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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 10, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 5pm: the prime minister's top aides, nick timothy and fiona hill, have resigned after the conservatives failed to win an overall majority in the general election. they went following what the bbc understands were demands from some senior tories that mrs may would face a leadership challenge if the two had remained by her side. the prime minister is preparing for talks with the democratic unionist party to shore up her government. the chief whip is in belfast for talks. the other headlines: police reveal the london bridge terror attackers a seven—and—a—half—tonne lorry but their credit cards were declined. petrol bombs and blow torches were found in the van they did use, police say they had pink ceramic knives tied to their wrists. a mid—atlantic yacht rescue
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involving the queen mary 2 2 cruiseliner after a once—in—a—lifetime summer storm. theresa may's top two downing street aides have resigned in the wake of thursday's conservative election failure to get a working majority in the house of commons. their departure comes after the bbc understands that conservative mps delivered an ultimatum to the prime minister to sack them by the end of the weekend or face a leadership challenge on monday. they were almost like alex ferguson to manchester united. they were that important to the success of the project. obviously, not quite as many victories as alex ferguson achieved
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with manchester united. i don't see how theresa may can function properly without them. they were almost her right and left arm, and she has made a huge sacrifice to try and continue as prime minister by allowing them orforcing them to resign, we're not really sure which. fight is it about timing some of this, she had to try to keep going before the brexit cox? the speculation was that key cabinet ministers insisted that these tee advisers went. they were the sources of key briefings against members of the cabinet and they were not prepared to continue with them at her right hand. i think that they had to go, but ultimately to reason may well have to go as well, i think that you are right, there is a
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continuity of her needing to stay to handle the brexit was haitian ‘s which are onlyjust about to begin, but talking to tory mps and sources, the mood has shifted —— brexit negotiations. it is now turning into angen negotiations. it is now turning into anger, really deep anger, and they do not see how the pragmatist survives. she is held very personally responsible for a campaign that we should not forget, she plutonium over all of the election literature and the campaign, it was very much theresa may's campaign and ultimately it failed. nick timothy and fiona hill quit, after theresa may failed to win an overall majority in parliament. after theresa may failed to win there were plenty of voices in the conservative party that reminded her that you cannot run the government like you run the home office. the government like you run the london bridge killers who used
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a van in their terror attack, had wanted a seven tonne lorry instead. and scotland are playing england in their world cup qualifier at hampden park. england in their world cup good afternoon. theresa may's two closest advisers, nick timothy and fiona hill, have resigned, following the conservative party's failure to win a majority in parliament, in the general election. a majority in parliament, the bbc understands the prime minister had been warned she faced a leadership challenge, if she didn't sack them. the government's chief whip gavin williamson is now in belfast, to hold talks with northern ireland's largest party, the dup, to secure support for mrs may's minority government. here's our political correspondent alex forsyth. they
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correspondent alex forsyth. were at the heart of p prime they were at the heart of power, the prime minister's closest advisers for years. nick timothy and fiona hill were accused of having too much control over policy and tactics, costing theresa may the majority and costing theresa may the majority and costing them theirjobs. they are brilliant street fighters and terrible political leaders because you need in government grey—haired people who will say don't do that, you will make mistakes. mistakes acknowledged by nick timothy today who said britain was divided and the prime minister was the one leader who understands division. but he said... today, as the consequences of the campaign sunk in, reflection and recrimination. some tory mps saying theresa may had to heed calls to change. there were plenty of voices in the party that reminded
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how you cannot run the government liking on the home office and there have been calls to make sure the circle around her was wider, more inclusive, to prevent anyone believing the two principal advisers had undue influence. the prime minister is under pressure from all sides with no majority and her plans for things like grammar schools and social care will be hard to get through parliament and the queen's speech, the programme for government, isjust a speech, the programme for government, is just a week away. speech, the programme for government, is just a week awaylj cannot see how a queen's speech can be laden with interesting legislation because many of them will be items that will cause dispute within the conservative party and between the conservative party and between the conservative party and between the conservative party and dup. theresa may is seeking support from democratic unionist party to govern here. for more talks are under way today. in order to lead a minority government she will have to balance competing demands on every front, considering
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not just the demands on every front, considering notjust the position of demands on every front, considering not just the position of the demands on every front, considering notjust the position of the dup on some issues, but that of her own mps. in scotland there are now 13 of them and they are essential to the prime minister. the party leader here suggesting a revised approach to brexit. what is clear is the conservative party having failed to wina conservative party having failed to win a majority needs to work with others, which means we can look again at what we hope to achieve as we leave the eu and i want to be involved. the prime minister may be backin involved. the prime minister may be back in number10, involved. the prime minister may be back in number 10, but in a position farfrom back in number 10, but in a position far from what she hoped. back in number 10, but in a position farfrom what she hoped. she has lost her trusted advisers, she has lost her trusted advisers, she has lost her trusted advisers, she has lost her majority in the commons, and thejob lost her majority in the commons, and the job of leading lost her majority in the commons, and thejob of leading has become that much harder. flesh out where you think the two departures of the advisers leave theresa may. theresa may operated on the basis of a small inner circle of trust and nick
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timothy and fiona hill were at the centre of that. their departure will leave her feel at isolated. centre of that. their departure will leave herfeel at isolated. —— feeling isolated. it shows the level of influence tory mps will now influence over the prime minister. there were suggestions if they did not depart she might face a leadership contest and with their departure she has bought some time on that front. there is no immediate clamourfor her to on that front. there is no immediate clamour for her to go. on that front. there is no immediate clamourfor her to go. after so much instability, the country needs stability, say the tory mps but there are now questions about how effective she can be in government because we know the conservative party is divided on issues, notjust domestic policy, but brexit, where there are differing opinions about there are differing opinions about the direction the government should take. theresa may is on the verge of starting those negotiations and this election, the fact she lost the majority and now she has lost these advisers, has undoubtedly left theresa may weakened.
