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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 18, 2017 7:00am-8:00am BST

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you can also find this on twitter and facebook. thank you for watching. hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. church services will take place today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. police say at least 58 people are believed to have died. residents and volunteers expressed their anger at a meeting with theresa may in downing street. it was a robust discussion, there was forceful emotion in the room and people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to and listened to carefully. good morning, it's
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sunday the 18th of june. also ahead: claims of growing inequality across britain. a new report says the gap between rich and poor is getting wider. next year's queen's speech is cancelled to give mps the maximum time to debate plans for brexit. a forest fire in portugal claims the lives of more than 20 people, including motorists trying to escape the blaze. in sport, england's tommy fleetwood remains firmly in contention at golf‘s us open in wisconsin. he's just one shot off the leader brian harman heading into today's final round. and helen has the weather. more sunshine on the way? good morning. another hot day for the vast majority, the sunshine as strong as it gets and it's likely to last for another few days yet
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for most of us. i'll have the details for you in a round about 15 minutes. thanks, helen. good morning. first, our main story. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire in west london. police have revealed that 58 people are missing and are believed to have yesterday, theresa may met with volunteers and those left homeless. government staff have been drafted in to improve the response to the disaster, as nick quraishi reports. the devastation caused by the inferno stops people in their tracks. the dark reality abundantly clear in broad daylight. for days on, the community is still angry about a lack of communication, communication and accountability. it's always the public that runs to the rescue. where's the authorities? where are they? residents, community leaders and volunteers took their frustrations to downing street, spending two hours with the prime minister.
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it was a robust discussion, there was forceful emotion in the room, people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to and listened to carefully. theresa may, who is coming for widespread personal criticism over her handling of the crisis, said she'd heard the concerns. the prime minister admitted: whitehall officials have been drafted in to help kensington and chelsea council cope with the response and the red cross will provide psychological support. as people wait and pray for the missing, church services today will remember those who didn't make it out of grenfell tower. a reminder of the complex and lengthy process of recovering bodies from this charred shell. nick quraishi, bbc news. we can speak now to our correspondent, simonjones,
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good morning, simon. the outside of this church has become a sea of flowers. many wanting to remember those who are lost and the posters around . those missing sadly around of those missing sadly presumed dead. many churches around here open their doors at 3am taking people in and offering shelter. in the days that followed they were the site for people to bring donations to help the community but a lot of people have been saying while it's great the church has been doing this and volunteers have been doing this, where is the government and the local council, people are asking, why haven't they organised this? stung by some of this criticism the
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government has announced a team from central government, central government, will come in at the council offices to give a more co—ordinated response. iwant council offices to give a more co—ordinated response. i want to give you a sense of where we are, the church, a focal point as it has been through much of the week, a police cordon here guarding the scene and then just behind me we've actually got the shell of the tower, still quite a sight all these days on. the focus in the church today will be a service at 11am and the idea is it will be a chance for people to contemplate what has happened over the past few days. there's a hope from church leaders that after the initial crisis management they can now offer support to people who have been so terribly affected by this because they know the scars of this for people who witnessed it and lost loved ones, those scars will not be quick to heal. simon, thank you very much. a report by the think tank the resolution foundation claims that britain's wealth
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inequality is growing. it suggests that a fall in the number of people who own their own home has resulted in a widening gap between the rich and poor. the government says income inequality is now at its lowest level since the mid—1980s. wealth is arguably the biggest determinant of living standards over people's lives but yet it barely features in today's living standards debates, and that's a big deal because our analysis shows wealth is far more unequally spread across scoiety than incomes are and because of declining property ownership, declining home ownership, for the least wealthy households that inequality has started to go up. the government says it intends to double the length of the new parliamentary session to two years to give mps the maximum possible time to scrutinise brexit legislation. the unusual move will mean next years queen's speech will be cancelled. our political correspondent is in our london newsroom. it is unusual, how significant a
