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tv   Election 2017  BBC News  June 9, 2017 2:00am-7:00am BST

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the party itself and the people around himi the party itself and the people around him i think organisationally pretty wea k. around him i think organisationally pretty weak. what is going to happen to brexit now? theresa may called this election in order to pursue the kind of brexit that you wanted but it doesn't look like she is going to get the result she was after. what a huge error, to pick a remainer to lead a brexit party in a brexit election. a massive mistake. if we get a corbyn coalition then brexit is in some trouble. if brexit is in some trouble, will you come back into active politics and fight for what was voted for only last summer? i would have absolutely no choice but to do exactly that. well, that's interesting. we've got to go. i'm sorry, interesting. we've got to go. i'm sorry, we interesting. we've got to go. i'm sorry, we may be able to come back to you. we have a result from battersea. i hereby give notice that the total number of votes given to the total number of votes given to the candidates in the election is as
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follows. . . chris coghlan, independent, 1234. ido hereby i do hereby declare that marsha de cordova. .. so, jane allison, the financial secretary to the treasury, a former public health minister, is defeated in battersea. labour takes battersea. and the swing in battersea, let's just see what that is, 46%. a swing of io% battersea, let's just see what that is, 46%. a swing of 10% from conservative to labour in an area thatis conservative to labour in an area that is almost 80% in favour of remain. just under 80% in favour of remain. i want to get back to nigel farage, whom we interrupted for that result. mr farage, thank you for waiting. the last thing you said was very tantalising. you said you would have to come back into active politics. it is not what i plan on 04 taiwan. i was thrilled to leave
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ukip to pressure cameron into offering the referendum and to winning. we triggered article 50. i thought it was all done. mrs may went for the big majority. she was found out, i think, went for the big majority. she was found out, ithink, in went for the big majority. she was found out, i think, in this campaign. what is remarkable about corbyn‘s achievement is he is getting remainers in london voting for him, but he is getting ukip voters around the rest of the country voting for him come here. of course, he's not going to be able to form a government on his own if it works out that way. but if we get a coalition with him and the snp and whoever else, then we may well be looking down the barrel of second referendum. is the whole brexit campaign, the brexit decision, is it all injeopardy now? is campaign, the brexit decision, is it all in jeopardy now? is the timetable... does it mean anything any more? well, look, let's see, there's a long way to go. but i do think this, i think, let's save the other result happens and theresa may
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scrapes through with a small majority or forms a minority government, i don't know. i'm not sure that her credibility is going to be restrained in brussels. i think, yes like the timetable, whatever happens here, is likely to get pushed back. how confident are you that there will will be what is called the hard brexit that you wa nted called the hard brexit that you wanted and that you think you won one year ago? i was always a bit suspicious with mrs may as to whether we would get it. she was asked in the campaign repeatedly, having backed remain, did shejust said tuesday the will of the people. you know, this may prove to be unfinished business —— shejust said she was carrying out the will of the pupils to bite the vicar‘s daughter, the vicar of bray. —— the vicar‘s daughter, the vicar of bray. one corbyn said that we would leave, he kind of boxed off brexit is an issue
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for ukip voters, many of whom did not see the party as being relevant in this campaign. and ultimately i think this rock we are seeing here tonight is all about personality. so all the shock we are seeing. ukip voters wa nt all the shock we are seeing. ukip voters want somebody by —— who they think is speaking for them. theresa may try to be an establishment figure. corbyn looked comfortable in his own skin, he actually appeared to be enjoying it. and the prime minister came across as insincere and frankly robotic. andrew marr has and frankly robotic. andrew marr has a question for you. could i ask you, nigel farage, whether you think that those very pro—brexit, strong brexit mps in the tory party will now try to remove theresa may as prime minister? yes, and i also think actually, andrew, ithink minister? yes, and i also think actually, andrew, i think on both sides of the debate within the conservative party the prime
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minister bulls debility as leader of that party is fatally damaged. 0k, thank you very much, mr farage. let's rejoin emily, we have another result. another gainful labour from the conservatives. their fourth game of the light. labour have yet to lose a seat. but it is early days. so all their fourth game of the night. stockton south poots paul williams in with a 40% share of the vote. you can see what has helped but a long, as mr farage was saying, you get down 8%. it seems that jeremy corbyn or the labour has picked up a lot of that fruit. the conservative share has not moved at all. the swing here, you can see, is pretty solid from conservative to labour. this was number 47 on the labour. this was number 47 on the labour target list. they were hoping to be competitive here, an outside chance, and they have picked it up. i have been referring to this at intervals throughout the light so far, this is how our exit poll composed of results so far. at one point it looked as if we might have
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to recalibrate because the conservatives were much lower down on the exit poll and they weren't real results. now you can see, based on the results so far. just under 50 results so far you can actually see what has happened. the exit poll and the results so far showing much similar pictures now. ukip down both 1296. similar pictures now. ukip down both 12%. the snp similar pictures now. ukip down both i2%. the snp down 11. a bit further in real life. you can see what has happened, more or less, the conservative and labour votes evening out. and proving the exit poll right so far. we have just had in this results so far. ealing central and action has been held for labour by rupa huq. an important seat as the greens stood aside to help labour. she is on a whopping 60% share of the vote. it was number 21 the conservative target list but it looks as if labour is having quite a good night in london so —— it was number two on the conservative target list. they did
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not need a very big swing to take this one, but you can see what has happened. it has gone massively towards labour, a bit like that seat, putney, wherejustin greening hold on. so what wherejustine greening held on. very big swing to labour but the direction of travel certainly favours labour in london so certainly favours labour in london so far tonight. if the exit poll proves right, the conservatives are short of an overall majority. boris johnson, who has a vested interest in all of this, the foreign secretary, has been talking about the odds of him becoming prime minister at 5—1. he is arriving at his account in uxbridge. whether he is being asked questions or not, i don't know. hello, how are you? do you still want to be leader of your party, boris? quite sensibly, not answering any of that. kirsty wark,
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bring us up—to—date on what is going on in scotland? well, we are about to get ourfirst on in scotland? well, we are about to get our first was go seat. it looks like glasgow east will declare $0011 looks like glasgow east will declare soon and it looks like the snp have held on by theirfingernails, possibly with a majority of less than 100. glasgow central was a swing two years ago to be snp. that too may be injeopardy. that is extraordinary because the council has just lost, the labour council just lost in the snp a matter of months ago. it looks like a big, big change in glasgow. swing we don't know whether or not glasgow central will go to labour. but the snp majority is going to be smashed. after the angus result, there is a tantalising thought that if the exit poll is out, it could be the new conservative mps in scotland which give theresa may a slender majority. that would be extraordinary. very
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much indeed. well, we are at 2:10am. the exit poll which we gave at 10pm has not been changed yet in a result, all of the results we have had on, we have had 100 declared, we haven't gone from the exit poll to what we call a forecast, when the results is commend modify the exit poll. we are still saying the conservatives are the largest party on 314. labour on 266. the snp on 34. the liberal on 14. and plaid cymru on three. and the greens on one. and that is what we are holding for the moment atjust one. and that is what we are holding for the moment at just after two telly. we are ten minutes later the news on the hour because so much is happening in the election centre of the bbc. let's now have our news. and wejoin reeta chakrabarti. hello. with more than 90 seats counted
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in the general election, labour have gained three — one from the snp in scotland and three from the tories in wales. an exit poll for the bbc, itv and sky has predicted the tories will be the biggest party, but that they won't win a commons majority. it says they will have lost 17 seats, while labour will have made gains. tom bateman has the very latest. the night began with a big projection — the exit poll. studied closely by all of the politicians. but remember, it's still just a forecast. it has the conservatives as the largest party, but short of an overall majority. labour have held wrexham, an area theresa may visited several times during the campaign. they have held on in darlington, too, where only a marginal swing to the tories was nothing like the kind of swing they needed to fulfil mrs may's hopes of a big parliamentary majority. there
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has been a labour gain in scotland, where the snp could be on course to lose a number of seats. and look at the mood in hastings, hardly beaming confidence, where the home secretary is defending her seat. i'm just quietly waiting and keeping an eye on everybody and everything. for some in labour it is already in much better night than they had hoped. theresa may's authority has been undermined by this election. she is a damaged prime minister whose reputation may never recover. the exit poll suggests the tories would have 314 seats, down 17 on two years ago. this is a projection. i think you made that clear. it's not a result. these exit polls have been wrong in the past. i think in 2015 they underestimated our vote. i think in a couple of elections before that they overestimated our vote. it's the real votes that count, though. and there's the traditional race to see which constituency could declare first. the two other seats won by labour
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in north—east england showed the tories may have done better than the exit poll suggested. the festival of democracy has been on for show. watch out for some upsets through the night. at least one minister's seat could be in question, and ukip's vote appears to be collapsing in places. good evening, mr corbyn. .. jeremy corbyn arrived home in his north london constituency tonight. if the exit poll is correct, a big if, he will have confounded the expectations of even his own mps. while theresa may's gamble to win big in a snap election will have failed. but the truth inside those ballot boxesis but the truth inside those ballot boxes is still to be fully revealed. tom bateman, bbc news. with the news of the exit poll, the pound has been falling against other currencies, including the dollar and the euro. let's get the latest reaction now from sharanjit leyl in singapore. tell us what's going on? well, that's right, the most immediate reaction in the markets has been
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from the british pound sterling falling nearly 2% against the us dollar after that exit poll suggested the conservative party could lose its parliamentary majority. it had recovered a little bit on some evidence that the exit poll may not have been entirely accurate when we saw those first results come in. analysts i've been speaking to say it is likely that the pound will continue falling through the day. a hung parliament being the worst case scenario for the pound given the political uncertainty and brings, they say, because it complicates brexit talks even further. uncertainty is something markets and investors don't like. having said all that, though, most asian markets that have opened our higher, but onlyjust. will be more from me throughout the light of course. for the time being, let's go back to david dimbleby in the election studio. welcome back to our election centre,
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we are not yet doing it but we are about, i think it is likely increase but not by very much the forecast for the conservative seats. they are still going to be short of the nod from what hear, we will get get those figures in just a moment. this is being borne out in tory headquarters. i understand ministers 110w headquarters. i understand ministers now do not expect to outperform the exit poll. that means privately, as we speak, there is acceptance and discussion of the fact that senior tories do not now expected have an overall majority. which means, if of course by the morning that remains the same, theresa may's roll of the dice looks set to be one of the biggest political mistakes that we have seen for quite some time. jeremy corbyn is arriving at his
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account in islington so go smiling like a cheshire cat. let's not forget, you was elected by labour members to be astonishment of the labour political establishment wa nts. labour political establishment wants. then the labour establishment tried to get rid of him. he was re—elected twice, and now he looks to have achieved one of the biggest political upsets in many, many yea rs. political upsets in many, many years. he has relished this campaign. we have seen day by day he has looked more and more confident, he has looked as if he has enjoyed more and more. he has, from the time that he took on the labour leadership, believe that if given the chance he could begin to put together a sort of coalition of young people, of former greens, former people who moved away from the labour party in the late 2000 the labour party in the late 2000 the mac, and that might possibly be some way towards getting labour into power. even 24 hours ago, even today, nobody in the labour party was predicting this kind of result. both the main parties got their numbers completely wrong. they got their numbers wrong, the polls got it wrong. if the exit poll is right.
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so, what happens, what will happen in your experience in westminster if theresa may goes back without an overall majority in the house of commons? i think the idea that the tories would give up on holding onto power is for the birds. if she manages to stay on she will try to put together a government. the technical process is they will put forward a queen's speech and there the others devote them down, very volatile. let's here -- to vote them down. he was said to be in some danger, angus robertson. angus robertson, scottish national party, 18,400 78. douglas ross, scottish conservative and unionist, 20 2000. the conservatives take
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murray. angus robertson, a familiar figure on the house of commons asking his questions on behalf of the snp, is out of the house. and douglas ross is there for the conservatives. this is significant nationally because the snp have been the third biggest party in westminster. this is the equivalent of the westminster leader of the lib dems losing at a different kind of election. the tories poured huge resources into this and it seems to have paid off. there is the result. a majority for the conservatives of just over 4000, taken from the snp. the sharav the vote was 48% for the conservatives, 39% for the snp —— the share of the vote. we can see those figures... well, a p pa re ntly we can see those figures... well, apparently we can't. i was going to show you the share... here we are. the change, the conservative goes up
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16%, the snp is down 11%. it is a swing from the snp to the conservatives of 14%. angus robertson, leader of the snp in westminster, is out. the conservatives take the seat. we have 110w conservatives take the seat. we have now had 122 declarations in. and, so far, labourare up now had 122 declarations in. and, so far, labour are up five. the conservatives are down two. the snp are down three. that is how we stand at the moment. we would talking about what is going to happen. perhaps we should talk about that. we have been rejoined by peter kalmar, our election expert. although everybody around this table is an election expert right now! on the back of that murray result. the snp are down everywhere that we have had result from scotland by top 15 01’ had result from scotland by top 15 or16 had result from scotland by top 15 or 16 percentage points. on current form they will end up with about 35% of the vote, the largest party in votes, they may have a majority of
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seats. if you add together the votes of the unionist parties in scotland, the conservatives, labour, the liberal democrats, they will outnumber the votes to the snp by almost 2—1. outnumber the votes to the snp by almost 2-1. what do you deduce from that? i think this kills scottish independence. you think voters were voting on the independence referendum? i think the snp mandate to have a referendum, they still have a majority, a near majority in the scottish parliament, they are the scottish parliament, they are the biggest party in westminster in scotland, but the votes tell us a story that i think independence is dead. labour also expected to take glasgow north east. without question, the metaphorical question oi'i question, the metaphorical question on the ballot paper in scotland was about whether or not people wanted a second referendum. it was a different question being asked to other parts of the country. we have a declaration coming from great grimsby. emily, iwill come a declaration coming from great grimsby. emily, i will come to you ina grimsby. emily, i will come to you in a moment. let'sjust hear this.
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the number of votes cast for each candidate is as follows. those are the results from great grimsby, which the conservatives had hoped for and labour held onto. a majority of 2565. let's see what the swing was. 49% for labour. it was up 196. swing was. 49% for labour. it was up 1%. the conservative vote up 16%. the ukip road was down 20%. and the swing, labour to conservative, just over 3%. this is another kind of seat where the tories' strategy was they hope to replicate everywhere that the ukip wrote they expected would swing across to them. that hasn't happened here. the numbers showed a huge drop in the ukip folk. clearly lots of those voters went back to labour, rather than going across to the tories. we mentioned it briefly earlier but perhaps it was a strategic mistake for the tories to go very aggressively after
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that kind of vote, rather than trying to shallot... why do you think that is? you have been travelling around all of these constituencies. boroughs of a riot of reasons. partly it is a misinterpretation of who ukip voters. it is not all right wing, plenty ofjejunal voters. it is not all right wing, plenty of jejunal labour voters. also the tory campaign has been full of missteps. theresa may you turning over the social care policy that went straight to cause anxiety amongst many older voters, who will have seen in these kind of seats people who are traditionally conservative, voters were worried about this. we saw the labour party having cut through over police cuts. 0f having cut through over police cuts. of course, the awful terror attacks that have frozen the campaign at two different moments, the labour party allowed to put together two issues, if you like. they were campaigning very ha rd if you like. they were campaigning very hard on austerity. they put
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that together with the issue of security. we heard that on the doorstep, coming back, people concerned about police cuts. that is probably one of the issues we have seen probably one of the issues we have seen here that will have cut through, that took the shine off mike the tories' early stages, the early confidence that people have into reeza may. i said we were going to turn our exit poll into a forecast on the basis of the results we have had in. 137 now, we have 500 01’ so we have had in. 137 now, we have 500 or so to go. let's see on the facade of the house of commons what we are now saying. the conservatives or on 322. 396 would give them an overall majority. labour on 261. the conservatives are quite a shot of the 326 that they would need. we have a result. emily? another
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conservative gain in scotland. luke graham takes it for the conservatives on 41% cherokee rose. a handsome majority of 3359. this was 128 on the target list. it wasn't within any of our sites. they have done extremely well. it is interesting to see notjust the snp falling but labour as well. maybe there has been a tactical unionist vote towards the conservatives, they are up 21%. i said earlier, holding most of hostage to fortune, that we wouldn't see a bigger swing than the one we had in angus. this is another 16% swing from the snp to the conservatives, landing it in safe territory. it was taken from labour last time around, now they are in second place, the snp. wigan, borre north, the north—west of england. this is labour's 15 of the night, sitting on 54% sure of the vote. david nuttal is pushed out, the
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rebellious conservative mp is now out, and james frith takes his place. you can see what the change looks like here. labour only needed a 0.4% swing. and they have done that and more. 13% increase in the share of the vote. you can see how handsome that is, from the conservative to labour. one more has just come in. labour are having a very good night in scotland, as are the conservatives, to be fair. a labourgain the conservatives, to be fair. a labour gain from the snp in midlothian on 36% to 34% share of the vote. owen thompson is out. daniel frawley is in. you can see that drop in the snp sharav the vote. both of those parties are up. the lib dems are not making much movement here. so all the share of the vote. the swing is also 11%. we sortjoin enormous swings of up to 40% was the snp last time around. it looks as though labour and the conservatives are starting to make some waves of their own north of the
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border in scotland with these games back, suggesting that they are trying to push into the long grass any talk of a second independence referendum. we will come back when we have some more. and we have got some more comments from people. we are in an extraordinary situation where lord ashcroft, the former conservative chairman, has put out a message saying that the conservative scots could possibly save the tories, that would be extraordinary, unthinkable in recent elections but thatis unthinkable in recent elections but that is where we might be. kevin maguire arthur daley ref has tweeted ona similartheme maguire arthur daley ref has tweeted on a similar theme saying angus robertson is gone. ruth davidson, talked about as a future leader of the conservatives, she is the leader of the scottish conservatives at the moment, she said, well done dog was ross, you will make a superb mp. —— well done douglas ross. this could be the difference between them being
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in government and not. the tories gained three in scotland and lost fourin gained three in scotland and lost four in england. exactly. the new forecast leaves them still short of a majority, but politically there is a majority, but politically there is a big difference between the original forecast of 314. on those numbers, the conservatives might have failed to get a queen's speech through parliament. with 322, that is the finalfigure, through parliament. with 322, that is the final figure, it could move either way, it will be a conservative queen's speech. they may need to butter up the dup in northern ireland, but there is not an anti—tory coalition of left and ce ntre—left an anti—tory coalition of left and centre—left parties and scottish nationalists and so one that could combine to defeat the tories. they have been humiliated that they will carry on. humiliated, but if it moves another few seat up they could have a majority. anotherfew moves another few seat up they could have a majority. another few seats down and they may be out. we are in that area where small differences. we'll be up well into the morning
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because the final few results are concerned of the politics of parliament. that is absolutely right. we can be confident that the unionist mps in northern ireland would prop up may if the numbers are in kind of zone. —— would prop up theresa may. but her own authority will have been so damaged from chucking a ball into the roulette wheel and making such a strategic error. thank you, we are going to go to putney, then i want to talk in derby to margaret beckett about labour. let's go to the education secretaryjustine greening labour. let's go to the education secretary justine greening in putney. you only just secretary justine greening in putney. you onlyjust scraped back in putney, do you? well, i'm delighted to have been re—elected as the mp for putney roehampton and southfields. it is always a tough battle here in london, that's what we have seen tonight. i think the other factor we have seen tonight. i think the otherfactor behind this we have seen tonight. i think the other factor behind this is very much young people really for the first time in many years are finally
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choosing to use the vote that they have got in the ballot box. but yes, i'm delighted to be able to give to you deserve my local community. what is it about the conservative party that does not appeal to young people? i think labour very much offered young people something that was appealing to them in terms of the obvious policy around tuition fees, the fact that it's unaffordable, the ifs said it had a black hole in a way was not something that particularly necessarily dissuaded them from thinking that was a policy that they wanted to vote for, but i think it's quite early on in the evening and a lot of the seats that declare early now are more urban seats. i think it's worth pointing out that both battersea and putney are the two seats in our country with the very youngest demographic, so with the very youngest demographic, so particularly seeing that perhaps coming through in the votes here, and there is a very long way to go
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in this election through the course of the night. if we, we know we have made a forecast of 322, that's short ofa made a forecast of 322, that's short of a majority for the tories in the house of commons. what's the future of the tory party under theresa may and the brexit negotiations, if that is the final result? well, i don't think at this point it's particularly worthwhile getting into speculation. there are a huge number of results do sul come through. as i said at the beginning of this, london is always an incredibly hard—fought london is always an incredibly hard —fought political environment. everybody knows that down here. i delighted to be representing my community, it's one i've represented 12 years. it's fantastic i get the chance to continue to do that. did you expect a majority of 60, 70, 100, for the conservatives?” you expect a majority of 60, 70, 100, for the conservatives? i think it was very difficult to tell exactly how the election would play
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out, not least because actually, when you look at the polls, national polls, but in practice we all know that perhaps results have never been more regionally driven and therefore the days that we can really look at a global picture of somehow what's going on across the uk and rely on it to do with any kind of accurate sense of what's really happening on the ground, i think argon, and we saw that in some of the polls that we re saw that in some of the polls that were reported in the papers this morning. i've often thought that in 2005, if you interviewed 1000 people in my constituency of putney, would you really have seen the swing that i was about to get to first get re—elected? i i was about to get to first get re—elected ? i don't i was about to get to first get re—elected? i don't know. but what it shows as is its exceptionally ha rd it shows as is its exceptionally hard in these political climates to really see what's going on on the ground and that's what we are seeing tonight. so does it make sense in those circumstances to say i've concluded the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the yea rs certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this election, which i said over and over
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againi election, which i said over and over again i won't hold? the words of the prime minister. i think the prime minister was right to recognise that britain was in a very different place now than we were in 2015, and it was right to go to the country and to ask them the question about what their views were, what people's views were about the direction they went to and wanted for the future. it what we are seeing in this vote is that people are still in a debate about what that future direction should be, but it is very, very early days. so i think it's easy to pick on some results in some parts of the country and to say that they are going to be massively representative. i suspect you will continue to see some very locally driven results that will on occasion contrast, as we've seen the conservatives doing very well in scotland, less well in london, and i think you will have to see how this
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plays out across the rest of the night. justine greening, thank you very much. we are joined from derby by margaret margaret beckett. if i'm not mistaken you were one of the people who gavejeremy corbyn your support in the leadership for the labour party on the grounds there should be a fair contest and afterwards said you were a complete moron for having done it. are you still a moron? somebody else said that, i didn't think it was right to dissent, but yes, i agree that it was a good thing to widen the debate and then i realised that it might be thought that i was suggesting that people should vote for someone who, asjeremy was, people should vote for someone who, as jeremy was, had people should vote for someone who, asjeremy was, had no experience at all on a front bench and so i made haste to say, i think you should be pa rt haste to say, i think you should be part of the debate, i don't think he should necessarily be the leader. there you go. so what do you make of what's happening? well, there's no
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question that i think the two things that i don't think you can dispute about this election campaign, is thatjeremy has about this election campaign, is that jeremy has performed about this election campaign, is thatjeremy has performed infinitely better than anybody probably including jeremy ever expected he could, and that theresa may has performed infinitely worse than anybody expected that she could. you know, it's the conventional wisdom, but why is it conventional, because sometimes it is also wise. the british people don't tend to like having an election they didn't have to have. so what is the consequence going to be, if we are seeing a much weakened prime minister, a much damaged conservative party? at this stage are you thinking there might bea stage are you thinking there might be ajeremy stage are you thinking there might be a jeremy corbyn premiership? what, to be honest, what i'm principally thinking is i'm wondering, fearing, i might say,
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whether i was prescient when we put oui’ whether i was prescient when we put our stuff away in the garage tonight andi our stuff away in the garage tonight and i said to my husband, let's do it carefully because you never know, we might need it again soon. i'm sorry, i missed what you said, can you say it against, i had another voice in my ear. when we put our way oui’ voice in my ear. when we put our way our equipment from our car tonight i said we'd better do it carefully because you never know, we might need it again soon. it was a joke. i think it's still going to be a joke. thank you. and as far as the future of the labour party goes, clearly the people you would recognise as on the people you would recognise as on the left of the party, the part of the left of the party, the part of the party that you don't occupy, are making the running now and whether it's jeremy corbyn making the running now and whether it'sjeremy corbyn or somebody else, do you think this is the new direction labour is going to go in? listen, i have always regarded myself as being either soft less door centre—left, depending on how you define these terms, and then other people, if i may say so usually in your profession, have
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moved the goalposts around me. i've basically stayed where i am and i propose to stay there. how have we moved the goalposts around you question might well, you are saying of course you are not on the left. well, yes, actually i've always thought i was on the left and i still think i am. thought i was on the left and i still think! am. margaret thought i was on the left and i still think i am. margaret beckett, thank you forjoining us. we've got two more results in, emily?” thank you forjoining us. we've got two more results in, emily? i want to show this one. there's so much churn overnight under the conservatives are taking seats in scotla nd conservatives are taking seats in scotland from the snp and it seems now from the lib dems in england. this is southport, wherejohn pugh stood down and maybe that help the conservatives, we don't know, but damien moore has now taken this. not only have they taken it but they've pushed the lib dems into third place here. they have the seat before, the lib dems are in third place, conservatives on 39% share of the vote and i can show you what that change looks like. games then for
