and experience it. sometimes events like this stop you to think about it, particularly with the kids. i have four kids, six grandchildren. i think it affected me there. i was thinking to myself, how would i feel? the week before i had gone to see manchester city with my four—year—old granddaughter. it could have hit manchester city that day. it didn't. that is the first thing that came into my mind. in a way that is the positive we should get out of this. it is interesting the way you're reflecting. six days on, the papers have almost taken that time to reflect back on what people are saying. you have picked out a piece in the guardian which is taking a look at the victims and how
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they must not be forgotten. yeah, they must not be forgotten. yeah, the important thing here... wejust talked about a lot that is in there. andy burnham will be a great, great mayor for the city of man. and he talks about why. i am a psychologist. i don'tjust want to look at abidi and say he was alienate it and bullied. i want to find out what the solution is to the problems. kids are alienate it, not just in ethnic communities but in many blue—collar communities. and what are we going to do about it? they don't attack innocent people. no, they don't. now we have to say, how do we deal with the alienation? how do we get rid of it? how do we minimise it? i have heard quite a few people say, and maybe some of
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these thoughts are less palatable, and it is absolutely true about looking for things that are good, but there is anger. there is. some people say, where does that go? howdy channel it in a positive way? that is what you have to do. —— how do you channel it? a lot of us have anger in our lives to do with our relationships, security of ourjob etc. how do we channel that into something constructive? that is the challenge. we will always have a certain proportion of negative people who will express it in a negative, aggressive way. how do we get the bulk of people who have anger and they want to turn it out word and blame somebody and take it out on somebody else, how do we channel that in a positive way? that is our chance. in your capacity as a psychologist, talking about the children, we have spoken to mothers
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this week and dads who were worried about how you explain to children to feel safe, to be defined against these people who are trying to scare us these people who are trying to scare us and refused to accept it.|j these people who are trying to scare us and refused to accept it. i went into my work the following morning. 0ne lecturer came to me and said, i need to talk to. he had an 11—year—old. he took the 11—year—old to school today and the 11—year—old said, i'm frightened to go to school. will there be a bomb in the school? the 11—year—old sees the news. this is a big issue. by the way, that is my second story. something i totally disagree with in the daily mail. it is called well—being lessons, mindfulness and things, trying to get kids to talk about things that trouble them in schools. this says we shouldn't be doing that. not true. what we are doing that. not true. what we are doing is, we need to do that. but he
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just said is really important. the teachers have to be aware of changes in behaviour among kids. they will be watching this stuff and they need to get it out. they need to talk about their worst fears. they can't contextualise it like us. and say, you are more likely to be run over bya carthan you are more likely to be run over by a car than blown up by a terrorist. they can't do that. we have to get their worst fears out and try to reassure them. that is ourjob. we will talk to you again in an hour. thank you. the headlines: in a few minutes. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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coming up before 9am, darren will be here with the weather, but first a summary of this morning's main news. police investigating the manchester suicide bombing have arrested three more men in the last twelve hours. 0vernight, police raided a house in the cheetham hill area of the city. 11 people are now in custody. across the country security arrangements for events planned for the bank holiday weekend have been reassessed. extra officers are expected to be on duty at football cup finals in england and scotland and the great manchester run. and police have now released the name of the final victim of monday's attack. megan hurley was 15 and from liverpool. her brother was seriously injured. a couple, believed to be in their 805, have been murdered in county armagh. a relative found their bodies at their home in portadown yesterday afternoon. they are reported to have been stabbed. a a0—year—old man has been arrested.
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leaders of the world's leading industrial nations, the g7, have agreed on new action to counter terrorism at a summit in sicily. they have agreed that internet companies need to do more to tackle the spread of extremist content online. but the leaders were unable to reach an agreement on climate change, with differences remaining between us president donald trump and the rest of the group. the national autistic society says it's deeply concerned about proposals by nhs bosses in south west london to reduce the number of children diagnosed with autism health commissioners the number of children diagnosed with autism. health commissioners want to focus on the most severe cases. they say it will relieve pressure on their teams. a record amount of solar power was generated in the uk on friday, thanks to the clear and sunny weather. the national grid said 8.7 gigawatts of electricity was produced by solar panels at their peak, that's the equivalent of nearly a quarter of the country's electricity supplies. a spokesperson for the network said it represented a "new era" for british power generation.
