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tv   The Election Wrap  BBC News  June 6, 2017 7:30pm-8:00pm BST

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in manchester, in the final tv debate of the campaign. we'll be in bradford west, one of the youngest constituencies in the country, to find out the issues that matter to the under 255, dear oh dear, the most apathetic group of voters in the country. with crucial brexit talks due to startjust 11 days after the election, it's claimed the debate surrounding leaving the eu has hardly figured in the campaign. we'll have the view from brussels on our election. and we should do more of this — bring together in peace and harmony voices usually hoarse from shouting at each other. gina miller, the woman who took the government to court over article 50 and won, talks brexit, with the former ukip politician godfrey bloom. can't wait. ido i do not understand the inflexible way we're going towards negotiations. why notjust leave, why negotiate. so civilised. and mulling all this over,
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my guests political commentator jo phillips and times columnist iain martin. let's bring you up to date with the latest developments on the campaign trail today. theresa may returns to her central message that only the conservatives offer stable government and warns that the election could be on a knife—edge. if we lose just six seats then the government loses its majority. and if we lose just six seats we could seejeremy if we lose just six seats we could see jeremy corbyn if we lose just six seats we could seejeremy corbyn in number ten downing st. diane abbott looking after our national security. john mcdonnell at the treasury with our economy. and the strings being pulled by nicola sturgeon. jeremy corbyn remains hopeful he can win. he says he's attracted thousands of people to back labour because it offers hope and campaigned on a
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positive manifesto. we are nearly at the end of this campaign and we have done dozens of events all over the country and you know what, everywhere we go the crowds get bigger, people are determined to show that this election can be won by labour but we are also offering something very different to the conservatives. we are offering hope that they are offering something else. and nicola sturgeon reckons the outcome in scotland could be vital. and paul nuttall insisted that his party is the patriotic party and its policies on immigration and foreign aid will come to be seen as ahead of their time. the lib dem leader, tim farron, thinks it's possible what he terms the conservatives' arrogance at this election may backfire. the approach they took to this
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election, assuming a landslide and taking the people of the country for granted. so a vote for the conservatives on thursday will be heard by theresa may as an endorsement of the dementia attacks but also police cut and cuts to health and school as well. a lot of talk about security inevitably but the parties now perhaps returning to their core messages? they're trying to get it back but i think the issue of course of the tragic and appalling events of the tragic and appalling events of saturday is overshadowing everything. and there are questions about police numbers, about security. questions about prevention of extremism and how we fund and support the security services. that
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is not going to go away and neither should it because it is a big issue. and whoever aspires to be in downing street on friday needs to address thoseissues street on friday needs to address those issues very clearly. they're trying to get back but this has been a fractious election. very difficult. we had those appalling attacks, we had leaders who have their own issues in getting their message out and that has been hampering them. and the tories so far ahead of the beginning of this campaign and pegged right back. far ahead of the beginning of this campaign and pegged right backm has been fascinating in many respects. some of the viewers might disagree! at full price —— for precisely the reason you have said, one party starting with an enormous lead which has been eroded. i think you have those closing messages returning to the message with which they began the campaign, it is about getting out the vote, turning out
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their existing voters. you are beyond the stage in the campaign we could hope to convert anyone so the tories are going back to that strong and stable position and jeremy corbyn with his hope and all the re st of corbyn with his hope and all the rest of it. and now it is about maximising the vote, the get out the vote operation. i think the biggest fear is because it has been such a ghastly campaign, and probably all the party leaders would agree, the biggest fear is no one bothers on thursday. and there is a low turnout and dreadful weather. and that is not good for any of us.|j and dreadful weather. and that is not good for any of us. i think it is particularly fascinating election because we are seeing a big sea change, ostensibly returned to the 2—party politics, the disappearance of ukip potentially, the liberal democrats staggering, and the re—emergence of quite a strong labour tribal vote. well, could the youth vote be key to this election? tonight the seven main parties face
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questions from a newsbeat audience of 18—to—25—year olds in manchester in the final tv debate. so what can we expect? i think we're going to hearfrom i think we're going to hear from the audience tonight a lot of passion, we talk about young voters being apathetic but having gone around the uk in this election talking to merrily under 25 about how they're going to vote and why they're not, a lot of care about the issues, low wages, their chances of going to university, equal rights. what turns them off is the language of politics and performance of politicians on the tv and radio. jonathan blake. fewer than half of young people voted in the 2015 general election — so will they be more likely to turn out this time round? we've been in bradford west, one of the youngest constituencies in the country, talking to a group of under 25s. labour have the biggest poll lead
