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tv   Election 2017  BBC News  June 9, 2017 2:00pm-6:01pm BST

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my way. the early things are going my way. the early election was good? one small fact, he did not win, he came second. he did improve the position and i think that in a very real sense, he improved the position on the basis of his appeal and his personality and the character that people saw in him for the first time. i don't think however that if he keeps to exactly the same policies and programmer has at the moment, he will be able to broaden labour support sufficiently to get those tory vote and those tory seats in order to form an overall majority in an experiment. your third jeremy corbyn would be badly and go. now we have had an early election and he has done well and there is no question of him going. he's not going anywhere. he's remaining as leader of the labour party but that is not the same as putting the labour party and a broad
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enough and fit in a state to win the election. if that what you want to do, he has to come back from the streets party performs very well into parliament where the labour opposition has got to be much more polished and effective anti—has two show the same sure—footedness in parliament that he has shown on the campaign trail. he has won on a ma nifesto campaign trail. he has won on a manifesto which are things in it that you would never have dreamt of norbert tony blair or gordon brown. and he has done well. you have to conclude that this is a new, more left—wing and reasonably successful labour party. it is not the end of the new labour project. if you want liberty when the next general election he will have to build on what he has achieved no one order to get that additional support that we all need in order to... let me give you an example. i am very concerned
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about the economy. i have been a business secretary and trade secretary during my time in government but my criticism of jeremy corbyn in this area is not that he gets it all wrong on the state should have no role in the economy of the government should intervene. that is not my view. what i believe is in the labour party's programme in this election we were not putting forward sufficiently creative, bold enough measures that are needed to transform the performance of the british economy and its productivity rather than simply taking parts of the economy back into state ownership. newbridge elector get involved? —— would you like to get involved? he doesn't have to look to the laws. i'll take that as a no. let's go to europe. ——
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europe. a glorious day here in europe. a glorious day here in europe. at some of our voters have joined this year and the pub, and you both voted labour sought to us how you are feeling today. overall very positive. yesterday i was feeling quite pessimistic, that maybe have was a defence technique but i saw the exit poll and stayed up but i saw the exit poll and stayed up until the results are ends overall very happy. i know you have been smiling all day,. when the exit poll came out i couldn't believe it. five minutes before i had been telling my friend but i was perfecting a landslide but how tides
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change. is this about tuition fees and what labour is offering on that front? i don't watch to get mixed up. the general perception is going to be that students have voted for labour on the basis of tuition fees. the people that know the most students are students like us and i feel that makes me qualified to say what i think students have voted for and a lot of them haven't voted on that basis, we have looked into other things that the party stands for but it is notjust tuition fees. tuition fees is a fair point but the ma nifesto tuition fees is a fair point but the manifesto was productive, policies resonated with people but at the end of the day it is more than that, it is the fact that injeremy of the day it is more than that, it is the fact that in jeremy corbyn and the labour leadership and division they saw something that appealed to them and was notable for the first time and they saw a clear choice. they were compelled to vote system whereas previously the felt
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like they should and maybe that's why it than it was more of this time the run excited about it.|j why it than it was more of this time the run excited about it. i know you are excited about voting, you voted for liberal democrats and i know you disagree because you think a lot of stu d e nts disagree because you think a lot of students did vote for the tuition fee. i think actually that was the main issue that a lot of students that i know voted on. for me i am sort of really liked about tuition fees because you don't have to pay anything back until you are earning enough. what was it about, the election? for me it was about brexit. it was about staying in the single market are me personally i think we should stay or 40 deal is going to be because brexit has its fingers in every single pie. i think we have ignored that at our peril.
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and ross, you voted conservative.” and ross, you voted conservativelj am and ross, you voted conservative.” ama and ross, you voted conservative.” am a little bit disappointed with the results to say the least. the election was about brexit, it was about food we think is going to be the best government to lead us out of the european union whether you wa nt of the european union whether you want us to remain or not we are leaving. the results have put our economic future and apparel peril. how do you feel know about the coalition? i am not a fan of the dup. i was disappointed when i had to be going into coalition with the conservatives and i am wary about the future, they are far too extreme for my liking. at the liberal democrats are preferable to the dup. no chance of that from your point of
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view? no coalitions. we have lots of people to be talking to a letter by letter. lots of views here in the sunshine of york. back to you. joining me down, simon fraser. theresa may asked for a mandate for herformer brexit, she didn't theresa may asked for a mandate for her former brexit, she didn't get it. that must surely undermined her to some extent, the negotiations. it. that must surely undermined her to some extent, the negotiationsm is true she didn't get that and that does weaken our position going into negotiations but it doesn't mean we shouldn't start and get on with them. i think we should. this is such an important issue and you can't spend your time just talking about it. and diplomacy in international negotiations the best thing is to get stuck in and get some real negotiating happening. i am infavourof some real negotiating happening. i am in favour of going forward. emanuel macron with the new
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president of france going to sweep assembly elections, angela merkel looking more electable, they are all strong and stable, they will look at us as strong and stable, they will look at us as weak and unstable. they may, we don't have the whip hand but we have voted to leave the eu and we have voted to leave the eu and we have to have this new procedure should and should be good to set out some positions and go see it. the eu have begun to give us some detail, we haven't done that yet and hope that when the government is formed and will be able to do that. getting stuck in on the practical issues is the way forward now. should she rethink some of our positions? should the cause everything? what was shown as the present unanimity behind her version of brexit and i hope we will be able to get a position to reflect a wider spectrum
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of views on the balance between the economic and political issues and priorities between the two. that doesn't happen is tough to happen immediately, there are things to get stuck into on the money and status of citizens before the end game on the future relationship. it is fair to conclude that the outcome of this election and i don't mean a party political terms but in practice brexit terms has been a setback for britain. i agree with you. it's a setback in that department studied not get what she was seeking so in retrospect this was not a particularly useful and over and twisted quite a bit of time. —— wasted a bit of time. we are where we are and we have to move forward. can she do it any time? the europeans seem keen to get on. the clock is ticking. it is a two—year period and we cannot you tell a unilaterally extend the period that
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only be done by agreement with the eu. ithink only be done by agreement with the eu. i think we can make good progress and that is what we should aim to do. thank you. much more to come about before that he was the weather. good afternoon. a bit of a mixed bag, some places with some pretty decent spells of sunshine but thatis pretty decent spells of sunshine but that is not the entire story because if you're a bit of cloud and that is generating some showers. great wit for a time in central scotland last drive for wheels and the south—west of increasing amounts of cloud coming in ahead of another area of low pressure just looking at west. but in any spells of sunshine 1920 degrees and largely dry for the early evening across most of northern england. sunshine in northern ireland and in the west of
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scotland. east of scotland more cloud and diffusion resulted around in the early evening. 16 in glasgow but only 13 in aberdeen. through this evening west rain, rain in wales and the north—west of england south—west of scotland and northern ireland. although scotland stays dry, single figures but for most 13 or 14. if everyone in it. the big picture for the start of the weekend, i suppose and low pressure, quite breezy out west and the weather fronts bringing some quite breezy out west and the weatherfronts bringing some rain which is moving northwards and oestrus. wet in the north—west of england and wales, northern ireland improved and northern scotland dry and cloudy. south—east of england and cloudy. south—east of england and east anglia will do well with sunshine and great one maybe 26 degrees. most high teens or 20s.
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saturday night the rain moves south and east a warm night again, fresher elsewhere and into sunday breezy day with sunny spells and scattered showers mostly on sunday to watch the north and the west. temperatures around 16 or 17 and glasgow and in belfast, closer to 2021 in the south—east. into next week, high—pressure dominating, if you weather fronts clipping the north—west hot dry and fairly bright for the most part. theresa may those to stay on at
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number ten despite a disastrous election night which saw the conservatives losing a majority. the uk now has a hung parliament. the premise that arrived at downing street to make the statement. i will know form a government that can lead britain forward at a critical time for our country. the snap general election has backfired spectacularly for the conservatives. they have lost 12 seats, labour has gained 29. labour leaderjeremy corbyn has gained seats across the uk. she says
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this party is ready to form a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. there isn't a parliamentary majority for anybody at the present time will stop the party that has lost in this election is the conservatives. it was a bad night for nicola sturgeon and the scottish national party, they lost 21 seats as appeared torn away for from plans for a second independence referendum. after another extraordinary election result we will be looking at what happens next and what it means for brexit negotiations which are due to start very soon. and i am in the heart of westminster getting more reaction to what has been one of the most remarkable elections in modern british history. hello from york variety of this afternoon with voters. we' re
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variety of this afternoon with voters. we're talking brexit and you thought all here a little later on. good afternoon from downing street. the prime minister has returned here from buckingham palace after going to see the queen this lunchtime to ask for permission to form the next government. theresa may said she intended to form a government to provide certainty and to deliver brexit. it was a disastrous night for the conservatives after an election that theresa may did not need to call. her goal of securing a stronger hand for brexit associations has backfired spectacularly. the snap general election has ended with a hung parliament. with all but one seats declared, the tories are 318 seats, eight short of a majority labour has
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261 mp5, the eight short of a majority labour has 261mps, the snp 35, liberal democrats 12 and the dup ten. far from increasing the number of mps, the tories lost 12 seats, labour against 29 billy snp saw the number of mps go down by 21. the conservatives took a 42.4% of the votes cast with labour at 40%. the conservatives did increase their share of the vote is that labour we re share of the vote is that labour were other smaller parties so there is decrease with ukip down by more than 10%. so — theresa may is taking the first steps to attempting a recovery from her election night catastrophe. the prime minister is confident she can stay in office with the help of the democratic unionists. if she can count on their support, she can just scrape a working majority in the commons. but labour leaderjeremy corbyn
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is waiting in the wings — he's offered to form a minority government, saying ‘it‘s pretty clear‘ who really won the election and the snp may be licking their wounds — but they too say they'll work with other parties to try to keep the conservatives out of power the lib dem leader tim farron, given heart by modest gains, insists the party won't do any deal to prop up a tory led administration ukip of course are now are completely out of the picture. after it was clear their support had leaked away, paul nuttall resigned as leader. so where does that leave the all important brexit talks? a fresh uncertainty plagues the prospect of negotiations, despite theresa may's insistence that she will plough on with them before the month is out. ourfirst report is from our political correspondent eleanor garnier
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i have just been to see her majesty the queen and i will know form a government that can provide certainty and lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. this government will guide the country through the crucial brexit talks that begin in just ten days. and deliver on the will of the british people by taking the united kingdom out of the european union. 10pm last night, the exit poll put the conservatives as the largest party but short of a majority. politicians on all sides remain sceptical. the traditional contest to see which constituency would declare frost raced into action. it wasn't long before tory faces ludlam
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will stop in hastings the home secretary angharad ali had onlyjust scraped home. theresa may managed a brief smile at her constituency but a huge radical gamble ended in disaster. she wanted to transform the tories pledge a majority into a stronger negotiating hand. instead our party has ended up weaker. if the conservative party is one the most seats and votes then it'll be encumbered to have a period of stability and that's what we will do. after she confounded expectations, labour has been left celebrating after picking up 29 seats. the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. the mandate she has got is lost conservative seats, lost votes,
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lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost supports and lost confidence. i would have thought that is enough to go. labour even took reading east, boasting a tory minister. —— posting. there are losses also implicitly canterbury and stockton. she has to consider her position. in scotla nd she has to consider her position. in scotland the tories were celebrating with the best result from more than 30 years gaining 12 seats. the snp lost big names on a bad night. the deputy leader angus robertson was ousted by the conservatives and former leader alex salmond was lost his seat to. this morning the party
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leader said the tories would hit living standards and cause a wider inequality. we would do everything we can to prevent that from happening and to bring an end to the austerity that voters in the length and breadth of the uk are no longer prepared to accept. we will have others if it is at all possible to keep the tories out of government. what the lib dems saw the return of former mr like vince cable, the pa rty‘s old former mr like vince cable, the party's old leader had one of the biggest upsets of the night losing his sheffield seat. i have encountered this evening something that many people have encountered before tonight and i suspect many people will encounter after tonight which is in politics, you live by the sword and you die by the sword. after the best ever witnessed the election result with ten of northern ireland's 18 seats, the democratic unionist party have said they will make their influence felt. paul not all resigned as ukip leader after
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the party lost its only seat and he failed to win in boston and skegness. but the only green mp and westminster increased majority and brightened a billion. —— brighton pavilion. theresa may knows she has to get on with governing. brexit talks start within days and after a result like this are long—term future is premised on will be endowed. the map will be endowed. —— will be in doubt. the premise that committee, she said she was going to stay on and said the country needs certainty and she was going to provide it. can she survive this?” think any short—term, yes but i don't imagine how tenure and energy to be very wrong. many tory mps think they will be looking for a new
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leader in the summer. that is in pa rt leader in the summer. that is in part because of the anger at the way that theresa may brought about this election totally needlessly. the campaign which was very much theresa may's campaign fought by her people and their manifesto with their approach to the election, there is a question mark about whether she could pursue courses about grammar school and social care, any majority to pursue his policies? but above all because of brexit, there is a view that she simply no longer has the authority to take britain out of the authority to take britain out of the european union because she wa nted the european union because she wanted the selection to be the moment when she told us many times that it would strengthen her hand, instead it has been profoundly weakened. the question mark is in the big picture which is how to be manage brexit, as theresa may no a serious handicap and for that reason
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i suspect many tory mps will think they have to find another reader. we know in a situation with the conservatives have lost the majority. she made clear she will be working with the dup navia very strong hand after last night. how will it work because this is not good to be a coalition? it'll work ona good to be a coalition? it'll work on a day by day process. that'll probably be sufficient to get the government through to the summer because when you talk to dup people, the one thing that unites them is an absolute of hordes ofjeremy corbyn because of the sinn fein ira connection so they are perfectly happy to work with reason me. deliberately to view this as a temporary arrangement, they too believe she will be gone in the summerand if believe she will be gone in the summer and if the active form a more lasting arrangement it will be with a different leader and not theresa may. they do not view her as a permanent fixture. trees a snap german general election about strengthening her hand from brexit
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and making those negotiations easier thanit and making those negotiations easier than it would otherwise have been no look what she faces, what impact is going to have on brexit, is it hard brexit out of the question?” going to have on brexit, is it hard brexit out of the question? i think it is completely unknown what happens with brexit snow. it is clear brexit here's what's to push ahead fast because they fear momentum is lost. the remain campaign used the selection to regroup and already talking to tory mps on the remain safely regroup and already talking to tory mps on the remain safety are quite clear they intend to have a big push and arguing that brexit must involve remaining part of the single market will stop crucial to this debate is that theresa may no longer has a majority who she could pursue the sort of brexit she was going down the road of which is that a bad deal is worse than no deal. the idea we canjust walk is worse than no deal. the idea we can just walk away. it is not clear thatis can just walk away. it is not clear that is any longer realistic in the new parliament. if you look at the
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balance of forces it would seem that we are no going to be any recent period with brexit, negotiations will begin next monday but i doubt very much whether any serious progress will be made until the autumn when the likelihood is that you will be another tory prime minister. thank you. let's go to couege minister. thank you. let's go to college green and westminster, andrew neil is there. i'm joined by len mccluskey, a big supporter of jeremy corbyn and the head of the unite union. at one stage you said it would have been a successful campaign if labourwon it would have been a successful campaign if labour won 200 seats. they won 260, 261 poster couldn't set the bar very high?” they won 260, 261 poster couldn't set the bar very high? i thought 200 book was good to be a good result, 261 is a fantastic result. it was a vindication ofjeremy corbyn's leadership. he should take great credit. emma nilsson to campaign run
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of the libertine —— a magnificent campaign by the libertine. conducted by the labour team. this campaign has proved that wrong. the policies are extremely popular and speak to all kinds of concerns and most of all kinds of concerns and most of all a rejection of austerity. the idea of five more years of austerity saw a great personal victory for jeremy corbyn. and the labour party. iam jeremy corbyn. and the labour party. i am delighted. but you lost? did we really? yes. ithink i am delighted. but you lost? did we really? yes. i think the truth of the matter is the labour party and jeremy corbyn won millions of voters last night, brought people back into politics especially dumb people. it is an unbelievable —— young people.