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as we've heard, theresa may weakened. mrs may needs the support of northern ireland's democratic unionist party to give her a working majority in parliament, and the government's chief whip is now in belfast for talks. and the government's chief whip but what will the dup demand in return for their loyalty, and how could any deal affect the politics of northern ireland? here's john campbell. the politics of northern ireland? political the politics of northern ireland? views here are fii’i and political views here are firmly held and slow to change. saturday morning ‘s for the last five years, unionist protesters have gathered at belfast city hall, opposing a council policy to reduce the numbers of days on which it flies the union flag, a decision may feel undermines their british identity. they welcomed the dup's new influence. i think northern ireland is in the best position, we could not have wished for anything better than a hung parliament. they should be asking to
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stop the witchhunt against people in the british army. what do people think dup should prioritise. the national health, the hospital is one of the most important. schools and welfare. i of the most important. schools and welfare. lam pleased of the most important. schools and welfare. i am pleased they are going into government with them. an executive for government in northern ireland. money is great but it does not answer all the questions. the dup isa not answer all the questions. the dup is a party with religious roots and that continues to influence its social policy. it opposes extending 93v social policy. it opposes extending gay marriage and abortion rights to northern ireland, but issues like these are unlikely to feature in talks with the conservatives. these are unlikely to feature in talks with the conservativeslj think talks with the conservatives.” think the dup's demands will be financial, they have a road map they set out in 2015 when they thought they would be in this position and there is little in that about social policy. soon i -- financial demands
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are likely to include infrastructure investment. on brexit, the dup does not appear to share theresa may's view that walking away with no deal isa view that walking away with no deal is a viable option. the conservative chief whip is here tonight beginning talks with the dup. there is a suggestion a formal coalition could be on offer rather than a vote by vote arrangement but the dup might be wary given the lib dems' bad experience as a junior partner. and there is the wider question, how can a conservative secretary of state be an honest broker among northern ireland parties if they are in government with the dup? it's been revealed the ringleader of the london terror attack had tried to hire a seven tonne lorry, instead of a van, to run down members of the public. instead of a van, to run down police say the number of injured would have been much higher. eight people died in the knife and van attack a week ago. here's our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford.
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on the edges of borough market, they were repairing the damage today, replacing the doors that had been shot off by armed police in the desperate hunt to find the killers. the police are gone but the market where five victims were stabbed to death remains sealed off. where five victims were stabbed a scene of horror and heroism. where five victims were stabbed we have stories of people who came out armed with chairs, other items, were throwing bottles and anything they could get their hands on with a view to try to prevent the attackers coming into pubs and bars but more importantly to scare them off to stop other people being attacked. to scare them off to stop other the weapons the attackers used were 12—inch pink ceramic knives of the ernesto brand, possibly bought at lidl. they were found tied onto the men's hands with leather straps after they'd been shot by police. hands with leather straps minutes earlier, they had killed three other people on london bridge before crashing their b&q van. three other people on london bridge in the van police found 13 petrol
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bombs made with lighter fluid and cloth cut from tracksuit bottoms and two blowtorches. detectives believe behind this door in east ham was the men's safe house. this door in east ham in a top floor bedsit rented this door in east ham by rachid redouane two months ago, detectives discovered items that had been used to make their petrol bombs and fake suicide vests. and an english—language copy of the koran left open at a page referencing martyrdom. of the koran left open at a page the ringleader of the gang, khuram butt, had tried to hire a 7.5 tonne truck that morning which would have made the attack worse, but fortunately his payment did not go through. he was also being investigated by counterterrorism detectives for fraud and was still on police bail, although the case was about to be dropped. bail, although the case at the present time i do not regard what i have seen as an intelligence failure. regard what i have seen but everybody would expect us to look at what has happened and to ensure we learn whatever