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labour and the conservatives at the expense it seems of ukip as well as the lib dems. this wasn't a particularly high leave area, so the lib dems would have hoped to do well here and yet both those parties, parties of leave we now say, seem to have done better. the swing is 7.6% towards the conservatives, so a bit ofa towards the conservatives, so a bit of a ray of light in england. can i interrupt you for a result, we will come back to you. result from renfrewshire. snp held, by france's oswald. night, lorraine and macmillan returning officer for the east renfrewshire constituency declare that the total number of votes given to each candidate was as follows. paul masterton, scottish conservative and unionist, 21,000 496. bloody hell. george mcdougall
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blair, scottish labour party, 14300 and 46. the total number of votes cast was 53,805 and the total number of ballot papers rejected was 67. the ballot papers were rejected for the following reasons. things are a bit awry with our system because you should be able to see the snp but the truth is the conservatives have lea pt two places, the truth is the conservatives have leapt two places, to the truth is the conservatives have lea pt two places, to top the truth is the conservatives have leapt two places, to top the ballot here. snp were 123,000, the conservatives with 21,000 the seat. i'm not quite sure what happened to oui’ i'm not quite sure what happened to our figures, i'm not quite sure what happened to ourfigures, do i'm not quite sure what happened to our figures, do doubt i'm not quite sure what happened to ourfigures, do doubt we can i'm not quite sure what happened to our figures, do doubt we can sort it out ina our figures, do doubt we can sort it out in a minute. shall we go back to where we were, if we can, emily? where were you, ynys mon? i'll show
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you ynys mon, it was number one on the plaid cymru target list and you can see what happened here. they haven't gained it. labour has held it on 42% share of the vote, quite slipped down behind the conservatives into third place, so when we look at the swing what might have been on a good night swing towards plaid, away from labour, actually becomes a swing as you can see from the conservatives to labour, 2.1%, and we are going to hand back now, we have renfrewshire east, have we? we might have done pottage east, east dunbartonshire, where... percentage bowl-macro being 78.23%. mp at the moment. i.e., returning officer for the uk parliamentary election in the east dunbartonshire county constituency, hereby give notice that the total numberof
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hereby give notice that the total number of votes polled for each candidate... he had a majority of just over 2002—macro years ago. callu m just over 2002—macro years ago. callum mcnally, scottish labour party, 7531. applause sheila mechan, conservative and unionist, 7563. applause john nicholson, scottish national party, 15600 and 84. applause jo swinson, scottish liberal democrats, 21,000... cheering 21,023. there were 68 out jo
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swinson, former minister in the coalition for the liberal democrats recovers dunbartonshire east from john nicholson, they're on the right. jo swinson in red will now perhaps come up and make a speech, we don't know, and see. yes. the lib dems will be absolutely thrilled by that result, because she was when pa rt that result, because she was when part of the coalition seem very much as one of the most talented of the next—generation ad for the snpjohn nicholson, big name for them gone, a prominent member of the snp front bench in westminster, somebody who was very often put forward either party. he of course... theresa may arriving at her account at maidenhead with her husband, philip. she will have heard all this news. she will have heard all this news. she is safe in her seat in maidenhead, i don't know if anybody
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will try to question her as she comes to the count. i'm sure they'll try, whether she will answer anything is a different question. she's looking pretty grim faced as she arrives. philip made, who made an appearance on the campaign trail yesterday at the last minute, smiling for the cameras. why bother new thing we have discovered about the prime minister is the naughtiest thing she ever did was walk through a wheat field as a child. running through wheat fields was the nautilus, maybe walking through would have been fine. this is a political disaster it seems for her. back tojo political disaster it seems for her. back to jo swinson, political disaster it seems for her. back tojo swinson, who was a feisty performer when she was in the house of commons. could be a leader, potential leader? she's talked of that in lib dems circles, she stopped swing that way, now she's backin stopped swing that way, now she's back in westminster we'll see. there's another former leader of the liberal democrats, nick clegg, arriving at his count. labour sources have told me they expect to ta ke sources have told me they expect to take sheffield hallam from nick clegg. he's looking... he is. he had
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a good campaign, nick clegg. a lot of people thought he spoke well on brexit, wanting the second referendum. i wonder if he will be relieved not to remain in the house of commons having been leader of a small liberal democrat party. since 2015 there was speculation about whether or not he would actually stand again. i wonder, had this parliament run to 2020, whether it would've stood again but the early election was called and he stood again. you suspect perhaps he will find other things to do. if you are correct that he's lost. we need to make sure it is correct. we do. labour sources have told me they are confident of taking it but until we hear it from the returning officer we can never be quite sure. certainly his body language would suggest that. we are also hearing the result on a knife edge for tim farron, the lib dem leader, to potentially a recount in westmorland. glasgow east held by
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the snp. with a majority of 10,000, just over 10,000. independent, 158. thank you, the declaration will be made by the high sheriff of south yorkshire. back to sheffield. if they can sort it out. i stephen ingram, being the returning officer of the election held on thursday, june 2017 do hereby give notice the numberof june 2017 do hereby give notice the number of votes cast for each candidate at the election is as follows. nick clegg, liberal democrats, 19,756. cheering . jared o'mara, labour cheering .jared o'mara, labour party, 21,000 881. cheering logan robin, green party, 823. john
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godden thurley, uk independence party, 929 will stop ianjeffrey walker, the conservative party candidate, 13,561. stephen dominik winston, social democrat party, 70. total spoiled papers, 89. and i hereby declare... so nick clegg has lost his seat in sheffield hallam. it's worth remembering he looks quite saddened by that, that he was the man responsible for the great experiment in politics, in going into the coalition with the conservatives and paid a terrible price. his party did. and now,
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tonight, he's paid the price, and does look what you might call almost visibly upset at having lost sheffield hallam. he does, he's been the mp there for a long time. it's the mp there for a long time. it's the end of what had been a successful political career. he was deputy prime minister for five yea rs, deputy prime minister for five years, took on those brutal wounds from being part of the coalition, but to lose his seat rather than being able to curtail his career at a time of his own choosing is not what anyone would choose. all political careers end in failure, don't they, but i wonder for the liberal democrats, their usp was the promise of a second wreck wood referendum but the most prominent exponent of that of all, nick clegg, has lost his seat, so we will see through the night how that strategy of offering a second referendum has played out in different places. we seemed jo swinson win in scotland but it seems it's almost like there's a different election taking place in scotland. lord ashcroft was saying earlier that scotland may
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have saved the conservatives. scotland has also saved the liberal democrats. they've lost two seats in england but are picking up seats in scotland. the expect to lose leeds north west, greg mulholland, we expect that to be a labour gain as well. but again these two tribes election playing out in extraordinarily different ways in different parts. family liberal democrat seats do we have in so far? our scoreboard with showing just one liberal democrat seat, no change. is that correct? i think that's right will stop one. yes. i hope that's right. but they may well pick up vince cable's old street, twickenham, maybe one or two others in london, but nothing in the south—west. the results from the south—west, the liberal democrats have gone further backwards. as we said at the start of the night the liberal democrats would be happy to hold on to what they had and maybe make a couple of games, but they we re make a couple of games, but they were not expecting much else. well,
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the victor in sheffield hallam, jared o'mara, speaking and we will hang on! jared o'mara, speaking and we will hang on i think, just for a moment, see if we can hear nick clegg's speech. let's remind you of the figures here in sheffield. the labour vote, 21,881. the liberal democrats, 18700 and 56. the conservatives, 13,000 761. 24% for the conservatives. the switch from mustang, labour goes up three, the liberal democrats down five, the swing from liberal democrat to labour, 4%. certainly a long speech being made! he may be coming to the end. i hope the defeated nick clegg will be the next to speak. i think it's worth hanging on for that. voters tell pollsters they want
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politicians to put nation before party. nick clegg did that massively after the 2010 election. it looks as if voters don't reward politicians who put nation before party. ladies and gentleman, i'd like to invite nick clegg to say a few words. thank you. thank you very much for... applause thank you very much for this opportunity to say a few words and i'd like to start by congratulating jared on his spectacular victory stop its been the greatest privilege of my political life to represent this wonderful constituency sheffield hallam for the last 12 years, and! sheffield hallam for the last 12 years, and i wishjared o'mara all the best of luck in representing the families and communities in sheffield hallam, with the dedication that they deserve and i also others who want to fully endorse what jarrett said about you
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as chief returning officer and all of your staff in once again conducting the elections across our great city so professionally. so thank you very much indeed. a huge special thanks from me to penny baker, to my agent, and to my whole team here, who not only supported me as ever so team here, who not only supported me as ever so unflaggingly in this snap general election, but also in the 12 years in which i have served as an mp in sheffield hallam, and prior to that my liberal democrat predecessor richard allen as well stop thank you, thank you from the bottom of my heart for everything you've done. thank you much indeed. imi time in parliament have never shirked from the political battle, i've never retreated from the political battlefield. i've always thought to stand by the liberal values i believe in. but i of course have encountered this evening something that many people have encountered before tonight and i suspect many
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people will encounter after tonight, which is in politics you lived by the sword and you die by the sword. but i would just like if i made to the couple words about what faces the couple words about what faces the parliament that is going to be constituted in a few days' time in westminster. it is a parliament which in my judgment westminster. it is a parliament which in myjudgment will not only face the excruciating task of trying to assemble a sensible government for this country, will not only need to deal with the agonising decisions which we face as a country as we navigate our way towards brexit, but asa navigate our way towards brexit, but as a parliament that is presiding over a deeply, deeply divided and polarised nation. we saw that in the brexit referendum last year and we see it here again tonight. polarised between left and right, between different regions and nations and areas of the country, but most gravely of all, this huge gulf now between young and old and my only
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plea would be to all mps, including jarrett from all parties is this, that we will not pick our way through the very difficult times that our country faces if in the next parliament mps of all parties simply seek to amplify what divides them. we must try and reach out to each other, to try and find common ground, if we are to heal those profound divisions, because if we do not... applause if we do not, it is myjudgment that our country will endure unprecedented hardship and difficulty in the years ahead and whatever party you are from... commonly known as vince cable, liberal democrats, 34,000... commonly known as vince cable, liberal democrats, 34,000. .. the twickenham result. cheering 34,969. catherine sarah darnley, labour party, 6113. drtania
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34,969. catherine sarah darnley, labour party, 6113. dr tania mathias commonly known as doctor tania mathias, served if party, 25,207. —— conservative party. the total number of rejected... so one goes down and as one goes down the other one comes up. vince cable, who was defeated at the last election for twickenham and liberal democrat business secretary and the coalition, has retaken twickenham. he will have heard of what has happened to nick clegg, he may not have heard what nick clegg was saying, rather moving speech about the future of young people in the political system and the future that the new house of commons faces and the problems, but anyway, vince cable is back and i suppose... the
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electorate gives with one hand and ta kes electorate gives with one hand and takes away with the other, within moments of each other but also remember a very, very knife edge resulting westmorland, where tim farron, the current party leader, is facing potential defeat. there's chatter about a recount. of course if that were to happen, lo and behold, prominent liberal democrat vince cable has just walked back into westminster. lucy manning. hello from tim farron's count, where it's pretty much on a knife edge. we have a recount here. it's a bundle recount, they are not going through every single vote, but they are looking at the bundles. there seem to be some votes that haven't been counted. it seems a bit of a mess down there. but what it does tell us is that if they were —— this vote is tight. | is that if they were —— this vote is tight. i was told perhaps initially a few hundred votes in it. that's tim farron, the liberal democrat leader who had a majority of nearly 9000. i think what we are seeing is
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the night develops is that potentially gets a bit dicey for the lib dems, not as good as it looked originally. nick clegg has lost his seat. they've potentially lost in leeds north west. yes, they've gained vince cable's seat and they have a seat in scotland. they need to get a few more in scotland for this to be a better night for tim farron. he needs to hold onto his own seat, but if he doesn't do that well, if the lib dems don't do that well, if the lib dems don't do that well tonight, i think there will certainly be questions about his leadership. mike robb thank you very much, we'll come back there. watching theresa may's face as she wa nted watching theresa may's face as she wanted her count, iwonder watching theresa may's face as she wanted her count, i wonder if on the basis of these results she might actually voluntarily stand down as leader of the conservative party. you'll been at this stage that's quite a leap. she didn't make it public, ever, but it was plain that she had ambition to take office, to be prime ministerfor quite some time. now i think if she ends up at the stage where are forecasted, where with support from the dup the tories look significantly more viable than the other parties trying
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to put together some kind of progressive alliance or whatever you wa nt to progressive alliance or whatever you want to call it, then i think the chances of her somehow just rescinding the opportunity to put together a government are very slim. how long she could stay on doing that though without making big changes is a different question and i expect if the result ends up in this territory by the morning she will have to make changes. she'll have to broaden out. a result from glasgow north east. let's take that. scottish liberal democrats, 637. ann mclauchlan, scottish national party, 13,395. cheering . paul sweeney, scottish labour party, 13600 and... cheering jack wylie, scottish conservative
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and unionist party inaudible i declare that paul sweeney is elected to serve in the united kingdom parliament as the member for the glasgow north east constituency. labour takes glasgow north east from the snp. and we'll have the figures there injust a moment. a labour gain at the expense of the snp in north—east glasgow. now i'm determined to go and join mishal husain, who has an extremely appropriate guest considering all we've been talking about, the liberal democrats. thank you, i'm with ming campbell, former leader of the liberal democrats and sarah pickles, a former chairman of the conservative party. ming campbell, let's talk first of all about your thoughts on seeing nick clegg lose his seat in that way. with great dignity and pointing up in a very sharp way the fact that these elections are producing not the kind of unity which the prime minister
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hopes for, but division, north and south, young and old. nick clegg has served his country and his party with great distinction. he took a bold step in 2010 in the public interest. i heard it being referred toa interest. i heard it being referred to a moment or two ago and got very little credit for that. and even after the quite tumultuous events of 2015, he buckled down and indeed as was pointed out, spearheaded the campaign in relation to the european union. your party is in the position today of he's lost his seat, the seat of your current leader, tim farron, is looking doubtful, but you have had vince cable re—elected, jo swinson also re—elected. what do you think the future holds? if the party is in the position of looking for a new leader, who will it turn to? i'm not going to get into that speculation but one kind point to the fact that after i resigned and
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before nick clegg was elected, vince cable was the interim leader. so he has some understanding of leadership, of what the responsibilities are. but it's very good for the party to have a genuinely heavy hitter back in the parliamentary party, and let's not forget, jo swinson, one of the most talented of the younger generation of mps of any party. back in the house of commons. the fact she's backin house of commons. the fact she's back in the house of commons is an advantage. ican i can remember talking to him, a couple of years before the election, and, he kind of recognised that the liberal democrats would pay a price for being in coalition, but i think it is to his credit the he worked ha rd it is to his credit the he worked hard with us. on your party's fortu nes we hard with us. on your party's fortunes we know that ministers are no longer expecting to have an overall imagine the, the latest forecast sees the conservatives
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ending the night on 322 seats short ofa ending the night on 322 seats short of a majority, which means a deal will need to be done. you said of theresa may she is the worst person in the world do a deal with. but finish the quote and the quote is if you make a reasonable request then she will generally back us, what that really means in terms of brexit and putting together a government, if people come outlandish ideas she won't play, she will go for the national interest, but if it is a reasonable process i think we are in foran reasonable process i think we are in for an interesting few days. what when wrong for you? didn't get enough vote, that is what went wrong. why? i think that we have seen a wrong. why? i think that we have seen a big increase in the youth vote, i think that mr corbyn managed to get the excitement of that, i think it was on the back not of
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idealism but politics, we will pay for your fees and we will write after your debt, that is going to prove to be extraordinarily expensive, we are tempted to do so, i suspect maybe we might have another general election.” i suspect maybe we might have another general election. i have to say a word about scotland because it is remarkable. the snp are losing to labour, losing to the liberal democrats, and of course, losing to the conservatives. in fact both parties are being saved by scotland to some extent. when you think the dominances they occupied after 200015 is extraordinary. but there isa 200015 is extraordinary. but there is a reason for it and of course thatis is a reason for it and of course that is the fact that people simply do not want a rerun of the independence referendum. thank you both. and we are keeping an eye onjeremy corbyn at his count at islington, we have another important result, a
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loss. this is a shock result. it is a gainforthe loss. this is a shock result. it is a gain for the conservative, for labour from the conservative, in ipswich, in suffolk, there is no other red for triround, this is true blue tory country, more than that it is the seat of ben gummer who five days ago was rumoured to be geared up days ago was rumoured to be geared up to be the new brexit secretary, ben gummer who is not only a cabinet office minister but who has been instrumental in writing some of that conservative manifesto, in planning some of the election campaign, he is now out, curiously i was on campaign trail with him two years ago, when he almost expected to lose then, held on in 2015, but he has now lost to sandy martin, for labour. islington north. north.. it is a very safe seat forjeremy corbyn. we will listen to it and hope that we will listen to it and hope that we will actually hear from mr corbyn. returning officer: on thursday 8th
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june 2017. i lesley serry but the returning officer for the islington north constituency held on thursday 8thjune 2017, north constituency held on thursday 8th june 2017, do north constituency held on thursday 8thjune 2017, do give notice that the numberof 8thjune 2017, do give notice that the number of votes recorded for each candidate at the said election, is as follows. keith angus, liberal democrat, 4946. suzanne nundy, independent, 41. james toby clark, conservatives, 6871. jeremy bernard corbyn, labour
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party, 40086. cheering and applause michael adam foster, 208. keith graham frazer, uk independence party 413. nigel george barrow official monster raving loony party 106. james william martin, no—one as bill
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martin, the socialist party gb, 21. mendoza, communist league, 7. caroline russell. green party 2229. cheering and applause the total number of ballot papers rejected is as follows. voting from all, 40. unmarked orvoid rejected is as follows. voting from all, 40. unmarked or void for uncertainty 82, the turn out was 73.6%, and! uncertainty 82, the turn out was 73.6%, and i do here by declare that the said jeremy bernard corbyn is duly elected to serve as member of parliament for the islington north constituency. cheering and applause thank you very much. and i first of
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all want to thank lesley and her staff for the way this election has been conducted, and i know all the pressures that are put on to the staff to achieve this, thank you very much to you and all the staff here tonight. and all those that run our democratic services in this borough. i want to particularly thank the police for their work today, and the work last night in helping to ensure that the crowds we re helping to ensure that the crowds were all safe, but also, all the work they did last weekend during the horrors of the attack that took place on london bridge and the borough. it shows the important of a fully staffed police service to make sure we are all kept safe at all times and! sure we are all kept safe at all times and i do thank the police for their work last weekend, and today. applause
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it's an enormous honour to be elected to represent islington north for the ninth time in parliament, andi for the ninth time in parliament, and i am very honoured and humbled by the size of the vote that has been cast for me tonight, as the labour candidate, and i pledge to represent the people of islington north in the best way i possibly can and to continue to learn from them, as well as represent them, at the same time because i believe representation is as much about listening as about telling other people. i thank the people for their support. i also want to say a huge thank you, to islington north labour party, to our agents, and all the other people that have worked so ha rd other people that have worked so hard in this campaign, and u nfortu nately, hard in this campaign, and unfortunately, or maybe from their point of vieux fortly, i have been out on the road for most of the last six weeks so they have been holding the fort and working very hard and i am very grateful to them for all they have done. i am very grateful to all of my family, and to my wife
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and to all the people that have worked so hard in our team at labour party head office, as well as in the constituency office here for achieving this incredible result tonight, in islington and the results that are coming in from all over the country, in terms of islington this is the highest turn out since 1951, it is the largest ever vote received for a winning candidate ever in the history of this borough, and i am very proud of it and very humble and very grateful to the people of islington for this result. chief cheering and applause this election was called, this election was called in order to for the prime minister to gain a large majority in order to assert her authority. and, the election campaign has gone on, for the past six weeks, i have travelled the whole country, i have spoken at
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events all over the country, and you know what, politics has changed. and politics isn't going back in to the box where it was before. because what has happened is, people have said they have had enough of authority politics, they have had enough of cuts in public expenditure, underfunding the health service underfunding our schools and our education sever advice, and not giving our young people the chance they deserve in our society. and i am very very proud of the campaign that my party has run, our manifesto for the many, not the few, and i am very proud of the results that are coming in, all over the country tonight, of people voting for hope, voting for hope for the future, and turning their backs on austerity. cheering and applause and so, if there is, if there is a message from tonight's result, is this. the prime minister called the
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election because she wanted a mandate. well, the mandate she has got, is lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support and lost confidence. i would lost votes, lost support and lost confidence. iwould have lost votes, lost support and lost confidence. i would have thought thatis confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go actually, and make way for a government that will be truly representative of all of the people, of this country. cheering and applause so, we await, we await the rest of the results, but i can assure you of this, in the new parliament, we will do everything we can to ensure that everything we have said in this campaign and everything that is included in our manifesto, is put before parliament, so that this country can be a different and i believe fundamentally better place. the participation in this election by many who have noted participated in elections before shows the determination to do something very differently in this country, and ta ke differently in this country, and take a different start towards the rest of the world, and i am very
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proud of what we have achieved here, iam very proud of what we have achieved here, i am very proud of the campaign our party has waged in this election campaign, and, i am very confident of the future, very confident of the future we will grow even faster and further, and that we will be able to carry out those pledges in our ma nifesto, carry out those pledges in our manifesto, to properly fund health, education, properly fund social care, and give all of our young people a real chance for a future, free from debt and full of opportunity, to the people of islington i say thank you very muffin deed. ito the people of this country i say thank o you to all those who have given such support in the labour party and thank you to all those over the country who have worked so hard for this day. we will carry on, because we believe in a better future for all. thank you all very much indeed. cheering and applause jeremy corbyn on the left of your
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screen, the prime minister theresa may on the right, and he says it is time for her to go and make way for them. we haven't had the count from maidenhead and we will stay with maidenhead and we will stay with maidenhead because when we get the count, at least we will be there for the count, no doubt theresa may will have some words to say about the outcome of the election as a whole, or maybe she will stick to thank the people of made head. it be interesting to see whether she does, she has been criticised for not saying anything, giving little detail of what she plans to do. she is not the politician, one of the criticisms lived at her who is nimble. ty that is one of the things thatis nimble. ty that is one of the things that is causing probable. this is a fascinating night. iam that is causing probable. this is a fascinating night. i am going to ta ke fascinating night. i am going to take you the scotland. we have 15 labour gains now, this from the snp in east lothian. labour on 36% share of vote. vote. we are seeing it is turning out to be a tough night for
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the snp. gains for the conservative pushing labour into first place to ta ke pushing labour into first place to take it on a swing, not as dramatic a swing as we saw in the earlier fore gains but 8.5% this is more than they needed. this seat was gained in the scottish parliament by labour, so some sense of a direction of travel but they will be pleased to have this, gordon brown's old seat of kirkical di, if i can bring that up. we thought it was safe snp. it was taken last time round. lesley laird takes his place, very very tightly fought this one, but it was a 23,000 majority under gordon brown, the snp then cut that, took it on brown, the snp then cut that, took iton9 brown, the snp then cut that, took it on 9 thousand and this is a similar majority, 259, but they got this, on more than a 9% swing. 9.7% swing. two more gains, for the conservatives. this time, aberdeen south, it has been taken from callum
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mccaig. this was 97 on their target list. let us look and see if we are getting the dramatic swings again, 1596, getting the dramatic swings again, 15%, we have seen the conservatives in that region. labour was in second place, but it was thought to be a tory target and they have been proved right. one more, ayr and carrick, we thought it was safe snp, and you can see what has happened here, that change in the vote, conservatives on 40% now, and the snp moving backwards down 1596. and the snp moving backwards down 15%. this was gained from labour in 2015, so that kind of churn going from labour to the snp, to the conservative, shows that scotland's really u p conservative, shows that scotland's really up in the air. and to add to the two gains peterborough and bedford. bedford but i am being told... 1796 is the biggest swing of the night. they have taken
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canterbury, i am the night. they have taken canterbury, iam not the night. they have taken canterbury, i am not sure my microphone picked that up. labour is expected to win canterbury in kent, thatis expected to win canterbury in kent, that is being held by the conservatives since 1918. if that is officially confirmed that would be probably the most dramatic example yet, of a seat that looks impossible for labour unless we saw significant youth turn out. that big question, we didn't know how the electorate wouldance it in seats like that, the younger part of the electorate who traditionally have stayed at home, seems yesterday, turned out in d roves. seems yesterday, turned out in droves. we have a labour gain in peterborough. canterbury we expected and another... we had emily had kirkcaldy in. bath is an interesting one. this is an up moment for the liberal democrats on a night which has brought gains and losses for them, and some sad faces in sheffield hallam certainly when nick clegg lost but the liberal democrats have
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gains this one, the seat of bath from the conservatives. if i show you what has happened here, they have got it on a 9.8 swing, they will be pleased with that. ukip got 796 will be pleased with that. ukip got 7% of the vote here and that has pretty much gone now, you can see they didn't stand here, that is how they didn't stand here, that is how the seats have been arranged in bath. i wonder if i can bring you one more. this is 16 on the target list. tightly fought. a percentage point between them. a majority of 6077. ukip standing down here again, which tories might have those thought would help them retain the seat. it has gone on a swing to labour of 2.796. so nobody will forget chris pat ten's face hen he was chairman of the conservative party, fought the campaign but lost his own seat. he will watch that. here is maidenhead. there is the prime minister on the left. we will hear the result of the vote.