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british wingsuit pilot fraser corsan is expected to make the second of his two jumps today as he attempts to break four world records. it is pretty remarkable what he is planning to do. depending on weather conditions and air space clearance, fraser will jump from over a0—thousand feet in ontario. thejump is higher than the cruising altitude of a commercial aeroplane. he's attempting to beat the record for the highest speed flown in a wingsuit, currently 23a—miles—per—hour, in order to raise money for an army charity. can you imagine? you are in a wing suit and you are travelling at 23a mph, more than that because that is the record he wants to break. it's
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incredible. those are the main stories this morning. black and white footage of intrepid adventurers exploring some of the most remote parts of the world has been unearthed. at the time the films were made, in the early part of the twentieth century, these places had never been seen by western eyes. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has been given an exclusive glimpse. this is the first ever view of mount everest from the air. it was shot in 1933 by a group of pilots who risked their lives to help create an aerial map of the mountain. the film is part of
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the royal geographical society's archive. it includes the very first attempt to climb to the top of mount everest, in 1922. the climbers are treated to a ritual dance at a tibetan monastery. the climbers are treated to a death ritual dance at a tibetan monastery. the cameraman was captainjohn noel. his daughter, sandra, recalls how her father filmed the expedition. he had a purpose built tent he'd taken with him to base camp. and at night, using water from the glaciers and yak dung as a source of heat, he processed 10,000 feet of film on the mountain. the historic imagery in the archives is an unlimited gift and a treasure. we can find these same editions is an unlimited gift and a treasure. we can find tigefithe exact itions! take a picture of the exact same place, and in extremely high resolution take note of the difference. conservation specialists
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are painstakingly restoring 138 films of some of britain's greatest explorations frame by frame. one of them is of a young army officer crossing the vast expanse of the libyan desert by motorcar. ralph bagnold and his friends drove thousands of miles for weeks on end into the blistering heart of the libyan desert. rovers that can drive across the surface of mars. to see this film makes me feel very proud of him. i'm in awe of what he managed to do. we can all now relive these extraordinary adventures, stories from a bygone age when the world held so many mysteries. so, you can see more of that
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remarkable footage, those pictures ofa remarkable footage, those pictures of a plane going over the top of everest of the first time is incredible. it's called great explorations. it's the fa cup final today. there's a huge game at hampden too, where aberdeen take on celtic in the scottish cup final. its many steps to the royal box so you have to be fit to be a footballer today. this is where the arsenal or chelsea captain will lead their team around. the victorious tea m their team around. the victorious team and the captain will come here and receive the trophy, the gleaming fa cup from the duke. they will loft
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it and show it to the world. it's quite heavy, i have to say. notjust the 90,000 fans in here... or put it back because it's the 90,000 fans in here... or put it back because its heavy... but for all the fans watching around the world. it will be familiar to arsene wenger as he has lifted the trophy several times, but for andre conte, it will be a new experience if they win. there
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will also be an emotional element today after the attacks in manchester. the security will have been increased. there will be armed vehicles in the roads leading up to wembley stadium. we will talk more about the fa cup and look back to 2002 when arsenal were victorious. it's also an day at hamden. it's also an important day at hampden. celtic are unbeaten in every domestic match this season and are on for the treble having won the scottish premiership and beaten aberdeen in the league cup final. they've exceeded what i would've expected to achieve. they pushed and pushed and the players have been able to cope with that. to go through a season unbeaten... and
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then winning both your domestic cups, that our plan, our aim and it's what we will try to do. this team, this season, this celtic team has been very sharp, focused with the work and they don't give much encouragement to their opponents. we need to find a way to put a seed of doubt in their mind. celtic have already beaten aberdeen in the league cup final and in the premiership. a sell—out crowd of 82,000 people will pack into twickenham this afternoon for the showpiece event of rugby union's premiership season — the play—off final. and it's being called potentially the best ever... featuring wasps v exeter who finished first and second.