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we can from what has happened and secondly we continue to improve and improve and that is what we have always done in this country in the face of a changing terrorist threat. country in the face the men killed three of their victims as they drove across london bridge of their victims as they drove and stabbed five more to death in borough market. it was the third attack on britain in ten and a half weeks. people are being urged to visit london's bars and restaurants in a show of "unity and resilience" a week after the attacks. our correspondent sarah campbell is in southwark, near london bridge. campbell is in southwark, this campbell is in southwark, is the anchor part and it packed. this is the anchor part and it is packed. you might be able to make out london bridge. borough market is a few minutes walk away, where this afternoon residents who had to leave afternoon residents who had to leave
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after the investigation were allowed back in. it is close to the events of last week but people i have spoken to say although it is on their minds, it will not stop them coming back to the capital, which is the centre that promoted this evening. donations are set to pour into the uk solidarity fund set up by the british red cross in the wake of the manchester and westminster attacks and so pubs like this, people will be asked to donate the price of a drink and restaurants the cost of the meal. uber will donate £1 perfare. all cost of the meal. uber will donate £1 per fare. all the cost of the meal. uber will donate £1 perfare. all the money will go to the victims and families of victims caught up in the attacks and the centre but from here is what ever happened last saturday will not stop people enjoying themselves. thank you. sarah campbell. a rescue operation has taken place in the mid—atlantic after a fleet of yachts that set out from the uk was hit by a "once in a lifetime" storm. from the uk was hit by a "once the sailors — who are competing
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in a transatlantic race — encountered fifteen—metre waves and 60—knot winds. the liner the queen mary 2 rescued one yachtsman, one race yacht sank, and another lost its mast. prince philip has been and another lost its mast. celebrating his 96th birthday. and another lost its mast. the king's troop royal horse and another lost its mast. artillery staged a 410gun royal salute in his honour. the duke, who is stepping down from public duties in the autumn, is understood to be spending the day privately at windsor castle. scotla nd privately at windsor castle. are taking on england football scotland are taking on england in a football world cup qualifying match. our correspondent is that hampden park. what is the latest? about a quarter of an hour in, 0—0 and scotla nd quarter of an hour in, 0—0 and scotland made an encouraging start backed by supporters who arrived en masse and in such high spirits, the
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atmosphere has been terrific all afternoon. there was increased security searches but everything seems to have passed off ok. there was an impeccably observed minute silence to remember those affected by recent terror attacks before kick—off and then play got under way. scotland need to win this match. their bid to qualify for russia next summer is looking in doubt. england top the group on 13 points. six points clear of scotland, who are fourth. england do not have the same pressure. this is the oldest football rivalry in the international game, dating back to 1872, and we should have a classic game. thank you. the british and irish lions have won their latest match in new zealand. have won their latest they recovered from a midweek loss, to beat the crusaders in christchurch by 12—3. to beat the crusaders owen farrell, making his first start on tour, scored
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all of the lions‘ points, kicking four penalties. and in paris, there's been a shock in the women's singles at the french open. in the women's singles the unseeded 20—year—old jelena ostapenko has won fought back from one set down to beat romania's number three seed simona halep. from one set down to beat romania's it's her first tour title. from one set down to beat romania's that's it. from one set down to beat romania's there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel, and i'll be back with the late news at ten. now on bbc one, its time for the news where you are. hello. this is bbc news. with some conservative mps losing their seats, there is widespread discontent with theresa may among the conservative party for calling the snap election. james cleverely was one of the conservative mps who was re—elected. speaking to my colleague jane hill, he gave his reaction to the resignations.