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lock at the array of candidates there. stay with us while we just hear how each of them has done. bat ten, gerrard joseph. uk hear how each of them has done. bat ten, gerrardjoseph. uk independence party. 871. 871. independent, 16. harvey, jonathan david. no—one as lord bucket head 249. —— no—one. hill, antony charles, no—one as tony hill. 6540. -- hill, antony charles, no—one as tony hill. 6540. —— known.
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hope, alan, known as howling laud hope, alan, known as howling laud hope official monster raving loony party. 119. knight, andrew, david. animal welfare party 282. may, teresa mary, the conservative party candidate. 37,718. applause mcdonald, patrick, known as pat mcdonald, patrick, known as pat mcdonald, labour party. 11261. reed, julian michael ivor.
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the just political party 52. smith, bobby. known as bobby elmo smith. 3. smith, grant. jonathan, independent 152. victor edmunds, christian peoples alliance. 69. waugh, derek norman, green party, 907 the number of ballot papers rejected was as follows. want official mark, zero. voting for more than, more candidates than the voter was entitled to, 19. writing or mark by
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which the voter could be identified, 3. being unmarked or wholly void for uncertainty, 86. rejected in part, zero. total rejected votes 108. i here by declare that theresa may, the conservative party candidate, has been duly elected. that is a good example of what english democracy throws up in the seats where the prime minister is. you get every tom dick and harry coming in, standing. i reckon they made £5,000 in lost deposit, here is theresa may to speak. thank you. thank you very much. first of all may i on behalf of myself and all of the candidates, thank the returning officer and all
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her staff, for the hard work they have put in today in running this election here in the maidenhead constituency. can i also thank the police who have had an extra job here tonight, in ensuring the security of this event. and thank you to all those who have once again supported me as the member of parliament for made head, it is is a huge honour and a privilege, to be elected, as the member of parliament for this constituency. i pledge that i will continue to work for all my constituents as i have done over the period of time that i have been your member of parliament. as i say, it isa member of parliament. as i say, it is a huge honour, this is is a wonderful constituency, and i look forward to continuing to work with you, to see improvements further improvements for the life of those who are living here, in the maidenhead constituency. as we look more widely across the country, of course, returns are still coming in, we have yet to see the full picture
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emerging, votes are still being counted, but, at this time, more than anything else, this country needs a period of stability. and if as the ends casings have shown, if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seat, and probably the most votes, then, it will be inkennel bent on us to ensure we have that period of stability. i would like to thank all of those across the country who have voted for the conservative party today. as we ran this campaign, we set out to consider the issues that are the key priorities for the british people. getting the brexit deal right. ensuring that we both identify and show how we can address the big changes facing our country. doing what is in the national interest. that is always what i have tried to do in my time as a member
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of parliament. my resolve to do that, is the same this morning as it a lwa ys that, is the same this morning as it always has been. as we look ahead and we wait to see what the final results will be be, i know that as i say, the country needs a period of stability, and whatever the results are, the conservative party will ensure that we fulfil our duty, in ensuring that stability, so that we can all as one country go forward to together. thank you. curious use of words, the country needs a period of stability, suggesting that it is not a full parliament she is thinking of.” think that is true. as we were saying half an hour ago, so ministers privately say clearly they do not expect to outperform the exit poll. we saw there a shaky theresa may who does not expect to be walking back in to downing street with a majority. it will only be in
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the hours to come that we can confirm whether that is not the case, but i think her wording there, certainly, implied that heavily. she said of course there is still votes to be counted but if as we expect we are the largest party with the largest number of votes, she said that very carefully, it will be incumbent on us to form a government. so in the prime minister's own words she chose to mention the formulation that subjects a hung parliament. the largest in umber votes and the largest in umber votes and the largest number of seats. that is only half the story, she inherited a lead of 100 seats over labour. she will probably end one a lead of 50 seats over labour. she inherited from the last election a 7 percentage points lead over labour in popular vote. it looks as if it will end in popular vote. it looks as if it willend up in popular vote. it looks as if it will end up 3%. so yes, she is correct, the conservatives are ahead on votes and seat but by half the
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amount david cameron achieved two—yearing a. amount david cameron achieved two-yearing a. she has to contend with the horror of her parliamentary party, it is worth saying james forsyth the political editor put up a tweet saying do not underestimate the fury and the parliamentary party, they are spitting, the prime minister told him off—the—record. she has to go and try to find a way of committing a party she is leader if she is... tim farron has retained his seat. we heard this, the lead other the liberal democrat, what has happened, over the last hour or so, is that we have revised our forecast and revised it down a bit from the conservatives point of view. jeremy, you have thety —— figure, conservatives point of view. jeremy, you have thety -- figure, let us look inside our virtual house of commons. revised in the conservatives favour, very very slightly. so, we started the night by saying the exit poll had them on 314. this is what it is saying now. it is tempered by some of the results we have had in. we have had
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half the constituencies, we have them on 318. it is down 13 seats from the last general election two yea rs from the last general election two years ago pup a bit from the way we start. of course crucially, it is not across the line here of 326, just above half the number of mps in the house of commons. so it looks as if if the night ends in the way we expect it, the conservatives won't have their majority, in the house of commons, let us look at the other parties slight adjustment to the labourfigure, up one, we have them on 267. in our exit poll the snp on 32, a bad night forthem, on 267. in our exit poll the snp on 32, a bad night for them, the liberal democrats, not withstanding the tim farron news we just had, doing not as well as we thought at the start of evening. the others, plaid with the three seat, green with their one seat and in grey you see the other, the northern ireland parties as well. so i can show you the figure, the key figure here is that the conservatives are short by eight. now, all kinds of other
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mathematics start to come. in sinn fein mps, there could be six by the end of the night. take the six away, because they don't attend the house of commons, so you end up with 644, you divide that by 2, the conservatives still not quite there but it makes it a tiny bit closer, and the other thing is the dup, we think they may have nine mps by the end of the night. they are the natural allies for the conservatives in this situation, so if you add the nine to the conservatives 318 you get 327, then they cross the line. take a whirl round the house of commons and have a look. yes, there isa commons and have a look. yes, there is a lot of blue, theresa may said they end with more seats than anyone but a strength thenned labour party. a diminished snp, a few more liberal democrats, it will be complicated politics in here and many more hours of conversation to come. david. thank you. i should say did just go up thank you. i should say did just go up to 322 at one point, so the tory
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figure, the conservative figure is moving around, it is above... eastbourne has been taken by the liberal democrats. nick robinson has been taken by islington. good morning nick. good morning. they are clearing away here, it is extraordinary being here at my local leisure centre, jeremy corbyn's local leisure centre, a place where he has come, election after election, the result has been predictable and just as pre—david miliband distinctable has been the fa ct miliband distinctable has been the fact known beyond the walls would listen to a single word he said. that figure, the maverick, stood on a stage here, and effectively called on the prime minister to quit, and to make him prime minister instead, and suddenly that doesn't sound absurd at all. contrast that with the face of theresa may, the look of a woman defeated. heavily made up, as if she had been in tears earlier,
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her voice cracking at times i thought, declaring she would provide the stability, the country needed, but nothing like what she said she wa nted but nothing like what she said she wanted to do, which is to have that big majority, which would deliver the country a strong mandate, a strong negotiating mandates for delivering brexit. i have to interrupt you. we have gone to boston and skegness. paul nuttall, the leader of ukip, is fighting back seat. applause the number of ballot papers rejected was as follows. voting for more candidates than entitled to, 11. in marc miller you could identify... a huge defeat for paul nuttall. this was the area that voted leave in the
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highest numbers. three quarters of boston and skegness voted to leave, but they are not giving any traction to ukip. we can go back to nick robinson, we interrupted you for the paul nuttall result and he did not do very well in boston and skegness, only got 3300 votes. finish your point. even a few hours ago when i was in sojeremy corbyn's hopes, they were looking at the results to see how far they could cut to reason me's majority. when they arrived here for his count, they as questions about whetherjeremy corbyn might in certain circumstances be the next prime minister. i do not think that is the
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central expectation, but they have left the building to give that proper and serious thought. he is now in play and the decisions he makes will matter for the future of the labour party and the country. just a few weeks ago, that would've seemed implausible, not just just a few weeks ago, that would've seemed implausible, notjust to most commentators but to jeremy corbyn himself. he is now a position of power ahead of the most difficult political negotiations this country has seen since the second world war, at position of power he never dreamt of. you are hearing theresa may, what do you think she will do no? she is severely damaged by this result. she called an election when she said she would not, and then it batters her reputation in the course of the campaign and in the result.
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where does that leave her in the tory party in parliament?” where does that leave her in the tory party in parliament? i think there are two answers to that: one, where it leaves her in her mind, doing her duty and forming a government, and secondly, where does that leave her in the minds of her own cabinet and party? will they ta ke own cabinet and party? will they take the view that she has gambled and lost big time and needs to be punished for it? the difficulty is thinking who would replace her. if they were looking for a charismatic figure who could give hope to the public and a future election, they would no doubt turn to boris johnson. but if the job would no doubt turn to boris johnson. but if thejob is would no doubt turn to boris johnson. but if the job is about doing a deal in europe, boris johnson would be regarded as deeply implausible, notjust johnson would be regarded as deeply implausible, not just in johnson would be regarded as deeply implausible, notjust in brussels but also by his cabinet colleagues. that is where the tories now find
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themselves. do they focus on the talks in europe or the possibility of another election which theresa may looks impossible for her to running again as she would surely lose. there is no lack of ambition on the tory backbenches, but as nick points out, this is a very curious position that the tories find themselves in. they ran on being a safe pair of hands, theresa may was the last grown—up left standing after the tory bloodbath over the referendum, but what do they do no? how can they combat that message and energy that labour are managing to bridges. is she in a position to change the chancellor of the exchequer? everyone said that is what she wants to do because he's
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screwed up the budget. it is harder for her to do anything. she will need to take the council of other people and will be speculation over whether she can cling on as the party leader. one senior tory has said to me in terms of her staying on, with brexiter looming it is a pretty bad time to muck about and i think her first instinct will be to try and stay on. we can get the latest games. some dramatic gains for labour. work in leamington, the kind of seat that we would expect labour to take if they were winning the election. david cameron has won this twice. it is a labour gained from the conservatives. they needed a 6-.5% from the conservatives. they needed a 6—.5% swing and they had done it
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ona7.6 a 6—.5% swing and they had done it on a 7.6 swing. the same in canterbury, this has been conservative since the first world war, it had majority of over 9000 and the conservative mp has been here since 1987, 30 years. was it duffield has just outed here since 1987, 30 years. was it duffield hasjust outed him. not where you expect a lot of labour to appear. a surge in their share, up 20%, and you can see the conservatives have made small gains, the swing is quite dramatic. you can see a lot of the lib dem holds. this was thought to perhaps be in danger, but the lib dems have held against the conservatives, keeping tom brake
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in there. he said it was one of the ha rd est in there. he said it was one of the hardest elections he has bought. there was a swing of 0.2. here are some of the old faces coming back end, vincent cable. in this one, a 4124 majority. a bittersweet night for the lib dems as they have seen nick clegg lose his seat at some of the former mps regain their seats. since our own the former mps regain their seats. since ourown —— the former mps regain their seats. since our own —— his majority was cut to only 777, tim farron. he has
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held on here. in norfolk north, norman lamb thought he was in danger but he has outperformed what people we re but he has outperformed what people were expecting. he stays here, the green party did not stand here which may have helped. he has done very well to hold on here. the seat has been lost in 2015, the snp came and then with some of those huge swings, they gained from third place but it is now jamie stone who takes the seat back for the lib dems in scotland. the unionist parties are having a good night against the
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others in scotland. again a pretty sturdy swing to the lib dems from the snp in scotland. if i step back you can see all the lib dem games here, summer holds and some have been taken, and two extraordinary results from labour in parts of england you did not expect to turn red tonight. we are joined by alex salmond. do you think you have held on in gordon? we will have to wait and see. we are sometime away from a result yet, it is a large constituency and a varied and urban one. ballot boxes have to travel a long way. what do you make of the loss of 14 seats so far for the snp? that is off the back of this and
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annie of 2015. i don't think anyone expected that to be repeated. i am an old—fashioned politician and you are an old—fashioned reporter, so it looks like the snp will have more seats in scotland than all the unionist parties combined. on that measure, the snp will win the election. the unionist parties have made huge inroads into the snp position. i think what the opinion polls didn't see was a late recovery and the labour party's fortunes. that was based onjeremy and the labour party's fortunes. that was based on jeremy corbyn. many yes supporters, incidentally. that has cost the snp some seats.
