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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  May 30, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello. it's tuesday, it's 9 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. a zookeeper killed by a tiger in cambridgeshire has been described as the shining light of the park. rosa king ‘s attack at hamerton zoo yesterday. this was her speaking a year ago. we do a lot of work for conservation, a lot of breeding to try and save the species, just like the malayan tiger here — there's only about 300 left in the wild and they're being poached. at least they're safe here. before 10, we'll speak to an eyewitness who was there with his family when it happened. plus — we'll talk to a surgeon who treated dozens of seriously wounded patients after the manchester terror attacks which killed 22 people. well, are you single, nigel? that's a very good question — a lot of people are asking that question. i'm not very married at the moment, let's put it like that. you're not very married? well, lam married. i know you are!
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well, it's good to get to know each other‘s status before we embark on this date. i think separated is my legal status. that full lunch date with newly separated ukip—er nigel farage and journalist racheljohnson in the next few minutes. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. a little later, we'll try and find out what's going on with golfer tiger woods, who's been arrested for driving under the influence seven years after he began to try and repair his public image after those multiple affairs. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. a zoo in cambridgeshire will remain closed while an investigation continues into the circumstances surrounding the killing of a keeper by one of the tigers. rosa king, who was 33, died yesterday at hamerton zoo
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park near huntingdon. amy cole reports. mauled to death by one of the park's tigers. police say the female zoo keeper, who has been named locally as rosa king, was killed inside the animal enclosure. it's not known yet exactly what happened. busy with bank holiday visitors, several people posted photographs as the air ambulance landed. those in the park were led away, although some claimed they were allowed back in for a short period before the park was closed by zoo officials who later handed out a short statement which said. nine years ago, a cheetah escaped through a broken electric fence, it was later recaptured nearby and no—one was hurt.
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police say there are no suspicious circumstances and a full investigation‘s under way. the zoo says it will remain closed today. amy cole, bbc news. ben ando is at hamerton zoo park with the latest. staff have been arriving for work in sombre mood. they are obviously too distressed to talk publicly about what happened. there is an investigation under way. yesterday, the police were here all day. at the end of the day, they said there were no suspicious circumstances surrounding what happened to rosa king. but of course, the zoo will have some serious questions to ask about how she came to be in the enclosure with the tiger that mauled her to death. she has been described by friends as a shining light here, someone by friends as a shining light here, someone who in some ways, the park revolved around and someone who cared passionately about the animals
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in her care, with an affinity in particular for cheetahs, in her care, with an affinity in particularfor cheetahs, but in her care, with an affinity in particular for cheetahs, but for all big cats as well. while the investigation is going on, the part remains closed. we will talk to an eyewitness who was at the zoo when the attack happened later. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. manchester victoria station has reopened this morning after it was damaged in last week's bomb attack. last night, hundreds of people gathered for a vigil at st ann's square to mark exactly one week since 22 people were killed by a suicide bomber at the manchester arena. 0ur correspondent frankie mccamley is in manchesterfor us now. joanne, if you can see behind me, people are starting to come and go from manchester victoria station. this city is now returning to some form of normality, but part of the station do still remain closed. the
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section that connects the station to the arena where ariana grande was performing when that bomb went off. staff have also been arriving. those staff members turned into first responders when they were the first people on the scene trying to help the walking wounded and help people who have been badly hurt in the attack. last night, a vigil took place, a minute's silence marking the exact moment that the bomb went offa the exact moment that the bomb went off a week ago. police have also released a still of salman abedi, the man who set off this bomb last monday. they are looking for a blue suitcase he was carrying in the hours leading up to that attack. with just over a week to go until the general election, theresa may will today turn the focus of the conservatives' campaign towards brexit. jeremy corbyn will campaign on the issue of childcare as labour seeks to turn the spotlight on public services. last night, they
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both faced questions in a live television broadcast. this was the first time theresa may and jeremy corbyn had appeared at the same venue in front of the same audience for a grilling in front of the cameras since the election was called. the labour leader had wanted to debate with the prime minister one—on—one, but the tories refused. jeremy corbyn was the first to face the audience, the order decided by the toss of a coin. he was asked about his determination to deal with terror threats. he was also asked about his approach to business. this country is badly divided between the richest and the poorest. you put corporate tax and tax at the top end down, the division gets greater. are you happy that so many of our children are going to school with super—sized classes? so many of our children are going to school hungry. next, it was theresa may's turn and she faced questions over the tories' social care policy. so why, prime minister, should we and my generation vote for you? so what happens is, people
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are paying for care, people are finding that they are having to sell their house, many people are having to sell their house to pay those care bills and many find that they're not able to leave money to their families. now, i want to take those risks away and that's what the proposals i've put forward are about. it's about ensuring that nobody is going to have to sell their house to pay for care in their lifetime. afterwards, it was clear neither leader had landed or suffered a killer blow. the grilling has just ended and senior politicians from the political parties are out giving their own slant on how it went. i think team corbyn and team may will both be pretty pleased. the two people wanting to be prime minister afterjune 8th will have another chance to make their case at a bbc question time special on friday. ben wright, bbc news. tiger woods has denied he'd been
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drinking when he was stopped whilst driving his car in florida yesterday morning. police charged him with being under the influence of alcohol — but the golfer has blamed an unexpected reaction to some medicine he had taken. prince harry will attend the launch of the uk's invictus games team and host his first buckingham palace garden party. the prince will meet the 90—strong team, who will take on the challenge of the paralympic—style competition at the toronto games in september. he's been the driving force behind the invictus games for injured, wounded and sick servicemen and women and veterans. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. coming up in six minutes, the first in our series of election blind dates, where we bring two people with opposing political views together on a blind date over lunch and they see if there are any areas where they agreed, or sparks
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generally fly. what happens when they have a glass of wine or two? today, nigel farage and rachel johnson. she's a journalist. today, nigel farage and rachel johnson. she's ajournalist. she today, nigel farage and rachel johnson. she's a journalist. she has a famous brother. lily tweets if this isn't a joke, i am completely speechless. it's coming up in five minutes. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport with holly. huddersfield town are on a high after what happened yesterday. what can we expect from them in the premier league? that's right, it has been a bit of a sporting soap opera. it is the story of this little—known german manager named david wagner, who lead a squad of relatively unknown players to the richest league in the world. this has been a fairy tale for fans. this is a team that have been waiting 45 years to return to top—flight football. in the end, it took more than 113 minutes of football, ending in a
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dramatic penalty shoot out against reading. it was christopher schindler scored the decisive penalty. it certainly will not be easy for huddersfield town in the premier league. the constant pressure of relegation is something they will have to get used to, but it is worth keeping an eye on david wagner, a german manager and former assistant to liverpool manager jurgen klopp. he was best man at his wedding. he has a meticulous eye for detail. we have seen him exploiting the foreign markets with signings like christopher schindler. it will be interesting to see how he develops his existing formula in the premier league in august. now, arsene wenger. we might hear more about his future today. is he going to get another contract at arsenal? that is the question. we do know that arsene wenger held a meeting with the owner stan kroenke yesterday. the outcome remains unclear but the decision will be
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relayed to directors at a board meeting later today. wenger has of course faced unprecedented criticism throughout this season, which ended with the gunners finishing outside the top fourfor with the gunners finishing outside the top four for the first time in 20 years. but they did manage to beat chelsea on saturday to win the fa cup, which did make wenger the most successful manager in the competition's history. his departure would cause some disruption, but things should be clearer later, when arsenal release a statement and an interview with wenger tomorrow. britain's sailors, led by sir ben ainslie, are quite behind the americas cup qualifying. can they come back? it is already the halfway stage of this double round qualifying series and as you say, ben ainslie and his team are fourth —— have a fourth consecutive defeat yesterday, beaten by france. that was certainly not in the script. it means great britain slipped down to the third place in the table. they
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will be hoping to avoid an early trip home. after the race, ben ainslie went on twitter to admit it wasn't the finest race, but it is time to hunker down, regroup and come back fighting. they desperately need a win now. it is not out of the question when you think back to 2013, when ben ainslie on bottas technician came back from a deficit to claim victory. today, they will face sweden. that is the one thing they have beaten. but the swedish crew have stepped up their game since losing to gb on saturday, so they will have a fight on their hands. but unless they solve those speed issues, the british team will be facing an early exit. more from holly throughout the morning when it comes to sport. next — election blind dates. over the next few days, we'll be bringing you a blind lunch date between two politicians with very different views to see if sparks fly.
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first in the series, journalist racheljohnson — whojoined the lib dems because she wants the uk to stay in the eu — went for a blind date with former ukip leader nigel farage at his private members' club. neither knew who they were meeting in advance — but newly separated nigel farage told us he was rather hoping it would be borisjohnson's sister, rachel. so this is how they got on — and a warning — there is some strong language used. there is an election on, and people are talking politics. so what happens when you send two people with opposing views on a lunch date? i'm nervous, my god, i have not done this for so long! will sparks fly?
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we will see people that choose to sign on and it angers me. or will things hot up? you look gloriously distinguished, slightly hunky. you are quite a pretty lady. get that on camera! will the political... when people stand at the dispatch box and tell me there is more money in education, i wonder where it has gone, because it is not in my children's school. ..get personal? what are you going to do? snog her. well... i'm racheljohnson. how will people know you? that's such a mean question! i've got to admit that they think of me as sister of boris, which is annoying, but i have to accept it. i am a journalist.