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obviously fiona and nick played their part and he came under some criticism. it is sad to lose collea g u es criticism. it is sad to lose colleagues like this, even when they have chosen to go. it was probably the right decision, a pragmatic choice, the right thing in the wake of the election results. do you think that your prime minister will still be the prime minister by the end of the year, lets say? absolutely. i think all the reasons that theresa may had such a comprehensive victory in the leadership election just under a year ago are still true. she is an incredibly experienced and well regarded politician. she never claimed to be a big razzmatazz television take prime minister. yes,
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but she called an election that she did not need to call. which resulted ina did not need to call. which resulted in a reduced majority. did not even get a full majority and now has two top two the dup. —— has two top two the dup. 13.5 million people voted conservative, that is a significant increase. of course we have fewer mps, which is a massive disappointment, but ultimately what theresa may also has is a mandate to deliver brexit, a manifesto commitment to deliver brexit which potatoes from any messing about which might happen in the house of lords, —— which protects us from any messing about. obviously losing
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collea g u es messing about. obviously losing colleagues is a disappointment, but this was an important election to hold and the result of the selection does mean that we can now get on with negotiating the terms of brexit. now that you have had 36 hours or so to reflect on it, why do you think that your party has fewer mps than it had before? well, as i discussed, we had a significant increase in both the number of people voting conservative and indeed our share of the vote. in any normal election that would not be well into landslide territory, but what we have seen is a big surge of support for the labour party. we need to look at why that happened, we need to look at our offer to younger voters. we need to look at how we communicate in the modern world of social media and digital media. so all of these things have got to be mulled over. i think it would be foolish for me to start
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speculating so soon after the election as to what we could and should do different, that will take time. there are many positives we can take from this election result, even though the most important metric, that is the number of mps, was a disappointment. i'm joined byjoeyjones, the head of public affairs at weber shandwick, who worked for theresa may briefly. what you make of these resignations, was this the right thing to have done? it had to happen. theresa may set expectations right up there, has fallen massively short of that, and the party is very angry. there is going to be top now about with nick and fiona gone, she can forge her way to a more collegiate, cabinet style of government. i do not buy that. what has happened here is the
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ritual humiliation, the humbling of her prime minister, by her own party, who is very angry about this fa ct party, who is very angry about this fact that she has been so u nsuccessful. fact that she has been so unsuccessful. the conservatives have told theresa may, the prime minister, who is boss. it seems to me that she is only prim minister in name, a very lonely situation which she found herself hostage to a party —— prime minister. the likelihood is that there will be a knock at that black door and she will be on her way. you make these two people out to be central to to reasoning's operations. he worked with them for a while, what was that like?” operations. he worked with them for a while, what was that like? i did not work with them in the same building, i know both of them, fiona in particular because i worked with her as a journalist at sky news, we did the overnight news for a long time and they have been close friends with her for a time and they have been close friends with herfor a long period.
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nick timothy i also came to know as a journalist, they are both very impressive individuals, very intelligent. they have given massive policy platforms at the home office. the modern slavery bill, for example, fiona was largely the architect of that. that is admired and emulated around the world. some of what they did, humbling the police federation, for example, in terms of stop and search, that is a big thing that nick timothy was driving. he changed perceptions of what was acceptable within those police procedures. so they did drive policy, it was notjust about keeping people from the door and exerting control, but as far as things have gone, obviously, within downing street, it does seem, and i have no direct experience of it, as though the dynamic that grew up was for other people outside of that, to even call it inner circle is wrong,
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ina even call it inner circle is wrong, in a triangle, was very ensure. we decide and you execute. for a pretty smart people, from cabinets at the dome, to be treated in that sort of a way, that is challenging. —— cabinets set it down. that was a lwa ys cabinets set it down. that was always going to come off the reel. it worked for a while. if they had w011 it worked for a while. if they had won the general election, maybe it's because of continued to again. but i think that it was a model that was intolera nt think that it was a model that was intolerant of mess, intolerant of the chaos and confusion of, shall we say, reality? brexit negotiation, things like that would have been very difficult to navigate without trying to bring more people into the ark, and that means allowing them to be invested in decision—making and not just the arms be invested in decision—making and notjust the arms and legs of the operation while fiona and the prime minister were the brain. so theresa
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may has sacrificed the two people who are most important to her political. where does that leave her name? it leaves her humiliated, in a situation where the party has exerted its pound of flesh. let's not kid ourselves, this is something that she would never have wanted to do. this is something that has been forced upon her, it leaves her grievously weakened and just waiting to see what either marching orders that the party are going to give her this week, because she is not really in control any more, she does not have the authority to have a proper reshuffle, she is not able to exert authority influence within the party, it is the party who are telling her what to do. for as long as they feel that it is better that they have her, almost as a cipher, it's me feel, at the top of the administration, it will go on. but i find it hard to believe that situation as unpalatable to most people at top of the conservative party ca n
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people at top of the conservative party can be allowed to last. they will be looking for something different, but there are not any great options out there. good to talk to you. thanks rematch. many thanks. it is a beautiful day, time for a look at the weather. this area of low pressure to the west of the uk and the weather front making slow process from west to east. the rain becomes lately patchy before fizzling out and then patchy rain drift that way towards the south—eastern corner. battered shares in scotland and northern ireland overnight. —— scattered showers. quite a bit of code for east anglia, the south—east. a little bit of light drizzle. fairly frequent showers in scotland and northern ireland. temperatures down on today's. monday looks like a