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it is an unbelievable result from six weeks ago. it is a great night for labour, a period very poor night for labour, a period very poor night for the prime minister. i think we have a lame duck premised on and i believe you another election soon. one thing is certain, this prime minister can't go on for another five years. my message is that labour no has to prepare for government. they do that by the parliamentary labour party coming back together and being united and making certain that the policies are developed and spread out and propagated in a way that will attract more and more people to us. you were up against seven years of austerity, you faced possibly the worst conservative campaign in living history, you needed 320 seats
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to form a governor and a 261. you feel 6o to form a governor and a 261. you feel 60 seats short? we are only having the selection because people like yourself and the media said it was going to be a landslide victory for theresa may. we were going to have... i was surprised when she announced the election. you may have been the only one that wasn't seeing it. the reality was that the conservative party and the media in general were talking about 100 150, even hurt 2oo general were talking about 100 150, even hurt 200 seat majorities. come from the position thejeremy corbyn started out, a man who has been vilified and attacked very unfairly by the media for two years and go from 25% of the vote to 40% efficacy biggestjob of any history of campaigning. but as a victory. if theresa may's efforts in forming
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the government peter out, would you convince mr corbyn to form a minority government? without shadow of doubt, he would put together a programme and form a minority government and in my opinion, it would get through parliament and he should try to implement these incredibly popular policies that would turn us away from this horrible race to the bottom culture that we live in and turn us into a nation that has got hope and a better and fairer britain. thank you for being with us, we will speak to norman lamont shortly, the former conservative chancellor, they are shaking hands. they tend to do that after elections! back to sophie raworth at downing street. straight to belfast, we are expecting to hear from the democratic unionist party shortly, this is the party that theresa may is going to rely on to
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support their in the commons and annita mcveigh is for us, what a position they find themselves in. absolutely. when theresa may went to see the queen at buckingham palace earlier and said she was forming a minority government, based on your understanding of the good relationship that she had previously with the conservative party, that it had with the dup but here it is the thing... what the dup has said so far has not been nearly as firm as that, they describe the situation as messy, they described talk of any deal as premature and they certainly will have a wish list of demands that they will want some movement on in return for working with the conservatives. perhaps in the last
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short while there have been conversations going on but we do not yet know about that would mean a deal is done and perhaps when we get this news conference in the next few minutes, we will hear more about that. as i say, earlier on, the line was that talk of any deal was premature. another interesting aspect is what does all this mean for the situation regarding the collapsed northern ireland assembly? there was a deadline of the 29th of june for the parties to nominate a first and deputy first minister to get the institutions are banned running again but look at it this way— if the secretary of state is supposed to be the neutral broker in any talks, what will nationalise parties think if the secretary of state, a member of the conservative party, is involved in another
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arrangement with the other big northern ireland party, the dup? lots of people say that could make the prospect of getting the assembly running again really difficult. are we any idea what could be on that dup wish list to make this work? we know the dup want more money for northern ireland to invest in various aspects of life and society here. also, the big su is that of the border, as we know, northern ireland is the only part of the uk of the land ireland is the only part of the uk of the [and border with part of the eu. the republic of ireland. it would seem less likely if there was any arrangement with the dup theresa may would be able to get out of the customs union and single market and if she has to enter enter some sort of agreement with the dup over that,
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thatis of agreement with the dup over that, that is likely to cause problems with certain members of the conservative party. whichever way she turns, this is not going to be a simple arrangement, it will be very complicated and she has talked about providing stability this morning but when you look at that particular area, discussions over the future of the border, membership of the single market and the customs union, you must wonder how that stability can be guaranteed when you have to try to look after the dup and look after the interests also of all the members of the conservative party? thank you. norman, how difficult is this going to be, day—to—day, for the conservatives and theresa may to work alongside the dup? there is a synergy work alongside the dup? there is a synergy of sorts and that is brexit, they are both firmly committed to
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brexit and that will bind them. they also have worked together during the last parliament where the dup have supported the conservatives in various debates and legislation so they have a track record and a familiarity, all of which will help. but they are not looking for any formal long—term arrangement, what they are looking at at the moment is simplya they are looking at at the moment is simply a working arrangement with theresa may to get through to the summerand theresa may to get through to the summer and then the expectation seems to be that there will be a new tory leader with whom they will have to form a new arrangement and be in no doubt, even in the short—term, the dup will have a price. quite likely that will involve money, investment, resources and the easing of austerity in northern ireland. there are significant policy areas may also look at, something like the triple—lock on pensions, which theresa may has refused to commit to
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and the dup insists should continue. there are positions were the dup is ina very there are positions were the dup is in a very strong position to make demands and it seems like theresa may has very little comeback. the one thing which strengthens her hand is the knowledge that, above all, the dup remain bitterly opposed to jeremy corbyn's labour party and the reason for that simply is not just brexit, it is because of his long—standing associations with sinn fein ira. and there is almost visceral distaste forjeremy corbyn, john mcdonald, diane abbott. anyway, the dup are always going to be much more sympathetic to working with theresa may. one of the key sources in the dup said this morning, we like theresa may. they will work with her but there will be a price. while we wait to hear from arlene foster of the dup in belfast, we can go back to andrew at college
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i enjoyed by ed vaizey, conservative mpfor i enjoyed by ed vaizey, conservative mp for wantage and stephen pound, labourmpfor mp for wantage and stephen pound, labour mp for eating north and norman lamont, former chancellor. norman lamont, former chancellor. norman lamont, former chancellor. norman lamont, you have seen some pretty bad tory campaigns in your time, was this other of them?m pretty bad tory campaigns in your time, was this other of them? it was not a good campaign, the most extraordinary thing, apart from the ma nifesto, extraordinary thing, apart from the manifesto, i thought the lack of emphasis in the campaign on the economy was truly extraordinary. unprecedented? jeremy corbyn, i thought, had a good election, presented himself well and had a wish list, a very list —— expensive list of promises and the conservative party made no attempt to cost them. i saw the analysis in the daily telegraph putting the cost at £300 billion. even labour admitted to it being equal to the deficit. the killer point that
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jeremy corbyn had was the claim that no one earning less than £80,000 would be affected, that is nonsense. john mcdonnell was trying to pretend that mass imagination had no cost because it was financed by bonds. does this not speak volumes for theresa may's uncertain position that not a single cabinet minister has been on this programme since seven o'clock this morning to defend your? i did not know that was the case but i am very happy to come here. they might be forming a new government as we speak here. they might be forming a new government as we speak so here. they might be forming a new government as we speak so there might be other things to do. no one has blinded her publicly.” might be other things to do. no one has blinded her publicly. i cannot answer that, we have talked about what is going on in the tory party and it is a case for me that we want to raise on as a leader. how long? she can run a minority government.
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they can go for a full term, that is what she wants. will the tories ever rely her to run on the campaign —— an election campaign began? she has everything to play for. the situation is so dire! she has everything to play for! jeremy corbyn started from a low base and exceeded expectations. we are reeling from this result, we expected a comfortable majority and thatis expected a comfortable majority and that is why the election was called and we have comeback as a minority government so the prime minister should prove that she can run a minority government and make some of the changes she wants, important social changes she talked about in her manifesto. what i would say, given what you said one downing st, is she needs to reach out more. she needs to reach out. she has crashed
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and burned in the election.” needs to reach out. she has crashed and burned in the election. i want to see more speeches from her, the count of speeches she was getting before the election was called by people struggling and need our help. and there were lots of policies that address those issues. why did mr corbyn in particular and the labour party in general do better than even many labour people thought? the issue of the young vote and the mobilisation of people. we do not know what the turnout was.” mobilisation of people. we do not know what the turnout was. i am looking at my own numbers, mike majority increased to almost wantage heights! right from the beginning, there was a feeling across the board that the tories were taking this for granted, this was going to be a correlation, they didn't even cost
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the manifesto. the arrogance of that and people resented that. people do not like that sort of thing and the issue of why we did so well was we offered some hope, people are sick offered some hope, people are sick of seven years of austerity, sick of being told they cannot afford the police force or pensions and security yet we are the sixth richest country on earth. norman lamont can break that down but for the average person on the doorstep, there is a disconnect. the tory message was relentlessly grim. there is a disconnect. the tory message was relentlessly grimm there is a disconnect. the tory message was relentlessly grim. it is all very well to say i am in favour of not having fear and hope, well, we allare. of not having fear and hope, well, we all are. but austerity is not something that you choose to have, it was unavoidable because of what happened in 2008. but there was no vision from the tories of what count of country we might become. no sense of country we might become. no sense of finer possibilities. mr corbyn did provide that. it was basically
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more time in the dungeon. possibly thatis more time in the dungeon. possibly that is right, maybe that should have been more on the economy but they should have highlighted what they should have highlighted what they had achieved in the past in the economy and explained that austerity is not to be nasty, it is because we have been in a deep hole. you said, why are there no cabinet ministers your? the downing street operation is very controlling and perhaps you we re is very controlling and perhaps you were told not to talk to the media. i earlier said were told not to talk to the media. iearliersaidl were told not to talk to the media. i earlier said i felt it was an automatic pilot, they had the playbook, they would attack mr corbyn and talk about brexit and they were not flexible enough to adapt. let me interrupt you because we're going to go to belfast, the key small party in britain these daysis key small party in britain these days is the dup, it has ten mps as a result of the election, mrs may is trying to do some count of deal with
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them to give her a modest working majority, if that. we do not know what the deal is what they are talking about. we can go to belfast and find out what the dup itself has to say. thank you for coming here today. yesterday's general election was truly historic. the dup recorded its best ever election result. and i wa nt to ta ke its best ever election result. and i want to take this opportunity to thank our director of elections, simon hamilton, for the marvellous job which he did. and i want to thank each and every one of the 292,000 360 air and people who returned ten democratic unionist members of parliament to the house of commons to speak about for northern ireland. to get over one third of the votes cast is truly humbling, we do not take support for
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granted and we make them a simple promise, to do everything we can to repay the trust that they have placed in the party. yesterday also represented a great result for the union. notjust represented a great result for the union. not just here represented a great result for the union. notjust here in northern ireland but right across the uk. those who want to tear the union are pa rt those who want to tear the union are part that we cherish and benefit from so hugely have been sent a clear and resounding message. and in the weeks ahead, it is the union that will be to the forefront of our minds, the union is our guiding star, we might represent northern ireland constituencies in the house of commons but we are involved in the interests of the uk as a whole as we are for northern ireland. i make no apology for saying that the
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dup will always strive for the best dealfor northern dup will always strive for the best deal for northern ireland and dup will always strive for the best dealfor northern ireland and its people. but equally, we want the best for all of the uk. and these are challenging times. our united kingdom and our very way of life are under threats from extremists. negotiations on our exit from the european union are about to commence and we face uncertainty at westminster. the prime minister has broken with me this morning and we will enter discussions with the conservative party to explore how it might be possible to bring stability to our nation at this time of great challenge. thank you very much. arlene foster speaking in the
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aftermath of an extraordinary night, she said, an extraordinary election night and we will discuss that in more detail later on. we can go to scotla nd more detail later on. we can go to scotland because some of the biggest u psets scotland because some of the biggest upsets of the night were there, the snp losing 21 seats, including angus robertson and the former leader, alex salmond. although they remain by far the biggest party in scotland. the tories took 12 of the snp seats, labour took six of them and the lib dems three. nicola sturgeon conceded that her party's plans for a second independence referendum had an impact on the snp's performance. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, said it had been an historic result for the party in scotla nd historic result for the party in scotland but the tories as a whole had fallen short of expectation and she said the people of scotland had rejected the idea of the second independence referendum. this was an election dominated by one issue, nicola sturgeon's decision in march
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to demand a second referendum on independence. we led the opposition to that demand. the scottish people spoke, the snp vote is down 13%, nearly half a million votes gone between 2015 and today. our vote is up between 2015 and today. our vote is up 13%. the largest share of the vote for the scottish conservatives since 1979. snp mps who last night lost their seats have paid the price per watt was a massive political mess calculations on nicola sturgeon's part. and this morning we have heard figures acknowledging that the referendum demands were behind that bad result. we heard the first minister say she will reflect on that matter but that is not enough. let me be clear. nobody is expecting the snp to give up on independence. that is what it
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believes and that is a perfectly honourable position to take that what people expect is that right now, the snp gives scotland a break. simply put, scotland has had its fill. we will refocus on challenges for education, nhs funding and the tax and welfare powers as well as a challenge from brexit. nobody will condemn the first minister. ruth davidson talking a short time ago. she has also made some interesting comments about brexit ascender conservatives need to talk to other political parties and find a way to deliver what she calls an open brexit. what that means, we do not yet know. lorna gordon is in edinburgh for us now. . yes, the snp are still the largest party by far here in scotland. but i think it is fairto here in scotland. but i think it is fair to say, most people would say
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they did not have a good night. with me are three people who have inside knowledge of the political process here in scotland. a former senior advisor for the here in scotland. a former senior advisorfor the snp, here in scotland. a former senior advisor for the snp, an advisor for labour, and a senior adviser to the conservatives. first of all, what do you think went wrong for the snp? well, the campaign north of the border was purely about indyref2. for the rest of the uk, it was about brexit. it was a disappointing night for the snp, there is no doubt about that and a good night for the conservatives in scotland. we would have to step back and say, the snp still won more seats than the other parties put together. and up until two years ago, when they won that remarkable result, they had never won more than 11 seats. was it a political miscalculation for nicola sturgeon three months ago, to call for the right to hold a second independence referendum? perhaps. we
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would have to say that she did say, again, almost like theresa may, after the brexit negotiations were complete, but it is being spun as if nicola has just been calling for a referendum next week which it isn't. having said that, she has said she will reflect on, i would not be surprised if indyref2 is parked for the time being. ramsay jones, what was the secret to the success of the conservatives here in scotland coverage they have had a huge surge what it down to with davidson or theresa may? it was down to ruth davidson and a centricity of message, a clear identification of where votes could come from and an appeal which resonated largely in areas where there has been a conservative vote in the past. but it was the person and the message and a rigid adherence to ramming it home. ina and a rigid adherence to ramming it home. in a strange way, in scotland,
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this general election which was supposed to be about brexit was about brexit. because within hours of that eu referendum, nicola sturgeon stood up and said the answer to brexit in scotland is indyref2. she framed it that way and it was ruth davidson and her party who made the most of it. she was very successful in harnessing that position, saying that the conservatives were the ones with the clearest position on the constitution, and being pro—union, but now, she has 13 mps at westminster. will then now be a deeper interrogation of her policies beyond that? what a wonderful problem to have, 13 mps at westminster! let's first of all give credit, of all the performances in scotland, that was outstanding, for ruth davidson and the team to do. if the debate in scotland got beyond the debate in scotland got beyond the constitution, you could say, the win, job done. but i would say that
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if and when that debate moved beyond the constitution in scotland, there isa the constitution in scotland, there is a whole raft of policies where is the opportunity for the centre—right message to be put and clear blue water from the other parties. does that mean theresa may is an electoral liability here in scotland? i think this general election in scotland was completely and large separate from what happened across the rest of the uk. very often in scotland now, it is not what is happening at westminster, but what can scotland do with the powers they have, on issues like welfare? do you agree, was it a separate type of election here in scotland? i think the question was, you had briefly does, one who was helped by the uk leader, and another one who was insulated from her trainer and another one who was insulated from hertrainerl and another one who was insulated from her trainer i think there is no question that kezia dugdale was helped mother was a surge here. the thing which is surprising and good for the conservatives is that ruth davidson managed to insulated
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herself from the campaign that theresa may was running, which was in doubt until the end. what you saw was, particularly in scotland, if you look at a seat like rutherglen which labour gained, their vote hardly we nt which labour gained, their vote hardly went up at all. the snp went down 12 points, the tory vote went up down 12 points, the tory vote went up12 down 12 points, the tory vote went up 12 points. there were labour vote rs up 12 points. there were labour voters who had decided that the constitution was the most important for thing for them, and they crossed the rubicon and voted conservative. at the same time, withjeremy corbyn's message, there were ex—labour voters corbyn's message, there were ex— labour voters who believed corbyn's message, there were ex—labour voters who believed that independence would deliver social justice and voted for the snp, and i believe they came back to labour because of the influence ofjeremy corbyn down south. there was a feeling that people here voted on unionist or indyref2 lines, what are your views on that going forward, do your views on that going forward, do you think it is dead in the water, indyref2? i think, a you think it is dead in the water, indyref2? ithink, a sturgeon you think it is dead in the water,
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indyref2? i think, a sturgeon will have to postpone it. ifeel sorry for her in some ways. i don't think she wanted to call it after the last referendum, she wanted to wait until the support got up to 60%, then her party pushed her into saying, you have got to put it in the manifesto. that was when nobody thought there was going to be wary eu referendum, let alone a brexit vote, socially has painted herself into a corner. now she has got to try and win the next scottish election and hold onto she has for the time being. plenty we could be saying here. thank you all of you very much. i'm afraid we have run out of time. nicola sturgeon, for her part, did make that statement at bute house earlier on today. she said she will consider the best way forward and listen to voters. so, in the last few minutes, we have had confirmation that the
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dup has gone into discussions with the conservatives. arlene foster, the conservatives. arlene foster, the leader of the dup, saying that they will explore how it is possible to bring stability to the nation. it all comes after an extraordinary night, an extraordinaire result which very few people saw coming. let's hear now from some of the voters. steph mcgovern has been getting reaction from some voters in york. yes. a glorious day here in york. yes. a glorious day here in york and lots of people around, all talking about the election result, not least our bleary—eyed voters, lot of whom stayed up late last night to watch the election. thank you forjoining us. starting with you, as your dress might suggest, you, as your dress might suggest, you voted labour dzeko how are you feeling today? i am feeling really awesome, actually. i can see the effort that our campaign put into it, the fact that young people and eve ryo ne it, the fact that young people and everyone came out and tried to have a voice in what society has to say
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for the next generation, it makes me really proud. why do you think young people came out and why did they vote for labour? for me, it is who spoke the language of the people at that moment, who made sure their voices were being heard, who was contacting them and liaising with that community? sometimes, politics can be disenfranchised from the people themselves, but this campaign went out and met young people and spoke to them, and the manifesto as well, putting it in the front of the conversation, for once, which never really happens. now, i know you are a lib dem voter. swing voter. yeah, you were really undecided, weren't you? absolutely, until seven o'clock last night. what swung it for you? the manifesto of the lib dem candidate from my area, not nationally, he wants to represent us asa nationally, he wants to represent us as a people. unfortunately, he did
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not win. i am just hoping that they realise that they need to represent the people in their constituency. it's not all about what is happening nationally, it is what is happening locally. you're thinking about the locally. you're thinking about the local picture. and dies, i know we spoke to you the other day on brexit as well, you wanted to vote ukip that you did not have a candidate, so you voted for the tories?” passed the ball to theresa may when she was inside the penalty area, and she was inside the penalty area, and she has basically kicked it over the crossbar, hasn't she? that is one of the best analogies i have heard so far! i will not be passing her the ball again. as far as feelings go, i feel like it has been a 0—0 draw. the snp have had lots of players sent off, theresa may has been booked for a professional foul, and... you have thought long and ha rd and... you have thought long and hard about this! i have had a few minutes! and i know you voted
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conservative, and you're very much conservative, and you're very much conservative, anju? yes. what do you think about the picture looking ahead, talks with the dup? i'm not massively positive about that. but i just we can get a strong leadership to lead us through brexit and towards prosperity, because i don't think labour would have given us that. i think the voters have said, labour is not what we want, however a massive tory landslide is not what we want, either. we have to look at the election and say, where do people go wrong, what do the people want, and try and address that. which i think theresa may didn't, she was very absent. when you arrived early on, you looked fairly fed up. yeah, i thought that when she called the election, i was surprised, and i thought, yes, she's going to win this landslide. i thought, she has got this in the bag. and it has gone so badly wrong for her. unbelievable. i am gone
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this morning, i'm afraid. but you say to me that you've just got to get on with it? you've got to. like isaid in get on with it? you've got to. like i said in the referendum, everybody wa nts i said in the referendum, everybody wants another referendum. we can't keep calling elections until they get the view that we want to. and i do hope she stays on and sees it through. and ian, you're keen to tell us your thoughts on this as well? as a liberal democrat, i was really pleased with the fact that people like vince cable and norman lamb are going to be there with their expertise, and at the same time tinged with sadness that greg mulholland has lost his seat, having worked tirelessly for the local community. but as we move forward from here, the liberal democrats are going to have a strong voice in parliament, and will hold theresa may to account, as she negotiates the brexit deal. and as we go forward , the brexit deal. and as we go forward, that will be a good
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challenge for them, because i'm not sure she's going to get it from jeremy corbyn. so, lots of questions to be answered. as you can see, the weather, absolutely glorious here. but what is it like across the rest of the country? a mixed bag, sunny spells and scattered showers coming few and further between. one or two in the east of england and scotland but looking towards the south and west the cloud and rain moving in this evening and overnight. stays dry in northern scotland is, temperatures into single figures but from most places 13 or 14 and quite wet through the start of the weekend across the west and south—west. written in scotland but improving in northern ireland and quite windy. breezy in the south—east and sunshine and warmth to be had, 23 degrees and some places 2425.