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amongst the young voters so what does not make of the party the jeremy corbyn? i think he is a great party leader. i worry if he becomes prime minister, would he be able to talk internationally. so not eve ryo ne talk internationally. so not everyone convinced. and what about prime minister theresa may question mark she is good as party leader but they have been in powerfor 18 mark she is good as party leader but they have been in power for 18 years now and i do not feel as a student i have got what i wanted from them. so what do these bright young things one from the party they vote for? mental health is a big issue at the moment. there should be much more emphasis on helping those who have mental health issues. the nhs should be posted because of the cuts to funding. with jeremy hunt going againstjunior doctors, funding. with jeremy hunt going against junior doctors, that has
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funding. with jeremy hunt going againstjunior doctors, that has put pressure on the nhs and a lot more funding needs to be put in.|j believe if you are capable of going to university you should not have to pay a fee. because you worked hard to get there. and what about the brexit word, 73% of the young voted to stay in the eu. i voted to stay in. i voted to stay. remain. to stay in the eu. i voted to stay in. ivoted to stay. remain. ifeel the lib dems are more open about brexit and talking about a second referendum before the final deal goes through. we do not normally associate young voters for some reason with the conservative party. there is a long tradition of this is vote rs there is a long tradition of this is voters tend to move towards the ce ntre voters tend to move towards the centre or a little bit right as they get older. but the tory party has a particular problem this time and thatis particular problem this time and that is compounded by the fact that
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i think theyjust expected that not to matter. they did not anticipate a surge amongst young voters for jeremy corbyn. the question is whether they will turn out. but also the tories took the bizarre step of declaring war on older voters through the so—called dementia attacks. voters they thought were signed, sealed and delivered, those older voters, it is striking that the conservatives do not in a manifesto merely have a message of opportunity or aspiration for young vote rs opportunity or aspiration for young voters about getting on housing ladder. all of that kind of stuff. is there any policy designed to get to someone under 30? it is strange because although the conservatives have had a problem with younger voters, they have been quite good, margaret thatcher, mcmillan, david cameron, in terms of talking about that ladder of opportunity. they
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have had a way of appealing to aspiration. but it is striking and you see it and hear it from focus groups and use it in the vox pops. people of that age just a bit baffled, why they would vote conservative. then again you have the young jeremy corbyn fans. they only have to pay £1 to join the party and he is galvanising them. they think that money grows on trees! ifjeremy corbyn is offering or peddling hope, that is what use is all about, hope. or peddling hope, that is what use is allabout, hope. but or peddling hope, that is what use is all about, hope. but i think it is all about, hope. but i think it is astonishing that the tories went out of their way to is not alienate but certainly sow seeds of doubt
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amongst their coffee —— their core voters. if that was their attempt to say we know that young people should not be paying the fuel allowance for rich pensioners, they did not do that in a good way. of course the a nswer that in a good way. of course the answer is you want a strong economy and entrepreneurial stuff, but nothing about aspiration. and the lib dems, you know, and the snp... well the lib dems had their ma nifesto well the lib dems had their manifesto launch in a discotheque! appealing to young people! will our friends at will ourfriends at bbc will our friends at bbc economy have put together a little malaysian appealing to younger voters. put together a little malaysian appealing to younger votersm there an argument that of the more all the problems in britain they
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mightjust go away? historically there has not been the case. the cba is represented all over the uk and we are getting bigger and bigger. in manchester in 2015 56% of registered voters did not vote. most of them we re voters did not vote. most of them were young people. we are proud of them. they are shaping the future of this country without even lifting a finger. those are used to upload pictures of their food. so join the cba party today. it is easy, you do not have to do anything. the cda party, ignore the problems of the uk and they might just party, ignore the problems of the uk and they mightjust go away. cba party? are we allowed to say that? can't be bothered. now the turnout for 18 to 24—year—old in the
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referendum campaign was 64%. for 18 to 24—year—old in the referendum campaign was 6496. which is pretty good. you have to ask why david cameron did not at that stage lower the voting age to 16 for the referendum. and why would you not do that and then making voting compulsory. that is part of the labour manifesto. i think they do wa nt to labour manifesto. i think they do want to do that. and the lib dems as well and the snp have already done it. but that apathy, it was suggested by jonathan blake, it. but that apathy, it was suggested byjonathan blake, is a p pa re ntly suggested byjonathan blake, is apparently because politicians of a certain age do not know how to talk to young people. this has always been the case, i do a lot of work with schools and debating groups and ifind with schools and debating groups and i find young people are incredibly engaged about politics. that is at school. and i cannot wait to vote. i was involved with the home office withjohn was involved with the home office with john denham was involved with the home office withjohn denham in getting out the
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youth vote. but in fact what happens is by the time they get to 19, 20, 25, they're so busy with their own opinions but they forget actually that you have to make that effort and get your name on a register and get down to the polling station before ten o'clock at night. and for the labour fortunes to go up and down on thursday, those young people have got to put down their game console or whatever, generalising ridiculously, but they've got to get out and make the effort. so much of the election depends on precisely that. if you look at the opinion polls in the last few weeks which put labour much closer to the the pollsters that have narrowed the gap are predicated there being a high turnout. something like 75, 80% of young voters which has never happened before. but anything is