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ijoined the tories, but only for a few years. i havejoined the lib dems. iam very concerned that we don't just go off the cliff willy—nilly in terms of brexit, because i am thinking about my children and grandchildren, waiting for grandchildren, not long now, i hope! i was anxious it was going to be michael gove. it could be possibly douglas carswell, he regards me with utter disdain, so that could be interesting. it would be great fun if it was nigel farage, but he will drink me under the table. i have got to play a tennis match after lunch! i am nigel farage, i was in business for 20 years, i was never involved in politics at all, so i gave up quite a normal life to dedicate myself to what was considered to be fringe politics,
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loony tunes. what i do know is i am meeting a fanatical remainer, i know it is a woman, i hope she likes a drink! what if i don't know who he is? will i know who he is? hello, nigel! how about that?! that is amazing. hello you! are you well? very well, thank you. take a seat. i am your waitress for the day. before we get into your date, tell us what you think of this man from what you know of him. the problem with nigel is he is impossible not to adore! he has completely destroyed the country, turned the tory party into conkip but i like him an awful lot. he is a brilliant communicator. nigel farage, what do you think of racheljohnson? a huge fan.
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clearly deluded on this issue, but over a glass of something we could talk some sense into her. good luck with that! are you single? that is a very good question, a lot of people are asking! i am not very married at the moment, let's put it like that. iam married. i know you are! it is good to get to know each other‘s status. separated is my legal status. how do you feel about that? i don't think anything would have survived what i have been doing for the last five years. not that i have been perfect, lam not, but it has been pretty awful. just hellish, really. are you talking about work and infidelity? the sheer nastiness and aggro that comes with this, the whole hard left movement
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are now the remainders. that is not the reason for your marriage breakdown. we are called hard remainers now? there is no life left. do you have any security now? no help from the police, no help from the state, nothing, so you literally never go out. that is awful. are you serious? i am dead serious, yes. i have a theory, i don't think people cared about project fear, i don't think people care that the eurozone will boom and we are going to go off a cliff. it has become an ideology, and all they want is to say, we have got our country back, without caring what that means. the ideology is to lie to two dozen countries in europe, to tell them they are
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joining an economic club, and then bit by bit to take away their democracy and independence. that is the ideology, the flag, the anthem, the police force. you are talking about democracy, why can't parliament have a proper look at the eventual deal? because parliament subcontracted it to the british people, thank god. had it been left to politicians... we have a parliamentary democracy, this is not democratic. why do you think the deal was bad? from where i sat, before we had brexit, we were not in schengen, we were not in the euro, we were not in the social chapter, to me it was a win—win. the good things were the bits we were not in. but we had the best of both worlds. i am not sure we did. thank god we didn'tjoin the euro. did you take our order?
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yes. where has he gone? i think he may have gone to the gents. do you think i have upset him already? where is he? he has deserted you. shall we ring him? send a search party for nigel farage. where is he? he is back. i had to sort something out. you had a cigarette. considering that you are on opposite sides of the eu argument, this is a bit of a love in. it has always had this chemistry, cannot help it! there are lots of
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remainers i like anyway. what i cannot stand are politicians who have been so dishonest about the subject all the way through the years. who can't you stand? who could you not have lunch with? the people who used to masquerade as eurosceptics at elections but were actually for it. nearly all of them. the referendum sorted people out in the end. i could not help overhearing your conversation about potentially thinking about standing for the european parliament if britain is not out of the european union by 2019. i will stand against you. if this confirmation that you are both going to stand? yes. unless i can find myself a seat somewhere else. in a by—election. you would fancy a seat in this country at westminster? you have tried to be an mp seven times. whatever it is. my duty was to stand. would you want to become an mp? will you try again?
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not particulalry. why not? i was not in politics for that, i was in politics to try to change things. there is your brill. this looks delicious, thank you. what would your brother think of this data? —— date? he would be very happy. you were on the same side. but not very friendly. but not unfriendly. what does your brother think of you joining the liberal democrats? he takes a very dim view, but i have reassured him that for me it is a single issue decision, and it is for this election. i reserve my right to do whatever i like in perpetuity, basically. i am a free agent. i can have a different political opinion. yes. your problem is this.
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excuse me. i am waiting for this! yougov says 45% want brexit at any price. walk away tomorrow, two fingers up, go. that is a problem, it is like vandalism. 23% want brexit to happen but with a good deal. the hard—core remainers are now 22%. you are shrinking. i know we are. i accept that. what i don't understand is what is so good about the european project. what is it you are in love with? why do you feel so strongly about it? leaving aside what is good about it, the fact we have had peace and security and prosperity...
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but that there are lots of reasons for that. one of them is we are part of the eu, it has kept peace in europe. are you saying the germans would have invaded again? not at all. because of the eu, the germans have been a real force for stability in europe and an engine of growth. can we talk about something else now? could you go to bed with a remainer? i am not going to answer that! are you only attracted to brexiters? no! that is a good question! he has no words! i must ask if the story about you snogging someone on a plane is true. it is a ridiculous setup.
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just ludicrous, the whole thing. a page—three model would have been 0k! it was more serious than that. what was she doing in business class? good question. were you stitched up like a ukipper? you can't trust anybody, talk to anybody. it is true. you cannot trust random people. there i was, sitting at the bar having dinner, somebody starts talking to you, what are you going to do? snog her. well... you need a nice, steady brexiter girlfriend, because then you don't have to have the conversation with her all the time. like what you said to me, "i don't understand why do you feel so strongly."
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you should be exchanging sweet nothings, you know you are both on the same page, you both want out. i still don't get why you feel so strongly. i grew up in brussels, i worked in brussels. do you want a united states of europe? i liked what we had, i don't want to lose it. cameron did as much to lose the referendum as anybody else. the deal was not good enough, so i almost entirely hold him responsible, more than you. that is disappointing. then when we went over the waterfall in a bucket, he left downing street with a song in his heart. he had to go. didn't he? are we allowed pudding? i should think so. coffee, maybe.
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what do you do to relax? over the last 20 years, not much, which is why i am pleased to be out of it. it is sad your private life has fallen apart, but you have done it for a noble cause. 53, separated, skint. why are you skint? 20 years of doing this. you are nigel farage, that is the problem. you have three kids? four. same wife? no. how many mothers? only two! you have been married twice? yes. you will be fine, you cannot complain, you have got what you want. douglas carswell is fantastically smug about what has happened. he is one of the unhappiest people i have ever met. either he is very unhappy... very strange individual. he is clever.
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he does not have your ability to connect with people. odd bloke. politics is full of odd people. i used to play golf. the other big hobby which i have got, which used to be considered really geeky... metal detecting. no. can i guess? carriage driving. no. is it sporty? it is historical. brass rubbing. no! am i close? not really. i am a first world war nut. an absolute nut. what should i do with the rest of my life?
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it is a big question. what do you want to do? i don't know. i think i am swimming against the tide at the moment. you will lose this one completely, but that is ok, because we all have a few losses. what do you want to do? i wonder if i have made a terrible mistake. you are doing pretty well, actually! it does not matter i am the butt of ridicule from half the cabinet for joining the lib dems? i was asking nigel what i should do with the rest of my life. joining the lib dems? have i destroyed any hope of any serious future? we are all allowed a few mistakes! how would you sum up your political first date? it is interesting, because rachel is seen in this country as being
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a hardline remainer, but when you talk to her, she would be a hardline eurosceptic in france. there are so few of us left, though. had she told me that she supports a united states of europe and everything else, iwould have been able to understand why she sacrificed her reputation to join the liberal democrats. as it is, i am bemused. but fascinated. do you think you have sacrificed your reputation? i felt that as we were entering a one—party state on an issue i believe to be wrong in every particular... ifelt i could not live with myself unless i made a futile gesture and stood up to be counted, if only to be shot down. how would you sum up your date with nigel farage?
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incredibly entertaining and infuriating. and wrong! how was your date? i enjoyed it. he has taught me a lot. i have turned her into a federalist! i have gone from a eurosceptic in france to a full—blown federalist. you want a european army? why not? bring it on. we can't afford a european army, but apart from that... there is no point joining the lib dems. in ten years, we will see whether it has been the great success that you hoped for, and i hope for too, as i want things to work. in ten years, the eu will not exist anyway, so it will be a different conversation. i don't think you're right. thank you for a lovely lunch. great fun. do you want a cup of coffee? 0n
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on twitter, they say this blind date is brilliant. another says blind date was a brilliant idea. sean says there was definitely chemistry there. lily says this is vomit inducing, not newsworthy, giving airtime to farage yet again. he is irrelevant. and conrad says stop trying to normalise this divisive and hateful prat. tomorrow, will have the next one. what happened when made in chelsea's georgia toffolo, better known as toff, met austerity campaigner and cook jack monroe? later in the week, we'll bring you dates between labour mp jess phillips and conservative mp john whittingdale, historian mary beard and peter stringfellow who runs a lapdancing club, gina miller, who led the brexit court case against the government and godfrey bloom, a former ukip politician and snp politician tommy sheppard and comedian stuart mitchell. still to come, the snp will be
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launching their general election ma nifesto launching their general election manifesto later this morning. we will talk to one of their senior politicians before 11. and we will try and find out what is going on with tiger woods. the golfer has been arrested for driving under the influence, but says alcohol was not involved. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. a zookeeper who died after a tiger entered an enclosure at a wildlife park in cambridgeshire has been named as 33—year—old rosa king. hamerton zoo park in cambridgeshire will remain closed while an investigation continues into the incident. manchester victoria station has reopened this morning after it was damaged in last week's bomb attack. last night, hundreds of people gathered for a vigil at st ann's square to mark exactly one week since 22 people were killed by a suicide bomber at the manchester arena. with just over a week to go until the general election, the conservatives are focusing on brexit while labourfocus on childcare policies.