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but when in more seats than any other party is important in politics. theresa may with love to be ina politics. theresa may with love to be in a position to say she was going to win a majority of seats. it looks like the snp will do that again in scotland so they deserve some credit, despite losing many fine parliamentary colleagues. doesn't make a second independence referendum more or less likely?” think there will be a second independence referendum, it is a question of timing. a third irony in politics is that this snp group will be going into a parliament that looks like it is going to be in full ensure lend. that influence will be used on behalf of scotland and scottish democracy and to defend the scottish democracy and to defend the scottish parliament. the people of scotland have the right to expect
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that if they elect the snp in large numbers they will be influential in the next parliament. you do not know what is going to happen over brexit. we know that you wanted to remain in the eu and that may be possible if parliament isn't also confusion. do you think there is a chance of the snp... ina you think there is a chance of the snp... in a balanced parliament we will have great influence and we will have great influence and we will seek a progressive alternative to the conservatives. if there is no conservative majority, theresa may will not be prime minister within the next 48 hours, she could not possibly survive having called an election unnecessarily, failed to do it, and then continue. borisjohnson is on it, and then continue. borisjohnson is on manoeuvres. it, and then continue. borisjohnson is on manoeuvres. it does not
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surprise me given the deficiencies of theresa may that have been exposed. the snp will use a position of substantial influence to get the best deal for scotland and to make sure we do not fall off a brexit cliff edge, which theresa may was headed towards. what do you think of what she said about how if she had the largest number of seats and the popular boat her responsibility would be to ensure stability. that does not suggest she's thinking of quitting any time soon. it sounded like the battle to me. consistency of position over a matter of hours has not been one of the hallmarks of theresa may in recent weeks. she has reversed manifesto commitments. saying that she will continue regardless is total nonsense. it is not clear who has won this election,
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thatis not clear who has won this election, that is true, but it is already clear who has lost it and that is the prime minister and she should face the consequences. you can see nicola sturgeon, the leader of the snp in scotland, at her account. we are to twickenham now and joined into cable who took the seat. vince cable, congratulations on your victory. you seem to have pulled off a tough fight. what do you make of the position of the liberal democrats and their role in the new parliament? in the last few minutes here heard of some seats near held and summary of gained, another is down to a thread. we are doing well in london and extremely well in scotland. norman lamb has held on, tim farron, we are going to get back
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with an increase in our parliamentary party. we have made it clear in terms of the big picture that we are not going to coalition with other parties and we want to be constructive. we want to give constructive. we want to give constructive criticism. the whole brexit approach will need to be rethought and we will contribute to that, while respecting the basic decision. personal care, which became a big issue, what is now becoming clear is that parties are going to have to work together in this different political landscape. how do you think that brexit can be rethought? the manager has been that brexit means brexit and that means you cannot be in the single market or the customs union and you need to control immigration. can that be turned on its head? the phrase
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brexit means brexit was always a nonsense and it is possible to sue a form of brexit that keeps the single market, or elements of it, which keeps the customs union and a lot of the clapperton arrangements that have been good for the uk. that is the kind of approach we need to rethink. —— a lot of the collaborative arrangements. are you saying it will not be politically possible for theresa may to pursue that without a majority in the house of commons? we do not know the detail yet, but to take an obvious point, the government were proposing to introduce a great repeal bill that would have got rid of the lot of regulation to do with the european union. i doubt that the current houses of parliament that is the elected tonight will make that feasible, they will have to compromise and find a way of
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accommodating many of the concerns of the 48% devoted to remain. accommodating many of the concerns of the 4896 devoted to remain. we are watching the prime minister returning to london from maidenhead. what is your reaction to nick clegg's defeat in sheffield?” what is your reaction to nick clegg's defeat in sheffield? i am very sad for him. i went through that two years ago and it is painful. he will be looked upon by historians as a major figure. with hindsight, a period of coalition was a period of stability. he was one of the main architects of that and he deserves a lot of credit. he will be a great loss to us and to parliament because of his understanding of european issues, so it is a great loss. thank you forjoining us. we have now had 439 seats in and we're 211 to go. labour have gained 20,
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the conservatives are down nine, the snp are down 14, ukip i don't one. it looks as if the conservatives will settle down into the night with 44% of the boat across great britain. that is what tony blair got in his line played —— got his landslide. remember the conservative vote is up, still ply i did doing badly? that is because in england we are back to two party politics. when there were of the 44% give you a landslide, that into party politics it is quite grim. but in terms of the share of the vote, theresa may can look margaret thatcher and tony blair in the face because she has matched their result. and trying to think when a party has got over 50%
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ina 2—party think when a party has got over 50% in a 2—party system. i think probably after the war. this is crucifying the conservatives in terms of their hopes of getting a majority. we can find out what is happening in hastings. is it true that there is a recount their in amber rudd's seat? can you hear me? i want to know if there is a recount. this is hastings, david. i know that. there is a recount in his things. i'm sorry about that. —— there is a recount in hastings. it has come down to the difference of a
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few hundred here. this is their constituency of the home secretary, amber rudd. she had a majority of over 4700, but at best that has been diminished to the hundreds. there will be a complete recount now and it will not be resolved for another hour to hear it will not be resolved for another hourto hear in it will not be resolved for another hour to hear in hastings. 1955, the conservatives got 49% of the vote. i think we can go to nicola sturgeon. the first minister of scotland. good morning. you are currently down by i don't know how many seats, it has disappeared from ice cream. how many seats do you think you have lost? we
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are still waiting for the final tally, but we are clear that we will have more seats than the other parties combined. the snp has won this selection in scotland and it will be our second best ever result ina will be our second best ever result in a westminster election. we are disappointed, am disappointed, to have lost angus robertson, who has been an outstanding mp and an exceptional leader of the snp group in the house of commons. we have won the election that we have some reflection to do on why we have suffered some losses this evening. is it right to say you have won the election because it is a uk election we're talking about. you have got more seats in scotland, but it is damaging for you to have lost it to the conservatives and the liberal democrats and labour, who were believed to have been wiped out in
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scotland. i am not trying to downplay the losses, but i think it is legitimate to say the snp has won the election in scotland. we will have more seats in scotland than all the other parties combined and more votes tha n the other parties combined and more votes than any other party, so by any definition that is winning the election in scotland. there have been a number of factors at play and i don't think there is any doubt about that. there has been a late surge tojeremy corbyn, including in scotland, which was not detected in the polls in scotland and some way it was elsewhere the uk. there is prose brexit uncertainty and independence is a factor in that. i will reflect on that in the days to come. tonight is a disasterfor theresa may. she called the selection, she did not need to, she
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thought she could cruise to a landslide victory and she is left tonight facing a disastrous result. we need to wait and see how the final result look in terms of how that means for the uk government, i hope the snp can play a part in a progressive alternative to tory government, but we will need to see how the final result look. you want independence and to stay in the eu. had both these games been improved by this result and if so, how?” will take time to reflect on this. it is 4am and i have not had any sleep. i am it is 4am and i have not had any sleep. iam not it is 4am and i have not had any sleep. i am not going to rush to hasty decisions, but there is thinking for me to do about the snp result. the snp has won the election in scotland, but equally i will not try to gloss over the fact that we
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have suffered some losses this evening. once we know the final result tomorrow, i think it is likely that the snp will be the third largest party in westminster, so we third largest party in westminster, so we will want to try to be part of a progressive alliance that is an alternative to the tories, but that depends on how the arithmetic looks in the final results are in. do you feel slightly chastened but you do not have 50% of the popular vote, more like 40% of the vote, it is only the electoral system that allows you to see you are the largest party. i don't think anyone listening to me will hear me overplaying the snp results, but i think it is reasonable when we had more votes than any other party and more votes than any other party and more seats than all the other parties combined to point to the
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fa ct parties combined to point to the fact the snp has won the election here. before 2015, the largest number of westminster seats the snp ever had was 11, and going into the 2015 election we had sex. we will probably end up with slightly more than 30. —— probably end up with slightly more than 30. -- 2015 probably end up with slightly more than 30. —— 2015 election we had sex. we have won the election and the losses are something i will have to reflect on where we understand the reasons for that. no one ever accused you of being anything other than straight with us. thank you for talking to us. now we can go to northern ireland. here is the prime minister going to number ten downing st. the north island story is
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interesting. —— northern ireland. chris is in northern ireland. could you phyllis and in what has happened and what you think will happen in northern ireland ? and what you think will happen in northern ireland? —— juju fill us in on what. the democratic unionist party and sinn fein, they have surged. not all the results from northern ireland are in yet, but on the basis of what we have, i reckon the basis of what we have, i reckon the dup are looking at tendencies, their best ever result in a
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westminster election, sinn fein could be on for six or seven, and the other has been one by an independent. the dup are in a strong position. when their leader gave his victory speech here, he said that the dup would make their presence felt in the next parliament and he referenced issues such as anti—terrorism, security and brexit, the dup are strongly pro—brexit, and the dup are strongly pro—brexit, and the future of devolution in northern ireland. the dup think it has strengthened their hand to restore at the stormont government that has not been operating. the dup will be ina not been operating. the dup will be in a strong position as a brexit party. presumably, sinn fein lost on not take their seats in the house of commons. they have made that very
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clear, no matter how tight it is they said that their candidates were elected with the intention to abstain and they will not take their seats. the increase in their representation, they are currently on six and they may take seven, taking one from the ulster unionist party and sources are saying they are worded about that. if they lose that they will be wiped out. with sinn fein not taking the place in the house of commons, it means there will not be any nationalist mps from northern ireland in the house of commons and it means that ten out of 11 mp5 commons and it means that ten out of 11 mps in the house of commons will be for brexit. you said that they are going to play a hard game, if
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the tory party did not have a majority they will be very strong position get what they want. yes, thatis position get what they want. yes, that is right. speaking to senior members of the dup, they realised they might be in an important position regarding the stability of the country going into brexit negotiations and they will enter into any discussions in that spirit. however, politics in northern ireland operates on the negotiations a lot of the time. in 2015, a big pa rt a lot of the time. in 2015, a big part of their platform as they went into that was that they expected a hung parliament and they would be best placed to get the best deal for northern ireland out of that. this time they did not seem to be expecting a hung parliament and aid and make it a expecting a hung parliament and aid and make ita big part of expecting a hung parliament and aid and make it a big part of their campaign, but they have now realise they are in a very strong position and they will be looking to maximise
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whatever gains they can get. orwa rd, orward, with his a quick word. george osborne, he is editor of the evening standard. he said the worst thing she has done, theresa may, is in her life, is no longer running through a wheat field, and just, in terms of some of the overseas reaction, we have a dutch msp who said cameron gambled and lost, may gambled and lost, the tory party is beginning to look like a cassano. this is a running theme. we have the front page of the times, the decision, which is brutal. may's big gamble fails and i think that is going to be the theme of the headlines tomorrow evening, it is she took a mam sieve gamble and it has backfired. emily has more results. get us go to wales and catch up with sian lloyd. all the
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cardiff counts have finish and the results are in. they are all know labourmp, cardiff results are in. they are all know labour mp, cardiff north has been regained by labour, it is a huge scalp and really coming into this this election it was seen as a safe tory seat. what we have seen here in wales is is that labour have held on to their seats and they have increased their majority, and they have taken seats from the conservatives, they have taken the vale of clwyd, they have taken gower and cardiff north, they have exceeded expectations of that exit poll and polls that we were coming into, a few weeks ago, saying that the conservatives were going to do very well here, and there was still a suggestion that in the exit poll this evening, they have borne out. labour have defended very well but they haven't just labour have defended very well but they haven'tjust defended, they have made gains and we have been hearing from people, senior people in labour here, who have been saying it has been down to two things, the welsh labour brand they have
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campaigned so strongly on, but also, jeremy corbyn as well, so they seem to be coming together with what they are saying in that and the conservatives in wales already saying that they perhaps should have been fighting more on a welsh conservative brand, so those are the things that we are hearing at the moment. now plaid cymru, we are not sure what sort of night it is going to be for them. they have been relegated into third place on one constituency. labour increased their majority from 229 on ynys mon, to almost 5,000, so a whopping lead for them there, so there is a recount in ceredigion and we are hearing it is very close between the liberal democrats and plaid cymru, who may mean they may not be any more liberal democrats in wales, of course it is a recount. thank you very much for that. we have a look at how things stand, go
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over to new broadcasting house, the bbc‘s headquarters and there we have the figures we are showing now, the conservatives, this is a forecast on 318, labour on 267. the snp on 32. liberal democrats on 11. on 11 conservatives still largest party but well short of an overall majority, that is with... not sure how many seats in, but a lot of seats in, we haven't got them all up yet at the moment. 484 i think at the moment. so, let us nowjust after 4.00 in the morning, have the news. hello. with more than 500 seats declared in the general election, labour has done far better than many had expected but the outcome appears uncertain. the conservatives are on course to be the biggest party — but without an overall majority.
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jeremy corbyn called on theresa may to resign as prime minister. but mrs may — re—elected in maidenhead — said the country needed a period of stability and the conservative party would ensure that. tom bateman has the latest. she called the election early, a political gamble, a hope she would transform the tories fragile add vanening in parliament with a huge win but the smiles have vanished. forecasts suggest the conservatives may end up worse off without even a majority. if as the indications have shown, if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seats and probably the most votes, then, it will be incumbent on us to ensure we have that period of stability, that is what we will do. and you can see what the labour leader makes of these results so far, a man whose campaign confounded
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many expectations, beaming smile, with labour on course for a far better night than many thought. the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. well the men date she has got is lost conservative seat, lost vote, lost support, and lost confidence, i would have thought that is enough to 90, would have thought that is enough to go, actually, and make way for a government that will be truly representative of all of the people of this country. in battersea labour have ousted a government minister on a swing of 10%, there have been labour gains elsewhere, in stockton south from the conservatives, and in scotland, rutherglen from the snp. senior figures appear dedelighted. theresa may's authority has been undermined by this election. she is a damaged prime minister, whose reputation may never recover. and just look at the mood in hastings, hardly beaming
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confidence, where the home secretary is defending her seat” confidence, where the home secretary is defending her seat i am just quietly waiting and keeping an eye on everything in the normal way. quietly waiting and keeping an eye on everything in the normal waym is not just on everything in the normal waym is notjust the tories suffering. in sheffield the liberal democrat's former leader nick clegg has lost his seat. the night began with a big projection, the exit poll, studied closely by all the politicians but remember, it is stilljust a forecast, it had the conservatives as the largest party but short of an overall majority. the tories would have 314 seat, down 17 on two years ago, it puts labour on 266 seat, up 34, the snp would get 34 seats and the liberal democrats 14. it was right to go to country and ask them the question about their views were, what people's views were about the direction they wanted for the future. but there is some encouraging news for the
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conservatives in scotland. they have taken the seat of the snp's deputy leader accuse robertson. the festival of democracy has been on full show, as has the upsets ministers under threat, senior snp figure gone, ukip's vote collapsing in many place, theresa may has left her constituency count, the election campaign has been an unpredictable journey for her, already some labour points are saying tonight should bring the end of the roet for her premiership but remember, there is still way to go and more votes still to be counted. tom bateman, bbc news. tom bateman, bbc news. the projected result of the vote has seen the pound weaken on the currency markets. let's get the latest reaction now from sharanjit leyl in singapore. tell us more. well, that is right. the most immediate reaction on the markets has been from the british pound, sterling falling nearly 2% against the dollar, after that exit poll suggested the conservative
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party could lose its parliamentary majority, the good news it is continues to hold round the 1.27 mark, it hasn't fallen any further thus far and analysts i have been speaking to say it is likely the pound will count weak through the day because the early results suggest no clear winner and given the political uncertainty the brexit process could be complicated further and that is an uncertainty that markets and investors don't like, but having said that, though, most asian markets are trading higher, we are seeing the the nikkei higher. the hong kong market is flat. there is no clear direction on how asia is reacting to the results. thank you. now back to david dimbleby. welcome back to the election centre,
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indeed welcome back to house of commons where we are forecasting 318 for the conservative, short of the overall majority, of 326. labour on 267, the conservatives the larnes party, there are many stories to be told about what has happened and emily has now a list of seats that have changed hand which we haven't caught up with. labour is having a good night in england. this is leeds north west which labour has taken from the liberal democrats on 44% share of the vote. they needed a 3.4 swing and they have doubled that. nearly an8 swing and they have doubled that. nearly an 8 point swing. greg mulholland is out here, let me take you to lincoln, the oldest constituency seat in the country, founded in 1263, and it is a labour gain from the conservatives. it has been pretty much a bellwether since the october election of 74, but
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karen lee has replaced karl mccartney. you can look at this change overnight which pushes labour up change overnight which pushes labour up eight points at the expense of ukip down ten, they got double the swing here as well. they needed 1.5 and they have a 3% swing. weaver veil number 11 on the labour target list, it was a tiny majority of 806 but the labour party is on 52. if you wanted to see what that looks like as a swing. nearly 5%. 5%. tony blair won heard for labour gus graham evans is out. some good news, from the conservatives in scotland, iam going from the conservatives in scotland, i am going to show you three seats they have taken. aberdeenshire west, ster they have taken. aberdeenshire west,ster stirling and berkshire which borders the one they had before this election, you can see these tremendous swings away from these tremendous swings away from the snp to the conservative, 14%, 1196 the snp to the conservative, 14%, 11% and 11%, everything has been up
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in the air, really since 2015. so to ta ke in the air, really since 2015. so to take any of these seats back needed really solid swings and you can see the kind of work they are doing. one more, i will end with this, edinburgh west, which has been gained by the liberal democrat, who are having a mixed night but a better night in scotland, liberal democrats taking this from the snp in edinburgh west, on 34%, a swing there, of 5.8%, on the back of the results what you can say is the one tory who is having an excellent night is ruth davidson. we arejoined now night is ruth davidson. we are joined now byjacob rees—mogg, i hope we are. yes, i don't know where you are, in somerset or bristol? are you in taunton? i am in somerset, i am in bath, iam taunton? i am in somerset, i am in bath, i am in taunton? i am in somerset, i am in bath, iam in bath taunton? i am in somerset, i am in bath, i am in bath university.” see. and you held your seat?” bath, i am in bath university.” see. and you held your seat? i have, yes. good. and tell us about your
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view of what has happened, was the prime minister guilty of hubris by running for the selection when she said she wasn't going to and is the result a disaster for the conservative party? no, ithink neither of those things is true. i think an election was going to be inevitable as a result of the brexit vote a year ago and having a new prime minister, that a new prime minister required a mandate ultimately, and it was merely a question of time, as for the conservative party, we seem to be starting out today, where we finished before the last parliament was dissolved, so there isn't much change but there is some rotation andi change but there is some rotation and i think that will probably mean we continue to form the government, so we continue to form the government, so it is not a disaster but it is not as good as it could have been. it is quite strange to say you are back where you were before this election when you did have a majority of 17, before the election, you now don't have a majority, it
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seems. well, we haven't had all the seats in yet, it is not an enormous change. it is within the margin of error at the moment. she said she wa nted error at the moment. she said she wanted to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead, does this do that for more than a couple of months perhaps? well, the british people have decided on the parliament they want, and that is their right to do so, and to be givened according to their democratic will and the certainty and security of the british constitution is very great over many hundreds of year, and, indeed the insecurity of the bbc reporting of it. i congratulate you on your tenth successive edition of election nigh. you may have an 11th in october to come, but time will tell. what do you think leaving that aside, for a moment, what do you think the prime minister should do about the brexit negotiations which are due to start, and we know in 11 days' time? can it be pursued as though nothing has happened well,
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the prime minister is the prime minister, and is person ho will purr see these negotiation, the very straight forward fact is we leave the european union at the end of march 2019 and the negotiations are a prelude to that. they are not necessary for that. we leave at the owned march 2019 whether we have had negotiation or not. that is part of our law and the european treaties. do you think there will be opposition in the parliamentary party, may be not you because you a loyal sporter of the prime minister, but there will be people in the conservative party who feel this was a terrible error to have thislike shuck and it has done the party —— this election and she should take temperatures blame it was her decision that led you to where you are tonight. but the thing to remember is george osborne is no longer a member of the parliamentary party, he stood down and though he may throw rocks from the eve ming
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standard she is not in the house of commons to cause trouble there. why do you mention george osborne in particular? there are many others in the tory party... i think you know what i am talking about.” the tory party... i think you know what i am talking about. i am smiling because you have reported his comments and he seemed to want to stir it up. she has only been the leaderfor to stir it up. she has only been the leader for dea to stir it up. she has only been the leaderfor dea year, she got it without any opposition. i don't think the conservative party is so fickle or such a fair weather friend as it would not continue to back the prime minister. there appears to be somebody dismantling the set behind you mr rees—mogg, and i don't want you mr rees—mogg, and i don't want you to suffer the humiliation of being alone in the open air in some god forsaken part of bath.” being alone in the open air in some god forsaken part of bath. i think the day is ended is the case here. thank you forjoining us.