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theresa may vows to stay on at number ten — despite a disastrous election night which saw the conservatives the uk now has a hung parliament. after an audience at buckingham palace, the prime minister arrived backin palace, the prime minister arrived back in downing street to make this statement. i have just back in downing street to make this statement. i havejust been back in downing street to make this statement. i have just been to see her majesty the queen, and i will now form a government, a government that can provide certainty and lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. the snap general election has backfired spectacularly for the conservatives. they have lost 12 seats and labour has gained 29. jeremy corbyn confounded
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expectations with those gains across the uk. now he says he is ready to serve the country. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. there isn't a parliamentary majority for anyone, and the party that has lost as the conservative party. it was a bad night for nicola sturgeon and the snp, who lost 21 seats as voters appeared to turn away from plans for appeared to turn away from plans for a second independence referendum. we will listen to these results and the voters and consider very carefully the best way forward for scotland, a way forward that is in the interests of all of scotland. after another extraordinary election result, we will look at what happens next and what it all means for the brexit negotiations, which are due to start a week on monday. i'm in the heart of westminster
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getting reaction to one of the most remarkable elections in modern british history. if you see a cabinet minister, tell them we're here. hello from york, where i am here with voters. all different political persuasions and ages. we're talking everything from brexit to the youth vote. more from here later. good afternoon from downing street. this afternoon, behind the door of number ten, theresa may is planning how to run a government without an overall majority. a calamitous day at the polls for the conservatives ended with the loss of 12 seats, and the party is now dependent on the
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support of the democratic unionists. the prime minister went to buckingham palace at lunchtime to formally inform the queen of the hung parliament and returned with a pledge to stay in office to provide certainty in difficult times. with all but one seat declared, the tories have 318 seats, eight short ofa tories have 318 seats, eight short of a majority. labour has 261 mps, the snp 35. the liberal democrats have 12 and the dup have ten. labour made the biggest gain in the commons, with 29 seats, and far from increasing their number of mps, the tories lost 12 seats, while the snp saw their number of mps go down by 21. the conservatives took 42.4% of the votes cast, with labour at 40%. both labour and conservatives increased their share, while smaller parties saw their share the crease, with ukip's down by more than 10%. in the last few minutes, the dup
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leader arlene foster has said she has already spoken to theresa may to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to the uk. the prime minister is confident she can stay in office with the support of the dup, whose support would just scrape a majority for her in the commons. jeremy corbyn is waiting in the wings, offering to form a minority government, saying it is pretty clear who won the election. the snp may be licking their wounds, but they too have said they would work with other parties to try to keep the conservatives out of power. tim farron, given heart by modest gains, has said his party will not do any deal to prop up a tory led administration. ukip are now com pletely administration. ukip are now completely out of the picture as it was clear their support had leaked away. paul nuttall resigned as their leader. where does it leave the all—important brexit talks? fresh uncertainty now plagues the prospect
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of these negotiations, despite theresa may's insistence that she will plough one before the month is out. a first report is on the results and contains flash photography. is this strong and stable, prime minister? she had wanted strength and stability, but that is not how it has turned out. theresa may did just enough to let her take the journey to buckingham palace, but no increased majority and no spring in her step. what the country needs more than ever is certainty, and having secured the largest number of votes a nd having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. as we do, we will continue to work with our
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friends and allies in the democratic unionist party in particular. ten o'clock last night, the exit poll put the conservatives as the largest party but short of an overall majority. politicians on all sides remained sceptical while constituencies raced to be the first to declare. it wasn't long before tory faces told their own story. in hastings, the home secretary amber rudd onlyjust clung on by 346 votes. arriving at her own constituency count, theresa may managed a brief smile, but her huge political gamble had ended in disaster. she had wanted to transform the tory majority into a stronger negotiating and that the brexit table. instead, her party has ended up weaker. if this is correct, that the conservative party has won the most seats and probably the most votes, then it will be incumbent on
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us votes, then it will be incumbent on us to ensure that we have that period of stability, and that is exactly what we will do. he, though, has prepped... confounded expectations. labour celebrated after picking up 29 seats. the prime minister called an election to get a mandate. the mandate she has is lost conservative seats, lost support and lost confidence. i would have thought that was enough to go, actually. labour kicked out eight of theresa may's ministers, and there we re theresa may's ministers, and there were more blue losses in seats such as stopping, and other conservative members wondering whether mrs may could continue. she's a remarkable, talented woman who does not shy away from difficult decisions, but she obviously now has to consider her position. in scotland, the tories
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we re position. in scotland, the tories were celebrating, gaining 12 seats, their best result for more than 30 yea rs. their best result for more than 30 years. we need to make sure there is a queen ‘s speech put forward, that the processes of government continue, but we also need to make sure that we listen to the message that the people of the uk have sent in the last 24 hours, and that involves parties working together. the snp lost big names on a bad night. their deputy leader angus robertson and former leader alex salmond. this morning, nicola sturgeon said the tories would hit living standards and widen inequality. we want to bring an end to the austerity that voters the length and breadth of the uk are no longer prepared to accept. we will work with others if it is at all possible to keep the tories out of government. the lib dems saw the return of former ministers like vince cable in twickenham, but the pa rty‘s old vince cable in twickenham, but the
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party's old leader was the victim of one of the biggest upsets of the night, losing his sheffield seat.” have encountered this evening something that many people have encountered before tonight, and i suspect many people will encounter after tonight, which is, in politics, you live by the sword and you die by the sword. after their best ever election result in westminster, the democratic unionist party now find themselves as kingmakers. the prime minister has spoken with me this morning, and we will enter discussions with the conservatives to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation at this time of great challenge. paul nuttall resigned as ukip's leader after the party lost its only seat and he failed to win in boston and skegness. westminster‘s only green mp, caroline lucas, increased her majority in brighton pavilion. while others celebrate, she knows she has got to get on with governing, now
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with the help of the dup, and brexit talks start within days. after this result, theresa may's long—term result, theresa may's long—term result as prime minister will be in doubt. it is extraordinary to think that when the general election was called and the conservatives were riding high with 20% lead in the polls, seven weeks and it is gone. we thought she seemed to be walking on water at that stage, and yet this political gamble has gone horrendously wrong for her. a few things have made the tories angry overnight. first, the election was unnecessary, she overnight. first, the election was unnecessary, she didn't have to call it, and some of them are furious that she did. she went ahead with a campaign that many of them are extremely unhappy about, saying it was disastrous, clocked up and planned by those aides extremely close to her will stop number ten
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planned this whole campaign. she could not admit that the social care policy was a u—turn. not turning up for tv debates seemed to great with the public. clearly, she feels she is the only person who can stay on and feels she is the only person with legitimacy to stay on and try to run the government. we now know that the dup is in conversation with the conservatives and they are discussing possibilities. there will bea discussing possibilities. there will be a price to pay for that. there will, and it was interesting heaving arlene foster's was. i don't think this will be a formal process or a formal agreement. i suspect it will be more of a day by day thing, where they agree to support on issues that they agree to support on issues that they can support on. clearly, though, that was theresa may's only real way forward in order to get the
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numbers to carry on reading. you have to wonder what it means the brexit, because this started because the prime minister wanted to strengthen her hand so that she could go into the brexit negotiations with a stronger position. now she goes into them, if indeed they start in nine days, with a weaker position. she called this election saying she needed a stronger hand to go to brussels to sit around a table with the other 27 eu heads of state with a stronger negotiating position. she even said that ifjeremy corbyn picked up six seats, that would be terrible for the conservatives. they have done far better than that. this has been a political gamble that has gone horrendously wrong. she doesn't now have that strong hand she was asking for. the negotiations start in a few days. next week, she knows she has to get on with it. it is interesting to get on with it. it is interesting to hear reaction from around the eu, because they have seen not only what is happening with theresa may, but
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what happened with david cameron before her. many will now be wondering whether or not she will see out the brexit talks. that is the big question, isn't it? when we saw her just after one the big question, isn't it? when we saw herjust after one o'clock, she said, iam saw herjust after one o'clock, she said, i am going to continue, the country needs certainty, but how long can she last? people are saying she needs to stay on for that stability. the remainder end of the conservative party don't want to givejeremy conservative party don't want to give jeremy corbyn and conservative party don't want to givejeremy corbyn and labour the momentum to try and form some sort of labour minority government. so for now, she will stick where she is. but look towards the summer, potentially the autumn, we may nce rumblings of whether she is the right person to be in charge and taking the party forward. an extraordinary night. who would have thought we would be in this position this afternoon? eleanor, thank you very much for now. viewers on bbc one are about to leave us, but our special coverage continues now on
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the bbc news channel and on bbc two. and this is a weekend for reflection and they think is right we listen to the public and reflect on what we have heard and deliver stability by monday. the premise that calls the selection because she wanted a mandate for her kind of brexit. she doesn't get that mandate so she has no german democratic legitimacy to proceed with that. we need to ensure we have the dup to support us to maximise the opportunities and minimise disruption and that when we should be focusing our efforts. that's what you said in the election campaign. as richard george you wa nted campaign. as richard george you wanted the british people to vote for, that's why she called the election and the british people have not given you that mandate to as planned. democracy is a very
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precious thing and sometimes the electorate to get politicians and convenient results which you must deal with. i wasn't one of your voters on your panel ellis and we can keep voting again and again. voters on your panel ellis and we can keep voting again and againm you should follow what the voters see rather than just ignoring them. despite not getting a mandate persisted as outlined before they liked. that is a matter for the government and the prime minister. but i think we need to do is on the result of the referendum with them very well be from us in particular to young people that many of them are feeling alienated. create your very clear that we aren't to be listening to them and we are delivering a brexit is to work. i think we have listened throughout. i think we have listened throughout. i think one of the important point that has happened here is we have had an election as an public spending anything but has happened its people have voted on brexit last
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year and come forward to the selection of voted largely on public spending. it wasn't for me to plan a campaign to think that is what happened, jeremy corbyn ran a campaign against austerity. i have heard very clearly that people want to see more money spent on public services. i would like that but you can't do that if you adopt policies which in the economy. what we need to do is make a clear case to the public at me to spend more on public services we need to adopt policies which grow the economy. should you have thought of this from the election campaign? i would have loved to have won the election campaign but it was above my pay grade. david davids said the conservatives put pulling out of the customs union and the single market to the electorate, they didn't support that some maybe they should reconsider their position. the
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position at the moment is that labour party have put in a manifesto that free movement would end as we left the eu. there is commonality between the parties that we can be in the economic area if we're going to end the free movement of people are controllable migration policy so i think it is pretty clear that the public overwhelmingly voted for two parties who accept that we're going to control our own migration policy and that means we can be in the european... labour is going to control its own... a storage shed during the campaign. and the ma nifesto during the campaign. and the manifesto belated freedom of movement for end but what we need to do this can offer the successful exit from the eu which i believe is only right paper. what exit will happen first? the exit from the eu are mrs may's exit has premised? i'm confident that theresa may will be backed for as long as it takes
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throughout this whole parliament. really. we are a precarious position, the public have chosen to put us where we are and i think that'll really focused minds of what it takes to several lectures. my priority is the safety facility of the people of wycombe and every mp will be in the same place. what she have to change to do better? it has been a disastrous result, how should she change? what we need to do is see a gentler tone and a wider team participating in policy. it is not for me to advise the prime minister, what the prime minister is doing is something our government before the public need to see is a broad range of chart and the conservative party including the ability get this helping people out of poverty. the
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bill was more coverage through today and made a list of donate should. results last night. they certainly weren't expecting to be in the very powerful position they now find themselves in today. we heard earlierfrom themselves in today. we heard earlier from the party leader arlene foster who said they would enter discussions with the conservatives to explore what options there were to explore what options there were to provide stability to the nation. annita mcveigh is in belfast. she was there when arlene foster was speaking a short time ago. thank you very much. this was a bit of a whirlwind of a news conference. arlene foster and her team were swept into this hotel room behind me, arlene foster and nine fellow dup mps and the party chairman. she
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wasted no time in reminding us all that the dup recorded its best ever general election result. what struck me as she said that was, what a contrast to how theresa may has fared with the hung parliament the result of the election for the conservatives. listening to arlene foster, it was very clear that despite what conversations might be going on behind closed doors, that we are not privy to yet, that at least in public she was saying that there is still a lot of discussion to be done in terms of any deal between the dup and conservative party. the dup will always strived for the best deal for northern ireland and its people. but equally, we want the best for all the united kingdom. and these are challenging times. our united kingdom, and indeed, our very way of life, are
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under threat from extremists. negotiations on our exit from the european union are about to commence and we now face uncertainty at westminster. the prime minister has spoken with me this morning and we will enter discussions with the conservatives to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation at this time of great challenge. arlene foster left after that statement, taking no questions from the assembled media, keeping us guessing as to what the party's wish list might be, what the price might be fought supporting theresa may. —— might be for supporting. we might ta ke might be for supporting. we might take guesses on that wish list. the party certainly wants more investment money for northern ireland. the party position on brexit, it campaigned strongly for brexit. it doesn't want a hard border between northern ireland and
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the republic of ireland, it doesn't wa nt the republic of ireland, it doesn't want border checkpoints or any intrusive border enforcement, and it would also want to leave the customs union. but whether its wishes fully match up with the wishes of all the conservative mps on brexit, that remains to be seen. clearly, the dup came here today feeling in a position of strength. and it seems like the ball is very much in their court. annita mcveigh from belfast. thank you. some of the biggest upsets of the night were in scotland. the snp lost 21 mps including the snp's leader in the commons, angus robertson, and former leader, alex salmond, although they remain by far the biggest party in scotland. the tories took twelve of the snp's seats — labour took six — and the liberal democrats three. the snp leader nicola sturgeon conceded that her party's plans for a second independence referendum had an impact on the snp's performance. our scotland correspondent lorna
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gordon is in edinburgh. i think the question of whether the union should continue or whether there should be a second independence referendum really has been the dominant issue of the campaign here in scotland. we have heard a lot from pundits during the day, and from politicians, but what about the voters? we have four who have taken a keen interest in the scottish election. andrew, who did you vote for? the snp. you have just turned 19. there has been a lot of voting in scotland in the last few yea rs. voting in scotland in the last few years. i first voted when i was 16 and this was the fourth time. i felt privileged to be able to vote. i think you will find in scotland that a lot of young people are energised and interested and keen to take part in the democratic process. you voted
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snp, was that on issues of independence or to do with wider policies? i voted for the snp, although i was very much torn between the snp and labour. i think had i been truly voting with what i wanted, i would had i been truly voting with what i wanted, iwould have probably had i been truly voting with what i wanted, i would have probably voted labour. of late i have become a little disillusioned with the snp, however, where i am from, i voted in inverness and i was scared that a vote for labour would split the vote so vote for labour would split the vote so that the tories got an mp. i thought that was more important to avoid. what did you vote and how do you feel about the result? in similarto you feel about the result? in similar to andrew. although i voted labour, the underpinning was tactical. for me right now, independence is not an issue either way regardless of howl independence is not an issue either way regardless of how i feel about it. i felt the key point was to
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minimise how right—wing i felt we we re minimise how right—wing i felt we were going nationally and how extremely brexit process felt like it was getting. i know where i live, morningside south, we were the highest voting anti—brexit area of britain. for me therefore it was about not giving more power to that, it was about spiking the guns as much as possible. voting labour was the way to go. you voted tactically and there is the sense that across scotla nd and there is the sense that across scotland there was a lot of tactical voting. you voted because of some of the policies of other parties and there has been a tory was urgent in scotland. how do you feel about that? i think it's natural, scotland. how do you feel about that? ithink it's natural, and scotland. how do you feel about that? i think it's natural, and to a degree healthy. while it's not my innate policies that attract me, i think one party politics isn't good for any democracy. i think that at least proportionate representation in scottish elections helps with that because it gives a voice to those people. it's no surprise they
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have come back, but i am surprised at how much ground the snp lost, but maybe people feel like it has been all one way for a long time and this isa all one way for a long time and this is a rebalancing. i certainly wouldn't presume that is independence dead, and i think anybody from the south who is believing that, i would say, i don't know why scotland voted the way it did and the dangerous thing in politics is to presume you know what's in people's minds. stuart voted for the snp. what are your thoughts on independence being dead in the water? i would agree that anybody who claims it's dead hasn't handled this properly. this was not an election about scottish independence, and far more about leaving the european union. having said that, independence was inevitably a factor when i voted snp this time. it wasn't the only factor because i was torn between them and labour, however, it factored in at the end when i put my cross in the box. what did you make of the
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campaigns? did you find yourself excited or weary about it all? this was my first vote in a general election. i voted was my first vote in a general election. ivoted in was my first vote in a general election. i voted in the scottish elections last year, sol election. i voted in the scottish elections last year, so i was excited to get involved and was looking forward to the campaigns. i found myself disappointed by all of them. there was a lot of blame culture, vote for us to save you from them. we are the only ones who can protect you from this. i want to know what you will do for me, rather than what you can stop happening. there was a lot of scaremongering and it put a lot of people off. it didn't make me think, they are the people i want to vote for. there wasn't one party who i wanted in government. i ended up voting for labour. it was the best of a bad lot. i kind of had a toss up between labour, and the snp, like all of us. independence isn't something i'm looking forjust now from the
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country, but there is a lot of other factors involved and i think it was really difficult. best of a bad lot — what do you make of that? ? ? forcedsyellow i was best of a bad lot — what do you make of that? ? ?forcedsyellow i was torn between snp and labour, and voting labour, particularly scottish labour, particularly scottish labour, a vote for them is a vote against independence. in scotland, it is this constant narrative of snp versus unionists. if i was to vote labour, my support for independence wouldn't be diminished, and i think that labour would benefit a lot from saying, we recognise that not everybody who votes labour is against the snp. not everybody who votes s n p against the snp. not everybody who votes sn p wa nts against the snp. not everybody who votes snp wants independence now, andi votes snp wants independence now, and i think it is about realising that independence was not the be all and end all issue of this election.