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last night, the leaders of both parties faced questions in a live television broadcast. theresa may was questioned byjeremy paxman on her stance on brexit. we gave people the choice. you've changed your mind? we gave people the choice, jeremy, and the british people decided to leave the european union and i think it's important for them to see their politicians delivering on that choice and respecting the will of the people. jeremy corbyn was questioned about his views on drone strikes and northern ireland. the labour leader had offended his stance on corporation tax. this country is badly divided between the richest and the poorest. you put corporate tax and tax at the top end down, the division gets greater. are you happy that so many of our children are going to school with supersized classes? so many of our children are going to school hungry? british airways says it will operate
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a full schedule at heathrow and gatwick today for the first time since the computer failure on saturday disrupted flights around the world. the airline says its it systems are now "back up and running" but "significant numbers" of passengers are still without their luggage, which could take some time to sort out. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10am. this is just this isjust in this is just in from the mother of rosa king, the zookeeper who was killed by a tiger at hamerton park zoo. she has paid tribute to her daughter honour saying of her dedication to herjob, she wouldn't have done anything else. it is what she has always done. it is what she has always loved. that is from rosa king's mum, andrea king. we will talk to a family member who was at the zoo yesterday when that tragedy unfolded. let's bring you the sport now. holly is back. coming up this
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hour, it was the £170 million match that means huddersfield are in the premier league for the first time. they beat reading in a dramatic penalty shoot out to win the championship play—off final yesterday. and in or out — arsene wenger‘s future could become clearer later. following crucial talks with majority shareholder stan kroenke, clu b majority shareholder stan kroenke, club directors are expected to find out whether he will be staying at the club. great britain's sailors, led by sir ben ainslie, need to come from behind in americas cup qualifying. they are four down after losing against france and now take on the other five teams again over the next few days, starting against sweden today. and andy murray starts his french 0pen later. the world number one plays russia's andrey kuznetsov. all that and more coming up at ten o'clock. the people of manchester paid an emotional tribute last night to those who died in the bombing exactly one week ago.
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police investigating the bombing have been searching a rubbish tip on the outskirts of bury. the city's victoria train station reopened at 5am. it's been closed since last week's blast. we can speak to two of those people whose courage and determination to help has since emerged. lianne shutt saved a stranger with life—threatening injuries — she's in salford — and zaf naqui, a consultant orthopaedic surgeon at salford royal
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nhs foundation trust who treated dozens of patients. lianne, once the attack had happened, you helped your daughter and husband leave, but you returned to help a dad and his daughter. tell us to help a dad and his daughter. tell us what you saw. yes, on monday evening when leaving the concourse in manchester arena, i came across a gentleman and his daughter who was very distressed. i pulled them both to safety on a road facing the main entrance of the men. an instinct kicked in and i started to treat the wounds that he had. and what sort of injuries were you helping with?
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there were several casualties this evening, and the injuries were horrific. mostly shrapnel wounds. you ended up driving this dad and his daughter at high speed to the hospital. some have reported it as being 100 miles an hour. i am not sure if that is accurate. definitely not. i drove there as fast and as safe as possible, given the circumstances with a casualty in the car. and what were you thinking when you were on thatjourney? car. and what were you thinking when you were on that journey? it was just instinct to get the gentleman and his daughter, myself and my husband to the nearest hospital and had him treated as soon as possible. clearly, the ambulances hadn't got to the exit you were at, is that right? yeah, i believe they were
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otherwise engaged at the other side of the arena and time seemed to move so fast. we just needed to get these casualties away on the seen and treated. let me bring in zaf, a surgeon treated. let me bring in zaf, a surgeon who volunteered to help in the hours after the manchester attack. the information you will talk about may upset some people, so i wanted to let people know that. you went into work at 6am, because that was when you new colleagues would have started to get tired. tell us what you faced when you arrived? first of all, our sympathy and thoughts are still with all the relatives and victims. i had been alerted overnight by a friend in los angeles, who said a bomb had gone off. that was the first i knew about
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it and! off. that was the first i knew about it and i had spoken to our on—call team who went in. it rapidly became clear that this was not going to be something we could deal withjust overnight, so we decided to stagger out overnight, so we decided to stagger our entry into the hospital to relieve other surgeons. so as part of the orthopaedic team, we went in and looked at all the injuries we had on our watch and worked out how best to treat them in terms of the numberof best to treat them in terms of the number of staff we had a the number of theatres and what those patients required. at salford royal, we are a major trauma centre. so we received the most severe category of injured patients. this meant that the injuries involve all parts of the body. we had to work with other surgeons on these patients in multiple theatres at the same time. and you could see the impact of the
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metal bolts that were embedded in people? yes. the metal bolts were embedded throughout, unfortunately from head to toe, in the brain, the head, face, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and all of the limbs. there was no part of the body among the group of patients that wasn't involved. like i said, we had neurosurgeons, general surgeons, vascular neurosurgeons, general surgeons, vascular surgeons, neurosurgeons, general surgeons, vascular surgeons, orthopaedic and trauma surgeons, plastic surgeons, ent surgeons, all working together for these patients. how do you reflect on the way that you and your collea g u es reflect on the way that you and your colleagues worked together last week? a week on, there are two
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things that i have considered. firstly, i am things that i have considered. firstly, lam really things that i have considered. firstly, i am really proud of everyone at salford royal and i am sure it is the same in the other hospitals in manchester, the way we somehow managed to coordinate and collaborate. it was like clockwork. if you consider several hundred people turning up at once, how we managed to organise ourselves is what saved lives, in my opinion. it was something i have ever seen. i have been a doctor for 20 years. it was incredible however one got to work. we had surgeons crisscrossing across the city. the way we managed to communicate and collaborate is probably what saved lives and limbs. that is the first thing. he was a group effort. as a group, the
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hospital treated dozens of patients and everyone made a contribution. the second thing, when i think about it, is that there has been such a great focus on the surgeons, of course. but actually, when i look back at the first 24 hours, the cleaners, the domestic staff, the caterers, the porters, people on switchboard, ourjunior doctors, caterers, the porters, people on switchboard, our junior doctors, our managers, they all contributed to enable the whole system to work. so in fact, as a simple example, how cleaners had turned up in the middle of the night. they were cleaning cubicles in a&e like nobody's business. all of these factors, the
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porters taking patients, contributed to lives being saved. they need to be recognised, because they helped tremendously. a monumental team effort, thank you, i was just a monumental team effort, thank you, i wasjust wondering a monumental team effort, thank you, i was just wondering leanne a monumental team effort, thank you, i wasjust wondering leanne if a monumental team effort, thank you, i was just wondering leanne if you had been able to keep in touch with the person you drove to hospital? yes, we have gained a great friendship which will last for life, i went to see him at hospital on thursday and he is making a great recovery. that is good to hear, thank you for talking to us. still to come on the programme, the snp launch their general election ma nifesto launch their general election manifesto at 11am, we will look at some of the things which might be included. an investigation's started into the death of a zoo keeper who was killed by a tiger in cambridgeshire. rosa king — who was 33 — died when the animal got into an area where she was working at hamerton zoo park. rosa's mother — andrea —
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has been paying tribute to her daughter, saying that she wouldn't have done any otherjob and it was what she had always loved. rosa spoke to the bbc last year and was asked what she thought about the view that keeping animals in zoos was cruel. my my personal opinion is that it is not. we do a lot of work for conservation, a lot of breeding to try and save the species, just like the malayan tiger here. there's only about 300 left in the wild, and they're being poached. at least they're safe here. we can work on increasing the numbers. we can speak to the wildlife expert from the one show, there must be strict protocol for working with animals like these, tell us about the rules which would be in place?