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one interesting thing, briefly, despite his avowed loyalty to the prime minister, there is a conversation going on among conservatives, what they should be doing tomorrow. what are they saying one former minister has said they find it hard to see how she can stay. tomorrow will be a very eventful day, i think it will depend on the final numbers, does it look like with northern irish votes she can like with northern irish votes she ca n co mforta bly like with northern irish votes she can comfortably be in government. it feels still a fragile... there used to be an old rule in the conservative party, not in the labour party, that senior members would come along and say to you, in number ten, sorry your time is up, as they did to margaret thatcher, you remember, that was on the voting system as a ruthless bunch. you think they might say that. system as a ruthless bunch. you
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think they might say thatm system as a ruthless bunch. you think they might say that. it is too early, there are conversations going on about what to do tomorrow. it is not a question of everybody will automatically file up behind her and say bad luck you made a gamble, it didn't go as expected but you we will stand behind you, it will be more complicated than that. what we will see are demand about saying she must widen her circle, she must move away from this very sort of iron grip she has held, a tiny circle of trust, there may be people calling for her to go, and one minister said to me is urging everybody to have a good night's sleep and a solution will be found, that will not involve having another election. the end of day the tories are passion fist, this is not a good time to change a leader but my point is this, we saw a shaky theresa may emply she will try to put a government together, but there are going to be real strains inside the tory party, that
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are already merging in conversations tonight, about whether or not they should take a different course of action, i am should take a different course of action, iam not should take a different course of action, i am not saying she will be out in the morning. it won't be as straight forward adds jacob rees—mogg saying of course we will all line up behind the prime minister. we have pictures of jeremy corbyn arriving back home. might just have a look at them because he is the beneficiary of this. a point about the tight closer, we have a declaration coming from gordon. i was going to ask about nick timothy and people round her, i can't, we are going, there goes mr corbyn going into the house, no trial to trim the hedges —— no time to trim the hedges. david evans 6230. kirsten muat, scottish labour party,
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6340. alex salmond, snp, 19,000... 6340. alex salmond, snp,19,000... cheering and applause 55 ballot papers rerecollected. total votes of 53740 i declare that colinjames clark total votes of 53740 i declare that colin james clark is dually elected to serve in the uk parliament. so the conservatives take gordon, and alex salmond, former leader of the snp, loses his seat in the house of commons. we heard from him a moment ago. here is the victorious conservative
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candidate it an exciting night. thank do youjim candidate it an exciting night. thank do you jim savage for the couldn't. i would like to start off by paying tribute. when did alex salmond go into the house of commons? i think in 1987 or 2. he was leading until the referendum on dense. i stand corrected. quickly. the conservatives came notjust from the third place, but distance, third place, 11.7%, under the old rules they would have lost their deposits two years ago, now they have won the seat. this is a remarkable result. the truth is those of us who watch scottish politics too closely than is good for us, have known from the local results in may that indeed the snp's vote was pivoting in scotland, away from the north east, an area of traditional strength, towards west
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central scotland, towards glasgow, towards the places where the independence vote was highest and conversely that the advancing conservative support which has been evident in scotland for the last 12 months was particularly strong in the north east. think one of the interesting things about the north east, is that despite the relatively high snp vote there traditionally it was not an area that voted in favour of yes, yes did not do very well, and of course moray in particular was the, which robertson has lost was the, which robertson has lost was the, which robertson has lost was the constituency which was almost voted for brexit. let us just leave scotland and look at the uk as a whole. what are when he hadding for, a hung parliament? yes, i think in truth now, the chances of the conservatives having an overall majority, shall we say they are no more than that. it really is beginning to look likely that the conservatives won't have 326 seat, that said, however, given that the dup are probably going to have a
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round 10 seats in northern ireland, i think some of the talk we have heard about possibly putting together a progressive alternative, that isn't going to work, it won't have the numbers, this is going to be an extraordinary election, nobody will be happy. we have a declaration coming from holborn and plymouth. let us have plymouth. keir starmer was re—elected by the way. here is the plymouth sutton. oliver newton colville 17806. richard the plymouth sutton. oliver newton colville17806. richard michael ellison, ukip, 1148. colville17806. richard michael ellison, ukip,1148. luke colville17806. richard michael ellison, ukip, 1148. luke pollard labour and co—operative party 23808. daniel michael sheath, the green
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party, 540. the number of rejected ballot papers was 83. and i therefore declare... labour oust the conservative from plymouth sutton and devon port seat. david owen had it, alan clarke, it has been liberal, it has been labour, now it is back in labour's hand. the conservatives took it in 2000 so, so the second time round he has taken it. we arejoining i hope ruth davidson, the leader of the scottish conservative party. you are looking very cheerful if i might say so, no surprise there, in view of the results you have had. what do you make of, well let us deal with scotla nd make of, well let us deal with scotland first of all, the inroads in scotland. this is a historic
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night for the scottish conservatives, we haven't taken multiple seats here for 20 year, the first election i voted in was in 1987. i had to watch the results as a student union that had been hired out because i didn't own a telly. i had to watch every conservative seat fall surrounded by 200 labour people bellows about the result, so i waited a really long time for us to come back, i am proud of my team who have fought so hard. is the, i can hear there is a lot of noise behind you, i hope you can hear me, is the problem for the conservative party in the united kingdom as a whole, that theresa may doesn't have the husbandster that attaches itself to you in scotland? well, i know it is getting late, but i didn't expect some compliment, i think we can
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leave my lustre somewhere else. we had a clear message at the campaign which was about the big irshould be in scotland and that was the issue of nicola sturgeon trying to ram through a second dense referendum in march. and theresa may was right to tell her, that it, not now, you know. and the people of scotland we re know. and the people of scotland were able to give their verdict op that, and you have seen the number of snp seats that have fallen, indyref 2 is dead in scotland and nicola sturgeon needs to reflect on that. i was referring to political alsoster, you may have had a different interpretation of it! looking at what has happened to the tory party, something clearly was very wrong about the decision to call an election, wasn't it? look, we still have hundreds of results to come in, many in rural constituencies where we know that there are a high conservative vote, so there are a high conservative vote, soi there are a high conservative vote, so i think it is is a bit premature before we can see the whole picture,
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you know, even i could hear professor curtice, his poll you know, even i could hear professor cu rtice, his poll didn't look at what the scottish conservatives were going to do, they may not have got what the uk conservatives are going to do. it looks as if we have scored in the mid 405, possibly higher than tony blair's landslide election, so there is blair's landslide election, so there i5a blair's landslide election, so there is a lot of information to unpack from tonight, and i am not sure that at this time in the morning is really the time to do it if i am honest. would you like to lead the conservative party? i already lead the scottish conservative party.” know you do. we know that. i am asking whether you would like to lead the conservative party in the united kingdom? well, look if! wa nted united kingdom? well, look if! wanted to be in the united kingdom parliament i would have stood in a united kingdom constituency at this election, i have a job to do here, i lead the main opposition in the scottish parliament. i have four years scottish parliament. i have four yea r5 to scottish parliament. i have four years to turn us into a credible
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alternative government for scotland, we have seen from the result last year when we stopped the snp having a hajjty, from the local government results last month here, when we more than doubled our result, we are able to make significant gains and we will challenge nicola sturgeon for the government of scotland. can i tempt you one more time, not to become the leader of the tory party in the uk as a whole, but to look at the problem that the tory party fa ce5 the problem that the tory party faces at westminster, and how you think that will work out, there is going to be a wedge of snp mp5 there, 33 i think at the current rate, they are down 19 and there is clearly going to be, it sound like it will be be a hung parliament. do you think it spell5 dangerous for the tory party as a whole and that will reflect on the tory party in scotla nd will reflect on the tory party in scotland in the end? look i don't think the labour party can rely on the snp, in fact their history shows that they can't, the snp helped
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bring down the labour government that allowed margaret thatcher to become prime minister, so you know, there is lots to be unpacked from this evening, one thing we have learned from scotland referenda shape up the snow globe of party politics, we have seen that with the scottish referendum, rest of the uk is seeing that with having an election after the a brexit referendum. sometimes it takes some time for the flakes to football fall, let us take a bit of space and time and distance to see where we are as a country, time and distance to see where we are as a country, we time and distance to see where we are as a country, we still have hundreds of seats to be declared, so time for analysis is later. ruth davidson, thank you, you point out we have 100 seats to be declared. thank you forjoining u from our helicopter we see pictures of theresa may coming to the conservative party headquarters i think. yes. she would have been expected to be cheered in by staff lined up on the steps to gleert,
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evenif lined up on the steps to gleert, even if the majority was 40, 50. nothing like the suggestion of the polls at the start. we should use a drone for these shots, just fly a drone for these shots, just fly a drone over it. there she is going into headquarters, right by the... a very different reception. is that the old headquarters. it is round the old headquarters. it is round the corner, with the pictures of margaret thatcher. the contrast to the tory expectations... what is she doing that she will have gone to watch the rest of the results. why hasn't she gone back to downing street? there is a question. the leaders would watch in the party head quarters in anticipation of
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their glorious walk back up downing street in the morning, by which point7, 8.00am street in the morning, by which point 7, 8.00am people like me are waiting for them. margaret thatcher when she was prime minister went back to conservative central office. she is applying tradition. it is right because this is a party night. government is tomorrow, government is tonight. we should look at the popular vote. this is projected national share, which is always a big moment of we tried to give you when we think the percentages will be. 550 end. we are flashing the games. it looks less true matic because many seats they were. but canterbury down here going to labour
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with a 10,000 majority previously. some red flashing in england. a lot of games in scotland for the liberal democrats and labour, which changes the terrain. this is how the map looks. now the percentages. this is how we think the night will end up, we have enough results now. the conservatives on 43%, labour on 40%, the liberal democrats on 8%, ukip on 296 the liberal democrats on 8%, ukip on 2% and the greens on 2%. the interesting thing about the selection outside scotland is the way that so many voters have aggregated around the two main parties. even though labour have lost the election, it is hired one of the ones tony blair got. it is a
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remarkable figure, 40% from labour. 43% for the conservatives. the conservatives are up 6% although they have had a reverse in many senses, but labour's increase is up 10% on the last election result. their explanation is here, the crash in the ukip vote, it is dramatically down. it has released a lot of voters into the system who were present to go straight to the conservatives, but a number of them have gone tojeremy corbyn's labour. the liberal democrats have not really benefited, they are only are up really benefited, they are only are up1%, really benefited, they are only are up 1%, although their vote seems to be better focused and that is what normally allows them to get seats. labour have made a tremendous
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advance in this election, the conservatives remain the winners. but to see the second—place party getting 40% is very remarkable. but to see the second—place party getting 4096 is very remarkable. good morning, here we are. you scraped and in broxtowe, well done, you had less tha n and in broxtowe, well done, you had less than a thousand majority. the first time i got elected here my majority was 389, saw majority of 800 is not bad. you have always lived dangerously. i should have got more. what do you make of this election, the decision to call it and its consequence? there was a lot of merit in calling it because theresa may wanted her own mandate,
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one year into someone else's manifesto, that made sense, you know my views about strengthening the brexit hand. we ran a dreadful campaign, i brexit hand. we ran a dreadful campaign, lam brexit hand. we ran a dreadful campaign, i am being brexit hand. we ran a dreadful campaign, lam being generous brexit hand. we ran a dreadful campaign, i am being generous there, andl campaign, i am being generous there, and i cannot explain what has happened because as germany hasjust dead divide we are seeing these incredible shares. —— because as jeremy corbyn has said, we are seeing these incredible shares. we have failed to win in nottingham south and there is a recount where a labourmp had a south and there is a recount where a labour mp had a majority of over 7000. this does not make sense and it depends on the candidate and the campaign and it depends on being a good, sensible, moderate conservative. you said you were
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being generous thing you said it was a dreadful campaign, in what sense? where do you want me to begin? anywhere you like. it was a dreadful campaign. lots of parts of the manifesto are extremely good, but if you look at social care, if you have to detail a policy in a way that explains it is a good thing, when you talk about the changes you are going to make in school lunches, you start with a headline that people from poorer families will now get two free meals a day, you do not start by saying that some children will lose a free school meals. those messages were appalling. then the change of heart on social care, i am afraid, was deeply flawed and it did not make theresa may look strong and sta ble
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not make theresa may look strong and stable as she had said she was. that was a very difficult blow in terms of her own credibility. and they weighed that the campaign was being run, which was about her. she put her mark in this campaign. can she remain prime minister? that is a matter for her. that sounds like a no. it is bad. it is a matter for her. sorry? i did not say anything. it is noisy in here. i think she is ina it is noisy in here. i think she is in a difficult place. she is very talented as she does not shy from difficult decisions, but now she needs to consider her position. we needs to consider her position. we need all the results, but she has to ta ke need all the results, but she has to take responsibility and i know she will, the running of the campaign
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was a tight group as well and it was hergroup there ran was a tight group as well and it was her group there ran the campaign. do you have a idea of who might take over as leader of the conservative party? and not even going to get into that. you raise the issue. you wanted to know whether she needed to stay on and i said she needed to consider her position. that means that you go. it is a gentle night. i have lost some remarkable friends, sound and moderate conservatives, one nation conservatives who have served their constituents and in government well. we never thought at the beginning of this day where we would be losing seats and seats that we have held with excellent mps would be losing seats and seats that we have held with excellent mp5 for some considerable time. this is very
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bad for the conservative party and we need to take stock and so does our leader. you have always been against brexit and have believed in remaining in the eu. what do you think will happen to brexit no? the announcement we are leaving the eu has been made, but do you expect things to change now and a departure more any style you may be likely to accept? i have accepted the result, ido accept? i have accepted the result, i do not think hard brexit was on offer. what was striking in the campaign in broxtowe is that many people had not accepted the result. a lot of people wanted the result, but there was no desire for a second referendum, no desire to go back on the result of almost one year ago. people want a good deal and they wa nt people want a good deal and they
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want someone who people want a good deal and they want someone who can people want a good deal and they want someone who can get that, but we are in a different position now. i pit we are in a different position now. ipit in we are in a different position now. i pit in my own literature that i believe in the single market and i will make a case for its and i will make the positive case for the benefits of immigration to this country and i'm proud to have been elected manifesto here in thank you for joining elected manifesto here in thank you forjoining us. we have some results. i am starting in halifax because many people will remember the theresa may launched her ma nifesto the theresa may launched her manifesto here. it should've been an easy game for the conservatives, it was the fifth on their target list, but labour have taken it with a majority of 5376. they have done very well in west yorkshire. this is a part of the country that theresa may and the conservatives focused on june the campaign. they are taking
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ona 5.1% june the campaign. they are taking on a 5.1% swing to the labour party. we thought this was safe conservative, it used to be a 3—way marginal with the lib dems, but labour have ta ken marginal with the lib dems, but labour have taken this on 48% of the vote. the mp here has gained 13% more of the vote and a swing of her black percent, giving her a majority of 915. ruth davidson is emerging as the bright spark of the conservatives tonight. a conservative gain in this seat. this was alex salmond's seat, he held this before he became leader and
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held the seat in gordon. it has now been taken from the snp. we can show you the swing, that is the biggest one we have seen tonight, 20% from the snp to the conservatives. you can see why nicola sturgeon was sounding a little less sure on independence for scotland. we have our results coming in, if it comes and we will let you know. after that very clear call from the former minister... bursars hurled by the conservatives with a challenge from the labour party. —— death is held by. the labour party, 28,000 703..
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sensational victory for labour in brighton kemptown. the conservatives has been beaten by a majority of nearly 10,000. that is another minister gone. there is clearly turmoil in the tory ranks. we heard a former minister calling for theresa may to go and consider her position. another tory source has just told me that theresa may is 50-50 to just told me that theresa may is 50—50 to go tomorrow. a good source suggesting it is 50—50 four hertz
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ago. another minister has just messaged, we are in strange territory. they are ruthless. if someone territory. they are ruthless. if someone looks like a loser, even though she will have the biggest party, the tories are ruthless if a leader looks like they cannot deliver. there is a lot of turmoil, iam not deliver. there is a lot of turmoil, i am not predicting what she will do, she is with her advisers right now. iain duncan smith, former conservative leader is here, as is the former liver party adviser. should she consider her position?” think it would be an error for us after the result to go into a leadership election, i think we need
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stability just now. we leadership election, i think we need stabilityjust now. we need to figure out what the final result is and then can we lead a government? these things need to be decided. you cannot say that we will have a leadership election, that will put everything into turmoil. do you think she should have a period of time before she steps down? we need to find out what the final result is and whether it is feasible for us to put a government together. we do not know what the final result will be. if it is feasible to put a government together, that changes the complexion of what we are dealing with and then the party have to top to her and decide what she wa nts to to top to her and decide what she wants to do and if she wants to do it, we need that stability. —— the party have two top to her. we need
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to stay calm and stable and work this through. it cannot be business as usual. it is clearly not business as usual. it is clearly not business as usual. it is clearly not business as usual. the result is full of procuring things. are poll rating has gone up but we have had a worse result. we have lost colleagues around the country. there is turmoil going on. the next 24 hours we need stability in and we do not need any rush to see change, we need to see what the results are and if we can form a government. on the point about vote share, when you are working with the labour party the share was 30% in's or in has achieved 40%. share was 30% in's or in has achieved 4096. it has been an extraordinary night for labour.
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there were labour mps up and down the country wondering if they would survive the night. jeremy corbyn ran the opposite of the theresa may campaign, it was open and full of hope and popular and he was visible. it is incredible we are in this situation. when theresa may called the selection she was 20 points ahead and now she is the one we are having conversations about whether she would be there in the morning. in february you said you under way thejeremy in february you said you under way the jeremy corbyn in february you said you under way thejeremy corbyn could save the labour party was stepping down.” got it completely wrong. what he has done brilliantly is offer people hope and i think this country is sick of seven years of this territory and they wanted a change and they wanted someone to some hope. i credit where credit is due andl hope. i credit where credit is due and i hold my hands up and say i was
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one of the people who was wrong. the labour manifesto, in contrast to the tory manifesto that did not offer anything and then there was the u—turn about the dementia tax... anything and then there was the u-turn about the dementia tax... was ata u-turn about the dementia tax... was at a dreadful campaign? it wasn't the greatest line i had ever witnessed or we would be in a better position, but the key element is that there will be time for my party to look through what did not go right and what went wrong and there we re right and what went wrong and there were all sorts of issues. the key element was that reason me —— key element was that reason me —— key element was that theresa may has found her position diminished. the conservative party and my colleagues need to take a deep breath and not go on the media, they need to stay quiet until we know where we are. know where your starting point is and then you can start... do you
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fear that brexit may not be delivered, or not the sort of brexit you would like? i want brexit and we will see what that means at the end of the day. the labour party have already said that they are signed up to brexit. i think the labour party position is good on brexit, but she started this campaign saying that her leadership was going to be strong and stable and now she is facing leadership challenges. she has had a thinker of the campaign.” wa nt has had a thinker of the campaign.” want stability and i want her to stay there. do you want strong and stable? i just once stay there. do you want strong and stable? ijust once stability. one final the numbers i will know better. she remains prime minister and the country must come first. if she is watching this, i have a simple solution to this, you are
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prime minister and you should stay put to figure out our options. we're joined now by one of those who were on labour's side quite critical of jeremy corbyn. congratulations on your victory, your vote went up by 12,000. what do you make of what has happened. you misjudgejeremy corbyn, didn't you? the prime minister held the selection for party political reasons, it was opportunism. she wanted a personal mandate to pursue a job destroying brexit and she has been denied that andi brexit and she has been denied that and i am delighted about that. she has been denied that notjust
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because she ran a terrible campaign and clearly is not up to campaigning, being with people and talking to people about the issues, that was exposed, where jeremy corbyn is at home campaigning and talking to people and getting involved in the debate. the reason why many people may have changed their minds and have reflected on this campaign, the reason i voted no confidence last year was that i was angry that we could have done more to ensure we got a remain vote indirect random, but the effect of jeremy corbyn running this campaign, positive and engaging, putting forward policy, the big thing that people will remember about the tory ma nifesto people will remember about the tory manifesto is the dementia tax, but the effect of putting forward this agenda has thwarted theresa may's
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attem pts agenda has thwarted theresa may's atte m pts to agenda has thwarted theresa may's attempts to pursue hard brexit. i givejeremy attempts to pursue hard brexit. i give jeremy corbyn and attempts to pursue hard brexit. i givejeremy corbyn and the entire labour team credit for that because it was a good national campaign and we had amazing local operations. labour party was founded 117 years ago, not only to be the representative for workers in parliament but to govern in their interest as well. we do not know the final numbers as to whether labour will be part of whatever government comes out of this, but big positive steps forward to government today, but ultimately we must get into government in the future to make our values real and to do what labour politicians have done in the past. if you were offered a position back in the shadow cabinet, assuming it is still a shadow cabinet, would you accept it? i have never been asked
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to serve in the shadow cabinet under jeremy corbyn before. i want to get the labour party back into government, if we are not going to be in government now. i will do anything to make that happen and i would not rule out being part of the shadow cabinet if i was asked to, but i do not presume i will be as, although i will play a very full role in this next parliament and make sure that we do what we need to do to deliver on our values. my guess is that you began this campaign thinking that at the end of that there may be a day can see for the leadership of the labour party... | the leadership of the labour party... i would not describe it as a dream. i did not dream of having the majority of their labour activists secured here. my wife was here earlier and she has to near the
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beginning of the campaign not to make any predictions because you we re make any predictions because you were wrong during the last campaign, you thought you were going to win the eu referendum and then you assured me we would not see president donald trump. i am not believing your predictions and i do not think you should make them. at the start of this campaign, people athlete brother and not the labour party would win and i said anything was possible and that was the view i had at the beginning of the campaign. i am going to stop you, thank you. i want to hear the result from hastings and whether amber rudd has held her seat. ukip, 1479. amber rudd, the conservative party, the total number of ballots
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rejected... amber rudd is elected as the memberof rejected... amber rudd is elected as the member of parliament. thank you. the home secretary holds onto her seat. c what she has to say.” the home secretary holds onto her seat. c what she has to say. i want to thank everyone who has done the job twice this evening. we are very thankful to you for staying late. i would also like to thank my team who have done a fantasticjob, working with me and making sure we had a good turnout on the day. i would like to thank the labour candidate,
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who i know where i'll, and who will continue in his role as leader of the council. we had a good, they fight. i the council. we had a good, they fight. iam honoured the council. we had a good, they fight. i am honoured to be re—elected for the third time by the residents of hastings and rye. this is often tacit place to live and work. i will continue to build on the great opportunities that has been taking place in this area, improving our schools and nhs and getting the infrastructure and investment that we need. this is what matters to me and what i hope to continue to deliver for this constituency. thank you. amber rudd with seagulls behind her. she was said to have accepted that she was formidable in the debates. may she be underlined to be the leader of
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the conservative party? she has been talked about. but having had such a narrow result in having been a big pa rt narrow result in having been a big part of a campaign that is being judged to be a disaster, it looks more difficult for heard this morning. at couple of weeks ago, amber rudd would've been near the top of the list to follow theresa may. she was tipped to be the next chancellor if theresa may stays on. she is considered as potential leadership materialfor she is considered as potential leadership material for the future. but thejudgment leadership material for the future. but the judgment on this campaign and her role in it makes that were distant. at least she appeared when the prime minister would not. she understudied for the prime minister ona number of understudied for the prime minister on a number of occasions. she is widely respected in the party. we
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can see what nigel farage has been up can see what nigel farage has been up to. nigel farage has stormed back into the political conversation. with paul nuttall having a bad result, nigel farage has been vocal. he said that article 50 had been triggered and we were on our way, but theresa may put this in jeopardy. there is a mood developing from those who are hired extra two yea rs, from those who are hired extra two years, perhaps including iain duncan smith, that this is happening. paddy ashdown, the former lib dem leader, has said that if the selection was about brexit then must we not include the briton has rejected theresa may's hard brexit? so there are people trying to use this result asa are people trying to use this result as a way of casting a judgment on
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the referendum in 2016. chris evans, from the daily telegraph, is talking about a softening of brexit. the dup are ready at learning times for assault brexit as a price for propping up the tories. the financial times says it almost looks as if theresa may looked at hillary's campaign and said, we should do that. here is the daily mailfront page. theresa may had huge support from most of the british press, she could count on the daily mail, her spin doctor is a former editor. they are very disappointed that the result. if you're brexit chaos. we have some results. look at this because this
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was where other was in michael padilla moment in 1997. it is a labour game from the conservatives again. in the day, there was a 15,000 majority, labour have taken it with 4300. come back to me. that isa it with 4300. come back to me. that is a great seat. outer london, not ina is a great seat. outer london, not in a london weather are lots of stu d e nts in a london weather are lots of students and trendy left, it is not the home of the trendy left. it is in middle britain seeks that almost happens to be in the south—east. there we see a big labour game. at the beginning of the night we never thought we would see that kind of swing. please do not talk to death. 9.796
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9.7% swing to labour in this seat. that was a moment in 1997 and it is ha rd that was a moment in 1997 and it is hard not to start drawing some come par sops, we hard not to start drawing some come parsops, we are hard not to start drawing some come par sops, we are looking at places that blair one for the first time and he went on to win three times for labour. sop of these are on the chart for the first time since then and it is an extraordinary thing to think of different characters, tony blairand think of different characters, tony blair and jeremy corbyn, but to see the same kind of places popping up, this is the first one i want to show you the next is keighley. far down the target, number 23. you can see it's a neck and neck vote between labour and the conservatives but enough for labour to gain it from the conservative, a big drop in the ukip vote there again, they needed a 3.1% swing. you can see what has happened here, they have taken it just on a 3.3% swing. we are getting interesting ones in. to be fair
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derbyshire north east has been a gainfor derbyshire north east has been a gain for the conservatives tonight, it was 18 on their list, lee rowley comes in here. you can see a 4.8% swing from labour to the conservative, in the seatjust outside chesterfield. a bit of play here but broadly the kind of seats we are seeing turn red are ones that people would have had on a rational target list, at the beginning of the night. they are places that are taking a lot us by surprise. john woodcock is the mp returned, labour mpfor woodcock is the mp returned, labour mp for barrow—in—furness, his majority squeaking in at 209. a brownite, and everybody is having their words thrown back at them tonight. words i want to throw back at you are labour is on course for an historic and catastrophic defeat.
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so what went right for labour? well... david, i have no idea. iam not sure that anyone who you will have on this programme actually has an idea either, if they say they do, i think they are probably winging. because as you say there have been extraordinary results, there will be laces where labour has struggled and lost ground, there have been placing like you mentioned canterbury where we have popped up this with incredible victory seemingly out of nowhere. the one thing i don't know what is going on in british politics, but i think the one thing which is clear, is that this is wide—open, and you know, there is a, there is a space and there is a need for a progressive force to take the country for a progressive force to take the cou ntry forward for a progressive force to take the country forward and out and give a more hopeful vision than that which has been fed over these last couple
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of years by the conservative government, and that force, we have shown, over night can be the labour party, iam shown, over night can be the labour party, i am deeply deeply proud, unexpectedly i will have to say i am deeply proud to be returned to be pa rt deeply proud to be returned to be part of that fight. you sign up to the kind of policies thatjeremy corbyn has been promoting, when you actually clearly thought they were com pletely actually clearly thought they were completely wrong, wrong for the labour party, but much more importantly wrong for the country. well, the labour party has always been a broadchurch, and probably i would say never broader than it is at the moment, but i mean one of the things which gave me so much heart locally was the way that local party members, who were, you know, deeply disagreed with what hay had said about the leader, the stance i take, they all came together in this
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campaign, to get us over the line and to keep a labour mp, to keep me here, and that shows actually, that we, we can unite, and there is going to bea we, we can unite, and there is going to be a huge question, of course, for the party, as to what direction we take, what vision we put forward, in the weeks and months ahead. but this result shows that we can do it. that there is not the appetite in this country for the paucity of vision, the lack of hope, the doing down of our country we have seen from this conservative government over the last two years, people want change, a difference and we have the opportunity to provide that and that is brilliant. thank you very much find. it is 5.05. time for another update on the news. let us have that with our results at the moment, showing our forecast showing with our results at the moment, showing ourforecast showing perhaps we are not going to show the forecast, we can, we can't... i don't know if we can show it or not?