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nicola sturgeon says she is going to pause, reflect and think of the best way forward for all of scotland's voters — what would you like to hear? i'm not a fan of brexit. i think people's concerns that led to the vote, i understand, although i think it is a misinformed opinion, though i understand where it comes from. i wish that politicians would do less dogma and more serious conversations, to be honest. as andrew said, why does it have to be all one thing or all another? i am worried about the nhs and the educational standards in scotland. asl educational standards in scotland. as i say, i am not in favour of brexit, so i worry about how hard we go out, because we are alienating our neighbours. i think people have a mixture of issues that they worry about, but when parties are talking to us, they tend to be talking about
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only one thing and they will not flinch. i would like some shades of grey out there. unfortunately, we have run out of time. shades of grey — fascinating comment to end on. this is the view from just a small group of voters here in scotland. sophie. lorna gordon, in edinburgh, thank you very much will stop it is very quiet at downing street at the moment, but later this afternoon, we expect the arrivals of some of the cabinet ministers. we haven't heard from any of them today, so we should be seeing some arriving shortly before the start of a free shuttle. we will talk about that more in a moment, but also to let you know, there is a special edition of question time, tonight at 8:30pm. david dimbleby will be at the helm, despite being up all night. he will be there with special guests. let's
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get a be there with special guests. let's geta summary be there with special guests. let's get a summary of all the latest election developments from jane hill. good afternoon. theresa may says she will lead a minority government despite the general election ending ina hung despite the general election ending in a hung parliament. with all but one seat declared, the conservatives have 318 seats, eight short of a majority. speaking at lunchtime, she said she intended to form a government with the dup of northern ireland to provide certainty and to deliver brexit. having secured the highest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. the dup leader arlene foster has
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spokenin the dup leader arlene foster has spoken in the last hour, saying she has spoken to theresa may today, and that her party had agreed to enter talks with the conservatives. she said that would be to explore how to bring stability to the uk. labour leaderjeremy corbyn exceeded all expectations, gaining 29 seats and winning 40% of the vote. that is the biggest increase in the share of the biggest increase in the share of the vote by a labour leader since clement attlee in 1945. jeremy corbyn says labour is ready to form a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. they're risen to majority for anyone at the present time. the party that has lost is the conservative party. the lib dems now have 12 seats, up four on their total in 2015, but theirformer four on their total in 2015, but their former leader, four on their total in 2015, but theirformer leader, nick four on their total in 2015, but their former leader, nick clegg, lost his seat in sheffield hallam. it was a bad night for nicola sturgeon and the governing scottish
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national party, which lost 21 mps, including the seat held by its former leader, alex salmond. the conservatives gained 12 seats, their best result in scotland since 1983. and a leader of ukip, paul nuttall, is standing down with immediate effect. ukip failed to win any seats in parliament, and its share of the vote collapsed. and a surge in the youth vote may have proved crucial tojeremy corbyn's gains last night. young voter turnout has been estimated at 7296. voter turnout has been estimated at 72%. overall turnout was 69%, and that in itself was the biggest since 1997. that's a summary of all the election news so far. more in the next hour. back to sophie in downing street. all the photographers here keep glancing at the gates because we are
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expecting later this afternoon the arrivals of the first cabinet ministers who will come here. eleanor garnier, our political correspondent, is with us. we haven't heard from cabinet ministers at all. none of them out and about, for obvious reasons. we don't know how theresa may will reshape her cabinet, and some must be wondering if they will still be in theirjobs. ben gummer was a cabinet office minister and helped to write the tory manifesto that lost —— but lost his constituency seat. there were alsojunior ministers his constituency seat. there were also junior ministers who lost their seats, so there will be places to fill. we will be wondering if some of those cabinet ministers will be losing theirjobs. of those cabinet ministers will be losing their jobs. amber of those cabinet ministers will be losing theirjobs. amber rudd, the home secretary, we think is pretty safe. there were questions about the chancellor, philip hammond. will he still stay in the treasury? it is unlikely that theresa may has the power to get rid of him, and who
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would she put in his place? ministers we did not see out and about during the campaign — andrea leadsom, priti patel, even liam fox, the trade minister. those are big names, big people, so who will she put in their places? it was an election she did not need to call, and there is anger in the party, so it will be difficult for the prime minister to rebuild that circle around her. she did not have the big mandate she was hoping for. we thought during the campaign that if she increased her majority, she would be able to make sweeping changes to her cabinet if she wanted. clearly, i don't think she is in that position now. she doesn't have the big mandate and increased majority, so it will be more tricky for her to do lots of switches and bring in other people. there are a few na m es bring in other people. there are a few names i have been thinking who may come into the cabinet — dominic raab, a prominent lead campaigner
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will stop what about iain duncan smith, the former work and pensions secretary? theresa may will also wa nt to secretary? theresa may will also want to keep the number of women up, so maybe she won't want to get rid of priti patel and andrea leadsom. it will be a difficult task and perhaps she won't make as many moves as she wanted to. the photographers are twitchy, but it could be awhile before we start seeing movement. two sources inside number ten are telling me it's a couple of hours away yet. asked if it would be afternoon or evening, they said one of those. we will see. one huge shock came from kent, where canterbury elected a labour mp for the first time since the constituency was formed in 1918. it was represented by one tory mp for the last 30 years. our correspondent june kelly is there for us now. what drove this shop change? one of the
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big factors was the big student population in the city. there are three universities here, and i am at the university of kent with a group of masters students. first of all, chris, you are not a natural labour voter but you voted labour yesterday. why? the eu referendum has polarised the nation, and i think the older generation is voting for us to leave, sol think the older generation is voting for us to leave, so i thought i had to tactically vote for the labour party because i wanted theresa may not to have a free ticket to vote however she wanted and have a hard brexit. i wanted however she wanted and have a hard brexit. iwanted her however she wanted and have a hard brexit. i wanted her brexit to be hijacked by the younger generation as they have hijacked our futures. another labour voter? yes. what was the big issue for you? the nhs, social care and education, those are
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my main three. you never mentioned tuition fees specifically.” my main three. you never mentioned tuition fees specifically. i think that tuition fees are way too high at the moment, so definitely i would like to see them lowered, but yeah, for me, it was more the nhs. farad, you did not vote. i was torn between two but i couldn't decide. i support lower tuition fees but i could not see how the numbers added up. at the same time, i would like to see grammar schools, so i was torn. i also thought about free movement in the eu and border control. are you a big fan ofjeremy corbyn?” the eu and border control. are you a big fan ofjeremy corbyn? i am graduating this year, sol big fan ofjeremy corbyn? i am graduating this year, so i got the chance to support caroline lucas backin chance to support caroline lucas back in brighton. if i was here, i
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would have supported labour. jeremy corbyn is an honest guy, and i believe he is an honest mp and has told us exactly what he believes in. there had been no lies, and everyone wants to support that kind of person, really. people seem surprised by how well he and his party have done — are you surprised? know, everyone has kept tabs on him since he has become leader. i think everyone has a critical eye when it comes to social media, as well as the mainstream media. chris, can i ask briefly, how important was social media in the campaign?” think it was very important, because it has the advantage of every young person being on it. if young people
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read, they would be more inclined to read, they would be more inclined to read the guardian. younger people tend to read memes. some of the political memes about theresa may absolutely destroyed her and her credibility. thank you for your views this afternoon. back to you, sophie. june kelly in canterbury, thank you. with the brexit negotiations days away, donald tusk, the president of the european council, is responsible —— has responded to the election result saying, our shared responsibility and urgent task now is to conduct the negotiations on the uk's withdrawal from the eu is to conduct the negotiations on the uk's withdrawalfrom the eu in the uk's withdrawalfrom the eu in the best possible spirit, securing
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the best possible spirit, securing the least destructive outcome for our citizens, businesses and countries. the time frame set by article 50 leaves us with no time to lose. our correspondent in brussels is kevin connelly. so, the clock is clearly taking the matter does that mean that he is saying that negotiations must start in nine days? it is an interesting question. from the european perspective, the interesting thing is that the start date, a week on monday, is just a date, a week on monday, is just a date in your diary. you can change that. the point they are making is that. the point they are making is that the end date can't change, and that the end date can't change, and that goes back to the source of european frustration with the way that british politics is starting to cloud and confuse the issue brexit, because of course, a lot of people here think that brexit was an act of political self harm in the first place and they can't understand a situation where britain triggered article 50 and therefore created a
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situation where an exit date from the eu was set, march of 2019, and then after that, called an election which always had the possibility of complicating the talks process. they are saying, you can stop whenever you like, but the talks are going to end in march 2019, and any time taken out of those two years is time taken out of those two years is time taken away from the british opportunity to cut the best possible dealfor opportunity to cut the best possible deal for itself. with a lot of issues of how british politics and brexit into iraq, there was a sense of puzzlement here, of mystification, —— and brexit interact. no amount of manoeuvring at westminster will change that. what is the mood from people you have spoken to in brussels? are people dropping their hands in glee
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and do they think it will change the kind of brexit that takes place? there are two aspects. one is the arithmetic of westminster. there are people who are thinking that theresa may, without a strong majority, may have to listen to other conservative voices, or even voices from other parties, talking about softer options for brexit. the other point is, of course, they are looking at diminished political authority, a much more nebulous concept, and they are wondering about the extent to which the whole process from the british point of view is robbed of clarity and certainty, so i don't think there is a sense of glee, because nobody wanted brexit in brussels, it's fair to say, but the feeling is, if you have to have it, it should be done smoothly and efficiently, and there's now a feeling that the british political process , feeling that the british political process, especially if there were to be another election soon, that the process is confusing things rather than helping. kevin talked of a sense of
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baffle m e nt kevin talked of a sense of bafflement in brussels and there was certainly a sense of shock overnight and this morning when people woke up to the election result. very few people predicted that. we can take a closer look at the results. all are counted except for kensington, a rock—solid conservative seat until now, but it's heading to a third recount in a tight battle with labour. that count will not resume until 6pm. he isjeremy vine in the election studio with his guide to the key numbers, and parties in this hung parliament. here is the new map for you. rather changed after this amazing election. the first thing you notice is that there is less snp yellow in scotland. the conservatives having a revival there. in lots of parts of england it's now a straight fight between labour and the conservatives, and in some places dramatically labour came off best. in canterbury, for example, where they overturned a 10,000
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conservative majority. also more liberal democrat orange on the map. they gained oxford west and abingdon. something for them to take heart from. what's happened in terms of their share of the vote, the percentages the party have? the conservatives came first on 44%, but not far ahead of mr corbyn's rejuvenated labour party, piling on the votes since they last bought a general election, lots of young voters turning out to support labour, and a very good 41% for them in second. the lib dems still bumping along a bit in 8% but still focusing better and winning seats. green on 2% and ukip interestingly on 2%. that's significance, a crash for them, down 11% and that's why the leader resigned. people were thinking all their votes would go straight to the conservatives to help mrs may, but looking at the columns, that hasn't happened. labour have also benefited from the
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ukip collapse. come with me to the house of commons and let's crunch the numbers. the government benches with the conservatives still on them, still the largest party with 318 seats, with one constituency still to count. 318 is not an overall majority, you need 326, just overall majority, you need 326, just over half the mps so you could outvote all the mps on the other side put together. so the conservatives have a problem. looking at the opposition benches with labour improving by 30 seats to 206 di. the snp with labour improving by 30 seats to 206 d1. the snp down by more than a third to 35. a dozen liberal democrats. in northern ireland, the democratic unionist party have ten, sinn fein on seven. in wales, plaid cymru have four, the green party keep their one, caroline lucas, and the independent mp is in northern ireland. no ukip mps in the house of commons will stop and more than 200 female mps for the first time. the
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government benches, they do not have enough for an overall majority, currently short by eight. what do they do? maybe they can bring in the democratic unionists, their closest soul mates in politics inside the house of commons. here they are, and the democratic unionists' ten mps would do this, giving the alliance a majority of seven. so they would be over the line and they could govern, but the conservatives would have to listen very closely to what the dup are asking for. it's untidy, it's messy and it's humiliating for theresa may. jeremy vine in the election studio. we can now hear from the voters. we have been getting reaction from some in york. it's absolutely glorious here and lots of people who are discussing the election result, i'm pleased to say over a drink as well. we have voters here who are chatting
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about their reaction to all of this. you both voted for labour. you are looking very cheerful today. you are really pleased with the result. i'm ecstatic. the fact i can see that hope and unity is the future, there is an ambition there to know that we are more united now as a collective and asa are more united now as a collective and as a people, it's amazing. ciaran, a lot of people are saying this was to do with a lot of young people coming out to vote. you are a student, what's that all about? social media plays a huge role in it. everybody is always on social media and politics has taken over social media in the last week or so. it's almost impossible to play ignorance. you have to have an interest. is that a change, do you think, that young people talk about it on social media? yes. it's crazy now, isn't it? out of ten people,
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seven now, isn't it? out of ten people, seven of them had their say was that that's great. in my constituency it's been a conservative stronghold for a long time and they put up a 21—year—old, and he cut the majority in half. he hasn't caught him yet, but the progress made has been amazing, and he has only been in p4 seven amazing, and he has only been in p4 seven weeks, i think. he started at the start of the campaign and the conservative mp has been there for seven years. conservative mp has been there for seven years. he's not been to our house. our labourmp seven years. he's not been to our house. our labour mp has already met my mum. and that means something to you. it makes a big difference. he has been getting to know the constituency and the person who has represented us hasn't. i feel confident going forward that maybe there will be change in my constituency. and you are really chuffed about this. what do you think it's about? we talked about the young vote, is it also about tuition fees and labour saying they would change that?” tuition fees and labour saying they would change that? i think that's maybe part of it. i think the
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manifesto as a whole, an entire programme, resonated with people in a way that hasn't before. i have spoken to a lot of people who have actually read the manifesto, and in previous years that was completely unheard of, especially among younger people. it's also the fact that the leadership and the vision has been there. it's been engaging with people. jeremy corbyn came to yorked himself a couple of years ago —— couple of weeks ago and there were 2000 people there in the square in an afternoon. speaking to that amount of people and engaging with them has compelled them to vote in a way they haven't before. thank you. we will speak to more people now over here. cha ntelle, we will speak to more people now over here. chantelle, for you and yourself come you both voted liberal democrats, but you couldn't decide, could you? democrats, but you couldn't decide, could you ? do democrats, but you couldn't decide, could you? do you feel any of the parties offered you anything? no, in a nutshell! i read all the manifesto
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was. it was laborious and repetitive. all of them were saying pretty much the same things, and the majority of the candidates in my area of hull were all speaking about national things. i was looking at local things. i wanted to know what somebody would do for me locally, for the local constituency, would they represent us in parliament, and u nfortu nately they represent us in parliament, and unfortunately the person i found didn't win, but i would encourage anybody, if you are voting, don't do the whole blind thing and vote labour because it is traditional in yourfamily, or labour because it is traditional in your family, or because of the area your family, or because of the area you work in. do your research is what you are saying? do your research, and candidates need to knock on the doors. i haven't seen a candidate. that made a big difference to ciaran. and it might happen again sometime soon! frank, you originally wanted to vote ukip
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but didn't have a ukip candidate. what has been interesting about the election is where ukip voters have gone. for you, you went to the conservatives. i had to this time, but i think there is some togetherness after this election. before the election, some parties we re before the election, some parties were ina before the election, some parties were in a mess, and now we are all in ms! it's like we have all grabbed hold of a lifeboat and we are thinking, and we are thinking, how do we get hold to the paradise? —— all ina do we get hold to the paradise? —— all in a mess. what will the conservatives do now?” all in a mess. what will the conservatives do now? i don't think theresa may can stay and i think the coalition with the dup is pure desperation. it is clinging onto a piece of wood, we are in a lifeboat and she's clinging onto a piece of wood. i don't think she has long to go. you could have lost their leader again today. we are in a mess, but we will be talking about this for some time. the good thing about all of this, you guys are all of
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political persuasions, but you have formed a coalition between yourselves, getting along great. fantastic to see. that's it from us here on a glorious day in york. steph mcgovern, thank you very much. that's all from me in downing street. the weather is next and then huw edwards will have continual coverage. i will leave you with the most memorable moments of an extraordinary election night. what we are saying is the conservatives are the largest party, note that they don't have an overall majority at this stage. this doesn't seem majority at this stage. this doesn't seem to look like certainty and stability. cheering basing the red flag.
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she has lost conservative seats, lost a vote, lost support and lost confidence. i would have thought that's enough to go, actually. the country needs a period of stability and whatever the result, the conservative party will ensure we fulfil our duty in ensuring that stability. i declare that colin clark is duly elected to serve in the uk parliament. are you stepping down, mrs may?” have just been to see her majesty the queen and i will now form a government. it is clear that only
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the conservative and unionist party has the legitimacy to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. now, let's get to work. hello there, good afternoon, it's a bit of a mixed bag out there. some places will enjoy some pretty decent spells of sunshine this afternoon but that's not the entire story. a fair bit of cloud at times and that is generating some showers. we have already seen quite a few showers dotted around across england and wales. quite wet for a time in central scotland. as we go through the afternoon the showers becomes fewer and further between across the western parts of the uk. largely dry for wales and the southwest but increasing amounts of cloud coming in ahead of another area of rain just lurking out west.