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first foremast i do not work for the zoo first foremast i do not work for the zoo community, and my condolences to the family. i know a lot of zookeepers and work in a lot of zoological communities around the world and i know they are an incredibly passionate bunch and are very knowledgeable and they are mad keen on their animals. some of the most knowledgeable i have ever met or zookeepers. i have worked on transporting tigers as part of a number of stories, we did a story where we transported a tiger to a yorkshire wildlife park and i saw their first—hand how incredibly big and ferocious these animals are. also the very safe precautions they sta b also the very safe precautions they stab go through when working with tigers. first and foremost, zookeepers have told me that actually the safest job zookeepers have told me that actually the safestjob in a zoo is frequently working with big cats
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because the golden rule is you never go in with them, you have no interactions with them whatsoever. when i have worked in any of the movement of big cats around various zoos movement of big cats around various zoos around britain there is a double gate policy, two locked gates between you and the animals and you can only open one gate when the other is closed. i would not like to speculate on what happened but normally they are very, very safe animals to work with because of the strict protocols. can i ask you more broadly about keeping big cats, tigers, in what will be to them a very confined space and the stress it may put them under? the tiger is endangered according to the criteria is of how endangered animal is, something likejust is of how endangered animal is, something like just under 4000 is of how endangered animal is, something likejust under 4000 left and they only exist in about 6% of
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their original territory worldwide. but even no bar are only 4000 in the wild there are something like 13,000 in captivity which is astonishing and the vast majority are held in responsible locations where they have protocols in place. but sometimes there can be a huge number held by individuals in less than ideal situations. so there are a huge number in captivity and i would say the vast majority are incredibly well looked after but this is an animal that covers huge areas, effectively alone, tigers are not sociable animals like lions. they will frequently have territory, so obviously keeping them, an animal which may be captive bred and may know nothing about living in the wild, ina know nothing about living in the wild, in a small area, is potentially, to some people
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unnatural. i personally think that zoos unnatural. i personally think that zoos do greatjobs in terms of preservation but you must know what you are doing with the animal and understand its psychology and how to enrich its life. stay with us, i am going to bring in stephen, his sister was killed in a tiger attack at the zoo in cumbria in 2013, thank you for talking to us. hello. i wonder how you respond to the death of rosa king? i know what her family is going through right now. it's a rare, unusual situation to lose your life in and because of that it will be all over the news, as we are right now. my thoughts go out to the family, absolutely. can you remind our audience what happened to your
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sister? she was in the tiger enclosure for her regular maintenance as part of herjob and a syste m maintenance as part of herjob and a system of doors that was supposed to keep the animal separate from her when she was in there did not work, was not maintained properly. it got in there and she lost her life. we don't know what has happened at the hammerton park zoo in cambridge, an investigation is ongoing, they have said ina investigation is ongoing, they have said in a statement it was a freak accident. well, that's obviously something else i thought of when i heard the news, when sarah did four years back, before any investigation the zoo came out and said it must have been her fault. so it's comforting in some ways to cure this zoo comforting in some ways to cure this zoo claiming it is an accident and sending their thoughts to the family, that is a big difference between this one and when sarah
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died. in the end of the zoo in cumbria was fined because it did not properly assess the risks of a defective bolt on a door? yes they we re defective bolt on a door? yes they were found guilty in court despite them trying to put the blame on sarah initially. it was legally deemed to be their fault. you have said you think zoos do an incredible job because some of these big cats are endangered species but i wonder what impact it does have an animal when it is in captivity? the fact of the matter is that a lot of organisations are trying to breed tigers, there is. tigers may well be, zoos may well be the saviours of
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tigers if the habitat destruction and the poaching continues. there has been good news of tigers in the wild, in the last year or so the population in the wild seems to have slightly increased. i think the more zoos can slightly increased. i think the more zoos can do in terms of education, the days of taking a tiger from the wild and putting it into the zoo is long gone, these are all captive bred animals who have never known anything other than being in a captive location so i think they serve an enormously important function. ijust serve an enormously important function. i just hope serve an enormously important function. ijust hope there is not an immediate reaction and people realise this is a majestic wonderful animal worth conserving and worth visiting, if you are not lucky enough to go out to russia or india to try and spot one of these animals in the wild. thank you, i think we can talk to someone at the zoo with
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his family when it happened, pete davies, can you hear me? hello. thank you, tell us what happened from your point of view? we were on a normal family day out, first time visiting the zoo, got there at 10am when it opened and got around to the whole zoo, ending up at the tiger enclosure which was about ten past 11, there was a guy in front of us taking photographs all the way around, we were in one part where the lines were and he was in the park next to us and he came running past as fast as he could and we thought something was going on and he came back 30 seconds later with five, six zoo keepers. all of them running down. we heard a scream and then one of the zoo keepers shouted
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for us to run. we went to a small office, the whole family inside the office, the whole family inside the office for about ten minutes with some other people, about eight of us altogether. we waited until it was clear to come out, they set tweet said come out, we were working our way up to the top and we were still watching what was going on, all the zoo watching what was going on, all the zoo keepers distressed, heads in their hands, a couple of them had buckets full of meat they were throwing over the enclosure. but yeah, we ended upjust having to go, but that is bad for all the people that work there as well as the family because they are all young adults, or most of them are, and to witness something like that will live with them for a long time i would imagine. from what you have
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described, the initialfeeling was potentially that there could have been a big cat that had escaped? well when somebody tells you to run and you are at the end of a lion enclosure, tiger enclosure, you do what they say. but initially i did not think there was any animals outside. you just run and take cover and then gather your thoughts and then we realised nothing had escaped, it was all inside the enclosure. yeah, initially, it is worrying when you hear that. thank you very much. pete davies who was at the hamerton zoo park when the attack happened. and thank you mike, the wildlife expert from one show. and thank you to steve and his sister was killed at a tiger attack ina zoo sister was killed at a tiger attack in a zoo in cumbria in 2013. coming
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up in a zoo in cumbria in 2013. coming up to 10am, the latest news and sport in a moment and the weather but before that thank you for your many messages about election blind dates. barry says the best piece of coverage i have seen since the election was called, light—hearted fun, just what we need right now. stevens says brilliant tv, more please. chris says it is very enjoyable. john says it is funny, even when nigel farage is taking part, he comes across as smug, arrogant and vomit inducing. another says something on the programme which makes nigel farage seem nice. another saying the only problem was looking at and listening to nigel farage. wayne said they were both incredibly charming and entertaining. victoria a class act. i used to be a waitress in my teenage years at a restaurant in rochdale so i have a lot of
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experience. tomorrow find out what happened when toff from made in chelsea met jackman row. happened when toff from made in chelsea metjackman row. time for the weather? a bit mild, lots of cloud around, the extent of the cloud on the satellite picture but also some breaks, in worcestershire some sunshine, blue skies breaking through, i think the process will continue for many of us as we go to the afternoon, brighter skies and the afternoon, brighter skies and the odd shower here and there, particularly towards north—western parts of the uk. cold front moving its way through northern ireland into scotland, some fresher brighter conditions behind it, less humid than the last few days. sunny spells
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in northern ireland. for northern england shower is particularly across north—western part of england, towards the north—east something brighter, sunshine breaking through the cloud in central parts of wales and inland parts of england. temperatures getting up to 20,21, parts of england. temperatures getting up to 20, 21, maybe 22 celsius. clear skies across the north will continue to spread south as it does so we will seek older air filtering across many northern areas, comfortable night for sleeping, temperatures down to low single figures. further south we will see mild air hanging on about 13 or 14 degrees. into wednesday high—pressure starting to build from the south, as it does so it will settle down and saw a drier and brighter day for most of us, cloud
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towards south wales and south west england, for most lots of sunshine during the afternoon and with it feeling quite pleasant with light winds, maximum temperatures up to 18,19 degrees, 20, 20 three winds, maximum temperatures up to 18, 19 degrees, 20, 20 three degrees across the south. for thursday driver most of england and wales but for scotland and northern ireland we have got more rain spreading, 17 celsius, the breeze picking up, further south and east it will be drier with bright spells and again feeling quite warm, temperatures up to about 25 degrees. hello. it's tuesday, just after 10 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. our top story: tributes are paid to rosa park, the zookeeper killed by a tiger yesterday. her mother says she won't have done any otherjob. when someone says to you run and
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you're in the end of a lion or tiger enclosure, you do what they say. heroes of the manchester tireor attack tell us what they experienced. it was something i've never seen. i've been a doctorfor 20 years. i was incredible really, how everyone got to work. that's what saved lives. and we'll be talking to jonathan trott about the highs and lows of life as an international cricketer. good morning. now over to the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. park in cambridgeshire has been named as 33—year—old rosa king. hamerton zoo park in cambridgeshire will remain closed while an investigation continues into the incident. her family said she was dedicated to herjob and wouldn't have done anything else. manchester victoria station
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has reopened this morning after it was damaged in last week's bomb attack. last night, hundreds of people gathered for a vigil at st ann's square to mark exactly one week since 22 people were killed by a suicide bomber at the manchester arena. with just over a week to go until the general election, the conservatives are focusing on brexit while labour focus on childcare policies. last night, the leaders of both parties faced questions in a live television broadcast. theresa may was questioned byjeremy paxman on her stance on brexit. we gave people the choice. you've changed your mind? we gave people the choice jeremy and the british people decided to leave the european union and i think it's important for them to see their politicians delivering on that choice and respecting the will of the people. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn was quizzed about his views on drone strikes, tax—raising plans and past campaigning in northern ireland. in a question and answer session with the studio audience, the labour leader defended his stance on corporation tax.