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can we show the forecast they are asking? i don't know. they haven't got it. ok. we haven't got the for cast so instead we have the news, and it is with louise minchin. i am sure you will have it in a couple of labour has done far better than many had expected but the outcome expected but the outcome appears uncertain. the conservatives are on course to be the biggest party — but without an overall majority. jeremy corbyn called on theresa may to resign as prime minister. but mrs may — re—elected in maidenhead — said the country needed a period of stability and the conservative party would ensure that. minute. the night saw alex salmond and nick clegg lose their seats. this report contains flash photography. she called this election early. a political gamble — the hope she would transform the tories' fragile advantage in parliament with a huge win. but the smiles of the campaign trail have vanished. forecasts suggest the conservatives may end up even worse off, without even a majority.
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if, as the indications have shown, if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seats, and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent on us to ensure we have that period of stability, and that is what we will do. and you can see what the labour leader makes of these results so far. a man whose campaign confounded many expectations. beaming smiles, with labour on course for a far better night than many thought. the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. well, the mandate she's got is lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support, and lost confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go, actually, and make way for a government that will be truly representative of all of the people of this country. in battersea, labour have ousted a government minister on a swing of 10%. there have been labour gains elsewhere — in stockton south from the conservatives, and in scotland, rutherglen, from the snp. seniorfigures already
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appear delighted. it's notjust the tories suffering. in sheffield, the lib dem's former leader nick clegg has lost his seat. the night began with a big projection. the exit poll — studied closely by all the politicians — but remember, it's still just a forecast. it had the conservatives as the largest party, but short of an overall majority. the tories would have 314 seats, down 17 on two years ago. labour on 266 seats, up 34. the snp would get 34 seats and the liberal democrats 14. the snp have lost big name, their
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deputy leader angus robertson was ousted by the conservatives and theirformer ousted by the conservatives and their former leader alex salmond lost his seat too. now, one of theresa may's own mps lost his seat too. now, one of theresa may's own mp5 is laying the blame on her. i think she is in a difficult place, she is a remarkable, she is a very talented woman, and she doesn't shy from difficult decisions but she now that to consider her position. the festival of democracy has been on full show, as have the upsets. theresa may has left her constituency count, the election campaign has been an unpredictable journey for her, already some labour opponents are saying tonight should bring the end of the road for her premiership, but en, there is still a way to go and more votes to be counted. the pound's position on the currency markets has weakened following early results in the general election. overnight sterling suffered one of its biggest falls since january, sinking to a low of almost 2% against the dollar and the euro, a clearer picture of the markets will
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emerge when trading opens across europe and the final results of the election come in. time for a quick catch up with the weather. here is helen. good morning. this is how we ended the day in high land scotland but for much of scotland, northern ireland it was a wet day on thursday, now today we till have the rain fering out, with showers heading eastwards, it is drier in northern ireland. there there will be harp showers on the western side of england. we are talking again hailand a of england. we are talking again hail and a risk of northumberland refer the showers but dry and brighter with sunshine further west. lit feel warmer as well. however, it doesn't last because as we go through the evening hours more rain comes in off the atlantic, so wetter for northern ireland as we move into saturday, for scotland, for many northern and western parts, but the south and east probably not seeing that much rain, in fact it will feel mugy and warm, the rain clears to reveal some sunshine and a few
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showers and that weather front clears from all parts as we go through saturday into sunday, so grey to start with, in the day is sunny spells and showers. that is is a look at the weather. let us go back to david. dawn has broken, over westminster. and a cruel dawn for the tory party. after the results that have come in, we still have 44 to come in, and a lot of talk now, from sources within the tory party about theresa may's future, we have had the call for her to go, pretty well call for her to go from anna soubry, famously outspoken but people that laura kuenssberg has been speaking to have been talking about having to do something dramatic, and fairly swiftly, we will see what happens.
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there is another interesting aspect to this election, which is that the votes have gone back to the two main party, conservative and labour, not since 1970 have both parties had over 12 million people voting for them. the current rate is labour on 12 million and 100,000, the conservatives on 12 million and00 —— 600 thousand, the liberal democrats downs on two million and all the other parties have given way to a two party vote, which in way is like that campaign was, there were two very clearly distinct me saps being given from the conservatives on the one hand with theresa may saying strong and stable and all that and jeremy corbyn on the other hand saying, there is another way, less austerity, more spending, government should do this and that and the other, so there was a polarisation in the parties and the voters have
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been attracted to that, they are getting two clear and distinct message, we will have a look at the parties and how they stand. can we do that? yes, let us do that, we started many hours ago in our virtual downing street, and we gave you our exit poll and a lot of people were saying on social media and so on, this can't be right. our forecast with only about 40, 44 seats to go, is very close to what we we re seats to go, is very close to what we were saying at five to ten, having conservatives falling short. 318 we think, we said 314 at start. let us look at labour, a long way back but exceeding expectation, that is point, they have done better than they thought as we heard from some of the extraordinary interviews we have had. so, 318 for the conservatives, you will see where the tile, the individual paving stone, which all are individual constituencies, where they are darking blue we haven't got a result but back here, we have got those,
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those results are all in, so it is the darker blue one, most are solid blue, so we haven't got that many more results to come. the ones we are waiting for, densing on the, richmond park, thirsk, sure row, and so richmond park, thirsk, sure row, and so on, still waiting for them, but really our exit poll stabilised with the results, 318, the conservatives short of an overall majority, 326 you need, because there are 650 mp, so you need, because there are 650 mp, so you need just over half to be be control and theresa may will not be, with only her own mp, she will have to find friends and one thing is for sure it won't be the liberal democrats this time. have a look at the labour line here, there are i suppose you could say labour's result is no better than gordon brown did when he lost the 2010 election but they have a handsome share of vote. part of that is surely sur surprising numbers of ukip voter going to labour, but new voter, i am sure we will find out
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young voters have been involved. labour 262 is what we are forecast, down four from what we were saying at 10pm last nigh. look at the end of the line. those are still waiting for. we have hendon, ilford north, so we are for. we have hendon, ilford north, so we are waiting for those, but most of these lines are solid red, solid blue, so we have the results m, solid blue, so we have the results in, this is the situation, what a blow for theresa may, to call an election when she was 16 points clears in the poll, thinking about a landslide of 100 and didn't get an overall majority, it is politically devastating for her, you saw overall majority, it is politically devastating for her, you saneremy corbyn giving the thumbs up to the reporter, amazing, david. thank you very much. so, john curtice, you we re very much. so, john curtice, you were how can i put it being cautious about your exit poll and not your
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exit poll, the bbc‘s skye, itv, i have to say that for copyright reasons all the time. this combined exit poll, you were being a bit cautious about it at the beginning say maybe it is not as bad has the for the tory, it looks as if you we re for the tory, it looks as if you were spot on with it. yes, one has to be cautious about these things because the truth is one knows the fragility, two years ago we did underestimate by 15 seats. it looks as though this time we might be one, two or three seats out but that is about it, indeed you are right. it looks as though the forecast is going to prove remarkably right. maybe in the end the most accurate poll yet. we will wait to see if thatis poll yet. we will wait to see if that is right. is there any possibility of it not being a hung parliament? we cannot say any way the divots can get to the 236 mark and we think it is clear that there is going to be a hung parliament,
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and that some of the questions that laura raised about theresa may's future, are going to become important later today. it is worth remembering, the international academic literature says calling snap elections often doesn't work because voters ask themselves, hang on, what is coming round the corner they are trying to hide from us is this if you think about the snap elections we have had in the past, 1970, haar roll wilson went to the country when he thought the polls turned round in his favour. he lost. in february 1974 in different circumstances edward heath went to the country because of the miners' strike, he lost. now very suddenly, and unexpectedly theresa may has gone to the country, when her party has not quite managed to lose but maybe we will find out she also had ended up the loser on this election. she should have talked to you before she decided to do it if she read the
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literature on why fixed—term parliaments actings are sometimes quite good, one of the reasons is although being able to call an election when you think it is a good idea might seem like an add van teenage, if you try to call an election early in a parliament it can rebound on you. we know, just on that point, laura, we know that she has a tight circle of political advisers. and clearly, she must have consulted them, they are the ones who must take the blame for this she currently is in tory hq closeted with people discussing what the necks moves ought to be t i am hearing another minister saying i do not think she has to go but things will have to change. i think there will have to change. i think there will be be demands, more than calls, demands from inside the 1922 committee and among ministers that she must change her style of work, she must change her style of work, she must change her style of work, she must ex beyond that tiny group
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of people, —— expand. she must ex beyond that tiny group of people, -- expand. do you think that would work? i think we will have to see, that is where the discussion is. is she capable of that? he has gone through an election campaign, even the casual conversations i have had with ministers says she doesn't move an inch without nick timothy. she is famed for her stub bonness, that is what she tried odd this in this election, boasting she could be a bloody difficult woman, but if you won't change your mind a and you have made the wrong decision it is not a great call. we are joined by andi not a great call. we are joined by and i would like you tojoin in on this, because it is about the politics of westminster by simon hamilton from the democratic unionist party in northern ireland. member of the northern ireland assembly. what do you think, i think we have eight for the dup? we, good morning david, we have increased our seats from eight in the last parliament to ten. to ten. what, you
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are parliament to ten. to ten. what, you a re clearly parliament to ten. to ten. what, you are clearly are going to be a very o tenlely an tractive partner to a tory prime minister who doesn't have an overall majority. —— potentially. what will you be asking for the results are coming in thick and fast and we will know that the final shape of the parliament is, let us see what the final result is s and what the mathematics is. the impact of northern ireland will be in not just in respect of what the party will have but the impact of sinn fein, they don't take their seats, will have an impact on the working majority, but look, in terms of what the dup will look at, we are yes, first and foremost we will be looking for to achieve our goals in respect of the best deal for northern ireland, and the new parliament, but we are mindful of our responsibilities in terms of the national political scene and this is a difficult time for the uk, there
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area a difficult time for the uk, there are a lot of challenges, in respect of terrorism and extremism and the attack on democracy, but also the challenges and opportunities that brexit presents and the need to get not just a brexit presents and the need to get notjust a good dealfor northern ireland, as the uk as a whole exits the european union but a good deal for the united kingdom. so, laura, you watch westminster very closely, can you, can you interpret for me what the dup position is and that mr hamilton putting out would mean in terms of votes in the house, what kind of pressure will they be able to bring? significant pressure, we have seen in the last parliament the dup were able to privately call some shots on some issue, i wonder if there were to be backsliding on brexit, what would you consider to be as something unacceptable? we have heard and we will hear i am sure there may be tory mps calling for a reconsideration of the idea of staying in the single market, would
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that be something you would consider as acceptable in the brexit negotiations? look, there are particular circumstances in northern ireland in respect of brexit, particularly because we have a land border with the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland will be the uk's board we are the european union after brexit, and clearly, the uk as a whole will be leaving the european around northern ireland will leave as part of it. there are particular circumstances shaped by history and geography and economy that we want to see reflected in an ultimate deal. that is something we would wa nt deal. that is something we would want to talk very early to a new government about. 36 it is clear you would only do a kind of vote by vote understanding, or is there any chance you might consider something more formal with the conservatives? let us see what happens over the necks number of hour, but our voights are going to be important in the new parliament. our votes were neededin the new parliament. our votes were needed in the way they may be in the new parliament. we were able to take
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a position that was consistent with presences and policy and platform, but were in the best interest of people of northern ireland and we will continue do that in the new parliament. parliament. can i ask you a simple question, not a simple question but straight forward, you are in favour of leaving the eu, what kind of border do you want with the south? we want to see a reflectionless border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, there are a lot of movements on a daily basis with people who are working on both sides of the board e movement in respect of the board e movement in respect of economy and trade. there is an important market the south of border. sorry to interrupt you, people who worry about that border, and think that for instance in terms of immigration into the uk, it is an open door, from the republic into the north, they are wrong, it is not a problem? the common travel area
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has existed between northern ireland and the republic of ireland since the 1920, that is something we want to continue, there has been a lot of talk during this, in the last year, and particularly during the election campaign about the caption of a hard boarder, that —— creation of a hard border we are talking about, polish worker, romanian workers coming from the eu, they have open access to the mainland of britain, they will be able to come into the republic through northern ireland and into britain, soi through northern ireland and into britain, so i though you have had a common board we are the south, but that will allow anyone to come from anywhere in europe, into the mainland of britain. —— border. clearly that is something that, the detail on how that would work in practise would have to be worked out and negotiated through the course of the necks number of years as we run through the article 50 process, we wa nt to through the article 50 process, we want to see a good deal for northern ireland as we exit the european
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union, we were reassured by what the prime minister david davis and other leading cap net —— cabinet members said, that is something we don't wa nt to said, that is something we don't want to see, brussels, officials and politician have said they don't want to see that, there is a reck negotiations of the particular circumstances of northern ireland, thatis circumstances of northern ireland, that is something we want to see in, dealt with early in the new parliament as we enter the important negotiations. thank you forjoining us. you mentioned david davies, i should say at this early hour we have been trying to get boris johnson to talk to us, no. day did david to —— david davis to talk to us, no. philip hammond, no. no. so security figures in tory party silent. unlike mishal‘s guests. we can talk about labour with the ben
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get of alastair campbell and the guardian journalist paul mason. did you dare to hope for these sorts of gains for that labour? yes, i knew as soon as we gains for that labour? yes, i knew as soon as we did the left—wing ma nifesto, as soon as we did the left—wing manifesto, we could get back to 35%, iam not manifesto, we could get back to 35%, i am not sure what the final percentage is going to be but it look like we are on 12 million vote forts labour which is pushing close to what the first two tony blair results were, and what has done it is the severe deprivation across the areas of britain that are voting for us, let me say, that you know, this means 12 million people pick up the daily mail and the sun and read headlines about corbyn being terrorist supporters and threw them in the bin. so it was the anti—austerity election for you absolutely. plymouth is the home of the trident refit, it look like
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labour will win both seats because what is, everyone to that military community, home of the royal marine commandos it is desperate out there, in many working class communities and nobody... you are making it sound like a win which it is not. alastair campbell, what do you think? it has been an extraordinary night and! think? it has been an extraordinary night and i do think an election that theresa may called to strengthen her position, because she looked at the numbers onjeremy corbyn in particular and thought this is unlosable and she has lost, she has lost big time and i don't think she can survive for long in the position she has got. i think as well, thatjeremy the position she has got. i think as well, that jeremy corbyn the position she has got. i think as well, thatjeremy corbyn is on the position she has got. i think as well, that jeremy corbyn is on to something in relation tojust how deep the austerity is going and the public say they want something better. it is important as you mentioned, it is important to emthat size that she has lost and labour hasn't won. —— emphasise. the the
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country is still saying we don't wa nt country is still saying we don't want either of you, they are doing it ata want either of you, they are doing it at a time when a government has to go into the most difficult complicated negotiations that any government has had since the war. for your party it means that blairism is firmly, i mean even more firmly, it is jeremy blairism is firmly, i mean even more firmly, it isjeremy corbyn's wing of party who will lead it for the foreseeable future. i want and hope that the labour party can encapsulate all of that space, because you, the only way the labour party is going to get back in to winning and having a labour prime minister is if you have that coalition that has the left, but also has the centre ground as well. sol also has the centre ground as well. so i think, i don't think, i want to get over this new, old, blair, brown... history has put us in an amazing position, we haven't won but we have to facilitate a stable
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conservative dup government forming itself. this country is under attack from terror. so what jeremy corbyn and emily thornberry are signalling about looking as if they are going to try and form a government. we must be ready to form a minority government. put that in place, amber rudd has to carry on being home secretary, you are right, that labour now needs to learn from this, andi labour now needs to learn from this, and i would certainly like to see some of those big hitters from the brown and blair era come into the z brown and blair era come into the 5;j;: labour, i ifif; est jféfjif brown and blair era come into the ::- labour, relook 3 if tilt? brown and blair era come into the ii; labour, relook possiblyfi brown and blair era come into the ii; labour, relook possibly at? within labour, relook possibly at what our offer on brexit is. we have won this committed to brexit. that is how you win in places like leigh, manchester, bolton, committed to brexit. but the kind of brexit now, i think has to be won that embraces an engainment with europe. one of her many big mistakes was that since the friend she has governed for the
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48% with two fingers up to the 52%. you can't build a position for the country possible pursuing a policy like that, think what the hung parliament may throw up, i don't know what configuration but there will have to be a much more consensual approach to what britain's relationship with europe becomes. thank you both. david. thank you mishal. let us join yvette cooper in wakefield. thank you for joining us this early hour of the morning and you are safely back in your seat. you were one of those who wa nted your seat. you were one of those who wanted to leave lead the labour. what lessons does it contain for people like you on the right or the centre of labour? i think it is great that we are winning back constituencies for labour, and we have seen the hard work across the country, we applaud the work that
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jeremy, tom, the shadow cabinet and labour candidates and members have been doing across the country to win back those constituency, we have had a small number of losses that obviously is sad for us, because i think people like natascha engel have been fantastic in part. but overall we have seen some great results, but of course what it means now it is looks like this is a hung parliament. think theresa may called this as a referendum on herself and she has lost that. i really do not see how she can carry on, i don't see how she can carry on, i don't see she has a mandate for the ma nifesto see she has a mandate for the manifesto she set out. that does mean it will be complicated, and we have got to keep up the pressure, in terms of what we should be doing now, because obviously, what we need is to be standing up for people to get a labour government. are you now happy withjeremy corbyn's leadership? we have
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leadership elections in the party, thatis leadership elections in the party, that is how we do things. jeremy corbyn won twice. that is why we had the whole party coming together as pa rt the whole party coming together as part of this campaign, the whole party campaigning across the country, i have been to around 20 constituencies. it is great to see many of the labour candidate selected. what is happening behind you? we cannot see. john hasjust been re—elected as the mp and the announcement was made just before you started asking me questions. you we re you started asking me questions. you were wrong about jeremy you started asking me questions. you were wrong aboutjeremy corbyn and it turns out he was a better leader than anyone else you could digest, are you happy to serve the shadow cabinet with him, if he becomes
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prime minister to serve in the cabinet? i think we have all been working together in this election. we have been fighting for every vote, every labour candidate has been fighting and we have done that together. that has been important. that is why we have won support across the country. it would be very presumptuous of me or anyone else to keep talking about what happens next. one thing that should happen is theresa may cannot carry on as prime minister when she has lost a referendum that she called on herself, we have not seen the strong and stable claims that she made. we have seen the opposite. we have usually imported brexit negotiations
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due to start in 11 days, we cannot have this carry on the way the conservative government was trying to do, it will have to be more transparent, more negotiations and discussions in parliament, there will need to be a wide—open debate about what kind of brexit the british government will pursue, they cannot do things the old ways and get away with it after this result. thank you. we now have 29 seats still to declare and we are able officially to see that there is going to be, when everything is then, there is going to be a hung parliament. the conservatives are the larger party. the conservatives need 326. far from the guarantee and
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certainty and stability for the yea rs certainty and stability for the years ahead, theresa may has lost 17 of what she had in favour of the hung parliament. 18 only. we are considering that inside the virtual parliament. in 2010 david cameron needed friends and they looked to the liberal democrats. what may happen this time? here is our caller shin builder. —— here is our coalition builder. what i am going to do is show you how it would work if the conservatives say to the dup to help them, because they do not have 326. how does this line—up
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ain? have 326. how does this line—up again? help me with the technology. while you do that, like makes plain. would put the conservatives 318 out here. we take the dup and we have them at ten and we add them to it, it is pretty close and it is very painful for theresa may. it is pretty close and it is very painfulfor theresa may. it is it is pretty close and it is very painful for theresa may. it is about asking the dup to help them. maybe not a coalition but a working arrangement. that arrangement involves trades having to be made and yvette cooper saying it will be more focused on what is said or done around the house of commons. it is a
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simple calculation. they got close enough to only need the support of the dup. this is what looks like inside the house of commons. you can see the finishing line here. they have not made it, it is a hung parliament. then look at the opposition benches. a bad night for the snp. the liberal democrats recovering about. we have put in the northern irish parties now. labour exceeding all expectations and the selection. the house of commons is dominated by blue, but the action around this line, the 326 line is the problem for theresa may and that
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is why she will need help to pass laws govern as she stays in power. if she does not stay in power, she will be the shortest time prime minister since the conservative prime minister who served 209 days in 1922-1923. it is a prime minister who served 209 days in 1922—1923. it is a personal record. nothing to be proud of. the upside—down version of what she thought was going to happen. she expected to be the first conservative leader for 30 years to have the proper majority, david cameron made coalition in 2010 and had a small majority in 2015, but this is the upside—down version of what theresa may was anticipating.