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breezy day for all part of the uk. some cloud and sunshine, scattered showers towards the north—west of the uk. 40 showers towards the north—west of the uk. a0 celsius in glasgow on monday afternoon, 20 in london. —— 14 monday afternoon, 20 in london. —— 1a celsius. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at 5.30pm. the prime minister's two chief advisers — nick timothy and fiona hill — have resigned. the bbc understands that theresa may had been warned that unless they went, she would face
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a leadership challenge. the leader of the scottish conservatives, has demanded assurances from the prime minister that the democratic unionist party's opposition to gay marriage won't be allowed to shape government policy. the government's chief whip is in belfast for talks with the dup. the metropolitan police has revealed the london bridge attackers tried to hire a seven and a half tonne lorry to carry out last last saturday's attack — but the payment was declined. and adam west, the american actor best known as the star of the hit 60s tv series, batman, has died aged 88, after a brief battle with leukaemia. richard richard hammond has escaped serious injury in a car crash. just before i hand over to spoke ——
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sport, there has been a tweet from jeremy clarkson saying it was the biggest crash i have ever seen at the most frightening. incredibly, richard seems to be ok. that is jeremy clarkson reacting to the news that richard hammond has been involved in a car crash. now it's time for the sport. thank you very much. good evening. we have a lot to get through. we'll get to the lions tour of new zealand and a brand new tennis grand slam champion in a moment, but let's start with a huge game between scotland and egnland as they attempt to qualify for the 2018 football world cup. england are top of their group and are unbbeaten so far. scotland are in fourth place and their captain scott brown picked up an early booking. celtic striker leigh griffiths had the first meaningful effort on goal — which was easy enough forjoe hart. england's skipper harry kane has had their best chance — but blazed over from eight yards out. commentary continues on 5 live
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and bbc sport website also in action today are northern ireland — they are in azerbaijan. that game kicked off half a hour ago. michael o'neill‘s side are second in group c, five points behind germany. it is still 0—0. the home side having the best chance of that game so having the best chance of that game so far. 15 minutes left in the first half to go. england's batsmen have recovered well in their run chase in their final champions trophy group match against australia. eoin morgan's men are already through to the semi finals but if australia lose they will be out of the tournament and bangadesh will go through. england restricted australia to 277 in their innings, thanks in part to this stunning piece of fielding from jason roy. if his foot touched the boundary while the ball was in his hand here it would've been a six, but he managed tojuggle it up in the air to take
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the wicket of glenn maxwell. roy was then part of a difficult start to england's innings, he was one of three early wickets to fall but that brought eoin morgan and ben stokes to the crease, they have scored very quickly and taken england to 205 for a, 73 runs from victory, although morgan has just been run out. england closing in on victory but there might be more rain delays on the way in birmingham this evening. there will have been a change in the mood of the british and irish lions team, after warren gatland's side won the most challenging match on their tour of new zealand so far. the lions beat the crusaders 12—3, in christchuch, and it was all about the boot of owen farrell. this is the time for the british and irish lions to call in the cavalry in canterbury. regarded as the best club team in world rugby, the crusaders, and the tourists would play like they were on home turf stopping a side with eight all blacks in it from the start. always influential, owen farrell put them 6—0 up and despite the odd bump in the road, as well as a solitary
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penalty, it was his first start on tour and it was going rather well. while it wasn't free—flowing, riveting rugby it was solid. the lions sniffed out danger. the pressure was telling here and a penalty awarded. it was a fourth and final owen farrell success. make no mistake, this was effectively a test match. the first defeat this season for the crusaders and a cavalry charge for the english and irish lions. a tough week. it has been really tough. a lot of criticism. people have written the tour off already after two games and it has been challenging for all of us and we have had to stay strong within the group and to keep the faith and the goal as a test matches to keep
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improving from there. so i hope we didn't disappoint too many people tonight. gregor townsend has opened his tenure as scotland coach with a comfortable 3a—13 win over italy. playing in singapore, they ran in four tries in 11 minutes — two either side of half time. tim visser finished off finn russell's clever kick. ross ford, who had scored just one try in 107 previous internationals, then added two tries in quick succession. damien hoyland completed the scoring. scotland will play australia next saturday. it's a busy day of rugby union internationals. england are in sanjuan to face argentina in their first test, that match kicks off at quarter past eight. and ireland are in newjersey to take on the united states later. that match begins at ten tonight. an unseeded 20—year—old, jelena ostapenko, has won the french open. it's her first grand slam title and she had to fight back from a set down against the third seed, simona halep, to lift the trophy
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and become the first unseeded champion in paris since 1933. in paris, this would always be a day of firsts. this player had never played before and neither had ever won a played before and neither had ever wona grand played before and neither had ever won a grand slam. one of them had never won any title before. unseeded, but also unfazed. a style of tennis that is all or nothing. astonishing power, but for every magnificent, unplayable winner, there was an error as well and it was those that help this player to the first set. how would the young latvian cover? well, down in the second set, it did not look good. questions over her temperament were a nswered questions over her temperament were answered in the most thrilling way. winner after winner roaring back to ta ke winner after winner roaring back to take the match to a deciding third set. the french crowd now with a new—found favourite, this was her moment. fittingly, it was another brilliant winner that won it. and on
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a day of firsts in paris, there is a feeling this may just a day of firsts in paris, there is a feeling this mayjust be the first of many. britain's alfie hewett has beaten the defending champion gustavo fernandez in the wheelchair final to win his first grand slam title. the 19—year—old from norwich lost the first eight games and saved two match points in the second—set tie—break before going on to win in three sets. hewett then went on to compete in the doubles alongside gordon reid but they lost to the top doubles side in the world, houdet and peifer of france in straight sets 6—a 6—3. sebastian vettel will be hopeful of claiming pole position for the canadian grand prix after topping the time sheets in final practice. the championship leader was almost three tenths of a second quicker than his ferrari team mate kimi raikkonen. britain's lewis hamilton was next, but more than a third of a second off the pace. qualifying in montreal gets underway in half an hour and you can follow the action on the bbc sport website.