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this country is badly divided between the richest and the poorest. you put corporate tax and tax at the top end down, the division gets greater. are you happy that so many of our children are going to school with supersized classes? so many of our children are going to school hungry? british airways says it will operate a full schedule at heathrow and gatwick today for the first time since the computer failure on saturday disrupted flights around the world. the airline says its it systems are now "back up and running" but "significa nt numbers" of passengers are still without their luggage which could take some time to sort out. tiger woods has denied he'd been drinking when he was stopped whilst driving his car in florida. police charged him with being under the influence — but the golfer has blamed an unexpected reaction to some medication he had taken. prince harry will attend the launch of the uk's invictus games team and host his first buckingham palace garden party. the prince will meet the 90—strong
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team, who will take on the challenge of the paralympic—style competition at the toronto games in september. he's been the driving force behind the invictus games for injured, wounded and sick servicemen and women and veterans. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. ? more messages will election blind dates. "i'd never go to that restau ra nt. dates. "i'd never go to that restaurant. the waitresses are opinioniated. i'm afraid today's engineered meeting is a terrible mistake. it is not a joke and shouldn't be turned into one. rachel johnson says this is the man who rue independent the country. we can't make a pet of him while we watch the slow motion car crash which is brexit. racheljohnson to nigel farage. would you go to bed with a remainor. jo says i'd like my
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licence fee back. i don't want that image in my head at 9.00am. brilliant dinner date between nigel farage and racheljohnson. it's tv gold. although apparentry i look like someone from hello hello which is true. you're right, james. thank you for that tweet. get in touch with us throughout the programme. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here's some sport now. gm manager david wagner's described it as a fairytale as huddersfield reach the top flight for the first time in 45 years. after the match finished goalless, liam moore and jordan 0bita missed from the spot for reading. but it was christopher schindler who scored the decisive penalty — sending huddersfield to the premier league for the first time. their promotion is worth around £170 million to the club. this is a fairy tale which is
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usually not possible. but they've continue it. we are very, very happy. i'm one of the happiest man on this planet at the minute, i think. so proud for what the players have done. i'm happy for everybody who's connected and supported huddersfield town. especially the chairman. we could find out later whether or not arsene wenger will be staying at arsenal. the board will be told a decision regarding his future — after missing out on the champions league places for the first time in his 20 years as manager, but winning the fa cup on saturday. an announcement is expected from arsenal later today. britain's best hopes at the french open get their challenge underway today. johanna konta is playing jeh su—wei of taiwan in their first round tie. that's just underway in paris. andy murray meanwhile plays andrey kuznetsov hoping to improve his run on clay this season — he's lost as many matches as he's won. although it's very frustrating, you have to try to enjoy this part of
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what we do as well. the struggles are part of what make the good times so enjoyable. i need to enjoy my struggle a little bitjust now. that will help me get through it quicker, i believe. it's set to be an uphill struggle for ben ainslie and his crew — after great britain suffered a fourth consecutive defeat in their america cup qualifiers. the team made an error around the third turn yesterday and couldn't recover against france. it means they're now third in the standings. they'll now take on the other five teams again over the next few days — starting against sweden today. they ground us down and got the win. we're they ground us down and got the win. we' re clearly they ground us down and got the win. we're clearly disappointed with that. we have to go away. look at our development programme, our configuration for the coming days. and make improvements. that's the sport. i'll have the latest in
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around 30 minutes' time. the largest party in scotland the snp is launching its manifesto in just under an hours time. it includes a plan to invest an additional £118 billion in public services. nicola sturgeon will also promise to give scotland a strong voice at westminster against tory cuts. 0ur reporterjim reed has been speaking to voters across the southern part of scotland. we're expect that can launch about 11.00. nicola sturgeon speaking live on the news channel at that time. you've touched on some of the things we're expecting to hear. a possible increase in the minimum wage. focus on immigration. if you're wondering why this manifesto launch is coming so late, a week or so ahead of the vote, it was meant to take place last tuesday. got delayed because of those terror attacks in manchester. before that date, we spent some time
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in the southern part of scotland really interesting area from a political point of view. there's three constituencies or seats there along the border with england in scotland. two of them held by the snp. 0ne scotland. two of them held by the snp. one by the conservatives. all very close at the moment. expect a big fight, tussle, this time round. we spent some time travelling through, speaking to voters. we finished in the very south—west of scotla nd finished in the very south—west of scotland in stranraer. we started further towards the east in the market town of selkirk in the scottish borders. we've had five years of not knowing what's going to happen. we've have the independence of scotland, we had brexit. they're so busy ranting on about independence and another referendum. it's like they don't want to hear our words, it's like they don't want to hear what we have to say. plays trumpet a week after the general election, the tradesmen of selkirk will perform at common riding, a tradition going back centuries to the border wars with england.
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applause in the recent independence referendum, this region voted strongly to stay part of the uk. not everyone, though, is excited about yet another vote next week. if they would just tell you there's a general election, send you the pamphlets and stuff like that, let you get on with it. but it's on the television, every night and day after day, you just get fed up. i'm interested, i must admit, much more so than normal. why this year? purely because i'm very much unionist rather than independent, and therefore i think this is really important. so for you, it's about independence, this? definitely, definitely. it's an area that needs strong local people leading us, because we can often be forgotten about, in this neck of the woods. everywhere you look here, you see signs of a rich past, giant mills that once drove a thriving textile industry. but most of those skilled jobs have gone, replaced by huge call centres.
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work tends to be short—term, and just above the minimum wage. alan brown is 22, and unemployed. his parents worked in the mills. he welcomes the call centre jobs, but worries about the future. the disadvantages are that they aren't really permanent, they're mostly temporary, they don't really last that long. do you sit there frustrated by that, or do you try to do something about it? how do you feel about the fact there is less opportunity than there was before? well, i can't really do anything about the less opportunities. all i can really do is have a voice, and my vote really matters. alan is planning to vote for the scottish national party next week. i voted yes for independence last time, but the referendum isn't the main reason for me to vote for the snp. ijust, personally, like the snp. i've got to know my mp5, and locally they are more engaged than other parties. and you don't feel the conservatives,
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or the liberal democrats, or labour can offer you a similar kind of thing? well, labour only mentioned their plan for scotland in 115 words out of 124 pages of their manifesto. so, not really. in fairness to labour, it has now published a separate manifesto for scotland. as for this region, there has been new investment. the train line to edinburgh has reopened. but, at a drop—in centre for unemployed young people, there's a definite sense of being forgotten by the parties. the british elections, the general elections, it's like they don't want to hear our words, want to hear what we have to say. i don't think they are dealing with any of the sort of issues that we have. you know, like lack ofjobs, or anything like that. they're just focused on the big issues, like coming out of the eu, and all that. it's been overshadowed a lot, and that's not so great. brooding piano music
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the snp totally dominates scottish politics at the moment, holding 56 of the 59 seats. but in this part of the country, the southern part of scotland, there is a realfight going on. the conservatives have been pushing an anti—independence message very, very hard, hoping to hang onto the one scottish seat they currently hold, and maybe pick up a couple of seats from the snp. we drive west to another constituency. dumfries is still a busy market town, but like many high streets, it's looking a bit sorry for itself. we're here to meet two viewers who messaged the programme. first up, john dowson, who's lived here for 30 years. he said he cal edge enned to us come
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to dumfries. dumfries is suffering from online shopping and supermarkets on the edge of town. john is part of a community project to buy up disused shops and rent them out cheaply. for years a labour supporter, he voted for scottish independence, and then to leave the eu. brexit is crucial to him, so at 69 years old, he just might vote conservative for the first time. i have a difficulty, because i'm tempted to vote conservative. but, i want to vote for independence, that's very, very important. but i don't want to see us gain independence as a scottish country, to get freedom from westminster, only to become subservient to brussels. so, which way are you thinking at the moment? that's between me and the ballot box! so, if you did vote conservative, would this be the first time you would've voted conservative in your life? if i do that, yes it would be, and it will be the same for many labour voters, and many snp voters. 0n the other side, morag paterson,
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who lives in the centre of the constituency. well, there you go, morag! jeremy corbyn was undoubtedly attacked over a sustained period of time. i think he's stood up to all the criticism really well, with a lot of strength, a lot of integrity. i believe in what he stands for, and i like his style of politics. here's where it gets complicated again. morag is a strong jeremy corbyn supporter. she is on the fence on scottish independence, and voted to remain in the eu. in this election, though, she says she is not voting labour. i've voted for all the parties during my lifetime. well, with the exception of the extreme right. but, this time round i'll be voting snp, because i really do not want to see a tory majority in westminster. as a jeremy corbyn supporter, how do you feel about not voting for him in an election like this? i can't vote for him here,
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because it's a tight race between the snp and the tories. i mean, if the polls change in the very close run—up, i'll re—examine it. but, i am campaigning for the snp and labour using social media, because i think for england, labour is a good answer. you know, in scotland, it's a different situation. dumfries and galloway is the sixth—largest constituency in the whole uk, with a huge farming sector. most voters live a decent drive from the towns. 28—year—old colin ferguson is part of a farming family. this place, with around 350 dairy cattle, is medium—sized for the area. in a second cow shed, week—old calves are being fed by hand. colin voted to leave the eu last year, a step into the unknown, but one he says it is worth taking. we've had five years of not knowing what's going to happen. we've had the independence in scotland, we've had the brexit, we've made all those decisions, what we need to do now
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is just get on and do it. so all this talk of a second referendum... we've made the decision. it's the same as the scottish independence referendum, we said no, accept it, move on. brexit, we decided to leave, accept it, move on. the longer we sit about not knowing where we're going to be in five years' time, the more businesses suffer, notjust in agriculture, everywhere. the farming community in scotland was split on brexit. many others are worried about exports and how they'll be affected. but, on this farm at least, colin and his father are prepared to give the government the benefit of the doubt. do you trust the people there at the moment, theresa may and the government, to get these questions right at the moment? i can't answer that! we'll tell you after they've done it. have to wait and see. i don't trust the politicians, but they're there for a reason. seats like this one are complex, so close, with so many unknowns. the result here will be watched very carefully,