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possible, we live in the era of brexit and donald trump. there has beena brexit and donald trump. there has been a lot of big increases in terms of voter registration, labour might be doing something underneath the surface on social media. that has not really been picked up on yet. so it is possible. well if the conservatives can be bothered to increased their majority on thursday they will have to do well to win some of the seats they won in 2015. one of their top target seats is newcastle—under—lyme in staffordshire. labour have held the seat since 1922, but they are defending a majority ofjust 650. what do voters there want to see from their politicians? satnam rana has been finding out. it is the birthplace of the man who created the modern—day circus. newcastle—under—lyme in north staffordshire. we created the circus
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ring. the foreman has come to town with his act, not that different to the general election. political spin, juggling campaigns, and performance. sound familiar? politics can sometimes feel like a bit of the circus so what will the candidates here do? police numbers in terms of neighbourhood policing have stayed the same and that is important in terms of intelligence gathering feeding through. as we've seen from theresa may we need to look again at what legislation might be needed as the world and technology evolves. we've said we will invest in the security services, in more policemen on the front line and beef up our security apparatus. under theresa may after six years at the home office it has been cut and cut and cut. the impression some people get is that
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we in the lib dems think we allowed too much freedom to too many people and therefore we're not going to put the procedures in place to restrain those people incline towards terrorism. that is not the case. voters have returned labour mp here since 1919, 98 years. can they do it ain? since 1919, 98 years. can they do it again? but this time around the candidates are walking a tightrope. labour contend with a slim majority of 650 in 2015, it is a balancing act. the marginal seat has attracted celebrities aboard. steve coogan out for labour at the new vic theatre. but the real drama is coming on thursday. who will wobble, who will fall and who will be the last man standing? 650 votes separating the parties. theresa may we are hearing has just said that she will beef up some
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human rights laws if they stop us from tackling terrorism. is that the kind of tough rhetoric that could swing it in a constituency where there are just swing it in a constituency where there arejust a swing it in a constituency where there are just a handful of votes? it might do. i wonder, i would question whether the terrible events of the last few weeks on the terror front, i would wonder if it is that simple for the conservatives. because there is only questions to answer, for example about the borough market three, why they were not picked up. and the record of theresa may in home office. i would question with so little time to go where they really that makes a difference. it suggests the conservatives after a pretty rugby campaign are worried. you wrote an article which has been quoted by a lot of people, a few days ago, that suggested that this was the worst conservative campaign since what,
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the second world war? since the first world war. since 1906. where they went backwards. i think to begin with such an enormous lead and such a weak opponent, and then to really make quite a spectacular mess of it, i cannot remember an election in which the conservative campaign has been so vulnerable as this. i think also there's something about her quality of leadership and the way in which she has been exposed to the public and found wanting. to an extent. the strong and stable, build everything around theresa may, addiction the conservative brand, thatis addiction the conservative brand, that is fine and then things began to go wrong with a manifesto, labour fought a better campaign than anticipated. in the last ten days,
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lynton crosby, the australian election guru who had not been in full control, has effectively taken full control, has effectively taken full control, has effectively taken full control of the campaign. and they've tried to move it on to a much more disciplined and clear message. but one of the fascinating things, when it is all over on friday, no matter the size of majority think they will be a lot of tory disquiet about how a lead of 20 points was potentially squandered. those shortcomings suggested in theresa may and her campaign but jeremy corbyn on the campaign stump has been brilliant. that is a fact. absolutely and he engages with people and they like him, they find him affable. that's a different question as to whether you want him running the country and diane abbott at the home office. that is the tory argument. exactly. but he is much
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better with people. i think theresa may, she does not have that kind of human warmth. frankly we're not voting for our friends, but for someone we think is the best leadership. but the tories have a lwa ys leadership. but the tories have always been absolutely bang on with discipline, disciplined getting their supporters, sticking to the message, and that was what tony blairand message, and that was what tony blair and alastair campbell brought to the 1997 election campaign, they learned the only way to do it by discipline. and it hasjust gone learned the only way to do it by discipline. and it has just gone to pot. astonishingly bad. we have got one more full day of campaigning to go. do you expect that tomorrow, brexit, brexit, brexit from the conservatives? 11 days before the substantive talks begin on a sleeping. they have done the strong
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and stable tough —— stuff today and the final message i think will have a lot to do with brexit. the logic makes perfect sense. i think we might look back on the campaign and think that the tories closed in the final few days in quite a clever way andl final few days in quite a clever way and i think that is about the brexit message, motivating former ukip vote rs of message, motivating former ukip voters of that is the key for the tories. david cameron won the last election with 35% of the vote, and if after some wobbling as the polls suggest, there is a large chunk of that 4 million ukip vote, say 2 million, swapping over to the conservatives, in the right places, that takes the conservatives into the majority of 50, 60, 70 territory. for the ukip voter, hearing the brexit word is very important. i think labour are going to try to get it back onto that.