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were a lot of opinion polls that said people preferred her tojeremy corbyn. people assumed it was hostile, like her not being flashy, not being as flashy as david cameron, not showing off his feet, she was not that kind of woman. she revealed nothing on the one sure apart from husband put out the dustbins. we heard that, people said that she was not like the other tories and she was not posh. people said she was like a headteacher. people stand up straight. she was calm and had departed. it was not just the social care policy that panicked a lot of elderly conservative voters, probably
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largely due to the policy rather than the presentation. the idea that she was stable and resolute was hugely registered by the fact she did a u—turn on a manifesto in days. also the issue of police cuts in the wa ke also the issue of police cuts in the wake of the terror attacks came up the rails in the closing days of the campaign. the electorate responded more positively on security, which isa more positively on security, which is a plus for them, but it appears to have gone the other way. is to fix like it seems to have gone on the outcome of the campaign. fix like it seems to have gone on the outcome of the campaignm seems that the care on people in
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their homes, it was clear in the ma nifesto their homes, it was clear in the manifesto that she was saying you can keep your last £100,000, but you will pay for the rest of your care. there was no mention that you would not have to pay more than £75,000, but when they said they would put that thing, you will not have to pay more than 75,000, she could not bring herself to say it was a change, and they said the old people may not have worried about it but clearly everyone knew that she had changed it. the public are more forgiving of the u—turn than westminster. everyone makes mistakes and changes their mind, you put up your hands and say that is what happened. she answered question after question. she said nothing had
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changed. but we knew something had changed. but we knew something had changed. this undermined her brand of not being like the rest of them. what is it that means they can take her on one side and tell her not to give way? she will have felt that. they are a trio that have worked together for years and years, but to present her as being unable to make up present her as being unable to make up her own mind is unfair. though the time she was in the home office two of them had left and gone on to other things. the thing about theresa may is that she is very self—contained. she does not trust people easily. people have said that she needs to broaden her circle. you can run that kind of tight ship in a
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department, but the number ten things are coming from a very direction and you need to be involved. in this campaign, that was the thing that theresa may did not seem the thing that theresa may did not seem capable of doing, being nimble. over the next 24 hours, if she is going to survive, she needs to be nimble. she has been talking to tory staff, she is calm and sombre and did not directly address the issue of her future, did not directly address the issue of herfuture, she did not did not directly address the issue of her future, she did not say that she was going to stay, so maybe she has not made up her mind. this is a list of seats still to declare, look at this. the tories have to win all of these apart from one. these are
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all being counted at the moment. they have taken their than west and the need to take all of them apart from one. if they lose to it will be a hung parliament, which is why we have forecasted that. that is still to come in. ijust texted a tory mp and asked whether she could survive. but the response was that they don't it. as laura has been reporting, this election was called over a single issue, it was brexit, she wanted a mandate to negotiate with conviction. it is clear looking at social media that the people who backed remaining, they are very much
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emboldened. we have a declaration coming from ashfield. the labour party, 22,000. the conservative party, 22,000. the conservative party candidates, 20800 and 44. the number of ballot papers rejected was five. there since 2010, our former political correspondent for television and once described as
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tony blair's favourite broadcaster. she has held onto ashfield. the previous majority was around 8000, now it is 400 or so. ashfield in nottinghamshire has been held by the labour party. those who wanted to remain were meant to be vanquished by the selection. the idea that theresa may had was that with the big mandate she could scupper them, but these guys are happy about this result. ed miliband has put out a message saying that we know to reason me “— message saying that we know to reason me —— saying message saying that we know to reason me —— saying that we now by minister mac has lost her authority. —— saying that we know that a message hasjust gone out
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a message has just gone out saying that hard brexit is dead and theresa may is on life support. we are going to have some complex battles in the conservative party and the house of commons, at that is not the only battle. the other 27 members of the european union, if she had got a big majority she might of had a stronger bargaining position, but now it is weaker. whoever is running the government is going to find it more difficult to get a deal out of the other 27. but if their mandate is weaker here and the tory party is still the biggest party, the strongest contingent in the conservative party id eurosceptics. with a weaker mandate, they may be
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more able to push her around. it is complicated. we can hear from a man big contenders until he dropped out of the conservative party leadership, he has held his welsh seat by just leadership, he has held his welsh seat byjust over 300, down from 5000. thank you forjoining us. tell us what you think about the state of bugbears for your party and the direction it should go in?” bugbears for your party and the direction it should go in? i have not been able to follow the unfolding results or of what the current state of the arithmetic is, but clearly something has gone awry here. we set out to provide the country with more stability, especially ahead of brexit, and we are emerging with the situation in parliament with more divisions and less stability. we need to take stock of what has happened and what
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these challenges are with the brexit negotiations, it will take some time to rethink what is the correct approach. can the prime minister hang on? absolutely. i don't know what the current state of affairs are with the number of seats, but if she is the leader of the largest party thing that is the duty on how to seek to form a viable government. the last thing she should be doing right now while the election results are coming and is calling for more knee jerk are coming and is calling for more kneejerk decisions are coming and is calling for more knee jerk decisions and reactions. we need to be calm. theresa may clearly understands the seriousness of the situation. we need to avoid any hasty decisions that add to the turbulence. leave aside the leadership, in terms of policy, you area
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leadership, in terms of policy, you are a staunch remainer, you do not wa nt to are a staunch remainer, you do not want to see britain leave the eu in difficult circumstances and go into the world trade organisation and supper in that way. do you think this election will have an effect on the decisions made about brexit from your point of view? i voted for a remain but i understood the result of the referendum last year and direction i understood the result of the referendum last year and director denies the need to strike a pragmatic and realistic brexit position. i think it is important that we are buoyed falling back on this hard brexit relying on world trade organisation rules. one of the m essa g es trade organisation rules. one of the messages tonight will be that the government needs to seek a very balanced and pragmatic approach, strike that deal with european union if we can. devon it is unlikely there will be one party with a majority, we need to forge
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cross— party majority, we need to forge cross—party consensus majority, we need to forge cross—pa rty consensus on majority, we need to forge cross—party consensus on this. majority, we need to forge cross-party consensus on this. we are watching zac goldsmith, there appears to have been two weekends. he is the blonde fellow in the background who is fighting the conservative cause against the liberal democrats who took his seat ina liberal democrats who took his seat in a by—election. we can hearfrom are porter there, if we can. we cannot. we will leave him there mulling over whatever has happened, and go to north east fife, and we have now lost them as well. i am sure everyone will come back in time and find us here. we have a hung parliament, we think. there are 20
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seats still to go. the tories are on 306 and we think they will end up with 318. is it time to remind ourselves what happens in a hung parliament, the technical rules? who is in charge while it is resolved, the incumbent prime minister in office, whatever happens with the tory party, the government in power gets the first jazz to form a government. if they cannot do that and they put something forward and it falls in the house of commons, the prime minister has to resign. we may not get there... i know you have carefully prepared that. labour have held that. if labour hold this it will be a
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hung parliament. the independence, 116. the labour party, 27,000 509. it is a hung parliament. the tories had to take that if they were going to reach the 26. it is now a hung parliament. this is the moment where we can say to reason me's gamble has backfired. she has lost the majority she inherited from david cameron, now
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she is vulnerable at a time when the country, whoever is in charge, this is the most complicated political task in decades. it is astonishing. the prime minister is still entitled, does she go to the palace? no, she is the prime minister.” think she will still go. she goes to the house of commons, a boat of confidence or what? that would be up to the 1992 committee. what will she do? the first move would be to put forward what she plans to do. the state opening is on the 19th ofjune so state opening is on the 19th ofjune so she will try to put forward a queens beach and then they are the
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other parties to vote you don't. —— the florida queen's speech. technically the largest party is entitled to put forward a queen's speech and see what the other parties think about it. if theresa may makes it through the tories, with the dup on board that queen's speech would go through. she would be damage but still in charge of government. it is too straightforward to say that she has got to get it through parliament, because the opposition parties might not want to force another election or to form another government, so they can abstain. they can do all sorts of things. she has already hoisted herself... the point is that
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the rules are there and they are releva nt the rules are there and they are relevant and they create the backdrop for this. the political mood is far more important. then there is a will, there is a way. if there is a will, there is a way. if the party want her to stay and she wa nts to the party want her to stay and she wants to and she was to carry on when she is so damaged, maybe she can. but in 11 days someone needs to talk to europe about leaving. who does that? if her minister mac stays on you would presume that would be david davis. —— if theresa may stays on. here are some more results. we might be feeling the pace here. this
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constituency is that north london suburb. although trees are billionaires has kept the seat, look at the swing towards labour, slightly more than that. the same direction as what we saw in partly. they are holding on here. dom fisher has been held for the conservatives —— dumfries has been. a move away from the snp towards the conservatives. it looks like a rejection of independence, whether you are talking about the scottish referendum or the start of the shy remain vote in england. we have seen some extraordinary swings in scotland, some of 20%. this is an 11
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point swing towards the conservatives away from the snp. even when you see the holds, we can look at that change, the ukip floats very deeply down, labour making gains which hold the seat for the conservatives. we are starting to see in scotland the rejection of independence with all the parties taking away from the snp. will really start to interpret these same movement and some of the games that labour are making from the conservatives? one of the effects could be to give hope to the 48% devoted to remain in the referendum last summer. now they will think there is something to play for again. this is the 4896 that felt forgotten. everyone was saying that those left behind had gone for
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brexit, but over this year those who wa nted brexit, but over this year those who wanted to remain feel that their voice has been ignored and it is coming through in the sort of election. they have not decamped to the lib dems. it was the lib dems strategy to target that 40% in the hope they would come over to the yellow column, but that has not happened. mathematically now, it is all numbers really, the 326 seats in the new house that the tories needed to have a majority even a small majority, it is now impossible. it isa majority, it is now impossible. it is a hung parliament. the conservatives have 309 seats, labour 258, there is no way the conservatives can get to 326. the snp and the northern irish parties
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we did not sure there. —— did not show. we're still waiting for the result in brighton for the green party. caroline lucas in brighton. that is how things are, it is a hung parliament, it has taken us from 10pm when it was astonishing to get the exit poll to nowjust before 6am the exit poll to nowjust before 6am the certain that is how things are. in the referendum last year, there was scotland doing one thing, london doing another thing, and the rest of england and wales. it is like that tonight, there are three different operations, in scotland is when from the snp to conservatives, in london a swing to labour in the tory marginals, the rest of england and wales, a small swing to labour. the
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shadow of brexit and the referendum is telling in these results. southgate has gone back to labour, but it was in line with the other conservative marginals in london. it was not a surprise in terms of what was not a surprise in terms of what was happening in london tonight. was not a surprise in terms of what was happening in london tonightm is 6am and some of you will have just woken up having not stayed up all night to watch this. we want to tell you what has happened and the news from the bbc election centre is that it news from the bbc election centre is thatitis news from the bbc election centre is that it is a hung parliament, that theresa may having gone there to get what she called certainty and stability were the years ahead has totally failed. she had a majority of 17 win this election was called, now she does not have a majority at all. from her point of view, it is a com plete all. from her point of view, it is a complete disaster that has fallen flat. that is how things are and we
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are for the next hour and the rest of the day discussing the ramifications of this, because there are ramifications to do with whether she stays in office and what she does and policy. in 11 days we need to discuss the terms of brexit. if you are about to do your morning exercises, that is the news feed. ifa if if a if we are to mount people whose drop it is to be one the error with. do you think this was the voice of the remainder coming back?” do you think this was the voice of the remainder coming back? i thought there was an element of the angry demeanour who had been ignored for much of the campaign expressing themselves in the summer. there's a lot of this result but the is the
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most stunning reversal of fortunes. labour was hammered at the elections last time. the worst result than the 1983 general election. fast forward to now, stunningly better result for a labour run jeremy to now, stunningly better result for a labour runjeremy corbyn than most people expected, including me and most of his mps. some of that was down to the dreadful conservative campaign but labour has obviously runa campaign but labour has obviously run a very effective campaign confounding so many expectations. there were many labour mps waiting to come out and anticipating a dreadful dropping and some of them appeared on this programme over the course of the evening preparing perhaps to launch leadership campaigns. all of that is for the birds. i said the guardian, i meant the thames. theresa may falling
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short in her gamble. jeremy corbyn did vastly better than people had expected, analysed. his idea was ed miliband did not energise people beyond the ordinary people who vote in elections. we can do that with a new message. everybody outside of their group thought that was is centric and would not happen and they were raped and we were wrong. but as one of the big drivers of the election —— work right. nobody saw that coming. one of the reasons is remain against leave. another reason is that when david cameron had the election real income growth was coming up and everything in political science tells you that you
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have to make the election about something else. she tried to make it about the brexit negotiations but it ended up being a lot about austerity. one of the things we see, not with an election winning number of voters for labour, but jeremy corbyn and his team were right and seemed to be proved correct and munching on to the idea that after seven years a munching on to the idea that after seven years a lot of the public is sick of austerity. even if it did not think plausible the whole labour programme... not much could have been done then? we are dealing with expectations. labour did not win the election. it must feel like it. of course it does. is there a way of taking the excitement thatjeremy corbyn brings to the campaign and linking it with a feeling that they
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could govern which would produce the extra votes that would allow them to wina extra votes that would allow them to win a majority themselves? it is important not to be carried away with expectations and think labour won the election. when the economy was going backwards, when there was a remain feeling, they fell short so we have to analyse that. what are you feuding within the party about theresa may's future? not one way or the other. if you fight in an election and you do it because you wa nt election and you do it because you want a mandate and you do not get it did put your position in question. the problem as there is no majority in the conservative party that would command a majority in the commons. where the commons and lords would go and where the conservative party would go with different so it is difficult to win an election on a platform that would allow you to govern. there is also the personal
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factor. i have watched other prime ministers go through this. david cameron had this. before the referendum he said he would not resign. he realised what a demolition of his authorities it was and that he could not carry on. even if enough of the party want her to carry on, wouldn't we both that? having tried to sell herself in this way and being rejected by the people, does she want to go on knowing that her party are furious with her, having to cut deals with the ulster unionists? it is not an attractive prospect. turning to the green party. in effect they have only one candidate with the chance of winning. that is caroline because
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the cold leader of the greens in brighton pavilion. —— co—leader. we will get her result in a moment. she represents half a million of the electorate. worth reflecting on those. let us get the results from brighton pavilion and see if she won. the numberof pavilion and see if she won. the number of votes for each and candidate in brighton pavilion are as follows, ian buchanan, ukip, 630,
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solomon curtis, labour party, 15,450th, caroline lucas, green party, 30,149, emma warman, conservative party, 11,000 are needed to, make your minds, independent, 376. voting for more than one permitted number 18. independent, 376. voting for more than one permitted number18. i'm marked or uncertain 133. the total numberof marked or uncertain 133. the total number of rejected thoughts was 154. caroline lucas has increased her majority, up by 6722 at nearly 15,000 majority. here she is, the co—leader of the green party. 15,000 majority. here she is, the co-leader of the green party. thank
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you to the returning officer and all of the amazing stuff. thank you to the other candidates. thank you to me easing campaign team and the volu nteers me easing campaign team and the volunteers who did so much in this campaign going well beyond the call of duty and i want to thank gabriel davies, rob sheppard, steve harris and all of you. you have been truly fantastic. thank you to my amazing family, as ever, who are with me every step of the way. thank you to the wonderful people of brighton pavilion whom it has been such an honour and privilege to serve. thank you for putting your faith in me again. caroline lucas winning her seatin again. caroline lucas winning her seat in brighton pavilion, winning that seat back again. time for some news. don has broken. down there in
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those few square miles around westminster the people coming back to downing street at tory party head office, labour party offers these, talking, trying to decide what to do. our reporters will be going down there, including laura.” do. our reporters will be going down there, including laura. iwill be going shortly. at some point theresa may will come out. or arrive back. i am not sure if she is back in there already. on mornings like this back entrance fees to official buildings come into their own. margaret thatcher used away from the window. john major in defeat was televised making a large speech to the staff when he lost in 1997. it is normal
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to go back to central office, not to go completely in the way. westminster abbey, the east end, and the union flag flying over the house of lords. a sumptuous view, an early june morning in london. let us not be deflected any further by the beauty of this scene of london and let us instead have the news. good morning. theresa may's decision to call a snap general election has back—fired and there will be a hung parliament. with only a handful of seats left to declare the conservatives have lost their majority. labour has done better than expected and jeremy corbyn has called for theresa may to resign. the prime minister says the country needs stability. the night saw both alex salmond and nick clegg lose their seats.
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our political correspondent tom bateman's report contains flash photography. she called this election early. a political gamble — the hope that she would transform the tories' fragile advantage in parliament with a huge win. but the smiles of the campaign trail have vanished. forecasts suggest the conservatives may end up even worse off, without even a majority. if, as the indications have shown, if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seats, and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent on us to ensure we have that period of stability, and that is what we will do. and you can see what the labour leader makes of these results so far. a man whose campaign confounded many expectations. beaming smiles, with labour on course for a far better night than many thought. the prime minister called
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the election because she wanted a mandate. well, the mandate she's got is lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support, and lost confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go, actually. in battersea, labour have ousted a government minister on a swing of 10%. there have been labour gains elsewhere — in stockton south from the conservatives, and in scotland, rutherglen, from the snp. the home secretary amber arrived only just scraped home. it's notjust the tories suffering. in sheffield, the lib dem's former leader nick clegg has lost his seat. i, of course, have encountered this evening something that many people have encountered before tonight, and i suspect many people will encounter after tonight, which is in politics you live
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by the sword and you die by the sword. the night began with a projection — the exit poll. we forecast the conservatives as the largest party, but short of an overall majority. it put the tories on 314 seats, down 17 on two years ago. labour would be up 34 seats, with 266 seats mps. it put the snp down to 34 seats, with the liberal democrats on 14. the snp have lost big names on a disappointing night, compared with their scottish landslide two years ago. their deputy leader angus robertson was ousted by the conservatives and their former leader alex salmond lost his seat too. now one of theresa may's own mps is laying the blame on her. i think she's in a very difficult place. she's a remarkable and a very talented woman, and she doesn't shy from difficult decisions, but she now has to consider her position. the festival of democracy has been on full show, as have the upsets. an unpredictable journey for a
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theresa may. there are those who see this result should bring the end of the road for her premiership. the seating arrangement has changed significantly because theresa may as you to decide. the pound has fallen sharply as traders react to the results of the general election. overnight sterling suffered one of its biggest falls since january, sinking to a low of almost 2% against the dollar and the euro. a clearer picture of the markets will emerge when trading opens across europe and the final results of the election come in. detectives investigating the terror attack at london bridge, in which eight people died, have made another arrest. a 29—year—old man was detained in east london, bringing the total number of people in custody to five. 12 others, who were arrested on sunday, were later released without charge. another man, arrested on suspicion of drugs and firearms offences, has been bailed. the trump administration has denied allegations made by the sacked
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director of the fbi, james comey, that the president tried to impede an investigation into russian interference in last year's presidential election. mr trump's lawyer said mr comey‘s testimony "finally confirmed publicly" that the president was not under investigation as part of any probe into alleged russian political meddling. he has also called for mr comey to be prosecuted for leaking his notes to the press. james comey has admitted that he is one of these people weakening. he admitted that he unilaterally and surreptitiously made unauthorised disclosures to the press of privileged communications with the president. it is sunny today although it will
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be damp in scotland. there will be some showers across western england and wales. persistent rain in northern scotland which will fizzle. showers into central and eastern parts could become heavy. many will spend the afternoon in the west dry and with more sunshine and it will probably feel warmer. temperatures will hold up tonight because temperatures will bring rain in northern ireland and parts of scotland, northern england and wales. northern ireland brightens up by saturday. the driest and brightest of all will be across the midlands and east anglia. humid, 23-25d. midlands and east anglia. humid, 23—25d. driest in the south—east corner, further north and west it will feel cooler compared to saturday. time now to hand back
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to david dimbleby. welcome back. where is the prime minister and what is she up to? a reporter is outside tory party headquarters. we believe she is in number 10 having spent quite a lot of time at tory hq mulling over what to do next. she talked to tory staff before she left briefly. i understand she said things will be different but the tories will continue to be a party that works for everyone. there was no mention about her intentions, whether she will stay or go. a source told me her mood was down, sombre, but calm.