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from edinburgh to london. we can speak now to stewart hosie — the snp's spokesperson on the economy — who joins us ahead of the manifesto launch from perth. how do you view the prospect of a former snp voters considering voting conservative this time because they do not want a second referendum?” think the package you just had was fascinating, labour voters talking about voting snp tactically, other snp people sticking with us, others concerned about independents or boarding to leave the eu, i think the package showed the complexity of real vote rs the package showed the complexity of real voters in real seats. the argument of what we all have to do is make a strong case which covers all of the issues. when i hear these things i am not dreadfully
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surprised. what i am confident about is what i am seeing in the polls which is ask somewhere around the mid—40s, people satisfied with the performance of the scottish government and after today's ma nifesto government and after today's manifesto launch enthused about what we will bring to the table at westminster. i wonder how many people are enthused about the fact that scotland recorded its worst ever performance when it comes to education in an international survey last year following from 11th to 23rd in reading, 24th in maths and 19th in science under your party leadership? kill obviously those are disappointing results but what you need to understand is that was a sample survey, not the data for all peoples. when you look at pupils across the country you do not get the results you saw in that sample survey, you get 83% or more on or
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above the required standard. last but survey was disappointing and nobody will say it was not, when you look at the whole survey you get more accurate data. the waiting time is for hospital admissions have been repeatedly missed, what is going on there? there is record funding and given the cuts scotland has had to suffer, about 2.9 billion, that is remarkable, more doctors and co nsulta nts remarkable, more doctors and consultants and nurses across the piece. it's getting worse in it's better than the rest of the uk. i have looked at the graphs, they
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are going down. as with every part of the uk there are always challenges when it comes to the health service. what i would say to viewers in scotland, if you think the performance in scotland is bad and it's the best in the uk, i would look at the privatised nhs south of the border and ask that you want the scottish national party pumping record amounts of money into the nhs to protect and preserve it or do you wa nt to see a privatised under somebody likejeremy to see a privatised under somebody like jeremy hunt? the to see a privatised under somebody likejeremy hunt? the answer would bea likejeremy hunt? the answer would be a categorical support for the snp support. you want control of immigration, you want that sector devolved, explain why? scotland is not full up, devolved, explain why? scotland is notfullup, our devolved, explain why? scotland is not full up, our population has risen but we are not full, we need more people to come and grow our economy. the argument about immigration in scotland is different to the argument against immigration
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south of the border. there is an a cce pta nce south of the border. there is an acceptance by all parties that managed immigration, bringing in skilled workers is a good thing for the economy. we want to control that, it is not good enough for tories to suddenly say scotland is an unattractive place, bring in more people, by denying us the right to control our own immigration policy, it is bonkers. it should be controlled in scotland to meet scottish needs. do you have a target of how many more emigrants you want in scotland or is it to do with the needs of the economy? you managed immigration on the needs of the economy. the tories have got it wrong with net figures, you cannot set a target because you don't know how many people believe, you don't know how many pensioners in the south of england might go and live in spainfor south of england might go and live in spain for example. that impacts your net migration figures, these targets a re
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your net migration figures, these targets are bonkers which is why george osborne disagreed so profoundly with weak and wobbly theresa may. thank you very much, nicola sturgeon will be live on the news channel launching her election ma nifesto, news channel launching her election manifesto, the snp leader, you can see that at 11am on the bbc news channel. next this morning — a dishevelled tiger woods, bleary—eyed and unshaven — a picture that will no doubt haunt him for years to come. it was taken after his arrest for driving under the influence. tiger woods was one of the world's most successful golfers — he totally dominated the sport winning 14 championships and was the number one for eight of the years he played. but that all collapsed in 2009 when he revealed he had had multiple extra marital affairs and issued this public apology the following year. the issue involved here was my
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repeated irresponsible behaviour. i was unfaithful. i had a fair ‘s, i cheated. what i did is not acceptable. and i am the only person to blame. i stopped living by the co re to blame. i stopped living by the core values that i was taught to believe in. i knew my actions were wrong but i convinced myself that normal rules did not apply. i never thought about who i was hurting. instead i thought only about myself. iran straight through instead i thought only about myself. i ran straight through the boundaries that a married couple should live by. i thought i could get away with whatever i wanted. i felt i had worked hard my entire life and deserved to enjoy all the temptations around me. ifelt i life and deserved to enjoy all the temptations around me. i felt i was entitled. thanks to money and fame i
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did not have far, i did not have to go farto find did not have far, i did not have to go far to find them. i was wrong, i was foolish. i don't get to play by different rules. the same boundaries that apply to everyone apply to me. i brought this shame on myself. i heard my wife, my kids, my mother, my wife's family, my friends, my foundation, and kids all around the world who admired me. i've had a lot of time to think about what i have done. my failures have made me look at myself in a way i never wanted to the fore. it's now up to me to make amends and that starts by never repeating the mistakes i've made. it's up to me to start living a life
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of integrity. i once heard, and i believe it's true, it's not what you achieve in life that matters. it's what you overcome. achievements on the golf course are only part of setting an example. character, and decency, are what really count. that was 2010. now he's blamed his arrest in the early hours of monday morning on an "unexpected reaction to prescribed medication" — and says alcohol was not involved. we can speak now to former ryder cup captain bernard gallacher and david alexander, a sports publicist who worked on a media campaign with tiger woods in 2006. bernard coll i hope you can hear me 0k. bernard coll i hope you can hear me ok. i can, thank you,. what do you think of this? when he says it
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wasn't alcohol, i think we have to believe him. it was a prescription drug, probably painkillers for the back operations he has been having but at the same time, i did not like the look of his mugshot, must be one of the worst that has ever been taken and it has not done him any favours. i don't know how he gets out of this one. but i did not think he was a drinker, he has no reputation for being in a bar or drinking, this was definitely related to the painkilling prescription drugs he is on. is this the end of his career? we're coming to the end of the tiger's career whether we like it or not because he's just not fit enough to play the modern game. he had a very athletic golf swing, hit the ball for miles, every pa rt golf swing, hit the ball for miles, every part of his game was good. golf is a twisting rotary type of action and anyone who has this
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sustained period of back problems and back operations, it's difficult to see him coming back to anywhere near the level he was before. but saying that, he is determined to come back in some sort of way. but it will be in a very limited capacity. let me bring in david alexander, sports publicist, what advice would you be giving him right now? first of all i think it's surprising he has not put his statement out on all this social media channels, if you look on his website there is no statement. he just gave the statement to usa today and allowed them to share it with other people. my advice to him would be to talk directly to his fans, because they are the people who at the end of the day are helping hand make as much money as he has even when his career has been slipping. he made $45 million last year which pits in the top 15 in the world. he
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needs to talk to them directly and notjust through needs to talk to them directly and not just through one journalist issuing a statement. do you feel sorry for him? i do not, i think there was an image of tiger woods as a robotic, superb golfer. he was the first african—american to break through in a predominantly white sport. very successful. but we all never saw a sanitised version of him and when you build someone up to such a high degree they are always going to fall further and further and further. he has learnt a lesson already so far by putting out a statement straightaway which he did not do after the problems he suffered in 2009, it took him three months before we got the statement we just saw. but he has only to one journalist. burner do you feel sorry for him? i do, in a way. tiger woods has been a great player, he's got to
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the very top in golf, all the prejudice in america which went with it. he's just been fantastic. prejudice in america which went with it. he'sjust been fantastic. but prejudice in america which went with it. he's just been fantastic. but i agree with what mr alexander says, he has brought a lot of this on himself. but we all try to make allowa nces, himself. but we all try to make allowances, i would like to see a great player like tiger comeback. golf, the great thing about golf is that golf seems to have got by without tiger, there was a case not so long ago when he did give up for a file so long ago when he did give up for afile in so long ago when he did give up for a file in 2009, tv ratings in america went to the floor when he left the sport and that seems to have recovered now so golf can live without him. but there is nothing i would like better than to see tiger playing against a rory mcilroy, justinjohnson, jordan playing against a rory mcilroy, justin johnson, jordan spieth, i would like to see him fighting against those type of players who
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have taken over his mantle since he dropped out of the game, that is what i would like. i wonder david alexander as a sports publicist you might suggest he concentrates now on his golf foundation? if you look at his website it says redefining what it means to be a champion. it should be someone setting a great example. 0ver champion. it should be someone setting a great example. over the last few years we've seen anything but the exemplary behaviour to young people and to inspire them. we also know top sports people, top actors, people are not perfect. absolutely but you have to position yourself in a way that doesn't portray yourself as perfect which is what he was doing in his early days of success. when i worked with him in 2006, none of the publicists were allowed near
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him because he wanted to keep a close circle so people didn't really get to understand what the real person was. that's why his fall's been so pronounced. thank you very much. still to come. we'll talk to former england cricketer jonathan trott about his career highs and lows. and about his career highs and lows. and a former rugby league player about the use of painkillers in high impact sports. some say they pose a bigger threat than doping. now the news headlines. our top story: tributes are paid to rosa park, the zookeeper killed by a tiger yesterday. herfamily said her family said le she was dedicated to herjob and wouldn't have done anything else. the conservatives are
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focusing on brexit while labour focusing on brexit while labour focus on childcare pom sis. the leaders of both parties face questions in a live television broadcast. theresa may was questioned byjeremy paxman with her sta nce questioned byjeremy paxman with her stance on brexit. we gave people the choice. you've changed your mind? we gave people the choice jeremy and the british people decided to leave the european union and i think it's important for them to see their politicians delivering on that choice and respecting the will of the people. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn was quizzed about his views on drone strikes, tax—raising plans and past campaigning in northern ireland. in a question and answer session with the studio audience, the labour leader defended his stance on corporation tax. this country is badly divided between the richest and the poorest. you put corporate tax and tax at the top end down, the division gets greater. are you happy that so many of our children are going to school with supersized classes?