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british rider cal crutchlow crashed in qualifying for the catalan motogp, damaging his hopes of a first championship win of the season. this is his on—board camera footage. his bike gave way underneath him during one of his fastest laps. he emerged unscathed from the incident and will be 17th on the grid for tomorrow's race. dani pedrosa will start on pole in what his his home race. the spaniard already has one win this season, but has never won a world championship. chris froome has an awful lot to do if he's to win a third straight criterium du dauphine after australia's richie porte increased his overall lead with just one stage to go. bmc rider porte attacked near the end to gain 2a seconds on team sky's froome who now trails the australian by one minute and two seconds. the stage was won by froome's teammate peter kennaugh with another briain ben swift in second.
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tomorrow's final stage is another testing mountain ride before a final climb to the finish line high in the alps. the top three women's hockey teams in the world are taking part in a tournament in london this weekend. england, argentina and the netherlands are all going head to head, but it's got off to a rather rocky start for the hosts. england were beaten 5—1 at the olympic park by argentina, as james burford reports. it clash between the northern and southern hemispheres. in a sport we re southern hemispheres. in a sport were close control and quick thinking rule, argentina set the pace. this deft flick forcing the short corner. the first golden chance of the match producing the first goal, perhaps then a barometer of the storm that was to come. but not to be deterred and through a short corner of their own, england's
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response was almost immediate. albeit a touch chaotic. argentina's play soon reached gale force, goals coming thick and fast. a combination of power, composer and skill putting england under pressure. and with literally a handful of seconds remaining, a final surge. literally a handful of seconds remaining, a finalsurge. england hammered at home, but a chance to make amends tomorrow against the netherlands. the multiple olympic and world champion usain bolt runs his final race on home soil today injamaica at the racers grand prix. bolt will retire after the world championships in london but as you can imagine he will be given quite the send off in kingston. just a warning there's some flash photography coming up in ade adedoyin's report from jamaica. 15 years ago, 15—year—old hussein bolt made history here at the national stadium in kingston when he became the youngest athlete to win a world title. he would go on to be an icon of the sport had a face of the sport. —— usain bolt. winning
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records and olympic titles. he has a lwa ys records and olympic titles. he has always maintained that winning goal back you as a junior is still one of the highlights of his career because of the pressure of competing in front of a home crowd, so it is perhaps fitting that the final race on jamaican soil should be perhaps fitting that the final race onjamaican soil should be here on the track where he shot to prominence. one thing i know is it is going to be a great reception. i am home and the amount of people that have called me to get tickets. i know the stadium is going to be full. i know there is going to be energy and it will be one big party and a bit emotional but i am definitely looking forward to it. usain bolt has also spoken about the warm body shares with his coach, glen mills, the man who guided his career. mills tends to stay out of the limelight and really does interviews, but i managed to catch up interviews, but i managed to catch up with him and he said that he believes usain bolt could have a view more years but he respects is desire to retire. physically, yes. he is not that old, only 30. for 12
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he has achieved at the highest level. it takes a lot out of you and a lot of stress and if mentally he feels it is time for him to retire, i support that wholeheartedly. i mean, if that is what he wants to do. there will also be a number of olympic gold medallists in action. the likes of more thorough. and on a night where the country celebrated career and achievements of usain bolt. that's all sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. the qualifying game for the 2018 world cup is on and is still 0—0 as they approach half—time at the moment. we will be back with more around 6:30 p.m.. just before we head back to
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westminster, just used to bring you about the crash that the former top gear presenter richard hammond had switzerland. we hear from gear presenter richard hammond had switzerland. we hearfrom his spokesman that richard hammond was involved in a serious crash after completing a climb in switzerland in an electric supercar and you can see they're what happened. clearly, the car overturned and there was a very serious crash that involved a vehicle bursting into flames. the statement goes on much richard hammond was conscious and talking and he actually climbed out of the car himself. he has been taken to hospital by air ambulance and is a p pa re ntly hospital by air ambulance and is apparently dealing with a fracture to his knee, so a very nasty incident. richard hammond, the former top gear presenter is unharmed, relatively, and is now in hospital recovering. back to the
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election now. my colleague is at westminster with all of the latest reaction. thank you very much. it has been a very busy day here. the news that came through after lunch today. theresa may's top two downing street aides have resigned in the wake of thursday's conservative election failure to get a working majority in the house of commons. their departure comes after the bbc understands that conservative mps delivered an ultimatum to the prime minister to sack them by the end of the weekend or face a leadership challenge on monday. we know that reza has to have talks with the dup in northern ireland. so there has been concerns expressed about that from within her own party as well as elsewhere. i have been talking about those negotiations that are to come. professorjon tonge from the university of liverpool gave me an insight of what the dup might want from a deal. it isa it is a case of needs must for theresa may. there are no other