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still showers dotted around for east anglia and the south—east through the early evening. in the spells of sunshine, 19 or 20 degrees. it looks largely dry in the early evening across most of northern england. spells of sunshine here, as you will find in northern ireland and west of scotland. on the eastern side of scotland, more in the way of cloud and still a few showers dotted around into the early evening. 16 degrees in glasgow but only 13 or so in aberdeen. into this evening, looking out west to this area of rain across south—west england, rain in wales, north—west england, south—west scotland and quite a wet night in northern ireland. northern scotland stays dry and temperatures will dip into single figures. for most it's 12, 13 or 14 degrees. a fairly warm night. the big picture for the start of the weekend, a big low to the west of the uk, lots of isobars wrapped around, and it will be quite breezy, particularly out west, and we have a weather front bringing some rain that is moving ever northwards and eastwards. quite wet in the north—west of england, parts of wales, northern ireland should improve and northern scotla nd ireland should improve and northern scotland will be largely dry but
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increasingly cloudy. the south—east of england and east anglia will do very well indeed with a southerly breeze. in the sunshine it will be quite one, 24, 25 and maybe 26 in some places. saturday night, the rain eventually moving south and east, and it will be a warm night again in the south—east. elsewhere fresher. sunday will be breezy with sunny spells and scattered showers. most of the showers on sunday will be to the north and west. temperatures around 16 or 17 in glasgow and belfast, closer to 21 in the south—eastern corner. fresher here. the early part of the new week with high pressure being the dominant force. we might see some weather fronts clipping the north pa rt weather fronts clipping the north part of the uk but for the most part fairly dry and bright weather. it's 4pm and we are at westminster, where theresa may is trying to construct where theresa may is trying to co nstru ct a where theresa may is trying to construct a new government after a disastrous night for the
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conservatives in the general election. the prime minister return to downing street having lost her parliamentary majority and having to depend on support from the dup.” have just been to see her majesty the queen, and i will now form a government, a government that can provide certainty and lead britain forward at this critical time for our country. the election that was never meant to happen resulted in a dramatic reversal for the conservatives, losing seats as jeremy corbyn's labour made gains. labour's performance exceeded expectations, winning 40% of the popular vote, asjeremy corbyn insisted he could lead a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. there is ina programme into operation. there is in a parliamentary majority for anyone, and a party that has lost is the conservative party. in northern
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ireland, the democratic unionist party expressed readiness to support theresa may, but there are few details so far on the nature of any deal. in the days and weeks ahead, it is the union that will be to the forefront of our minds, the union is ourguiding star. forefront of our minds, the union is our guiding star. in scotland, the snp suffered heavy losses as the conservatives and labour made gains. plans for a second independence referendum were blamed.” plans for a second independence referendum were blamed. i am in downing street, where theresa may is putting plans in place for her cabinet as key ministers lost their seats. we expect an announcement later this afternoon. we are live at westminster, looking at the dramatic result and exploring the implications just result and exploring the implicationsjust ten result and exploring the implications just ten days before the brexit talks are due to begin. we are at westminster as the outcome
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of the general election, a hung parliament, is slowly sinking in. along with the implications for the months and years ahead of the united kingdom. theresa may and the conservatives have emerged as the largest party but with no parliamentary majority, and they are hoping to rely on northern ireland's democratic unionist party to sustain our government in the months and possibly years ahead. there is no word yet on key cabinet positions. we will have all the reactions after an eventful night. e cap on the results of the election, the election that was never meant to happen, and which resulted in this hung parliament. with all but one seat declared, and that is kensington in central london, the
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tories have 318 seats, eight short ofa tories have 318 seats, eight short of a basic majority. labour has 261, the snp 35, the lib dems12, the democratic unionists ten, and plaid cymru on four. labour has gained 29 seats in this new house of commons. parfrom seats in this new house of commons. par from increasing their seats, seats in this new house of commons. parfrom increasing their seats, the conservatives have lost 12. the snp lost 21. what about the popular share of the? the tories took 42.4% of votes cast, labour 40% full stop both labour and conservatives increased their share, while ukip support collapsed by 12%, over 12%. we start with this report on the events so far. a warning, there is flash photography coming up. is this strong and stable, prime minister? she had wanted strength and stability, but that is not how it has turned out. theresa may did
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just enough to let her take the journey to buckingham palace, but there is no increased majority, no spring in her step. what the country needs more than ever is certainty, and having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of votes and the greatest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist party as the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. as we do, we will continue to work with our friends and allies in the democratic unionist party in particular. ten o'clock last night, the exit poll put the conservatives as the largest party but short of an overall majority. politicians on all sides remained sceptical while constituencies raced to be the first to declare. it wasn't long before
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tory faces told their own story. in hastings, the home secretary amber rudd onlyjust clung on by 346 votes. arriving at her own constituency count, theresa may managed a brief smile, but her huge political gamble had ended in disaster. she had wanted to transform the fragile tory majority into a stronger negotiating hand at the brexit table. instead, her pa rty's the brexit table. instead, her party's ended the brexit table. instead, her pa rty's ended up the brexit table. instead, her party's ended up weaker. if, as the indications have shown, the conservative party has won the most seats and probably the most votes, it will be a incumbent on us to ensure we have that period of stability, and that is exactly what we will do. he, though, has confounded expectations. labour's been celebrating after picking up 29 seats. the prime minister called the election because she wanted a mandate. well, the mandate she's. is
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lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support and lost confidence. i would have thought that was enough to go, actually. there were more blue losses in places like canterbury and stockton. some in her own party are now questioning whether mrs may can continue. cheese ina very whether mrs may can continue. cheese in a very difficult place. she is a remarkable and talented woman who does not shy away from difficult decisions, but she now has to obviously consider her position. decisions, but she now has to obviously consider her positionm scotland, the tories were celebrating, gaining 12 seats, their best result for more than years. we need to ensure on behalf of the country that a queen ‘s speech is put forward, that the processes of government continue, but we also need to make sure we listen to the message the people of the uk have said in the last 24 hours, and that involves parties working together. the snp lost big names on a bad
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night. their deputy leader angus robertson and former leader alex salmond. this morning, nicola sturgeon said the tories would hit living standards and widen inequality. we will work with others to prevent that from happening, and to prevent that from happening, and to bring an end to the austerity that voters the length and breadth of the uk are no longer prepared to accept, and we will work with others if it is at all possible to keep the tories out of government. the lib dems saw the return of former ministers like vince cable in twickenham. the loss of the former party leader was the biggest upset, nick clegg losing his seat in sheffield. ? ? forcedsyellow i nick clegg losing his seat in sheffield. ? ?forcedsyellow i have encountered the thing that many have encountered the thing that many have encountered before tonight in politics and that many will encounter after — you live by the sword and you die by the sword. with ten of northern ireland's 18
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seats, the dup now find themselves as kingmakers. the prime minister spoke with me this morning, and we will enter discussions with the conservatives to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation at this time of great challenge. paul nuttall resigned as ukip leader after the party lost its only seat and he failed to win in boston and skegness. westminster's only green mp, caroline lucas, increased her majority in brighton pavilion. while others celebrate, she knows she has to get on with governing, now with the help of the dup, and brexit talks start within days. after this result, theresa may's long—term future as prime minister will be in doubt. that was our report on the comings and goings so far, but there is a very important job to and goings so far, but there is a very importantjob to do now in terms of channelling opinion between the conservative backbenchers and,
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of course, number ten. that is an incredibly responsible position, and thatis incredibly responsible position, and that is the job of graham brady, the conservative mp and chairman of the i922 conservative mp and chairman of the 1922 back bench committee, and i am pleased to see mr brady is with me. the broad result, firstly, because clearly he will have a view on that. share that with us. obviously it is not the result we wanted or expected. we have had the best conservative vote share since 1983. many of us have got the highest number of conservative votes in our own constituencies that we've ever had, but at the same time, something quite remarkable was going on. there was a search for labour, which is something we didn't anticipate. the fa ct something we didn't anticipate. the fact that we had a hard left leader of the labour party not even supported by the majority of his own mps really did not look like something that would be a great vocal rallying point for people who previously hadn't voted. you put
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this down to a labour surge and not yourcampaign? this down to a labour surge and not your campaign? our campaign could have been significantly better. i have been significantly better. i have fought six general elections and can't think of one that went entirely to plan, but this clearly was not the most successful campaign the conservative party has fought. we could have fought a bitter campaign. notwithstanding that, we did getan campaign. notwithstanding that, we did get an extraordinarily good conservative turnout. we got a good vote share, and as i said, in a lot of individual constituencies, we got the highest number of votes we have ever had. we made a point about vote share earlier. contrasting that with the results... can i press you on the results... can i press you on the campaign? there are a lot of questions being asked about the way it was run and the way the prime minister ran her own leadership team, if you like. what can you tell us team, if you like. what can you tell us about your thoughts on that, and what are the views that you will be relaying to downing street on that? there is no question that the
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handling of some manifesto elements was a problem for the campaign. social care... that was the thing that seemed to stall the campaign and seemed suddenly to stop a lot of people and make them think as to whether they would support the conservatives or not. were you aware that was going to be in the ma nifesto ? that was going to be in the manifesto? no. what were your thoughts when you saw it?” manifesto? no. what were your thoughts when you saw it? i sent an e—mail saying, it is lovely to have £io0,000 e—mail saying, it is lovely to have £100,000 protective for everyone, but what will be capped the? it was clear to many others that it had to be done and it was a problem that it wasn't there, but it was apparent immediately for people campaigning around the country that it was something that really hit home and was a problem. what about the way the prime minister responded? it was forthright, saying that nothing had changed. the effect that was helpful? it wasn't. ithink changed. the effect that was helpful? it wasn't. i think the reason she did it was that she
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anticipated a cap being something that would come out of the consultation but it did not communicate in that way, and clearly, again, it was not a high point of the campaign. what we saw subsequently, partly because the opinion polls titan, we saw a lot of people looking much more carefully at what the alternative was —— we saw the opinion polls tightening and people realise that a hard left labour government would be much more damaging to the country than any changes to social care funding proposed by the tory party, and we did see people coming back to the tory party and voting for tory mps at the election. do you think it is possible for the prime minister to continue with this small team around her in the months ahead in the way that she has in the last year so? do you think that is a model that can continue? i think all prime
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ministers struggle to maintain a properly open machine that their party, includes other people with interest and experience. there is a lwa ys interest and experience. there is always a tendency to try to keep things tight. has this been too tight? | things tight. has this been too tight? i think things tight. has this been too tight? i think it things tight. has this been too tight? i think it has been too tight. even if we had had a better result, i would tight. even if we had had a better result, iwould be tight. even if we had had a better result, i would be saying that we need to look, as i said to the previous prime minister as well, at ways in which we can make sure that collea g u es ways in which we can make sure that colleagues are more involved in discussion and policy—making, that the experience and expertise of conservative mps is deployed to best effect. given the nature of this result, given that we're working with no overall majority, and depending on bringing in support from other parties, members of parliament who are prepared to put the national interest ahead of their personal party interest, then i
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think it becomes even more important to work with the grain and include people as much as possible. do you accept that the prime minister's authority has been dented or damaged? any prime minister would have their authority enhanced by a majority of 100, and it is clearly much more difficult if you don't come back with a majority. i think we are all realistic people. we are here dealing with the aftermath of a general election and we have to look at the reality of how the public chose to cast their votes, and it is our responsibility to move on with what the public have given us. was ita what the public have given us. was it a mistake to call the election?” think there were good reasons why the prime minister called the election. i think she particularly wa nted election. i think she particularly wanted that longer time horizon in order that the brexit negotiations weren't pushing up against the next general election. were you keen on it? it came as a surprise, put it
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that way, to almost everybody when it was called. at least it was a rare example of a secret that was successfully kept in government, but however good those reasons were for holding the election when it was held, as i have said, clearly we didn't get the result that we wanted to achieve. it's going to be difficult and we are going to have to bend to the task of making it work, but i think it is our responsibility to try to make it work. do you think the prime minister is in a position to change her style and way of governing sufficiently to please backbenchers and to reach out in a way she has not done so far? i think she has tremendous policies, all of the same policies that appeal to conservative mpsa yearago policies that appeal to conservative mps a year ago when we chose her as our leader, and indeed appealed to the public so strongly. obviously,
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we need to make sure those policies come through... because they are not coming through now? clearly they did not come through successfully in the election campaign as they did in the ten months previous to that but we need to go back to what was working before. if some of your colleagues come to you in the coming days and say they have seen enough, they had a bad experience at the election and they believe change of leadership would believe change of leadership would be the best thing, what would be your message to them? what i am hearing mostly from colleagues is that there is no appetite is now for plunging the government and the country into a period of turmoil. we do want to offer some continuity and prove we can make this work effectively. so i don't think there is any great appetite either for a leadership contest, for another general election either, i'm sure the public will be relieved to hear.
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on the prospect of some kind of formal agreement with the democratic unionists, what's your understanding, do you have concerns ifi understanding, do you have concerns if i ask that question a different way, that there would be too much compromise sought in order to sustain that kind of support?” think wejust need sustain that kind of support?” think we just need to work closely together as a party and we need to recognise, as in any coalition or informal agreement, that there are two parties in that agreement. we need to make sure the conservative party is on board and happy with what's being done. it comes back to the collegiate working, pulling people together and making sure everybody is included in the decision—making process. everybody is included in the decision-making process. the prime minister is clear, the brexit process going ahead according to the plan and timetable. there were noises from brussels this morning saying that if you needed time they could be flexible. the prime minister said that wasn't the case.
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given the uncertainty, you must have concerns the government can't be fully engaged in the process that begins in ten days' time. the electorate has given us this parliament and we have to work with that. we have to make it a success. we have to do our very best to ensure we can deliver what is expected of us by the british people. you said earlier that we have to listen to the message. can i say to you, when the prime minister spokein say to you, when the prime minister spoke in downing street earlier, she had come back from buckingham palace, and there was no reference to what happened in the election, no reference to any mistakes made in the campaign or even recognising what voters had said in a direct way. do you think she got that right, was the tone of the statement right? i think the prime minister will be doing more broadcasting later this evening, and i am sure you will hear more about those things are. what a fascinating answer. thank you, graham. graham
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brady, the chairman of the 1922 backbench committee, the central role in channelling messages and opinion from the conservative backbenches to number ten. we are pleased he joined us backbenches to number ten. we are pleased hejoined us today backbenches to number ten. we are pleased he joined us today because that really is the best authority on what's going on. we can go to downing street where we join eleanor and we will also speak to iain watson at labour headquarters. eleanor, any comings and goings or any signs of who might be going into key jobs today any signs of who might be going into keyjobs today bastion yellow no comings and goings so far. in fact, all the cabinet seems to be hiding. we haven't seen any of them in the last few hours. some indications earlier in the day we might get signs of a reshuffle and potential announcements later this afternoon. it now looks like that might actually be pushed into tomorrow. i think we are unlikely to see any new shape or names in the cabinet after
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what has been a pretty extraordinary results during the election campaign. thinking ahead in terms of people staying put and the kinds of patterns we are likely to see, is there any kind of signal from within there any kind of signal from within the big departments of state about expecting continuity? let's state the treasury foreign office? during the treasury foreign office? during the campaign there was lots of speculation about whether chancellor philip hammond would be able to stay on in his role. you would imagine theresa may, without the big majority, without having increased the number of mps that she really wa nted the number of mps that she really wanted to do, perhaps philip hammond will be safer in his position. other big names we might be looking out for, amber rudd, the home secretary, i think she will be safe where she is. borisjohnson, i think she will be safe where she is. boris johnson, the i think she will be safe where she is. borisjohnson, the foreign secretary, initially we thought he was being kept away from the campaign. we didn't hear very much from him, but it's interesting to
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note that her last campaign event coming he was there introducing her. perhaps theresa may realising that he isa perhaps theresa may realising that he is a key part of the campaign tea m he is a key part of the campaign team and potentially he could stay in his role as foreign secretary. i don't know if we will see movement. names we could be looking at to leave the cabinet, there were noticeable absences from the campaign trail. environment secretary, angela ‘s. priti patel, and also liam fox, the trade secretary. —— angela lowes ‘s. we didn't hearfrom secretary. —— angela lowes ‘s. we didn't hear from them secretary. —— angela lowes ‘s. we didn't hearfrom them in secretary. —— angela lowes ‘s. we didn't hear from them in the campaign. names that are floating around that could come into the cabinet, iain duncan smith and former education secretary michael gove could make a comeback. or prominent leave campaigner dominik rab. those are the names being talked about. although it might be some time before we hear about whether they are in or out of theresa may's new cabinet. it's interesting that she doesn't have the mandate she wanted, does not
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have the increased majority, so does she have the momentum to do wholesale big changes? i think the likelihood is that she doesn't have that power to make some of the big changes we thought she wanted to make during the election campaign. thank you to eleanor from downing street. if there is more we will hear from you right away. iain watson is that the labour headquarters. we heard earlierfrom mr corbyn and there was talk about trying to position labour in a place where they could offer a minority government. the figures are against that and clearly mrs may wants to carry on with the support of the democratic unionists. what's your sense of the labour's position this evening? i think labour are getting reconciled to the fact that they will be in opposition, not government, but it's quite astonishing thatjeremy corbyn said we are ready to serve, because he felt that close to government. also
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interesting some labour sources are saying to me here, if theresa may has trouble with the dup, our ma nifesto has trouble with the dup, our manifesto and their manifesto, and some key issues are not far apart, the triple lock on pensions, scrapping the bedroom tax, they like that. to some extent, if theresa may has faltered today, and may yet fault, they may be ready to step in. but trying to get this progressive alliance put together, for want of a better term, the liberal democrats, the one green mp, they would still fall short. nevertheless, what jeremy corbyn has done, is effectively win another election. i know what to maghaberry prominent labour mps who are planning to launch a leadership challenge if jeremy corbyn had done much worse in these results. perhaps increase labour's share of the vote but lose seats. those challenges have been
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scrapped, so he has seen off the challenge to his own position, so he will see that as a success after the events of yesterday, but he has still fallen short of being able to topple theresa may. one insider here, who is not a particularfan of the current labour leader said it was the worst of both worlds because we are now effectively stuck with theresa may and stuck with jeremy corbyn as well. iain watson with the latest at the labour headquarters. lots of talk overnight and into today about the turnout among young people. there has clearly been a surge in turn out in some areas, especially in university towns. one of the big shocks of the night was in kent, in canterbury where a labourmp in kent, in canterbury where a labour mp was elected for the first time since the constituency was formed in 1918, 100 years ago. tory mp sirjulian brazier had represented it for the last 30 yea rs. represented it for the last 30 years. the university of kent is right there. june kelly is there
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with some young voters. what do they have to say? there are three universities in canterbury. we are at the university of kent. matt, you are a first—time labour voter. it was the accessibility ofjeremy corbyn. he was honest, and wanted our opinion. that something the conservatives have never done because their opinion doesn't speak for our age group. it was his honesty, as well as his opinions, but it was his honesty, opening up to debate incident shying away. holly, you are 18 and still in sixth form. why did you vote labour? i am going to university in september and because they would scrap tuition fees that would extremely help me out. that's one of the main reasons. you have also said you thought labour had a big focus on social media. yes, especially, labour was one of the big parties that pushed for
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promotion on snapchat, instagram, through musicians, facebook pages. they were all out there. megan, did that hit home, the social media campaign? definitely. my brother was also a first—time voter and he got into labour and also all his friends we re into labour and also all his friends were backing labour. ithink into labour and also all his friends were backing labour. i think corbyn was in with stormzy and that. that affected the way he voted. scrapping tuition fees and lowering the voting e. tuition fees and lowering the voting age, they hit home with younger vote rs age, they hit home with younger voters more than any other party. bradley, what was the big issue for you? notjust tuition fees, but also the policies for all the generations. free meals for children in schools to help with their education, and to stop the means testing for the winter fuel allowa nce for testing for the winter fuel allowance for the older generation. it was across the spectrum, the policies that help each generation. so it wasn'tjust policies that help each generation. so it wasn't just about your age group? no, it's all about the
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future, looking at how children grow up future, looking at how children grow up and how they become an asset to england and contribute to the economy. megan, what about corbyn himself, was he a big pull for you but agreeing to be honest i didn't trust him at the start, but by the end he became... i thought he was very honest and more related bull than the other leaders. to me anyway. — — than the other leaders. to me anyway. —— more relate able. than the other leaders. to me anyway. -- more relate able. what's important is the prevention of the privatisation of the nhs. something the conservatives were pushing, and something i don't agree with on a personal level. it's for the many at the end of the day, and at the end of the day that's what the country should be about. the tories represent a small minority of the population. i have been at university over the last seven years and realise the financial difficulty there is and the tories don't apply to me. despite all the support for
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jeremy corbyn, the labour party are still in opposition. that is true, but considering the difficulty they have been through and the media scrutiny on corbyn, he has done a fantasticjob. i scrutiny on corbyn, he has done a fantastic job. i think scrutiny on corbyn, he has done a fantasticjob. i think this is a start in change in politics. over the course of the next five years it will be a conservative led government, but i think it would be a new era for labour. holly, as a first—time voter you gave this a lot of thought. did you decide labour right away or did you think about it? i thought about it quite a lot and because of the recent terrorist attacks, one of the other main things for me was the increase in police and firemen. when i'm going out in the summer and things like that, i would feel more safe with an environment that has more people on the lookout for where i'm going. that became an issue in the closing stages of the campaign. so that was an important issue for you? yes, especially because recently, at the