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so many of our children are going to school hungry? british airways says it will operate a full schedule at heathrow and gatwick today for the first time since the computer failure on saturday disrupted flights around the world. the airline says its it systems are now "back up and running" but "significa nt numbers" of passengers are still without their luggage which could take some time to sort out. tiger woods has denied he'd been drinking when he was stopped whilst driving his car in florida. police charged him with being under the influence — but the golfer has blamed an unexpected reaction to some medication he had taken. prince harry will attend the launch of the uk's invictus games team and host his first buckingham palace garden party. the prince will meet the 90—strong team, who will take on the challenge of the paralympic—style competition at the toronto games in september. he's been the driving force behind the invictus games for injured, wounded and sick servicemen and women and veterans. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now
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andy murray starts his french open later. the world number one plays russia's andrey kuznetsov. 0n court now in paris is british women's number one johanna konta againstjeh su—wei of taiwan. she's already three—one up in the first set. a victory parade will take place in huddersfield laterfor the town's football team, promoted to the premier league for the first time. they beat reading in a dramatic penalty shoot out to win the championship playoff final in a match worth at least 170 million pounds. in or out — arsene wenger‘s future could become clearer later. following crucial talks with majority shareholder stan kroenke — club directors are expected to find out whether he'll be staying at the club. great britain's sailors, led by sir ben ainslie, need to come from behind in america's cup qualifying. they're four down after losing against france and now take on the other five teams again
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over the next few days — starting against sweden today. all that and more coming up later. england cricketer jonathan trott is here. he played professional cricket at the top for over 6 years — making over 3,800 runs — but through parts of his career he was also dealing with mental health challenges which saw him quit an ashes tour early as a result of stress. we'll talk to him properly in a moment — but first — some facts and figures behind his career. music: "every teardrop is a waterfall" by coldplay. # i turn the music up i got my records on # i shut the world outside until the lights
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come on # maybe the street‘s alight maybe the trees are gone #i feel my heart start beating to my favourite song # and all the kids they dance all the kids, all night # until monday morning feels another life # i turn the music up i'm on a roll this time # and heaven is in sight...#. he's here. the paper back version of his autobiography unguarded is out now. i'm going to start with the tour you left down under. describe
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tour you left down under. describe to our audience what was going on in your head when it came to you thinking about playing for england? it was more of a case of getting into cricket. it was actually the physical challenge of going to the match and playing. i wasn't quite sure what was going on. that was the most confusing thing. i'd wanted to bea most confusing thing. i'd wanted to be a cricketer since i was three yea rs be a cricketer since i was three years old. suddenly, i was having all these feelings. feeling almost frozen. not sure how else to describe it. as a cricketer, a batsman, you need to move quickly. i was feeling i was slow. 0ther batsman, you need to move quickly. i was feeling i was slow. other things we re was feeling i was slow. other things were taking up my mind. i wasn't able to concentrate or think clearly acid autohe a done previously and successfully. you weren't sleeping the night before. worried about bowlers running in at you. you were exhausted? yeah, i think also, there we re exhausted? yeah, i think also, there were a few factors. i was perhaps putting a little bit too much on my plate. trying to hard. before, i
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really focussed on my preparation and let playing take care of itself. a little bit of an imbalance. thoughts of wanting to be do too much. be the best batsman. before i focussed on other things. i was putting too much pressure on myself. well heavy schedules, it took its toll. i wish i could have changed things or go back and do things differently. i certainly learnt from the experience. comingings through that experience. leaving that tour and fighting my a place back to the tour of the west indies 18 months later, i'm very proud of that against all the odds. i'm proud of that, to give it another crack. the tea m that, to give it another crack. the team had moved on. different personnel. 0thers players had retired. my time as well had run playing international cricket. it was time to get out of the way for younger players we see being so successful today. you talk in the
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book about ringing your dad. it was really ha rd to book about ringing your dad. it was really hard to say you were leaving that tour in australia. a dad who had encouraged and supported you. and, also, made you butter through pressure, possibly, as you were growing up. you said you felt, it was the hardest phone call of your life, to ring him? certainly. my upbringing's slightly different. i had both very sporty parents. weekend were spent on the side of a hockey or cricket field. my mother was an international softball player. i was either on the side of a softball pitch or cricket field. they were both fantastic sports people. i luckily got a bit of talent and wanted to make the most of it and make them proud. to phone your dad who was with you every step of the way. you're leaving app ashes tour, it is something very difficult. 0ne tour, it is something very difficult. one of the hardest things i've ever had to do emotionally to do that and make the decision. i
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certainly stand by my decision to leave. i certainly felt like i wasn't helping the side in what was a difficult ashes tour. the other thing which was hard to take was to lose the series as hard as the team did. i'd been lucky enough to be around for successful times. but it is important to be there when the times are tough and you want to help them out of a sticky situation. what would have been the impact on you if you'd stayed? i couldn't have helped but i wish i had been there trying to be able to help. when eventually, the initial england statement was stress related to illness. later, you gave a statement. people were talking about it and didn't really know. in the interview you talked about burn—out which led former england captain michael vaughan to suggest he'd felt he was conneds by the initial statement. how did you react to that? as soon as any
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ex—cricketer or ex—england captain questions you or your thoughts or how you go about your business playing for england and feeling conned, that's quite hurtful. everyone's entitled to their own opinion. the occasion was, the problem was, when i left the tour, we weren't quite sure what was wrong with with me. he said, i'd sign you off for a couple of weeks normally. but on an ashes tour, doesn't work like that. with help through the ecb i saw like that. with help through the ecb isawa like that. with help through the ecb i saw a psychologist. after six weeks i woke up feeling better and wa nted weeks i woke up feeling better and wanted to play cricket again. i wasn't back in that pressure cooker situation. speaking to the psychologist, they were saying, typical symptoms of burn—out. i hadn't been put back into that pressure situation. we did the documentary. went and play another
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game of the cricket and felt the same. by then it was too late to stop that documentary being aired. i had to try again and sort myself. i played a few games for warwickshire. had another break and steve peters helped me get back on the field. psychiatrists who've helped various other sports people. i want to take you back to the controversy around that. do you think you would have been better treated if you'd simply had depression? do people understand depression more? i think nowadays, people are understanding it is quite a broad term. there are lots of things people suffer from. a broad term. there are lots of things people sufferfrom. i haven't suffered from bee precious. i suffered from bee precious. i suffered anxiety. i was putting too much pressure on myself which caused me to freeze up a little bit. it is very new. i'd always gone out there to express myself and enjoy the situation. preparing for the game. letting cricket take care of had testify. whatever happens, happens.