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iam her mood was down, sombre, but calm. i am told she has left and gone to downing street. a trickle of tory party staff looking desolate. they thought this would be a morning of jubilation and celebration. i was with the both these that went round visiting labour seats that they thought would be turning blue. none of them were expecting what we have seen of them were expecting what we have seen unfold. things will change meaning? laura has been talking about that she would have to change the way she does things. could that be what she meant or do you think she meant she might not be around anymore? i think it is more likely to be the former. she will be well aware that as this campaign has progressed there has been a growing degree of frustration, anger, within the tory party ranks, the parliamentary ranks, about how she ru ns parliamentary ranks, about how she runs the show, how this campaign was
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conducted. anger about social care and how the policy unravelled in a couple of days and had to be amended and the offerings on pension benefits, the triple lock, pensions, the repeated mantra that we need strong and stable leadership. a lot of disquiet in the past couple of weeks about how this campaign had been run and what it said about how theresa may runs her inner circle. already demand of the party for that to change. if she had won co mforta bly to change. if she had won comfortably and carried on in the months and years of prime minister she would've been forced to make some changes on that front. that may be what she was referring to. you we re be what she was referring to. you were on the campaign bus. that was a lot of talk aboutjeremy corbyn going to speak to 1000, 2000 people and she would, it was being described, going to an empty factory
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where 12 workers were brought to listen to her. is that how it was felt, that she was not making any real eye contact with people, not arguing her case, keeping away from the crowds? not entirely fair. i went to some of these factory visits and often the workers then these places of work were given no clue as to who was about to turn up. they we re to who was about to turn up. they were just told a vip was about to make an appearance and they were stunned to see the prime minister standing in front of them. she stayed for half an hour taking questions. it is always awed when you are in a workplace setting quizzing the prime minister with no notice but there was a degree of interaction but that was not any of the colour and carnival and mass rallies that we saw from jeremy corbyn. the tory campaign was entirely different. theresa may made the same short speech to 100,
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perhaps 200, tory activists who had been bussed into a venue to hold up placards handed to them. it was often hard placards handed to them. it was often ha rd to placards handed to them. it was often hard to find a pulse on this story campaign. it was not exciting, not fun, it was robotically driven, even rammed home message that did not change throughout the campaign. they will feel it did the job in getting the message onto the television screens. that is what the campaign was about. all me in the last couple of days didn't have the feeling of a general election campaign. there were rallies that i thought theresa may became more animated at under one fairly in the campaign. it felt strange inside the bubble of it. inevitably the blame game has already started inside tory headquarters. this campaign was like the last two campaign is being run
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by lynton crosby, the australian so—called palling maestro. sources inside are seeing that crosby's team did not understand theresa may, they did not understand theresa may, they did not understand theresa may, they did not get hurt, they did not understand her, they walked in with a prepared attack lying about the coalition of chaos and strong and sta ble coalition of chaos and strong and stable and the sensible people who knew theresa may asked for changes in speeches, told people that the strong and stable slogan had become a joke, those suggestions were basically pulled out. everybody is trying to rewrite history and say i was seeing it was going to be a disaster. it seems the public have rejected that much more controlled kind of campaigning. very similar to what david cameron did. theresa may did not play at any different to david cameron. under lynton crosby. that model did not fit for her. she
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isa that model did not fit for her. she is a very different type of politician and that type of campaign did not work. i will come back to you for a wider implications, stirling, what has happened, can you afford to go on holiday? just about. i was asking on the half of the viewers. we were here on brexit night and the market has shown its ability to misjudge election outcomes of the market was positioned for a solid theresa may majority and that did not happen and from the moment of the exit poll at 10pm last night stirling has been weak, fallen by up to 2%, the type of brexit deal we have me soften but if we think about the economy, when politics hits the uncertainty but in the economy keeps going. the challenges, real incomes falling,
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growth slowed, uncertainty around the direction of travel for the government on tackling these big economic issues has only increased overlaid on the brexit issue and how the government is going to negotiate with europe. that is going to mean a wea ker with europe. that is going to mean a weaker sterling, investors being more nervous about the uk. at the same time as in the eurozone growth has increased, some of the election risk has reduced in the netherlands and france, in america growth is coming back. foreign investors they have options where to put their money, global capital is global capital and that will be the worry from investors and businesses in the uk about this period of uncertainty overlaid on brexit twitter is going to cause the uk economy more problems and real incomes falling will not be tackled by the government because the government will not be clear on what its
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political approach will be. let us look at these seats. the updated prediction, the conservatives needed 326 to have a simple majority. they are 12 short. we have not looked at for some time some of the key constituencies that told their story. can we do that? it has been a night of the big beasts with some pretty poignant losses on one of those was in sheffield hallam, nick clegg saying he had never shot from fighting political battles that he had stood up political battles that he had stood up in the national interest and coalition with the conservatives, but you see what happened possibly other result of that or as a result of labour strengthening. labour have
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taken the seat from nick clegg. on a majority of 2000. it was on the labour target list. their work quite forlorn and start moments watching nick clegg realise that his political future had ended nick clegg realise that his politicalfuture had ended tonight. this is what happened, even for percent swing to labour from the lib dems. we also saw angus robertson, who was always on the list, the snp leader in westminster, often called, in the old days, the voice of real opposition to the conservatives, in the days when the snp were not taking labour very seriously, he has lost his seats to be replaced by douglas ross of the conservatives. gordon, alex salmond lewsey is this seat. he took it from the lib dems and the conservatives have taken it from the snp. a loss of some big figures. better news in twickenham,
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vince cable is back for the lib dems. possibly vince cable coming in there again. amber arrived home secretary just holding there again. amber arrived home secretaryjust holding on his things after two recounts in which we thought she looked quite vulnerable. brighton pavilion, one of the results of the night, caroline lucas has virtually doubled her majority, at nearly 7000. she is sitting of the majority of 14600 and 89. an astonishing personal performance for the very popular green leader and party mp. we have a declaration coming from north east fife. rosalind garton, scottish labour,
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4026. stephen geffen is, snp, 13700 4026. stephen geffen is, snp,13700 and 43. tony mclynn ski, conservatives, 10000 and 88. janet wretches, liberal democrats, 13,741. might he work, independent, 224. the total number of ballot papers allocated was 14800 and 22. the snp holds on to fife north—east by two votes. that liberal democrats very
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nearly took the seat. thank you presiding officer and members of staff for your extraordinary efforts to unite in what has been an extraordinary evening. can i find elizabeth, tony and rosalind volley well for campaign and thank you for the campaign that we fought? cani can i also thank all of the volu nteers can i also thank all of the volunteers here from my extraordinary team, second from all of the volunteers from the other parties who make democracy work. you have my thanks as well. and finally, presiding officer, on a personal note, my wife had a baby halfway through this election and she's been an absolute hero so thank you. we'll
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leave north east fife with a reminder that the last election as close as that was in winchester, mark oaten is had a majority of two and the election was re—fought and t won it by a landslide. barry gardiner, shadow to the trade secretary joins us from gardiner, shadow to the trade secretaryjoins us from brent north. good morning. good morning. what do you make of all this? it's been an extraordinary night. if you look back seven weeks to ford was being predicted in the broadsheets, the prime minister expected a floodgate, a sooner army, she was prime minister expected a floodgate, a sooner army, she was looking at 120-150 a sooner army, she was looking at 120—150 seat majority and she said she needed this in order to be able
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to negotiate in europe a good brexit dealfor the uk. to negotiate in europe a good brexit deal for the uk. and to negotiate in europe a good brexit dealfor the uk. and we are now in a situation which is far less about which party is up and down, it's much more about the fact that in a week's time we will be starting these negotiations and she has gambled everything for party advantage and she has lost what it is not her that has lost, it's not her party, it is britain that has lost because she will go into that negotiation and she will be considered a laughing stock by those with whom she has to negotiate. and that means we are weaker as a result of her incompetence and indeed her arrogance. have you spoken to jeremy corbyn, your party leaderjohn mcdonnell? no, not since all our election results were known, i haven't. you didn't expect this to happen, did you, you were taken by surprise like many other labour party people? sorry, iwas
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surprise like many other labour party people? sorry, i was working to win this election. you didn't expect it to happen. i didn't take anything for granted, i did not have anything for granted, i did not have an expectation, there are storms sweeping an expectation, there are storms sweeping across an expectation, there are storms sweeping across british politics, brexit was one of them, this was a general election which proved to be very difficult for the conservatives in terms of their own chicanery and manoeuvring on their own manifesto but it was blighted by the appalling events of manchester and london bridge. i think there were very different, swirling... measures which meant this was a very difficult election to predict. so what i concentrated on was the ma nifesto what i concentrated on was the manifesto that we had, the clarity of our policies, my belief that they we re of our policies, my belief that they were right actions to take to the help people in this country who really needed a change of government and needed a fairer society. and i'm
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deeply, deeply disappointed that we didn't manage to achieve a labour victory so we could put those policies into effect. do you think, put it this way, are you concerned now, you talk about the worry of brexit talks starting in 11 days, do you think the prime minister will have to go? do you expect to still be on the opposition benches facing a prime minister who is supported by maybe the northern ireland parties? what do you think the future parliament is? i think there are only probably two people who know the answer to that and that is theresa may and her husband. she is in the driving seat in this but of course she has lost the confidence of her party, that is very, very clear. and it really is a matter of what she can broker was in the conservative party. this is a time when she should be focusing on what
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she can broker in europe and that's why it's so deeply damaging to our nation. politics is not a game between the political parties, it ultimately supposed to be about the benefit of the british people and she has put that all in jeopardy by this and she has lost. barry gardiner, thank you very much for joining us. barry gardiner started that interviewed by telling us it was an extraordinary night and i've pulled out three tweets that tell us something similar, fraser nelson from the spectator said ifjeremy corbyn takes labour to 40% he have done more to increase his party's vote than anyone since attlee in 1945. the astonishing labour triumph which has taken many people buy is a prize. second is from mark wallace, a conservative labour, an off the re cord a conservative labour, an off the record cold... although cremations that laura has
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been reporting on, inside tory hq, they are thinking about where this we nt they are thinking about where this went wrong. this final tweed which is possibly more panoramic and we will be talking about it for months, possibly years ahead, harry leslie smith, a veteran labour activist says this... this has been about young people swinging party towards jeremy corbyn and taking many of us by surprise. we know the prime minister has gone back from tory party headquarters to number 10 downing street. jeremy bowen is standing outside, do jeremy? the virtual equivalent, maybe a car will suddenly draw up but i'm thinking people will be waking up and the wonderful we have
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in three with this extraordinary result so let's take it out by hour. up result so let's take it out by hour. up until2am result so let's take it out by hour. up until 2am these were the first handful of seats, about 40 odd. you can see seats that labour thought we re can see seats that labour thought were on the edge of being marginal or taken by the conservatives, hartlepool, vale of clwyd... stayed labour. the conservatives interestingly took angus in scotland, on paper looked like they had no prospect of doing whatsoever. 3am, let's see what we knew by then, more seats coming on, look at the labour line, they've ta ken more seats coming on, look at the labour line, they've taken sheffield hallam, nick clegg at that point is out of the house of commons, as goat north—east coast labour, interesting, and ipswich goals from blue to red, again to labourfrom the conservatives. the conservatives are hanging on to what they've got. cleethorpes for example but they would expect to hang onto those
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kinds of seats. what are they doing a disturbing them forward? nothing outside scotland at all. 4am, let's look now, what do we have on the labour side? badly spent came in, the late joe labour side? badly spent came in, the latejoe cox, that was her constituency. and in london, people we re constituency. and in london, people were posting quite high percentages in places like boxall and dagenham... ——jo in places like boxall and dagenham. .. —— jo cox. in places like boxall and dagenham... ——jo cox. labourdoing very well indeed. scotland was co nsta ntly very well indeed. scotland was constantly offsetting the bad news for the conservatives, here you see aberdeenshire west, sterling berwickshire going to the conservatives in scotland, quite against any predictions that had been made. 5am, we are nearly there! moving forward, you can see the conservatives get the result of
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hastings and that is amber rudd, the home secretary's constituency, very, very close, she would not expect to be in the real kind of nip and tuck fight but that was the case with quite a few conservative seats. labour are behind but doing much better than anyone expected, taking enfield southgate from the conservatives, has an election history with that said, michael portillo being kicked out by tony lera's party in 1997. by 6am, let's bring on the rest that we had, the conservatives are ahead but we knew by this stage they weren't going to make the finishing line of 326, taking chipping barnet and devon west but a lot of those seats were safe seats, they would never have expected to be in trouble. let's go back to the labour line, just look at the end. southampton, ilford
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south and ilford north, hold... labour to get and held it. what a situation, we are near the line now but we are not near enough for the conservatives. look at the end, the seats on the end are not yet in, where they are dark blue for the conservatives or dark red for labour we don't know the final result, truro, crewe, saint austell, st ives... the thing we do know, the conservatives cannot, cannot underline make this 326 line, that is just over half the total number of mps in the houses of parliament, they cannot do it and therefore its been a terrible, terrible mistake for theresa may to throw away the majority won by david cameron in 2015 and yes, labour have come second and they have done far better than almost anyone expected. david,
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thatis than almost anyone expected. david, that is the story. amazing. laura kuenssberg has been sitting here since 10pm last night and you have to be done to downing street to wait for theresa may. do you know when she is speaking? we were told that might be 10am, but we know now it isn't, i am going to go in case it as soon. isn't, i am going to go in case it as soon. summarise for us how do you think things stand now and the way you think politics will develop at westminster over the next few days? unquestionably a total political disaster for theresa may. this unquestionably a total political disasterfor theresa may. this is on her, it was her decision to do it. huge success forjeremy corbyn, not the largest party but he has massively outperformed expect nations, achieved far more than he himself thought. he won the labour
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leadership against expectation, fended off labour mps who put and he wasn't up to the job and he performs better than labour in 2015 and 2010, huge success for him. for us, for the public, we know the tories are at the largest party, of course they are ever going to try and form the government and have the right to do so government and have the right to do so and for them they are tantalisingly close to actually getting a majority. and they would have a sort of workable majority because we know the northern irish unionist mps will come alongside them but we do not know at 6:43am is whether or not it will be theresa may who is the person who tries to form that government, it may be her, she may be forced to stay on as a sort of caretaker, may be forced to do some sort of deal behind—the—scenes about standing down, she may decide to quit after this you milliyet and she may be privately forced to do so. we know the result but we don't know for
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sure who the prime minister will be. tell us about jeremy corbyn sure who the prime minister will be. tell us aboutjeremy corbyn because he must be tough as old boots to go through that campaign having been monster at by the press on a big scale, having 80% of his own mps against him. what kind of person is at that has been on the backbenches, invisible really, all his career, only known for voting against everything... a protester. one thing we've all be is known aboutjeremy corbyn is he thrives on campaigning, he's been a protester and campaigner, he is used to being on the outside, he was a political outsider. the gamble for the labour party is whether an outsider could ever have enough of an appeal to the floating voter, the person in the middle but watching him over the last couple of years, even though he's had brickbats thrown by him at his own party, you see he kissed one energy from the campaigning he has
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had a dean day by day in this campaign, was almost like he was plugging ina campaign, was almost like he was plugging in a charger to the crowd to get his energy to keep him going. that is what we have seen, protester turned campaigner who has reinforced... how will he take to success ? reinforced... how will he take to success? he's had success in his own way but it's fascinating, even on the last day of campaigning at one of his rallies, he said it's not just about elect mps. by normal convention you say it's only about electing mps, that's the point but for him and his supporters, what seemed to be a crackpot cue to start with, to say it's not about winning, it's about a movement. actually, that formula has got the labour party further along the line than its last couple of leaders. quite something, it's an amazing achievement but still, clearly not the largest party and there's no question if we look at the gaps in
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the numbers will be the tory party trying to form the government. while labour have had an extremely good night it's not the situation that somehow has been able to overthrow the above once again, just as in 2015 and in the referendum, the great british public have thrillingly, boldly, audaciously reminded the political establishment they are the ones who call the shots. laura kuenssberg, thank you so shots. laura kuenssberg, thank you so much. i am going to be done to number 10 downing street, well i am not, but we are. let'sjoinjohn pienaar, good morning. the obvious question is do you have any news about what the prime minister is going to do? secondly, what are your reflections on the campaign? the news about that is that there is no news, it is anyone's guess whether the prime minister will choose this
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moment after that most purity of election victories that has left a scar on her authority, whether she will take that as a cue to leave the stage. we will find out when she makes a statement, i was in contact by text with a senior figure in the tory machine a seat moments ago and asked would she be soldiering on the a nswer asked would she be soldiering on the answer was, no idea and i think he was speaking for an awful lot of people when he said that. will have heard anna soubry earlier suggesting not to subtly that theresa may should fall on her sword, another big figure in the party saying jacob rees mogg, who said we need that stability, she needs to stick around and then another member of the 1922 committee, the tribal elders of the tory party, his position was this is the wrong time to go with breaks of negotiations just a few days away.
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we wait to see and we will have that statement before too long i imagine. and theresa may sticks around we will, i am quite sure, see a significant change in her way of running the party, the government, not just cos she running the party, the government, notjust cos she will see that's necessary but because i think the party around will be pretty insisting that's what happens and that will take a number of different forms, i think, that will take a number of different forms, ithink, if that will take a number of different forms, i think, if it happens. you will see the prime minister being pressed to listen carefully to the party at large, the mp5, the tribal elders. in whitehall around here and there are senior civil servants who say right they want to see their department, there are voices, not just heard but he did in number 10 downing street. we know very well for theresa may relies very heavily ona for theresa may relies very heavily on a small circle of close senior advisers. many people feel excluded from all of that and you will see mps and senior civil servants in a more deferential way, looking for that circle to be widened, for that
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listening to be made more attentive and what's being said to be responded to. all the den is for the future, mean file to date we will hear from the future, mean file to date we will hearfrom the prime minister a little later, having absorbed what happened overnight, telling us whether she will carry on and meanwhile, elsewhere in the political sphere, the labour party will consider its future which looks so will consider its future which looks so very different. we've had a realignment of british politics overnight and that's not overstating it. john, thank you, that was a great help to us and no doubt we will be back at number 10 downing street during the morning when the prime minister comes out to speak. emily, can be looked at a summary of how things stand ? emily, can be looked at a summary of how things stand? imagine if you we re how things stand? imagine if you were a normal person and you stayed up were a normal person and you stayed up to watch the x will add 10pm and then thought i will go to bed and wa ke then thought i will go to bed and wake of the morning and see what happened. that exit poll byjohn curtice broadus suggested the
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conservatives would be on 314 seats, labour would be on 266, it is impossible for you to imagine the kind of turmoil at all of us in the studio had been through wondering just how accurate that would be and whether we were putting ourselves on the line with some of the results. the forecasting and figures we were jumping out... at this time in the morning coming up to 7am, these are the seeds that are in and they are nearly all counted, 643 out of 650, the conservatives sitting on 313, losing 12, net losses, labour sitting on 260, making gains of 29 so sitting on 260, making gains of 29 so far with 6—7 to be declared, the snp on 35, we predicted they would be down by 22, have lost 21, the lib dems on 12, they have made gains of exactly four and you can see the dup and sinn fein. what i want to do is show you what that looks like as a percentage of the vote, suddenly it
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becomes an extraordinary story and a very stark want when you tell it in turns of as we've been looking at them, poll numbers. the conservatives sitting on this real pool of 42% to labour 41, two michael percentage points between them, the snp on 3% even though they still have all those seats in scotland, they don't stand elsewhere, there are vote assured out efficiently, the green party a point behind them even though they have the seat of brighton pavilion with caroline lucas. this is the moment that is quite a triumph for the psephology and the exit pollsters. at the beginning of the night we suggested that labour could be 11 points up, the conservatives could be four points up we suggested ukip could be 11 points down, the snp11 ukip could be 11 points down, the snp 11 points down as well and the green party would show a fall of about 3%. that is what we gave you, we held our breath and tried not to tremble when we showed you the
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results on air and these aren't the results, nearly all of them counted and you can see just how similar the pattern is our. labour up 10%, conservatives up 6% and ukip and the snp pretty much in line. this is the moment at which she want to probably turn tojohn curtice for a big pat on the back. john curtice is standing there beaming with pleasure, does the exit poll deserve a pat on the back, it sounds pretty magical. i hope you find it useful and it have to inform your coverage during the course of the night. the crucial thing is, it's not whether it's right or wrong but it gives people a guide as to what the early results might be. you will remember that actually very early in the night it wasn't clear the exit poll was made, most of the results came infor was made, most of the results came in for the north—east particularly newcastle and sunderland and the
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exit poll overestimated how labour would do in that part of the world but the truth is filed that was going on we were hearing allsorts of commentary about what was going on in seats further south, particularly crucial marginal seats and to be honest it was very clear to us early on that we had got a broad picture right. and therefore hopefully it means that the programme started off on the right track but i have to say david, it's not just on the right track but i have to say david, it's notjust me, i have a wonderful set of colleagues who have done computer programming and an awful lot of hard work notjust a night but all the way through the election campaign and the interviewers from jfk and its oz mori who stood outside polling stations in some cases in inclement weather and collected adapter and frankly we could not have got it right but for the fact that collected data that proved for the most pa rt collected data that proved for the most part to be highly accurate. you're just the front man.” most part to be highly accurate. you're just the front man. i know do not! i hope i contributed something to the analysis and my colleagues would probably say i do but without
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the support i would not be able to do this. sky, itv, sac... the support i would not be able to do this. sky, itv, bbc... the reason it isa do this. sky, itv, bbc... the reason it is a cooperative poll is because everybody would have a different poll and everyone would blame everybody else for getting it wrong but it's now like that. john, congratulations on it but let's join michelle hussain. i am sitting here with david lambie labour mp for totte n ha m , with david lambie labour mp for tottenham, contribute re—elected so congratulations. you've been a prominent remain campaigner, one of the mp5 who voted against the triggering of article 50 but i want to ask what you think tonight means for the brexit process. george osborne has said hard brexit is now in the bin. i think he has right. theresa may committed to leaving the single market, the customs union. she asked country to back her, give
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hera she asked country to back her, give her a bigger majority, that now lies in tatters. there has to be a different course and i might say that mps like ken clark, like anna soubry, mps that do not want a hard brexit are emboldened within her party with such a small minority government that effectively she has to form. you voted against triggering article 50, jeremy corbyn your leader to gig very different position. in the end his approach perhaps, perhaps, that was one of the keys told in together the disparate groups of labour voters and delivering this result? my view remains largely the view of london and you have seen a massive remain position here in london for labour have done well but of course across the country, it looks like jeremy corbyn it right. his assessment was that we have to have a brexit but broadly it has to be a soft brexit
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and that has chimed in the country and that has chimed in the country and that has chimed in the country and that is fine those predictions that we would lose the north of england, but quite working—class britain had deserted labour, this morning were proved wrong. jeremy corbyn and the labour party have ke pt corbyn and the labour party have kept those seats in yorkshire, the north—east and north—west. against your expectations? actually, my view was always the expectation that ukip vote rs was always the expectation that ukip voters would go solely to the conservatives was an overstatement, i know my colleagues feared but we have seen a third of those voters, over at to labour. thank you very much. david... thank you. i am joined by peter hennessy the constitutional expert who has arrived for the book called the cabinet menu. is the process now of continuing the government of britain continuing the government of britain complex? it's in this cabinet manual, i rarely leave home without it audits quite, the catered, raw
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politics can make a difference to the prescribed drills and after a night of malta double political convulsions i fearfor night of malta double political convulsions i fear for mrs may it's going to be a day of raw, brittle politics. why old friend john ramsey once described the tour really do ship asa once described the tour really do ship as a tough receipt tempered by assassination and the question is will she be assassinated by her own hand or that of other people, sooner or later? for the last two general elections we had a drill made out, it was always back of an envelope constitution when you and i first used to do this but there is a drill in this prime ministers resigning either individually or be half of their own government... but what about not resigning, with a minority government? several drills and possibilities for it, whether they will do a deal, supply in confidence and so on or try and sort it on as
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the largest single party but i think she will call upon the queen if she follows the pattern of ted heath, the 1st of march 74, he went to see the 1st of march 74, he went to see the queen to explain what he was going to try and do the weekend by way of doing deals with the liberals and one or two people from northern ireland so i think that president will probably be followed but who knows? we are coming up to 7am, there is a shift change coming now, let me work it out. jeremy vine is staying, yes? peter hennessy, you are staying. we shall have seen, your work is done and you are going home. emily... you are staying right through. you are going?” home. emily... you are staying right through. you are going? i am going to broadcasting house. we have got a dayjob to do, david. to broadcasting house. we have got a day job to do, david. we have been through the night, we came on air just before 10pm, we have been
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through the most fascinating night, to tell the truth, i don't think any of us expected when we sat down here, i got the exit poll in that secret room at the back and we looked at it, we couldn't believe it, it is a document i will put on ebay one day and they get documents that —— make a fortune from, nothing prepared us for it. politics is a lwa ys prepared us for it. politics is always surprising, politics is exciting and one of the complaints often, particularly among young people is they find it warring. this election showed that young people can be energised i politics, that's really whatjeremy corbyn managed to do, he managed to get people involved and intrigued by it, seeing a different way of doing politics, not just the same a different way of doing politics, notjust the same old way and i said earlier, the fascinating thing is we have reverted effectively to a 2—party system, binary choice between the tory party and the labour party, the other parties have fallen aside and for the first time since 1970 we have a vote for 13 and
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a half million tory, 12 nearly 13 million labour so the bulk of voters and we obviously still have to find out who those voters were, what a young did, the old dead, people in the towns and cities did, universities, all of that stuff... what we have done is moved towards 2—party politics and the result to play for because theresa may must be under extra pressure having originally called the selection to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead. our coverage goes on here on bbc one throughout the day, there will be all kinds of developments and hugh edwards will be back in the chair to take us through the afternoon and no doubt until this evening as we were about the ramifications of what has happened. but now just the ramifications of what has happened. but nowjust coming up to 7am ronnie, david dimbleby, here is the news and here is louise minchin.
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hello, good morning. theresa may's decision to call a snap election has backfired as the uk wakes up to a hung parliament. the conservatives have lost the ridge or debugger remained the biggest party, labour has done better than expected and jeremy corbyn has called for theresa may to resign. the prime minister says the country needs stability. the night saw alex salmond and nick clegg lose their seats, our political correspondent tom baker and's report contains flash photography. she called this election early. a political gamble — the hope that she would transform the tories' fragile advantage in parliament with a huge win. but the smiles of the campaign trail have vanished. forecasts suggest the conservatives may end up even worse off, without even a majority. if, as the indications have shown, if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seats, and probably
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