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for us, a premiership final is beyond our dreams. that was a couple of seasons ago, but we want to go there, do ourselvesjustice, and if we get going then there's no reason we get going then there's no reason we shouldn't get our hands on some silverware. it didn't feel like we had achieved everything we wanted to this season, but that said, it's only a feeling, but the feelings need to be backed up by actual actions and if we can inform at a good level for this club them i think we will win. scarletts play wales —— play dublin later today. manchester city centre held its first major sporting event since the terrorist attack on monday
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as the great city games took place. there was a minute's silence before the event started to remember the 22 people who lost their lives. in the pole vault, britain's holly bradshaw set a new national outdoor record of a.80 metres. she later posted on social media — what a day! manchester, that was for you! also taking part was the london 2012 olympic long jump champion, greg rutherford. he won his event in front of a large crowd at albert square, with a season's best 8.18 metres in his finaljump. at wembley, there will be lots of ways they will be paying their respects to those who lost their lives in the terrorist attack. the players will be wearing black armbands and there will be a minute's silence before the match begins. back to the football and there's a repeat of the 2002 fa cup final played in cardiff while this place was being refurbished. arsenal we re place was being refurbished. arsenal were the strongest team with ray parlour scoring one of the best
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goals ever you our with walk it's not just any it's notjust any other game. it is the fa cup final. i never thought, in my wildest streams, that i could maybe play in a cup final, but to play in five of them was incredible. 2002 was my famous year, the one i enjoy the most, with chelsea becoming a real threat, manchester united. it was a very special derby. the players they had, they were
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superb. young john terry, frank lampard, it was a tough game. what an atmosphere in the stadium. the game itself was really, really tight. the second half opened up a little bit. chelsea had a couple of good chances with david seaman making some very important saves. david seaman had to turn it over the bar! in the seventh minute, tony adams picked the ball at the back. got to a good little angle, because when i picked the ball up i was waiting for the runners on either side but there were no red shirts coming, soi side but there were no red shirts coming, so i took a couple of chelsea players away from the ball. it was perfect, it was my
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opportunity, all i did was open up my opportunity, all i did was open up d opportunity, all i did was open up my body a little bit. ray parlour! ray parlour! i'd done it every day in training, but to the form in a cup final... it was probably the best week of my life because when we went to old trafford five days later and won the double, but were today for anyone involved in the club. you can tell your grandchildren you played in an fa cup final your grandchildren you played in an fa cupfinaland your grandchildren you played in an fa cup final and that is lucky, but ican fa cup final and that is lucky, but i can tell mind that i scored in one. i had to bring the cup with me.
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ididn't want one. i had to bring the cup with me. i didn't want to run down the 107 steps. a bit dishevelled, not as smart as you guys. guy mowbray, dan, good to see you. i was talking to some arsenalfans good to see you. i was talking to some arsenal fans last night and they were saying if they win it then arsene wenger is more likely to go because they will go on a higher? there's a lot of talk about what arsene wenger‘s future will be. they said with the fa cup be enough? making the top of the table? there is still a lot of talk about what arsene wenger‘s role is going to be. will they be able to keep players like sanchez. arsenal fans are still in the dark over that i
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in the dark over that decisionlj think it in the dark over that decision.” think it is unlikely to make any difference. i think arsene wenger knows what he's going to do, and he knows what he's going to do, and he knows the tone of the board meeting. i don't think it will make any difference. if he wins it will make him the most successful cup manager in history —— club manager in history? what's the pressure like? with so many people watching? the commentary is way down the list. it's more nervous than any other game. i didn't sleep a great deal last night. don't get in the way is the main thing for a commentator. just be a part of it make sure you
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get everything right. hopefully, complimentary action. we are going to get fa cup final weather and that will suit arsenal. do you have any phrases? such as pure theatre! i remember my dad saying, it is not yet, it is bought! - lee, things will come out in the right context at the right time. i know there's a breakfor the at the right time. i know there's a break for the news and then it's a lwa ys break for the news and then it's always to you at half past five. mark lawrence has a sparkling performance, you can watch that later. we have the road to wembley, and an elongated interview with arsene wenger. we will also hear from andre conte. and we've got that
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celtic cup, the 50 years... they became the first british side to win the european cup so they will be a long look at that with pat nevin. it's a perfect fa cup final afternoon. we will have pat nevin here on the safe with us. the first edition of the fa cup is now in a football museum in manchester. there's a plinth at the bottom of the stage with all the names on. we will be back with mike a little later on. but what's the weather going to be like, darren has got the details for us. the guys are lucky to be sitting on a dry safer at the
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moment because there is some brain around outside london. —— rain around. further north at hand, there may also be rain arriving for the scottish cup final which will be developing. some brain developing already cropping up towards the london area with a few thunderstorms. —— rain temperature is widely far—away from 20 degrees at the moray firth. hale and gusty winds across the north of england. clouds and breeze will keep temperatures down in