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con certain things that, especially for my age group, i would feel a lot more confident with people on the lookout. —— more confident with people on the lookout. — — at more confident with people on the lookout. —— at the concert and things like that. some views from young voters at the university of kent. thank you to june kent. thank you tojune and the students at canterbury. earlier graham brady was telling as the prime minister would do some broadcasting this evening. the prime minister has recorded a statement in downing street just a short while recorded a statement in downing streetjust a short while ago. this is it. asi as i said during the campaign, i wa nted as i said during the campaign, i wanted to achieve a large majority, but that was not the result we secured. and i'm sorry for all those candidates and ha rd—working secured. and i'm sorry for all those candidates and hard—working party workers who were unsuccessful, but also particularly sorry for those
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collea g u es also particularly sorry for those colleagues who were mps and members, who had contributed so much to our country and who lost their seats and didn't deserve to lose their seats. asi didn't deserve to lose their seats. as i reflect on the results, i will reflect on what we need to do in the future to take the party forward. did you think about resigning? our focus last night as the results came through was on those colleagues who we re through was on those colleagues who were sadly losing their seats, collea g u es were sadly losing their seats, colleagues who i've worked with and who have contributed much to our country, and i felt who have contributed much to our country, and ifelt they who have contributed much to our country, and i felt they did who have contributed much to our country, and ifelt they did not deserve to lose their seats. as results started to come through, it became clear that we were the party that had won most seats and most votes, and i felt that had won most seats and most votes, and ifelt it that had won most seats and most votes, and i felt it was that had won most seats and most votes, and ifelt it was incumbent on us votes, and ifelt it was incumbent on us ata votes, and ifelt it was incumbent on us at a critical time in our country to form a government in the national interest, and that is what i'm doing. you called this election in order to strengthen your hand in the brexit negotiations — hasn't your hands now been weakened? what
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is important in the brexit negotiations that will starting ten daysis negotiations that will starting ten days is that we have the certainty ofa days is that we have the certainty of a government that can take forward a plan into those negotiations. that's why i think at this critical time for our country it's important to form a government in the national interest as we are the party that won most seats and most votes. we are the only party in a position to form a government that can do that, and that is what we're doing. you talk about certainty, but can the public certain that this government can last five years and that you can last five years as its leader? what's important is to bring the government together, form a government jarring the government together, form a governmentjarring this critical time for our country, because we do face the challenge of those brexit negotiations, so it is important to have a government that can take the negotiations through. that's what i'm doing, forming a government. i obviously wanted a different result last night, and i'm sorry for all those colleagues who lost their
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seats who didn't deserve to lose, and of course, i'll reflect on what happened. some people are calling for staff changes — will there be some? today, i am focusing on forming a government. as the party with the most seats and vote, we are the only party who can form that government to take this forward. i will shortly be forming my cabinet, and obviously there will be further ministerial posts. so, that was the statement made by the prime minister in downing street just statement made by the prime minister in downing streetjust a few minutes ago. basically expressing concern for those colleagues who have lost their seats, and chic repeated quite a few times that so many of them had lost their seats when they didn't deserve it, and she said she wanted a different result, clearly, —— she repeated quite a few times. she said she would go one to form a
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government, construct a cabinet and said there would be further announcements in a short while. that was the statement made by the prime minister. none of that was touched on in downing street when the prime minister came back from buckingham palace at lunchtime. that was all about continuing to work on carrying on, no expression of regret at that time, but this latest statement now does carry the statement of regret at lost seats and that she did not get the result she wanted for the conservatives. we will discuss more of that in a second. there was another announcement i would like to share with you, if i may, given that mrs may wants to construct this agreement with the dup. still in the northern ireland context, a very important potentially significant announcement by sinn fein today, and it comes from their leader in northern ireland, michelle o'neill, who says she is ready to resume negotiations on monday with the aim of restoring devolved government, which has been suspended for quite a
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while, in northern ireland after this watershed election, as she calls it. she says the unionists secured less than 50% of the vote, people had opposed the conservative agenda, and she said, we have a job of work to do. then the sinn fein president, gerry adams, says that the dup, the unionist plot that mrs may wants to form a government with, in effect, had actively blocked the resumption of the power—sharing government in northern ireland. he called for period of calm reflection, and he goes on to say, alliances between ulster unionism and british unionism have always endedin and british unionism have always ended in tears, says gerry adams. a rather stark statement from sinn fein. annita can join rather stark statement from sinn fein. annita canjoin us from northern ireland, just a few comments on that statement from sinn
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fein. when i look through what was said at that sinn fein news conference, it is clear that it is very much focusing on returning to the power—sharing assembly, at this building behind me, storm on. the 29th ofjune, that is the date coming up in the knot in the not too distant future for the party to nominate a first and deputy first minister and begin the process of getting a functioning assembly working again. there were all sorts of questions over whether that could happen in that time frame. because of the general election result and because of how the dup are in this position being kingmakers, potentially the party that can allow theresa may to govern for the conservatives. when we saw the dup earlier, of course, they had, i think it's fair to say, a slightly
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different take on what had been happening today. theresa may went to buckingham palace earlier and said that she was confident she could form a government with the support of the dup. of course, we know that the conservatives and dup have a pretty good working relationship, not in any formalised sense, though, but when we heard from arlene foster, she said that she had spoken with theresa may this morning and they were entering into discussions. it did not sound as if any deal had been reached. it is my understanding that the discussions that have taken place are not in anyway detail, just an initial conversation has had. while the dup are focusing over the next few days on what sort of deal they might be able to put together with theresa may and the conservatives, sinn fein, as i began this conversation with you, is talking about what might happen here. let's listen to more of that
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sinn fein news conference. clearly, this was another watershed election for sinn fein. significantly, the fa ct for sinn fein. significantly, the fact that for the first time since the formation of this state, the unionist election returned less than 50%, which is significant in itself. people have ta ken 50%, which is significant in itself. people have taken a stand against the tory agenda, austerity, brexit and plans of the tory government. we have a job of work to do. our negotiating team have met, we are ready to go. we know that we can get back to power—sharing, and we want to lead our team into the executive, get back to the principles of the good friday agreement. we want positive government, and people have asked for it, but they have asked for a government that has equality, respect and integrity at its core. sinn fein leader michelle o'neill, talking a short while ago. i suppose it is fairto talking a short while ago. i suppose it is fair to say that what might present a solution for theresa may and the conservatives in terms of
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forging some sort of deal with the dup might not necessarily mean that there can be a solution here in northern ireland in terms of getting that assembly working again, because of course, there is a thought that if the secretary of state, the conservative secretary of state, who is supposed to be an independent broker in any discussions here regarding the assembly, is in a government that is in some sort of arrangement with the dup, then how will that make the nationalists feel? will they feel sidelined in any discussions that go one, and could be secretary of state then be seen could be secretary of state then be seen to be a truly neutral broker? it isa seen to be a truly neutral broker? it is a real rubiks cube of a political conundrum here, so a lot of very complicated stuff to be worked out over the next few days, hugh. with me here at westminster on a rather sunny evening, we discuss the possible permutations. we have had
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labour today responding very enthusiastically to a set of results that very few people predicted. what was that down to? obviously, it was down to the battle of ideas. i think labour had better ideas than the tories. the tories had a sort of empty vessel. that campaign was a bit robotic and i feel that in a campaign, you need to touch people's parts, and that was lacking from the tories. somehow, labour with parts, and that was lacking from the tories. somehow, labourwith its person—to—person style of campaigning really touched people ‘s emotions and hearts, particularly the young people, and ifeel that is what got young people to the polls this time. and yet, you are dozens of seats short of a parliamentary majority. we have done well and there is no region now where we can't win. a long time, england has
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been a challenge, and we have had exciting results, from ipswich to canterbury to wales. we have made a bit of a breakthrough in scotland. in terms of regional politics, it feels that there is no where we can't win now, and that was a big hurdle psychologically. i am excited because i feel that, given another chance, we could go anywhere and win anyone back. how constructive will labour be in this new parliament, in this brexit process? the government is in this brexit process? the government isin a, this brexit process? the government is in a, let's say, fragile position. the government depends on the dup, so how constructive will labour be? we want to see jobs and the economy first. we are worried about inflation, the flatness of wages, and how brexit might lead to a loss of jobs wages, and how brexit might lead to a loss ofjobs in the uk. would you revisit the issue of the single market and access to it? we have to think again about the customs union
quote
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again, with the introduction of dup into the picture today. and the tenets of the good friday agreement, for both the sinn fein and the dup grouping, who must work together. the sdlp are no longer players. it is crucial that all of northern ireland politics is felt now, not just to have one side. that could lead to people feeling disenfranchised. let's not put too fine a point on it — in this parliament, labour will be in a position to exert considerable pressure on this new government if mrs mae succeeds in getting in and getting her queen ‘s speech passed. in the brexit process, where do you think you will be able to apply pressure in order to change maybe some of the parameters of the debate? there will be lots of voters watching who will have an acute interest, so what is your message to them? our message is, anything that
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threatens jobs them? our message is, anything that threatensjobs or them? our message is, anything that threatens jobs or living standards asa threatens jobs or living standards as a result of brexit negotiations, we will be fighting very hard. we wa nt to we will be fighting very hard. we want to be constructive and we recognise the difficult position we are rolling democratically, but we also want to get across some of our ideas about people's standards of living, because people also voted to stop the austerity agenda and to look again at the nhs on its knees, to look again at schools funding. we cannot lose teachers in our schools. and once again to look at social care, older people and people with disabilities. catherine west, re—elected labour mp for hornsey and wood green, thanks forjoining us. some of the biggest upsets were in scotland, where the snp lost 21 seats. that included the snp leader at westminster summer angus robertson and the former first minister and former leader, alex salmond was of course, let's underline this, they remain by far
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the biggest party in scotland right now, even after this election. tories took 12 snp seats and labour took six. the lib dems took three of them. first minister nicola sturgeon conceded that the party's plans for a second independence referendum did have an impact on the snp's performance. with all of that in mind, let'sjoin lorna gordon in edinburgh. what a difference a night makes. 2015, the political map of scotland turned snp yellow. by this morning, though, it was more of a patchwork quilt of different colours. the north—east corner of scotland has gone entirely to the conservatives. so, too, has a sweep across the border, with conservatives and the liberal democrats winnings —— with liberal democrats winnings —— with lib dems and labour winning seats, too. she paid tribute to angus
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robertson, the first minister, and also to alex salmond, calling him herfriend and also to alex salmond, calling him her friend and mentor for almost 30 yea rs, her friend and mentor for almost 30 years, a giant of scottish politics. the prime minister, she said that she believed theresa may had lost all authority and credibility and that she had put the interests of the party ahead those of the country. this is what nicola sturgeon had to say. in 2015, the snp achieved an exceptional, perhaps once ina snp achieved an exceptional, perhaps once in a century, result. traditionally, in westminster elections, the snp is squeezed by the main uk parties. indeed, in this campaign, we have seen the return of a dominant 2—party system in england. this makes the snp's achievement of winning a clear majority of seats in scotland all the more remarkable. however, as we do after all elections, we will
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reflect on these results, we will listen to voters, and we will consider very carefully the best way forward for scotland, a way forward thatis forward for scotland, a way forward that is in the interests of all scotland. john swinney from the snp perhaps went further than nicola sturgeon with comments this morning, acknowledging the results of the election, the question of the second independence referendum was perhaps a significant motivator in this election in how people voted and he said the snp had to be attentive to that. but if results for the snp we re that. but if results for the snp were disappointing, the results for the conservatives at least in scotla nd the conservatives at least in scotland were quite the opposite. they had a remarkable result under the leadership of ruth davidson, doubling their share of the vote, their best result in 34 years, 1983. she called it an historic night and said in her opinion the question of
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the independence referendum was now dead. this morning we heard snp figures in knowledge the independence demands were now behind this bad result. we heard the first minister has said she will reflect on that matter. but i'm afraid that's not enough. let me be clear, nobody, not me, not anyone, is expecting the snp to give up on independence. that is what it believes, and it is a perfectly honourable position to take. but what people do expect is that right now the snp give scotland a break, simply put, scotland has had its fill. we need to focus on the challenges we face on education, nhs funding, new tax and welfare powers, as well as the huge challenge of brexit. nobody will condemn the first minister if she now decides to reset her course. two key areas to
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keep an eye on in the coming days, i wonder if ruth davidson perhaps is a little bit uncomfortable with the conservative's relationship with the dup going forward in particular, the dup going forward in particular, the dup position on certain issues. we will see what she has to say on that going forward. it will be interesting also to see what nicola sturgeon has to say. she said she will pause, reflect on the message voters have sent her, and undoubtedly we will hear what she has to say about that in the coming days. lorna gordon with the latest in edinburgh. a fascinating political picture in scotland. we will have more from scotland later. with me at westminster, jonathan powell, chief of staff to tony blair in downing street from 1997 to 2007, that momentous decade. we have talked about several elements, including northern ireland, where you have a special interest, but first of all,
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some thoughts on how we got where we are today. i would imagine gordon brown is feeling rather good. gordon brown is feeling rather good. gordon brown had criticism for not calling an election when people thought he should call one and win. he might have ended up with the same problem theresa may has. she took a risk and backfired. people saw her in action and it backfired. was that the main reason? there was that, as well as the tax on outsiders and the rest of it. looking at the root causes of that, as people like graham brady and others will tell us today, it is partly to do with the decision—making process. you know the decision—making process in downing street better than anyone, you were in the tony blair government, but every prime minister does it differently. if the team is very small and the circle is very tight, what are the pros and cons of that? is a former chief of staff and a member of the chief of staff of trade unions, i am very sympathetic
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for chiefs of staff, they always get blamed. but there is a problem if you have a closed circle. if you think of richard nixon's circle, if you have that kind of blockage there can bea you have that kind of blockage there can be a problem. we made sure tony blair had access from all types of advice, his mother—in—law, election agents, people in scotland. you have to keep those channels open or it can go badly wrong. is that how ma nifestos ca n can go badly wrong. is that how manifestos can emerge where, as a senior tory minister said earlier, he would have liked it right away. it's easy to say that after the event. but if you have a process thatis event. but if you have a process that is to closed and narrow. we we re that is to closed and narrow. we were not perfect from that point of view, but if you make it very narrow there is a problem. talking about northern ireland, we have two dimensions, the prime minister having to depend on support from the democratic unionists and we had sinn fein saying today this is a watershed westminster election and we would like to re—enter
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negotiations on the stormont arrangements and reinstate what's going on there. what are your thoughts on how that will work out? i think this is a really big problem and the conservative government has made a big mistake. they have made themselves dependent on the dup. whenever they wake up, they can only go on if the dup supports it. since i991, go on if the dup supports it. since 1991, the british government has a lwa ys 1991, the british government has always been neutral in northern ireland, for very good reasons. by doing this, theresa may has made herself a hostage to the dup, meaning she cannot be an independent mediator between the two sides. we have to set up the executive, the british government has tried to go backwards and forwards between the two sides. now we are on one side and the dup could pull the chain at any moment. we need to find a new neutral party to be the go—between between the two sides. looking at the parliamentary arithmetic, the conservative party had very little choice. i don't accept that. even at
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john major's weakest point, he didn't depend on the dup, but he didn't depend on the dup, but he didn't because it would cross the boundary. and that was a government that really struggled. they did struggle, but did not take this step for very good reasons. it might have the effect of undoing 20 years of good work we have done in northern ireland. that's a big thing to say. and the other factor is the border. one of the three priority issues in brexit is the border. the dup has a com pletely brexit is the border. the dup has a completely different position. 57% of people in northern ireland voted against brexit, and now we have a government dependent on the one party who voted for it. we'll negotiations take place in an honest and straightforward way? how will the dup influence then influence the government stands? they would have a veto on it. they could pull the plug at any moment. where we stand this evening, are the prospects of
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reinstating the executive at stormont nonexistent?” reinstating the executive at stormont nonexistent? i don't see how you can do it, if you don't have the british government being a neutral party, if you are captured by one side, how can you do it? we will get reaction from that later. jonathan powell, former chief of staff in downing street when tony blair was prime minister between i997 blair was prime minister between 1997 and blair was prime minister between i997 and 2007. in wales, the labour party had a strong night taking back a number of seats from the conservatives. labour ended up with 28 seats, while the tories took eight and plaid cymru won four. they added one to their tally from last time. the results represent a blow to the tory party who had hoped to make gains in pro—brexit areas. plaid cymru won four seats and the liberal democrats lost their only welsh mp. let's speak to our correspondent tomos morgan in cardiff. i have gone through the figures. can you pick out for us what you think other notable characteristics of the
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overnight results in wales and. the big swing seats were the three marginals that the tories have taken from labour in the 2015th election. in the gower the tories only held eight majority of 27, but the biggest swing was in cardiff north, in the capital, where the tories held a 2000 majority and the swing has now gone to labour, who now hold 4000 has now gone to labour, who now hold 40 0 0 votes has now gone to labour, who now hold 4000 votes in cardiff north. a big moved to the labour party. all those seats the tories were targeting in wales, bridgend, wrexham, they failed to make any ground in those seats. bridgend was the area theresa may chose to visit when she launched her campaign in wales. it's also the seat of first minister carwynjones in the assembly here, and they did not make any games. you mentioned the lib dems, who lost their only
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seatin the lib dems, who lost their only seat in wales, the first time since 1859 that there isn't an np sitting in wales. plaid cymru gained one, their joint in wales. plaid cymru gained one, theirjoint highest in wales. plaid cymru gained one, their joint highest they in wales. plaid cymru gained one, theirjoint highest they have had in a general election. and ukip, their share of the vote was wiped out com pletely share of the vote was wiped out completely here, losing 12% of their share. the total seats, 28 for labour, eight for the conservatives and fourfor labour, eight for the conservatives and four for plaid labour, eight for the conservatives and fourfor plaid cymru. labour, eight for the conservatives and four for plaid cymru. that was from cardiff bay. with me at westminster is professor roger scully of cardiff university centre of welsh governance. we were taken through the figures and changes there. what was notable in the welsh results ? there. what was notable in the welsh results? an extremely strong performance from the welsh labour party. a month ago labour in wales looked like they were staring disaster in the face, but the
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conservatives looks like they were looking at a breakthrough. labour had an astonishing comeback in the last month. when we thought they would lose seats to the conservatives, they have gained three seats back from them. what we re three seats back from them. what were the main factors in that change? some of that is labour across britain was doing better than we thought they might. also labour in wales ran as welsh labour. the main face in wales ran as welsh labour. the mainface and in wales ran as welsh labour. the main face and voice of the campaign was first minister of wales carwyn jones, notjeremy corbyn, and i think the election result in wales isa think the election result in wales is a significant personal triumph for first minister carwynjones. is a significant personal triumph for first minister carwyn jones. we have talked a lot in uk terms about the social care policy. there are some devolved issues here, but to what extent did the manifesto controversy for theresa may feed into anxiety in the welsh conservatives? they started the election campaign with real prospects of making advances. but we have seen theresa may stumble over social care, looking hesitant on the
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campaign trail, and herstanding has taken a real slide. she started the election as the most popular politician in wales but by the end of the campaign all the polling showed she was a long way behind evenjeremy showed she was a long way behind even jeremy corbyn showed she was a long way behind evenjeremy corbyn in popularity sta kes. evenjeremy corbyn in popularity stakes. plaid cymru added one seat to get up to four. what will they make of that? they will be pleased with adding a seat, but what of their overall performance?” with adding a seat, but what of their overall performance? i think they somehow got away with it. they only just held one they somehow got away with it. they onlyjust held one seat and only just won another. in terms of seats, it is their best ever performance, but their vote share is down significantly from two years ago. in many of the seats where they talked up many of the seats where they talked up their chances, the performance was actually pretty dismal. the lib dems were wiped off the board, the first time ever we have seen the liberals or liberal democrats failing to have any parliamentary rips into asian from wales at all. we thought 2015 was as bad as it could get for them, but they ended up could get for them, but they ended up doing significantly worse and the liberal democrats are now in a party
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in welsh politics. —— a minor party in welsh politics. —— a minor party in welsh politics. —— a minor party in welsh politics. is it sunny everywhere? it's sunny at cardiff bay and sunny at westminster. j win can tell us more. we have some good spells of sunshine out there at the moment. looking out into the atlantic, all of this swirl of cloud, it's an area of low pressure heading our way bringing rain and breeze overnight and into tomorrow. ahead of that, good spells of sunshine with showers fading away. one or two left over. splashes of rainfor one or two left over. splashes of rain for the south—west of england for a time. it will move into parts of wales and northern ireland and southern scotland. northern scotland staying dry, a warm night of 13 or 14 degrees will be typical across the country. it stays windy in the morning with the main area of rain
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shifting north and east. it will be sunny and warm, 2425 degrees for some. 20 degrees in belfast. underneath the rain, not a particularly pleasant afternoon. heading to sunday, more rain forecast but mostly in north—west of the fairly breezy for everyone. some clout in north wales and maybe a bit of rain. it's five o'clock, we are at westminster, where theresa may is trying to construct a new government after a disastrous night for the conservatives in the general election. in the last half—hour, the prime minister has apologised to her colleagues after losing her parliamentary majority and having to depend on support from the democratic unionists. i obviously wanted a different result last night, and i'm sorry for all those colleagues who lost their seats, didn't deserve to lose, and of course, i'll reflect on what happened. the election that was never meant to happen resulted in a dramatic reversal for the conservatives,
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losing seats as jeremy corbyn's labour made gains. labour's performance exceeded all expectations, winning 40% of the popular vote, asjeremy corbyn insisted he could lead a minority government. we are ready to do everything we can to put our programme into operation. there isn't a parliamentary majority for anybody at the present time. the party that has lost in this election is the conservative party. in northern ireland, the dup expressed readiness to support theresa may, but there are few details so far on the nature of any deal. in the days and weeks ahead, it is the union that will be to the forefront of our minds. the union is our guiding star. in scotland, the snp suffered heavy losses as the conservatives and labour made gains. the plans for a second independence referendum were blamed for the snp's performance.
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we will be in downing street, looking under dramatic result and exploring the implications just ten days before the brexit talks are due to begin. it's five o'clock. we are at westminster, as the outcome of the general election, a hung parliament, is slowly sinking in, along with the implications for the months and years ahead. theresa may and the conservatives have emerged as the largest party, but with no parliamentary majority, and they are hoping to rely on the ulster unionists to sustain a government. in last hour, the prime minister apologised for the tory candidates who lost their seats last night.