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what happens is beyond anyone's control and that may swing things but i think they had a plan and i think the labour party will get it back and try to go for the carter, reagan thing. jeremy corbyn wants to offer hope and to a certain extent theresa may is offering clear. so we're back to that whole brexit campaign which was based on fear or threat. i think that is damaging for us asa threat. i think that is damaging for us as a democracy. threat. i think that is damaging for us as a democracy. a lot of people i think, and particularly theresa may will be glad when friday comes but i think what happens afterwards, if we have a hung parliament, jeremy corbyn unassailable because probably he will get more votes than ed miliband. theresa may now probably holed below the water line unless she can pull something out of the bag. very interesting indeed.
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with the general election round the corner, my colleague victoria derbyshire's been organising a series of election blind dates — a lunch between two people with very different political views. this time it's the turn of gina miller — the woman who took the government to court over article 50 and won — and godfrey bloom, a former ukip politician known for making controversial remarks — particularly about women. here's how they got on. i'm godfrey bloom. i was a founder member of ukip but it is not for me. but every time i see theresa may on television my pen hovers over the ballot vote. she's very good at running a church fete but as from running a church fete but as from running a church fete but as from running a country i rather not.|j would hope that this is not a date with someone who has no respect for women. i'm gina miller, i took the government to court. my voting history has been for the labour party because it is all but brexit soi party because it is all but brexit so i will vote lib dem. hello! how
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lovely to see you. and you. do you think we have given already more away with the brexit negotiations then we should have done. rather than getting too much away to ali i think it is the mood, all the europeans on the other side of the table must be now looking at us and thinking we can be as strict as possible because this prime minister will buckle under pressure. i do not understand the inflexible way we're going towards these negotiations. why are we negotiating, why notjust leave ? why are we negotiating, why notjust leave? what happens next if we just leave ? leave? what happens next if we just leave? when i left my club, my london club, i wrote a very nice letter and said it was marvellous and goodbye. they said sorry to lose you, goodbye. what are we negotiating? the question i asked
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was what happens next. what happens next is we just leave. they have already said it's not that simple. do people know what they voted for? you're saying people are stupid and do not understand what they voted for? i have been hearing a lot of this. if why the day before the referendum the biggest google search was what is the european union. that was what is the european union. that was the biggest search by millions. always the same when you meet your fellow, so much more common ground than you ever imagined. what is positive, we can disagree and agree but have a civilised conversation. it was pretty civilised, at the beginning! it drifted off a bit at the end. mr bloom megan giglia the
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british public knew what they were voting for. —— mr bloom making it clear. a second referendum? i do not think so, we are where we are. so i think so, we are where we are. so i think not. i do not think there is the public appetite for that. but the public appetite for that. but the idea of a hard brexit, is that what people voted for?” the idea of a hard brexit, is that what people voted for? i think they voted to leave the european union. and we believe in a number of different ways. but the lib dems have had problems, the country has moved on. those who voted for brexit are glad it is happening and the other half who voted to remain, they it is going to happen. that is about three quarters of the country. it has been great to have you, thank you very much. and that is it from election wrap for today. thank you
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for watching. most of us today had a rough day of weather. the good news is that tomorrow is going to be a lot better. some sunshine on the way and a lot warmer and the wind light as well. we still have gales across eastern areas for a time and further heavy rain across eastern scotland in particular and the north—east of england. by the time the rain clears across this portion of the country, sometime tomorrow, we will have seen perhaps even 100 millimetres in some places. further west and south it is a case of clearing skies through this evening and overnight. so tomorrow, still some rain and windy weather for a tomorrow, still some rain and windy weatherfor a time tomorrow, still some rain and windy weather for a time across eastern scotland, perhaps the north east of england but then that window of opportunity with some sunshine before the next area of rain comes
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in from the atlantic. so thursday once again going to be wet, but not so windy. this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines at 8pm: the third london bridge attacker is named — 22—year—old youssef zaghba was living in east london. his name was on a europe—wide watchlist. bell tolls this morning at 11, a minute's silence observed across the uk for the seven people who were killed in the attack and dozens who were injured. an australian nurse, kirsty boden, is the third victim to be named. she was killed as she ran to help others during the attack. also in the next hour, back on the campaign trail —
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theresa may has said she'll change human rights laws,

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