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for now, crossing the ropes has become more pressurised. the balance between the game, life and death, changed a bit. it wasn't a case of burn—out. i reeventually got round to getting myself right, playing cricket and enjoying it again. are you? absolutely. very fortunate to be for booed by warwickshire. i have quys be for booed by warwickshire. i have guys around me who are true friends. understand my game. helped me get back to playing for warwickshire. what did steve peters suggest to you in terms of the kind of tricks, if you like, you should do in order to get yourself comfortable around edgbaston but without necessarily playing cricket? there are various steps. when i first sat down. it is surreal, you go there, know there are surreal, you go there, know there a re lots of surreal, you go there, know there are lots of other great sportsmen who've been to see him. you have a bit of trust and confidence. he
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said, i don't see a human, just a computer i need to fix. speak to me and i'll see what we can do. i remember driving away from the peak district, phoning my wife, this will be fine. i felt a lot more confident, raring to go and do work with him and try to get better. it was a case of starting in the second tea m was a case of starting in the second team at warwickshire and learning to accept disappointment, getting out to 17 or 18—year—old try lists getting me out in the nets and being 0k getting me out in the nets and being ok with that. moving on, playing a second team game. accepting failure. earning my place back in the warwickshire first side. then, being 0k warwickshire first side. then, being ok with that. moving on to the international stage again in 2015. it isa international stage again in 2015. it is a long process. but, something very valuable. i learnt a lot of things about myself. and that will certainly help me in today's career. at the end of my career. but going
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forward in life. whatever the future holds. how old are you now? 36. how many century for warwickshire this season so far? a few. three or four, i think. so modest. season so far? a few. three or four, ithink. so modest. how long season so far? a few. three or four, i think. so modest. how long will you play for? i don't know. until they get rid of me! thank you. we're going to talk about painkillers in sport next. there is a doctor suggesting actually you're injured, you have a back injury, you take a painkiller to get through a game. long—term it can be really bad for your health but you can see why professional sports people use these painkillers. are they an issue. do you think physios abuse them to get a player on the pitch? you have to be careful you're not too reliant on them and they mask an injure ary which will do you long—term damage. i've been fortunate with injuries and niggles. i have taken a few to get through a stiff back or knee. you have to sort it out. you have to
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sort out what the real problem is. so, claims that the misuse and abuse of painkillers by athletes poses a bigger threat to sport than doping. jiri dvorak — fifa's former chief medical officer says use of these drugs has reached "epidemic" proportions. i spoke to him earlier and he told me the "abuse" is putting the long—term health of footballers in jeopardy. we have several studies which are indicating the long—term abuse of non—steroidal anti—inflammatory drugs, so—called painkillers, can have adverse effects, particularly increasing the risk of myocardial infarction is. so heart attack in
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later stages of life. it seems this risk is dose—related. later stages of life. it seems this risk is dose-related. you are saying it could lead to a heart attack in later life? this is correct. this is the most recent paper published on a large survey with close to 400,000 people in denmark. players want to play, they have short careers. if pain relief can get them few a few games then they are going to take the painkillers. yes, we know that and we have a clear indication that the use or i would even say the alarming abuse of those medications is almost the entire competition. why is it abuse? icy abuse because if there is the medical indication
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and it's not justified, if there is the medical indication and it's notjustified, we go from already used to abuse. let's talk to danny sculthorpe — a former england and wigan rugby league player. following complications resulting from an injury picked up during training, he became addicted to oxycontin and fenta nyl. and at the national sports centre in lilleshall is chris tomlinson — a team physician with wolves football club and chief medical officer with british gymnastics. danny, tell our audience how you came to be addicted to painkillers? i got came to be addicted to painkillers? igotan came to be addicted to painkillers? i got an infection after being in theatre, really bad infection called septicaemia and i put on massive amounts of morphine, all the strongest opiates for the pain. massive amounts for a long time and i got addicted. eventually that addiction got worse than the injury. the withdrawal of coming off all those strong drugs was horrendous. how do you respond to this warning
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from the former chief medical 0fficer from the former chief medical officer of fifa, that people using these painkillers could end up with long—term problems? these painkillers could end up with long-term problems? rugby league is trying to stop players using these strong painkillers. paracetamol and anti—inflammatories are quite popular in the sport, a lot of players taking them before training and after training and sometimes, stuff like tramadol and stuff like that players are taking that to relax after training and abusing it in that way. seriously? yes, some players taking these tablets, tramadol and what have you, you cannot have a drink to relax after the game so they will take them to chill out and watch tv and try to help them sleep. sleeping tablets and painkillers were a major problem
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when i was playing. i knew a lot of players addicted to sleep medication because they found it hard to sleep after big games. chris tomlinson, thank you for talking to us, the professor saying misuse of these painkillers could have potentially life—threatening effects, what do you think? i think it's interesting, we have to look at the potential long—term affects and that still slightly unknown. the study of anti—inflammatories suggesting the risk is current when you take anti—inflammatories but the long—term effects are not quite known. it is concerning because as uk sports doctors we work under a professional code, at the heart of thatis professional code, at the heart of that is doing no harm to your patience and that the patient is at the centre of any decision—making process. so when you are sharing a decision with a patient or athlete aiming to compete in a competition ora aiming to compete in a competition or a match at the weekend what
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you're trying to work out is what risk you are putting them under and that can be a short—term risk for an injury, could the injury be worse because you are masking pain? 0r could it have longer term effects, for example cardiac problems later in life or arthritis later in life or further damage? tell me if i am wrong, i imagine if! or further damage? tell me if i am wrong, i imagine if i was a professional footballer i would say to you, look, as my position, i want to you, look, as my position, i want to play on saturday, i am not thinking about 20 years down the line. yes and that is why decision—making becomes difficult. again, there is a lot of pressure on professional footballers, playing twice a week for most of the season. if they do not play they have problems, they could be out of the first team for the next three months. they can be perceived as being weak by managers. they are keen to play, so my question is what
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is the underlying cause of the pain and are we doing harm by masking that, are we putting them at more danger by treating it or not treating it? have you ever put pressure on a position to give you painkillers danny so you can play in a game? probably the foremost games. i remember when i was at wigan i dropped some weights on my stern and cracked my sternum, for the next six months i was getting local anaesthetic injections in my chest before every game because i did not wa nt to before every game because i did not want to let my family, my friends, my fans and my team down. you want to play every week as a young professional athlete and i would play no matter what. thank you very much gentleman. and you can hear more — from danny as well as former rugby union england international lewis moody — on the radio this evening.
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gain without pain is on file on 4, on radio 4, at 8pm. thanks for all your messages saying how much you enjoyed election blind dates — today it was the turn of leading brexiteer nigel farage and journalist racheljohnson, a staunch remainer. are you single, nigel? that's a very good question, a lot of people asking that question. i am not very married at the moment.” asking that question. i am not very married at the moment. i am married. i know you are! it's good to get to know each other‘s status before embarking on this date.” know each other‘s status before embarking on this date. i think separated is my legal status. how do you feel about that? i don't think anything would have survived what i've been doing for the last five years brackley. not that i've been perfect, i years brackley. not that i've been perfect, lam years brackley. not that i've been perfect, i am not, years brackley. not that i've been perfect, lam not, but it's
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years brackley. not that i've been perfect, i am not, but it's been pretty awful. it's been pretty awful. hellish. are you talking about work and infidelity?” awful. hellish. are you talking about work and infidelity? i am talking about the nastiness and aggro that comes with it, that the whole hard left movement are now the remainders. that is not why your marriage broke down. the last time i we nt marriage broke down. the last time i went out with a family we were assaulted by 80 people. that is the la st assaulted by 80 people. that is the last time we went out as a family. do you have any security now? no help from the police, the state, nothing. you never go out. that is awful. are you serious?” nothing. you never go out. that is awful. are you serious? i am dead serious. shall we talk about something else? laughter could you go to bed with a remainer?
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lam not could you go to bed with a remainer? i am not going to answer that! are you only attracted to brexiters? that's a good question. he has no words. i must ask if the story about you meeting someone on a plane is true. you were snogging a page three model. ludicrous, the whole thing, page three model would been 0k. what was she doing in business class? that is a good question. where you stitched up? what the episode shows me is you cannot trust anybody, you cannot talk to anybody. that is awful. i don't think you can trust
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random people. no. there i was sitting at the bar having dinner and someone comes and sits next to you and talks to you, what are you going to do? snow car. yes, well. if you want to watch the whole thing you can find it on our programme page — bbc.co.uk/victoria — there was plenty of politics chat in there as well. and tomorrow find out what happened when toff from made in chelsea met austerity campaigner and cookjack monroe. later in the week we'll bring you dates between labour mp jess phillips and conservative mp john whittingdale, historian mary beard and peter stringfellow who runs a lapdancing club, gina miller who led the brexit court case against the govt and godfrey bloom a former ukip politician and snp politician tommy sheppard and comedian stuart mitchell. all of your message is quite a lot of them seeing how much you loved it. good to see humour and everything according to one, another saying they loved it, what we need
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to lighten up the selection. in today's increasingly aggressive dialogue it's good to see people exchanging different views and agreeing to disagree says another. politics explained in english says sarah, one of the many reasons i love your programme is that you explain politics in english. thank you, more again tomorrow. thank you for watching. a lot of cloud out there at the moment, a bit of sunshine i promise. this is a weather watcher of water from earlier on, just starting to break through, for many of us you will see brightness coming through, one showers in north—western areas but this weather front, more persistent rain in scotland and northern ireland, it turn much sunnier, fresher, temperatures,
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warmth in the south—east, tonight clearer skies sinking further south, much colder than recent nights, temperatures down into fairly low single figures, misty and murky conditions across the south, into wednesday we will start off cloudy, brea ks wednesday we will start off cloudy, breaks in the cloud, elsewhere you can see much more settled picture, lots of dry weather and sunshine, maximum temperature up to 18—20, perhaps 23. goodbye. this is bbc news.
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jeremy corbyn is campaigning on labour's promise of free childcare for all two to four year olds. the snp are about to launch their manifesto — calling for higher public spending across the uk and an end to social security cuts. we'll be live in perth shortly, where they'll also be putting their case for scotland to stay in the european single market, after brexit. the mother of zookeeper rosa king who was killed by a tiger says she loved herjob and wouldn't have done anything else. manchester victoria station reopens a week after the concert attack

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