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she said she will now reflect on what is needed to take the party forward, and added that today she would be focusing on her cabinet. we will have the latest reaction, after a bad night for the conservatives, a better night for labour, and a night of setbacks for the scottish national party. so let's recap on the results of the election that was never meant to happen, and which resulted in a hung parliament. with all but one seat declared, the tories have 318 seats, eight short of a majority. labour has 261mps, the snp 35, the liberal democrats 12 and the dup ten. labour has now gained 29 seats in the commons, and far from increasing their presence, as so many had predicted, the conservatives lost 12 seats, while the snp lost 21.
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the conservatives took 42.4% of the votes cast, with labour at 40%. both labour and the conservatives increased their share of the vote, while ukip's support collapsed by 10%. we start with the report on the events so far, with our political correspondent leila nathoo. strong and stable, prime minister? shihaab wanted strength and stability, but that is not how has turned out. there may did just enough to make sure it was her who travel to buckingham palace to form a new government. but there is no increased majority, no spring in her step. what the country needs more than ever is certainty, and having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in
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the general election, it is clear that only the conservative and unionist party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the house of commons. as we do, we will continue to work with our friends and allies in the democratic unionist party in particular. last night as constituencies raced to declare the results, tory faces told they're on stories. in hastings, the home secretary amber rudd onlyjust clung on. theresa may's huge political gamble has ended in disaster. she had banked on a bigger majority, but instead her party is weaker. he, though, confounded expectations. labour are celebrating after picking up 29 seats. my party has had a huge increase in its boat, gained seats all over the country,
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and every region of this country, and every region of this country, and in scotland and wales. i think eve ryo ne and in scotland and wales. i think everyone in the labour party, and eve ryo ne everyone in the labour party, and everyone who supported the labour party yesterday, young people, all people, everyone in between, they should be very proud of what we achieved. labour kicked out eight of theresa may's ministers, there were more blue losses in places like canterbury and stockton, some in her own party now questioning whether mrs may can continue.” own party now questioning whether mrs may can continue. i think she's ina mrs may can continue. i think she's in a difficult place. she is a very talented woman and she doesn't shy away from difficult decisions but she now has two consider her position. but in scotland, there we re position. but in scotland, there were cheers as the tories gained 12 seats, the best result there for more than 30 years. we need to ensure on behalf of the country that the processes of government continue, but we also need to make sure that we listen to the message the people of the uk have sent in
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the people of the uk have sent in the last 24 hours. that involves parties working together.l the last 24 hours. that involves parties working together. a bad night for the snp has their losses included big names, deputy leader angus robertson and former leader alex salmond. this morning, nicola sturgeon still confident but thoughtful. this campaign, we have seen thoughtful. this campaign, we have seen the return of a dominant 2—party system in england. this makes the snp's achievements of winning a clear majority of seats in scotla nd winning a clear majority of seats in scotland all the more remarkable. however, as we do after all elections, we will reflect on these results, we will listen to voters and we will consider very carefully the best way forward for scotland. the liberal democrats saw the return of former ministers like servants cable in twickenham. the party's old leader was the victim of one of the biggest upsets of the night, nick clegg losing his sheffield c. biggest upsets of the night, nick clegg losing his sheffield cm biggest upsets of the night, nick clegg losing his sheffield c. in the liberal democrats, we have made progress in incredibly difficult
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circumstances, and we face a new parliament ina circumstances, and we face a new parliament in a far stronger position than we left the last one. after you get's vote collapsed, paul nuttall resigned, having failed to get elected himself in boston and skegness. the greens' caroline lucas, though, increased majority in brighton. after their best ever westminster election result with ten of northern ireland's 18 seats, the dup now find themselves as kingmakers. the prime minister has spoken with me this morning and we will enter into discussions with the conservatives to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation at this time of great challenge. she knows compromises lie ahead, but she fonua has to try to get on with governing. what is important is that we form a government in the national interest at this critical time in our
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country, because we do face the challenge of those brexit negotiations, so it is important to have a government that can take the negotiations through. that is what i am doing, forming a government. i obviously wanted a different result last night and i am sorry for all those colleagues who lost their seats, who did not deserve to lose, and of course i will reflect on what happened. but after this result, she had not fathomed whether theresa may will still be here in the longer term is in doubt. where are we this evening not least in terms of constructing that new cabinet? let's speak now to our correspondent, eleanor garnier, who is at downing street, and to iain watson, who's at labour's hq. lri , lri, our colleague mentioned she expects boris johnson lri, our colleague mentioned she expects borisjohnson to stay as foreign secretary and philip hammond to stay as chancellor. what do you
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make of that and is it going to be the case with all the main jobs in cabinet? theresa may is behind me at number ten putting plans in place for her new cabinet. those two big positions of chancellor and foreign secretary, well, they are really important positions and clearly theresa may has decided she cannot move those key people at this stage after that disastrous result for the conservatives. remember, there was plenty of talk during the election campaign about whether philip hammond could stay on in his position and how theresa may and her tea m position and how theresa may and her team were getting on with philip hammond and his team. we got reports of tensions between those two teams. as the borisjohnson, the foreign secretary, we did not see much of him at the beginning of the campaign but i think it was significant at theresa may's last campaign stop off, it was the foreign secretary who introduced her. so, two big key positions, we understand they will
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see as they are. we have also heard that perhaps amber rudd, the home secretary, will be staying put. but key na m es secretary, will be staying put. but key names we will be looking out for perhaps moving on, people we did not see much of during the campaign, like the environment secretary, andreea leadsom, for the trade secretary, doctor liam fox, or the international development secretary, priti patel and thejustice secretary, liz truss. will they still be in their offices once theresa may is finished with her cabinet reshuffle? and who could potentially be making a step up? names like michael gove, iain duncan smith, those are the kind of names that are doing the rounds at the moment, but it sounds like it will be some time before we know exactly who is in and who is out. you might expect on days like this usually to have some of these big characters to be out and about making the case for the prime minister. i have to say, it has been notable today for the absence of people like borisjohnson
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and philip hammond and all the others. should we read anything into that or is it simply downing street is trying to contain the message to mrs may bold—mac own message to voters and colleagues?” mrs may bold—mac own message to voters and colleagues? i think that isa voters and colleagues? i think that is a reflection on what an election result it has been and what a shock it has been, as senior members of the party ask questions of themselves, ask questions of the party, but of course, asking questions privately of theresa may and her close colleagues, because this is not what she wanted, she had hoped to get an increased majority, she wanted to strengthen her mandate, to strengthen our hand to go into the brexit negotiations. and as we know, that political gamble has completely failed. it has ended in disaster. so, why did that happen? many tories, i think, in disaster. so, why did that happen? many tories, ithink, pretty angry that we had an election in the first place. it was not necessary. theresa may did not need to call it.
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some are cross about the nature of the campaign, that it didn't go very well at all and that the manifesto had so many hiccups, but social care cap and criticism of a u—turn. and theresa may not making those appearances in the tv debates. so i think tories, to put it politely, are think tories, to put it politely, a re pretty think tories, to put it politely, are pretty frustrated with how things have gone and clearly, theresa may gets that, we heard her as saying how sorry she was that so many tory candidates did not win, that some of the key ministers and some of herformer that some of the key ministers and some of her former mps that some of the key ministers and some of herformer mps have now lost their seats, and she said theyjust did not deserve that. but clearly she knows she has to get on governing, she thinks that with the support of the dup, she is going to be able to do that, and remember, brexit talks start in just a few days, next week so she needs to get on with things, and she will at least need to project a sense of being in control, having a new government in place, as she says, to government in place, as she says, to govern in the national interest.
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iain watson is at labour hq. some talk today of trying to form a minority labour government but i think mrs may crilly has arithmetic on her side that she can bolt on ten boats from the dup. so what is labour's stance now? —— votes.” think labour are reconciled to the fa ct think labour are reconciled to the fact that they will be in opposition but also those close to jeremy corbyn saying he has actually defied expectations, the worry is that he is almost settled for second place as though it was actually victory and they're as though it was actually victory and they' re concerned as though it was actually victory and they're concerned that perhaps he will become complacent and not make changes that the party might need to broaden its support if there isa need to broaden its support if there is a second election this year. but for the time being, those around jeremy corbyn are clearly pleased with the result. however, what they
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are saying is that what they are going to do is harry the government not just against brexit and austerity, trying to build this progressive alliance with some of the other parties, there was even talk earlier on whether perhaps they could make their own approach to the dup, perhaps difficult givenjeremy corbyn's politics in the past, but some of the things in the labour ma nifesto some of the things in the labour manifesto are some of the things did dup want to see. if theresa may does not have the deal sealed with the dup you might expect an approach. but they wanted to give the impression at least that they are ready to form a government. the other thing jeremy corbyn wanted to do was give the impression that he had done so well in this election that there was really no point for any of his internal critics to challenge him. he got 40% of the vote, more vote than at any time since the toni blair landslide and that seems to be successful at least in the short term. so any labour
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pisi were considering launching leadership bids have no shelter the plans for the time being. so it looks as though that whilejeremy corbyn has not won the election, he has won the right to continue to lead labour. iain watson, thank you very much. so, just to underline how important now the politics of northern ireland are, even more important than usual in this jigsaw, because we now have theresa may depending on the support of the dup in order to govan. the politics of northern ireland are centre stage in this months mr election. just to underline what has happened, the big winners of the night in northern ireland were at the dup and they took ten seats. sinn fein got seven. the sdlp and the ulster unionist party lost all of their westminster mps. and the support of the dup's westminster in peas will not be crucial for the conservatives in order to get the legislative process
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under way. rush—mac westminster mps. —— westminster mp. let's join annita mcveigh in stormont. some time, the northern ireland assembly, that collapsed back in march, more on that in a moment, but first let us talk about the situation that immediately presents itself of the dup is going to be doing over the next few days, as it considers any sort of deal it might make with theresa may to help power and the conservative party continue in government. what struck me at the dup news conference earlier today was how confident the party was looking for. arlene foster was there with her ten mps reminding everyone that this was the best election result that the dup had ever recorded in a general election. she did not give away any details on what she might precisely be discussing with theresa may, but this is what she said. the dup will always
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strive for the best deal for northern ireland and its people, but equally, we want the best for all the uk, and these are challenging times. the uk and indeed ourvery way of life are under threat from extremists. negotiations on our exit from the eu are about to commence and we now face uncertainty at westminster. the prime minister has spoken with me this morning and we will enter discussions with the conservatives to explore how it may be possible to bring stability to our nation at this time of great challenge. arlene foster. well, sinn fein also recorded its best general election result in this election, of course, though its mps do not take up their seats at westminster. and the
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pa rty's focus seats at westminster. and the party's focus is on getting the asset low—mac here restored, it says. there is a deadline ofjune the 29th for the parties to select a first minister and deputy first minister to at least begin the process of getting the devolved assembly up and working again. this is what sinn fein's leader in northern ireland had to say a short while ago. clearly, this was another watershed election for sinn fein. quite significantly also, the fact that for the first time since the formation of this state, the unionists returned less than 50%, thatis unionists returned less than 50%, that is significant in itself. it will want us to take a stand against the tory agenda, taken a stand against austerity, taking a stand against austerity, taking a stand against brexit and the plans of the tory government. but we have a job of work to do, people voted for good government. our negotiating team have just met and we are ready to go, we want to lead our team into the executive. we want to get back
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to the principles of the good friday agreement. we want positive government and people have asked for that but they have asked for government that has equality, respect and integrity at its core. with me here is brian rowan. good to have you with us. first of all, the dup, whatare have you with us. first of all, the dup, what are its demand is going to be? what do you think the price of its support for theresa may will be and how far will it push for those demands? it is interesting that the conservative party became the conservative party became the conservative unionist party again and that theresa may wanted to speak to her friends and allies here in northern ireland, have ignored this place for quite some considerable time. you heard the emphasis of arlene foster, being about the union, the dup here got a scare in march at the election, and all of a sudden there was a conversation about a united ireland and a border poll. i think arlene foster will wa nt poll. i think arlene foster will want to stress there are 300,000 votes for the dup, that should push
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the border poll further down the road. so when she shared the union will be her guiding star, how did you interpret that? i think she was probably pleased that the snp did not have a great election in scotland. i think she was pleased with the result the dup got here because sinn fein have been pushing re ce ntly because sinn fein have been pushing recently for a border poll. the other issues for the dup will be around brexit and what the border will look like, around business and trade, and another thing where they could find some common ground with the conservatives is on the question of legacy. a lot of concern in the newspapers in britain about legacy investigations involving soldiers and police officers and i think the dup and the conservative party will probably be having a conversation around that issue. sinn fein says it wa nts to around that issue. sinn fein says it wants to get back to discussions here at stormont on monday to try to get the assembly working again. how compatible do you think the dup's discussions with the conservatives
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will be with the discussions here about the assembly? the close of the dup—— about the assembly? the close of the dup —— because of the dup get to the conservatives, the further away they come from sinn fein. so it can either be a conversation with the conservative party or it can be a negotiation with sinn fein. sinn fein have clear demands, in terms of putting this place back together again. we talked about them the last time we were here, an irish language act, marriage equality, a bill of rights, and also that arlene foster must step aside until there is the completion of the rh! enquirer. —— enquirer. arlene foster off the back of the result, is she likely to stress their plus side? she has given no indication of the this point that she was prepared to do that. i doubt very much if she will be prepared to respond to that sinn fein demand. brian, thank you very much. so it is by no means certain that a solution for theresa may in terms of some sort of arrangement,
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we're not talking a coalition but some sort of looser arrangement with the dup, it is by no means certain that that sort of solution would allow theresa may to stay in power, though the conservative government to continue, it would also be a solution for the process here in northern ireland, but the dup are saying that they are in discussions with theresa may. there was a phone call other, it is my understanding that nothing substantive was discussed at that stage, but over the next couple of days we expect the next couple of days we expect the dup to consider its list of demands that they will be interesting to see how far they are prepared to push on those demands, what sort of support they would be prepared to offer theresa may to continue in government. for the moment, back to you. and e—mail has come through from number ten downing st confronting five cabinet positions. —— confirming. philip hammond is
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confirmed as chancellor. amber rudd, who held onto her seat on the south coast, confirmed as the home secretary. borisjohnson confirmed as the foreign secretary. david davies confirmed as the secretary of state for exiting the european union, the so—called brexit secretary, and so michael fallon confirmed as the defence secretary. no other appointments will be made this evening, it says. but those top five jobs this evening, it says. but those top fivejobs in the this evening, it says. but those top five jobs in the cabinet, theresa may deciding she does not want to get into the process of trying to move any of them, that is if she even had an intention to do so, she is leaving them where they are and that clearly will minimise some turbulence as well. so continuity very much the name of the game, with those five appointments nowjust being announced. the shadow attorney general, shami chakrabarti, is here with me now. first of all, the fact that all of
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those posts, kava nagh first of all, the fact that all of those posts, kavanagh jobs first of all, the fact that all of those posts, kavanaghjobs confirm, is that what you expected?” those posts, kavanaghjobs confirm, is that what you expected? i think so. is that what you expected? i think so. it has been such a terrible night for theresa may, and she is trying to project stability. that is what she said this election was all about and she has done the very opposite of creating stability so i would have thought she would want to say, don't worry, at least we are keeping the same people in these jobs. perhaps there is something to be said for that. this extraordinary moment where she has thrown away a majority and turned it into a very difficult minority government. so, here we are, the day after the election, we are looking at a hung parliament, which very few people expected. what do you put that down to? is of the fact we had two leaders in mr corbyn and mrs may who are very different in terms of temperament, in the way they deal with people, is it down to that? or
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is it down to, as mr corbyn continually said, the policies that labour was offering?” continually said, the policies that labour was offering? i think it is probably a number of different factors but i think first and foremost, and jeremy is big enough to say this, the ultimate star of ourcampaign to say this, the ultimate star of our campaign was to say this, the ultimate star of ourcampaign was not to say this, the ultimate star of our campaign was not evenjeremy himself, it was the manifesto. it was a very popular manifesto that articulated a very clear alternative alternative vision. more money for the nhs, for social care, for older people and so on. and the contrast was the conservative manifesto, which went down very badly, and in particular the dementia tax and so on, and all the flip—flopping around that. lots of older people and their children and grandchildren very worried about their homes and so on. so that is the sort of hard edged politics part. i also think we ran a very positive campaign, no smears or nasty attacks on people's character.
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and i'm afraid the conservatives did runa and i'm afraid the conservatives did run a very nasty campaign. the architect of course was lynton crosby, who ran the campaign against sadiq khan in london. there were reso na nces sadiq khan in london. there were resonances with that, with attacking people's characters —— character. and theresa may did not want to come out and debate and there is nothing that the british public... i have been up and down the country throughout the campaign, feeling the tide is turning. i think the prime minister who calls this election because she wants a landslide and because she wants a landslide and because she wants a landslide and because she wants a stronger hand negotiating brexit, should come out and debate the other leaders. there isa and debate the other leaders. there is a sense of fairness in britain that did not sit comfortably with her approach. if you think the ma nifesto her approach. if you think the manifesto was the star of the campaign and people loved the policies, there are still dozens of seats short of getting a parliamentary majority, so what did not do the trick for you?”