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wales. after the showers and storms we get some sunshine and some water gens are fine —— warmth so a fine end to the day. a lot of cloud overnight, warm but not quite as muqqy' overnight, warm but not quite as muggy, temperatures 13—1adc. a lot of cloud around on sunday. it breaks up of cloud around on sunday. it breaks up in england and becomes warmer. quite warm enough and over england and wales. a big change on the way for scotland. cooler in the north. rain on bank holiday monday. spells of rain moving northward. the rain becoming less so more warmth in the
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south—east. the time now is 852 so we will turn our attentions back to manchester. the attack at manchester arena was the worst terrorist attack in the uk since the 7/7 bombings in london 12 years ago. now, as then, the bomber was born in britain. so what can be done to stop the growth of home—grown terrorists? ahmed patel is the brother—in—law of mohammed sidique khan, the man who orchestrated the 2005 atrocity. he's been telling breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin about the moment he found out his relative was a suicide bomber. they came to my house with family and my brother said, that being in london. he did it. mohammed siddique khan was one of the terrorists responsible for the bombings in 2005. 52 people were killed and many injured. its disbelief, you can't
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believe this individual you have known is capable of that. i was full of anger. absolute anger. where the people who said that the family must have known? yes. that they knew that he was angry but not a killer. what was annoying him as a politicised muslim was that why dewsbury wouldn't discuss politics of foreign affairs, foreign issues. why do the sufi have two be happy clappy muslims focusing only on prayers? after the attack, did anyone around you ever see, i understand why. there was a lot of, that was only
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52, what about the millions around the world. i find that problematic. yesterday, jeremy corbyn said, we are yesterday, jeremy corbyn said, we a re less yesterday, jeremy corbyn said, we are less safe here because of what far away. but he believes that we should focus to the community closer to home. we need to say, it's sad what is happening over there, but you need to be a good human here, live your life here, get a good education here, and stop the focus on the middle east. you've done this interview anonymously because you worry about the backlash and your family? there's no for this
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justifying. people have been hurt and murdered. how did you feel about manchester? did the bridge building give you hope? yes, when there are past experiences, what happens when the cameras go away? we don't need tragedies like this to bring us together we need to be like that anyway. he said it would take more conversations, more integration and he believes that the muslim community should step up to notjust condemn these acts and say so but reach out also. former chief prosecutor for the north west, nazir afzal joins us now. just with your expertise and your former role, there's been a number of arrests but no charges. can you
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talk us through logistical arrangements happening bright now? the police arrested 11 people so far. there are certain arrangements to keep them into custody for up to 14 to keep them into custody for up to 1a days, and then they can keep them in custody for another 1a days if they go to a high courtjudge. so there is 28 days for the evidence to be collected. people need to appreciate this is an extremely complicated enquiry. there are scientific evidence, social media, dna, international enquiries that need to be completed which all need to be assessed. multiple counterterrorism teams will look at the evidence make a decision as to
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weather there is sufficient evidence to charge the individuals. but this is to give the police the opportunity collect as much evidence as possible. lots of questions are being asked and one other subject being asked and one other subject being brought up as she spoke to a suicide bomber in that report —— to the relative of a suicide bomber in that report, that more needs to be done within communities to tackle terrorism. when an attack like this happens, the focus goes on to communities, the muslim community in particular. what can be done to stop isolation and alienation of communities? it's a very difficult subject. there was a vigil last
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night where people were coming together. the responsibility begins and ends with the criminal. sadly, when it comes to this type of event, some ignorant people tend to focus on the muslim community being somehow responsible and we have all learned that initial concerns about this particular individual, this bomber, came from the community itself. that ties into the prevent strategy, the government's programme. the community should be highlighting any concerns which has led to salman abedi. prevent isjust safeguarding, it also applies to the
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recent cases of child sexual abuse. the idea is to report it to someone who can provide you with mentoring and support. all radicalisation, a third of all referrals are also far bright. there was an incident recently of a soldier who had been groomed by the far bright, he'd come back home to birmingham. his homelessness and addiction was dealt with, which all meant he could no longer be cultivated by the far bright to do their dirty work. it's about safeguarding individuals who could do harm. i get what you are saying about the bad publicity. but the point is, those who work in this field know that what they are doing is safeguarding people from harm. thank you very much for talking to
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us. we will have your headlines in a moment. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. more arrests are made by detectives in manchester investigating monday's terror attack. two men in their twenties are detained in the early hours, on suspicion of terrorism offences.
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