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allies for the conservative party, so if she does not get the support of the ten mps from the dup here at westminster, then she won't get the queen's speech through to parliament and we will be looking at the nightmare of another election within a few months, so there has to be some sort of confidence and supply arrangement at least with the dup, but the fact that the dup is the monopoly supplier of support for the conservatives mean that the price tag is that much higher. that is so interesting. how high will it be? it will be a huge financial price tag. what the dup will want is for their own community and northern ireland more generally a lot of infrastructure projects. that is relatively easy to do. it is easy for the government to give more money to northern ireland. beyond that, we get to the more controversial areas because the dup will want their continuing veto to carry on in terms of same—sex marriage, with the dup has blocked five times so given that the
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assembly is semi—suspended or whether we have a return to devolution, the dup will want still to have that. they will want to block any liberalisation of abortion in ireland. there is also the issue of continuing prosecutions on the actions of british soldiers in the troubles in northern ireland. the dup are very unhappy about those continuing investigations and will ask for amnesty for british soldiers, so that is some very controversial areas that they will wa nt controversial areas that they will want a say on. there is also the issue of going into the marching season and they do not like the parades commission. so if they really wa nt parades commission. so if they really want to push it, they may have something to say on that. so there are a whole welter of controversies associated with the dup. that is a pretty substantial list. what about this idea that the government should remain neutral in matters around northern ireland? because nothing has been happening
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at storm at four months. doesn't any government of the day, given that thatis government of the day, given that that is the situation, are they not meant to be an honest broker and step back and negotiate in an egalitarian fashion, if that is ever going to get back on its feet?” think the old days of being an honest broker of the good friday agreement have long since gone and it is worth remembering that the dup opposed the good friday agreement and the majority of members still say they would foot against it if a referendum was held tomorrow, so the government has moved against it —— has moved away from that and will side with them because they have no choice. it is the question of needs must. the question it begs is how far would arlene foster as leader of the dup really push the government. i think she is sensible enough as dup leader not to offer a huge public shopping list which would alienate many on the conservative side. she is not interested in changing legislation for the rest of the uk. she is only interested in protecting the interests of northern ireland. ruth davidson has appeared
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on social media being worried about the infringement of gay rights in scotland. that simply won't happen. well, much has been made of the difference made in this election by the increased turnout of young voters. here's what joe twyman of yougov had to say to me about it earlier. it looks like the degree to which young people turned out was crucial in determining notjust the size of theresa may's majority, but the fact that she did not get one at all. and so we knew this would be a key issue and that was one of the reasons that the pollsters at the polling organisations had such wide—ranging estimates of results. some said it would be a majority of 100 for the conservatives. others like i said it would be a hung parliament. and that was all to do with the way that we all anticipated and models for turnout and it is true that is doggedly speaking young people particularly eating 2a—year—old are
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far less likely to vote. this time round, they were far more likely to vote labour. more so than in previous elections where the liberal democrats have been able to get in on the game and this time that was not the case. overwhelmingly, they we re not the case. overwhelmingly, they were going for labour and the turnout was increased. there is still not be highest group. that is doubly over 65 ‘s, but that is still significant and has helped to get us to the situation are in now. talking about the role of younger voters in all of this. mike williams is nme‘s editor—in—chief — his magazine did weekly polls on the voting intentions of people aged between 18 and 3a. so we have a sample group that we speak to be time about anything that is going on in the world, whether it is going on in the world, whether it is things that we are interested in or they are but as soon as the election was called we decided we would focus all of our talk to them
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around what they were thinking and feeling. that sample is 18—3a, but we can cut that to 18—2a. feeling. that sample is 18—3a, but we can cut that to 18-24. so you can look at both sections. yes. we saw that they were very engaged in the election, which was something that whether it was true or not, certainly an accusation within the media and an assumption within the general public that people were not engaged in what we saw right from the off was that that was not true but we also saw that the rout as they got more and more engaged, they focused a lot more on the kind of things they believed in and we saw a huge shift while people focused in on support for labour and leaving behind the conservatives. and where are you able to gauge why, what sort of issues were engaging them, how much of it was about tuition fees, which is often cited as an example as to why there has been this level of engagement. what sense did you have of the issues? tuition fees was