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parliamentary majority, so what did not do the trick for you? i just think that this was an amazing reversal in a short period, and i think this is the beginning, not the end. what has been achieved injust seven weeks is something to be built upon. it is not a blip? seven weeks is something to be built upon. it is nota blip? no, not seven weeks is something to be built upon. it is not a blip? no, not at all. forgive me, but you and your collea g u es all. forgive me, but you and your colleagues in the broadcast media, jeremy corbyn and his team have had the fairest hearing that they have had in two years. as the public have got to knowjeremy and that top team, they have actually liked him better, and of course the manifesto, which we stand by, the values in that force to fight for build upon, evenin that force to fight for build upon, even in opposition. just a thought about the parliamentary process, you are going to be in a powerful position in parliament, i am just thinking when the brexit talks start in ten days, how constructive will labour be in the process, and what other kind of areas where you will try to exert some pressure, let's
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think about access to the single market with a customs union, let's think about freedom of movement, what are the areas in which you would want to exert pressure? what we have said consistently is that yes, we respect the result of the referendum even though we have members who voted both ways, that just means we are a very big national party, but we will put the economy first. we will notjust play games, nationalist games with people's lives, we will hold the government to account to try and ensure a brexit that protects people's jobs, and access to markets and so on. protecting industry, the economy and individual people's jobs. that is what we will be focusing on. shami chakrabarti, thank you very much. if there are conservative voters watching wondering why i am not interviewing people like boris johnson and philip hammond, believe me, we have asked many times! but they are not available as we speak, maybe that will change later. but
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think it is important to underline that point. some of the biggest upsets of the night were in scotland. the snp lost 21 mps, including the snp's leader in the commons, angus robertson, and former leader alex salmond, although they remain by far the biggest party in scotland. the tories took 12 of the snp's seats, labour took six and the liberal democrats three. the snp leader, nicola sturgeon, conceded that her party's plans for a second independence referendum had an impact on the snp's performance. with all of that in mind, let's join our scotland correspondent in edinburgh to talk more about these results. what an interesting night the results have been here in scotland. it would have been hard for the snp to match the results of the last general election, but i think it's fair to say they fell
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further. resorts are deeply disappointed. as for the conservatives we did expect to see a bounce in the results they got, but in the end they ended up with 13. bruce davidson said it was an historic night for her party to. to chew over these results i have some company. what do you make up the results ? company. what do you make up the results? it is the old adverts from 2013 not be winners and losers. the snp won this election by any measurement, but because of the expectations of the last result in 2015, they look like the losers. low expectations for the scottish labour party. they end up with seven mps. quite a turnaround. the lib dems are relatively well and chiefly that scottish conservative results. they expected, they're working assumption
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was between 5—15 games, and they ended up at the upper end of that, which i think surprised them. a few days ago it felt like some of the early momentum for the tories had dissipated. was it tactical voting? tactical voting, a bit of brexit. but chiefly the independence issue, as ever, has been the dominant dynamic in scottish politics in 2014. the tories were quite blatant. theresa may feeding, lend us your vote. it was practically all they campaigned on. i think that could run out of steam. but they definitely resonated in parts of scotland. the backlash against the idea of independence, and chiefly the referendum. politics is often about mood and momentum. do you fully momentum slipping away. they only had one direction in which they could go. if you remember before that general election, the snp had
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six seats. i remember alex salmond telling me in an interview that he and his party would be delighted with 20. they got 56. they had more seats and the rest of the opposition put together. on the other hand, to lose 21 seats overnight including some of the biggest hitters, and some of the finest operators, that's difficult to put a gloss on. the pro—independence and early pro—independence and early pro—independence referendum.” pro—independence and early pro-independence referendum. i think she would wish it were dead. although, in saying that, there is a
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caveat. the so—called tory revival such as it is, rests solely on with davidson's ability to stretch out the constitutional uncertainty. as she knows, and the rest of us though, as soon as the constitutional issue is settled one way or another in scotland, and the tories go back to the national position in scotland, which is third orfourth. grey position in scotland, which is third or fourth. grey although position in scotland, which is third orfourth. grey although it position in scotland, which is third or fourth. grey although it does position in scotland, which is third orfourth. grey although it does but nicola sturgeon in a difficult position because she has got to find some way after this period of reflection of parking the idea respect an independence referendum. the broader electorate are referendum. the broader electorate a re clearly referendum. the broader electorate are clearly exercised about it and they may settle down. the word nicola sturgeon used
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earlier today, she said she would reflect a look at the best way forward for all of scotland. what do you think she means by that? there's a couple of observations. that phrase did jump out at me when i was listening to her this morning. one is that politically, and she is a very astute and experienced political operator that buys her time, but secondly, and that is time with the people in her party who wa nt with the people in her party who wantan with the people in her party who want an independence referendum early, and above all else, but also gives her time to reflect on whether she can maybe move the timetable back a bit. she was talking to years from now regarding the date when the brexit negotiations, remembered them, were supposed to be concluded. theresa may seem to indicate during the general election something in
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the general election something in the region of five years. i think nicola sturgeon would have settled for maybe four years. however, she is approaching choppy waters because i think that she would have preferred to have had a second independence referendum before the next hollywood macro direction hole election. —— before the next holyrood elections. why do you think we will have another election? this was a snap general election which we nt was a snap general election which went horribly wrong and i think that diminishes the prospect of a second. i think there is a distinct possibility we will have another election. do you remember1974? vividly. two elections! we will be back to talk about elections and decades gone past. as with many political issues here in scotland, divided on whether the question of whether there will be another
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general election. thank you both very much. thank you to you and your guests for that interesting exchange. of course this afternoon we have had another statement from the prime minister. we have when she returned from buckingham palace, but then we have another inside downing street where she said things that she hadn't said on the step of downing street earlier. she started to express regret about the fact that the results hadn't turned out as she wished, and she started to convey her apology in the grid to collea g u es her apology in the grid to colleagues who had lost their seats. that is listen to what the prime minister said. i had wanted to achieve a larger majority, but that was not the result that we secured. and i'm sorry for all those candidates and hard—working party workers who were unsuccessful, but also particularly sorry for those colleagues who were mps and ministers, who had contributed so much to our country, and who lost their seats, and didn't deserve to lose their seats. as i reflect on the results,
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i will reflect on what we need to do in the future to take the party forward. did you think about resigning? my focus last night, as the results came through, was on those colleagues who were sadly losing their seats. colleagues who i've worked with, colleagues who have contributed much to our country. and i felt that they did not deserve to lose their seat. as the results started to come through, it became clear that we were the party that had won the most seats and the most votes. and i felt it was incumbent on us at a critical time in our country to form a government in the national interest. and that is what i'm doing. you called the selection in order to strengthen your hand in the brexit negotiations. hasn't your hand now been weakened? what i think is important in the brexit negotiations, which will start in ten days' time, is that we have the certainty of a government that can take forward a plan into those brexit negotiations. that's why i think at this critical time for our country it's important
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to form a government in the national interest, as we are the party that won the most seats and the most votes. we are the only party in a position to form a government that can do that, and that's what we will do. you talked about certainty. but can the public be certain that this government can last five years, and that you can last five years as the leader of it? what is important is that we bring a government together, we form a government in the national interest at this critical time for our country. because we do face the challenge of those brexit negotiations. so it's important to have a government that can take the negotiations through. that's what i'm doing, forming a government. i obviously wanted a different result last night, and i'm sorry for all those colleagues who lost their seats, who didn't deserve to lose. and of course i will reflect on what happened. briefly, if i may, some of your mps are calling for staff changes. will there be staff changes? what i'm doing today is focusing
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on forming a government. as i say, i think that's important in a national interest. and as the largest party with the most seats and most votes, we are the only party that can form but government to take this forward. i will shortly be forming my cabinet, and there will be further ministerial posts. and of course some of those ministerial post already confirmed. i mentioned them to you earlier on. foreign secretary, home secretary and chancellor david davis and the brexitjob, and and chancellor david davis and the brexit job, and michael and chancellor david davis and the brexitjob, and michael fallon as defence secretary. the former labour home secretary, jack straw, is here with me now. thanks for coming to talk to us. what did you make of the prime minister's responds by? well, she is right to apologise. but i still don't think she gets it, about why she lost. and there were these catastrophic errors made in the campaign. none of us could believe
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it because frankly nobody in the party, including those around jeremy corbyn, thought we were in for a bad night last night. at very best, holding on to what we had got. not in our wildest dreams did we think we'd get the seats that we did, and a 40% share of the vote. but elementary mistake one was assigning mrs is made to assault her own supporters through the so—called dementia tax. so bad that even the daily mail turned on her. it caused her to do a u—turn. elementary mistake her to do a u—turn. elementary m ista ke two her to do a u—turn. elementary mistake two was for mrs made to polarise the whole of the campaign on herself. so the party didn't exist, it was all about i, i, i. margaret thatcher and david cameron didn't do that because both of them understood that if they won, they would get the credit anyway. but we re would get the credit anyway. but were they to lose, they would have
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alibis that were present, as it were, at the scene of the crime. the other thing was thatjeremy corbyn, i take my hat off to him. he showed that he was really enjoying the election, and people were enjoying meeting other people and junior pitting other people. whereas mrs may had a different psychological make—up and was very much an introvert. she did not communicate. she looked wooden and increasingly during the campaign as if the very last place she wanted to be was out seeking votes. how much of a mistake was it not to take part in the debate because prime minister ‘s previously have said they won't take the risk and she is not alone in there. tony blair refused to take pa rt there. tony blair refused to take part in debates on the route —— and the result of that was there were no debates. the convention was broken in 2010 when gordon brown did agree to ta ke in 2010 when gordon brown did agree to take part. i think he did ok and nick clegg did better. given given that that is now accepted, i think
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it was very unwise of theresa may to refuse to take part in that key final debate. jeremy corbyn made a brilliant tactical move to say that she —— that he would take part in this, and where were you? if theresa may had been riding high, it would have been fine. but as the public we re have been fine. but as the public were getting worried about her, it simply confirmed fears that she was not willing to submit their programme to serious questioning. we have seen mr corbyn meeting supporters today. can you add knowledge now that you underestimated him ? knowledge now that you underestimated him? and that you now accept that he is firmly in place and firmly established without threat of leader? i'm happy to acknowledge both of those and i've been doing so well might. it would been doing so well might. it would be childish and ridiculous not to do so. be childish and ridiculous not to do so. he was able to recharge of people in a way that was certainly
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unexpected from me. i didn't think he was going to. critically, under his leadership, the party has reached out to young people. we've also had a following, but faced a situation, as have the other parties, of great cynicism against the young. i can't remember how many conversations we had with young people on the doorstep who said they would not bother, we will be sane, and stuff like that. i think young people generally got a bit shocking last yearreferendum. too few of them voted and the result directly was the result they didn't want it. this time what one felt, and it is only in the last week that i've felt it knocking on the doors, and yesterday manning a polling station, young people actually were getting the point and coming out to vote. that was the thing that shifted its. very interesting, jack. very good to talk to you. jack straw with his experience and shedding some light
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for us on the campaign, as he saw it. so, theresa may think she will form a government with help from friends and allies. that means the dup. my colleague, christian fraser, looks at hung parliaments and how they work in more detail. we don't have as much experience with hung parliaments in the uk as they do on the continent, but we have had one as recently as 2010. you will recall that after five frantic days of negotiation, david cameron went into coalition with nick clegg's liberal democrats — a government that lasted the full five—year term. it's unlikely we're going to get a coalition this time. but the conservatives can still govern, and here's why. 326 is the magic number. it's an absolute majority, it's just over half of the constituencies in the uk. the conservatives are eight short. in fact, the number is usually a bit less than this because sinn fein don't take their seats and the speaker doesn't vote. nonetheless, the conservatives can have a go at it because they have the most seats in parliament. and that's what theresa
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may's doing right now. she's taking initiative. she went off to see the queen just after lunchtime today because she thinks she can form a government. what she has to ensure is that by the time they come to the queen's speech, there's a majority of mps in parliament that will support her platform. or to put it another way, she has to ensure there is a majority of mps that aren't going to vote against it. so let's take a look at the numbers. what i'm going to do as i'm going to build a left—leaning alliance. not a coalition, but parties on the left that might supportjeremy corbyn. there is 261 for labour. we put in the snp, the liberal democrats. let's put in plaid cymru, and also the one green mp. and you'll see that they're short of the magic number, and actually shorter than the conservatives' number on 313. so they're five short of where the conservatives are. but then look what happens to the conservatives if you put the dup with them. the biggest party in the northern ireland assembly, ten seats, and they're over that magic number. so they have potentially 328 mps.
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what kind of relationship with this be with the dup? well, there are three options, potentially. a formal coalition, or they could have a much more informal relationship where they vote on a vote—by—vote basis. or they could have what we call "confidence and supply", whereby the dup agree to vote with the government on key issues like a budget, or a vote that might bring down the government, in return for a price. the one thing to say, though, is that these two parties do have long—standing connections, and the dup has voted with the conservatives many times before. a couple of important dates for you before we finish. this one — june 13th. that is when the new parliament meets. after that through the week new mps will be sworn in. this is the date by which theresa may has to be confident that she's got that majority of mps — a week on monday, june 19th. incidentally, what happens if after that point, after the queen's speech, there is a leadership contest, or theresa may decides to stand aside?
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well, the conservatives would still remain in power while any leadership contest follows. many thanks. christian diener the permutations for us. i mentioned earlier that there was still one seek outstanding, and indeed there is. it is kensington, a rather affluent pa rt it is kensington, a rather affluent part of central london where we do usually —— don't usually find a labourmp. usually —— don't usually find a labour mp. they had several recounts but gave up because everyone was exhausted. they will be counting again. tim donovan is there. there has been a 12 hour pause, as you say. proceedings were halted shortly after 6a m say. proceedings were halted shortly after 6am this morning. the reason, as you said, given was that staff we re as you said, given was that staff were absolutely exhausted. they are
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due to resume proceedings in the building behind me at six o'clock and have a third recount. we were told that there was a margin of around 50 in the original count with labour slightly ahead, pretty extraordinary. there was a third recount and then we were told that the margin had come down to about 38. a second recount happened. we weren't told what happened, but it was said that there were discrepancies between the number of ballot papers and the number of records kept by the counters. it was felt that this indicated that people we re felt that this indicated that people were getting pretty weary. that was one of the reasons. one of my collea g u es one of the reasons. one of my colleagues here earlier said that he was told that another reason a p pa re ntly was told that another reason apparently was that the room needed to be hired out for other people. in a quarter of an hour they will resume. it has been frustrating in particular for the candidate here. she feels she was tantalisingly close to a pretty important results
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we re close to a pretty important results were labour. this seat was once kensington and chelsea and alan clark and malcolm rifkind have helped this seat before. it is a seat that has not been labour since i974. seat that has not been labour since 1974. we waited we what happens in the next couple of hours. thanks very much. tim donovan in kensington with the latest, telling us they will start counting in about ten minutes time so we may get a result in the mid—evening. we are back here on college green just outside parliament. before we get an update on the weather, we will try to take stock. let's discuss the day's events with paul waugh from the huffington post and with jessica elgot from the guardian. this evening, theresa may now confirms these top five jobs. clearly trying to say that business
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is as usual, all that is how she would like to portray it. how did you read things? that became quite obvious from the moment she walked into downing street. it felt like she was giving the speech she had a lwa ys she was giving the speech she had always intended to give. she walks through the door, the staff applauded, and the cabinet was the same. there is that clip of her during the election where she is doing a new and saying nothing has changed. it felt like the same thing today. paul, what we all thoughts? she turned into the neighbour of the character of the campaign. she was robotic. shouldn't say what she had to say later, feeling sorry for the tory candidates but lost. you talk about how the government is going to be constructed. there have been no cabinet ministers here today. they have all been in radio silence, wondering if they have a job. she doesn't have the authority to fire anyone. most of the mp5 i've spoken to for that they have a chain around their neck, a choke chain on a dog
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but if she moves one step out of place they will yank on the chain and put her back into place. what about the chain from the tories to the dup, as we look ahead for the next few months? what do you make of that? in terms of the tory party's plan, theresa may is the woman that point the phrase monastic party. if she is going to form an informal coalition with a party whose values are different from most of the other mainstream parties in britain, including gay marriage and lb gt writes, she is going to take a step backwards. i have spoken to labour vote rs backwards. i have spoken to labour voters who think that it is a big own goal, but she doesn't have much choice. i genuinely feel now that the dup can name their choice to theresa may. she's not coming to these negotiations from a position of strength. last night, arlene foster was saying to bbc radio
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ulster but she thought that may's position was untenable. if that is the place than it really is a case of them saying, here is the list of the man's and you sign up to them. talking about the campaign, where did you think the turning point was? lots of people seemed to agree that there was a turning point. it was around the manifesto. was that for you the main point of the campaign where things notably shifted? very much so. and also labour's private polling picked up. that is the point that they were really surprised that elderly voters could get between labour and tory. it suddenly shrank and they've saw an opportunity. at the same time they saw ukip voters we re the same time they saw ukip voters were responding to labour's own message on high earners and corporations, both of which messages people didn't really expect to turn up. don't forget ukip is an economic populist party, ultimately. nigel
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farage was against globalisation. labour tapped into that in an unusual way and the conservatives we re unusual way and the conservatives were flat—footed on the issue. unusual way and the conservatives were flat-footed on the issue. one of the labour mps in a midlands seat was describing to me the conversations he was having with voters at the beginning of the campaign, particularly older voters. they were saying to him that they we re they were saying to him that they were going to vote conservative for the first time in their lives. midway through the campaign those people started coming back to labour and that is really one of the m essa g es and that is really one of the messages we've seen. and that is really one of the messages we've seen. it notjust about young voters, which has been a big theme of the campaign. but also about the way that tories have lost their core voters. misses may have died stability and continuity are important. she has appointed people back into the same jobs in the top echelons of the cabinet. —— mrs may have said stability and continuity are important. there will inevitably
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be some turbulence around the talk. definitely. she looks very much like a caretaker prime minister. she didn't use the phrase today, people aren't using it. but privately a lot of mps are viewing it like that, and it's a question of not if she goes, but when. going into these talks and being on probation is quite underwhelming, to be honest. it destabilises the whole negotiating position and the people in europe don't know if she's going to be there at the end of the position of 2019 when the talks are due to finish. that is difficult for any prime minister, let alone a prime minister trying to negotiate something is hugely important as brexit. she went out of her way to say five years, didn't she? she absolutely did. itjust doesn't seem to me to be tenable at all but a prime minister could go into these incredibly complex and tens high—pressure negotiations with the eu. propped up by the dup. any false
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movement from either wing of her party and she could find herself floundering. i do think as well but may be another election is on the cards, but i think it's likely that we will start to see in polling over the next few weeks that labour are gaining on the conservatives. then why would she call an election? she's in a very, very difficult position. a quick thought on a second election, and what is the appetite for that likely to be? the prime minister called the selection on the back of a 22 point poll lead. that is unlikely to be repeated. how likely is it that they will want to trigger a snap election of any kind? the government will be forced into a second election, rather than have any choice over it. good to talk to you, both. and thank you for battling with the voice in the background! time for the weather. good evening. we start with a look out into the atlantic because that
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is where the weather is coming from. you can see this huge curl of cloud, an area of low pressure which is bringing rain with it. we have seen cloud early on but that is melting away and it will be a lovely end to the day for many. we look west for the day for many. we look west for the rain to move in and the winds to freshen. it will turn into a wet night in northern ireland. bobby rainey northern ireland and the south—west of england and western scotland. —— there will be rain. for most scotland. —— there will be rain. for m ost pla ces scotland. —— there will be rain. for most places it is a fairly mild night. into the morning, a little bit of rain for the south—west. more into the south—west of wales. further east where into something much drier, brighter and quite one, two. in one start to what will be a warm day in that corner. further north, quite a wet day. the main body begins to clear away from northern ireland as it pushes its way up into central parts of scotland. so a wet start to the day here. that rain will continue to
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move away from northern ireland and it will be bright and breezy. the rangers push to northern scotland. it will be pretty wet and quite breezy here. funny and really quite warm elsewhere, but around 20 celsius for glasgow and belfast is pretty good going. a band of rain eventually starts to move its weight eastwards through the evening. the rain becomes light and patchy. here it is going to be a pretty warm night, around 15—16 celsius. quite mild at 13—14 with further showers into scotland and northern ireland. i think on sunday the big picture of these low pressure in charge. lots of white lines, the isobars indicate it will be windy, particularly in the north and west. it is in the north and west that we will see most of the showers on sunday. a fair bit of the showers on sunday. a fair bit of cloud at times with rangers drifting eastwards, but that shouldn't amount to too much at all.
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22 degrees in the south—east corner. o nto 22 degrees in the south—east corner. onto the early part of next week, a weather front brushing its way towards the north—west of the uk which will be the focal point for whatever rain we do see. for most of us, and the high—pressure, that will settle things down. quite a lot of dry weather into the early part of next week. if you need more details, there was always plenty more for you on the bbc weather website. theresa may's election gamble backfires. we have a hung parliament, as the conservatives fail to keep enough seats to form a majority. mrs may is forced to form a government with the help of northern ireland's dup but insists she'll stay on as pm. i have just been to see the her majesty the queen and i will now form a government, a government that can provide certainty, and lead britain forward at this critical time
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for our country. mrs may apologised to those tory candidates who lost their seats and said she wanted to reflect on how to take the party forward. labour celebrate dramatic gains. still fewer seats than the tories butjeremy corbyn says his party exceeded all expectations. incredible result for the labour party,
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