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a big thing and i think that was a big story because it has been such a huge natural burden for young people. it is something that scares people. it is something that scares people going into university and something that hangs heavily on them as they leave. but really it was the bigger things, the nhs. something that i don't think of as a young person issue at all. but the nhs was huge. zero—hours contracts. an inability to break into the closed housing market. all of these things that are real—life problems for everybody. they are the same problems for young people and they are problems for young people and they a re really problems for young people and they are really fixated on the nhs as one of the key issues. that is really interesting. and you had jeremy corbyn on your front. yes. a decision taken because...? because he and his party and his manifesto actually put young people at the centre of what they were talking about. i think that you can see from the way the other parties campaigned that they did not only not speak to
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young people, they actively kept them out of the conversation. was that you saying this is the person you really think you should vote for or was it because people were contacting you and you thought this quy contacting you and you thought this guy is clearly engaging people. that was a very proactive decision on our par to put was a very proactive decision on our parto put him was a very proactive decision on our par to put him on the cover. it wasn't i was responding to a press pitch. it was as saying that this quy pitch. it was as saying that this guy has captured the imaginations of young people in the uk and we think that they trust what he has to say a lot more than they seem to trust what other leaders have to say. he is, was, will continue to make a difference to them and the fact that he is focusing on what they think and also ultimately that if the conservatives think that they have got problems right now, they have got problems right now, they have got much bigger ones on the horizon given that only 20% of that demographic actually voted for them and 60% have voted for the labour party and if they do not begin to engage with young people going forwards and actually realise that they are the voters of the future, then the problems will get bigger.
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michael williams, the editor in chief of the nme, could talking to me earlier. we will have much more from westminster at 6pm on another extraordinary day. plenty to discuss and analyse as a result of the election fallout and the fact that we are now facing a hung parliament and have a hung parliament in this country. the prime minister's two chief advisers — nick timothy and fiona hill — have resigned. the bbc understands that theresa may had been warned that unless they went, she would face a leadership challenge. we will have more analysis and talk more about the negotiations going on with the dup as well. that is all coming up but we will pause and
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catch up with the weather. it has been really lovely here in london today. we have been very lucky indeed. let's find out how it is wherever you are in the uk today. hello. the latest satellite sequence shows a swirl of cloud which shows an area of low pressure which has been drifting across the uk, bringing some rain with it but it has not got to the south—east corner. it has been a lovely afternoon here with some sunshine and warmth as confirmed by one of our weather watchers in east sussex. here is the picture from wales, which was brain on the windows. there has been some rain through northern england and also the south—west. northern england will dry up and that will drift through the midlands. very light and patchy by this stage. dry spells behind it but showers to be had in scotland and ireland. 1a celsius for glasgow and ireland. 1a celsius for glasgow and belfast. some parts of the south—east, no lower than 17 celsius. mighty close night here.
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scattered showers across scotland and northern ireland in the morning. if dean celsius in the east of scotla nd if dean celsius in the east of scotland weather should be some dry intervals. a dry picture across england and wales. low cloud and a bit of sunshine. maybe a shower or two. most places will be dry. a fair bit of cloud for the east midlands and the south—east. perhaps a light rain and drizzle. eating celsius at nine a.m.. pretty cloudy. light rain and drizzle on and off. some spells of sunshine. the showers across scotla nd of sunshine. the showers across scotland and northern ireland will be quite frequent. not quite as warm as it was today. 16—17dc. on into monday and we have got a fair number of isobars, so still quite breezy. pressure is building all the while. this might be a focal point for some wet weather. some showers elsewhere but a lot of dry weather and the
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wind slowly easing. some spells of sunshine to be had on monday and we will see temperatures getting up to the low 20s in the south—eastern corner. middle teens for many places. tuesday, high pressure continues to build across the uk. we still have these weather fronts. just a glancing blow towards the north—west of the uk, so the closer you are to be northwest, you are more likely to see cloud and outbreaks of rain. for most of england and wales, it is to be fine and dry. this is bbc news. the headlines at 6pm: i'm jane hill at westminster, where the prime minister's top advisers, nick timothy and fiona hill, have resigned. nick timothy said he regretted not pledging to cap total social care costs, and that the party hadn't talked to the people who decided to vote labour. they went following what the bbc
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understands were demands from some senior tories that mrs may would face a leadership challenge if the two had remained by her side. ido i do not see how theresa may can really function properly without them, there were almost right and left arm. she has made a huge sacrifice by allowing them to resign orforcing them to resign.
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