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move would this be?|j it is unusual, how significant a move would this be? i think what it shows is the government's concern really about the opposition potentially to brexit legislation now it doesn't have that majority in government. this will give mps a longer period of time to scrutinise that but crucially what it would mean is you wouldn't have to have another queen's speech next year. the queen's speech this year has already been delayed waiting for the government to do a deal with the dup, or will have to rely on the dup to get their queen's speech through. by to get their queen's speech through. by having this two—year period it won't have to go through that next time round so the queen's speech next time they don't have to try to get support to get it through and avoid the risk of it being voted down. it is something that has been done before. if you remember 2010, so done before. if you remember 2010, so from 2012 to 2012 the coalition government had a two—year parliament
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to get through the coalition agreement so it's been done before but it is very unusual. a sign of how difficult the brexit legislation, getting it through parliament, could prove to be. picked up on a story that's in one of the newspapers this morning, on the front page of the sunday times, tories tell may you have ten days, suggesting this is coming from the grassroots to mps - saying grassroots to mps basically saying theresa may has to shake up in their words orface a theresa may has to shake up in their words or face a challenge for the tory leadership. can you tell us any more on that? we got that story and a couple of stories in the paper today suggesting she could be facing some kind of stalking horse challenge from backbenchers. this is something that has been spoken about since she didn't get the majority she wanted in the election last week, so her position is tenuous because there are those eurosceptics who are concerned because she didn't get the majority potentially the approach in terms of the brexit
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talks may be watered down. they want her to stick to the promise she made about leaving the single market, the customs union, not having the european court of justice customs union, not having the european court ofjustice in charge of any of our laws, and also sticking to that ending of the freedom of movement. if she moves away from that then certainly her position could be tenuous. her leadership has been brought into question again this week because of the dealings around the grenfell tower disaster. her leadership is in question, she has a lot of people on the backbenches worried about this, concerned about it, so we'll see what happens. certainly another leadership challenge potentially but we don't know for sure. thanks very much indeed. a forest fire in central portugal has killed at least 2a people. 16 of the victims died in their vehicles when they became trapped as they tried to escape the flames. nimesh thaker has more. 9. giggly ffiii fife strintg’fifisf- the flames, now threatening to engulf homes.
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burning uncontrollably, this fire is already one of the worst forest fires in portugal in decades. more than 20 people have died, most of them trapped in their cars. a number of people were reported to be missing. we've already identified 2a victims but this number could rise. all of those who died were on a road in the same fire at the same place. it started on saturday at 3pm local time in a mountainous area 200 kilometres north—east of lisbon. translation: i was there staring at my house, i don't know what will happen with it now! 0fficials describe the fire spreading violently, some properties have been destroyed. the local mayor said there wasn't enough firefighters to deal with the number of villages at risk.
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nimesh thaker, bbc news. seven sailersmissing aftehngs—l ship off the coast ofjapan have been found dead. their bodies were discovered by divers in flooded cabins. the ships commander and another sailor have been airlifted to hospital for treatment. french voters go to the polls today for the second round of the country's parliamentary elections. president macron‘s en marche! party, which was formed just over a year ago, is predicted to win up to 80% of the seats. it is currently ahead in 400 out of 577 constituencies. a traditional polynesian canoe has become the first vessel of its kind to co m plete a round—the—world voyage. the canoe returned to honolulu in hawaii after visiting 19 countries during three years at sea. the crew used the stars, wind and ocean swells to guide them. they wanted to use the same techniques as the first polynesian settlers to hawaii did
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hundreds of years ago. slightly incongruous side coming in against that modern skyline. beautiful, sydney. —— incongruous sight. time to look at the weather, any advice for people going out in the sun? i do have some advice, let's look at the blue skies outside our building in salford quays. the son is going to be strong, helen's advice will be the same as mine, put on plenty of sunscreen if you're out and about today. do you often follow your own advice? yesterday i did but somewhat belatedly. in a game of lads and dads football on a beach in south wales resulted in a burnt forehead. you have a problem when you get older as a chap because your airthins and yourskin
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you get older as a chap because your air thins and your skin is exposed. and it isn't skin that has been exposed for many decades. it is looking beautiful in salford quays this morning, record temperatures in the south yesterday, 30.2, 30.4? 30.2, and it could be 30.2 today. we couldn't resist getting our camera teams around the country to film some joyous teams around the country to film somejoyous moments in the teams around the country to film some joyous moments in the sunshine and we thought we would share them with you. glorious day. wonderful. glorious day. wonderfullj glorious day. wonderful. i think we may have another glorious day. poor old helen is having... the sun has made your graphics machine have a sunny turn, have you got it working? all my talk about my receding hairline gives you a chance to get the graphics working. are you was envious of you on the beach, on the beachit envious of you on the beach, on the beach it is much more refer to ring. —— i was. you don't get that he'd very often but i do miss the sea.
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beautiful sunny pictures coming in from all around at the moment. and i stay here as well and the sun strength increases as you go up the mountain.. lovely day in scotland for mountain climbing but strong uv levels, as strong as it gets and you do not see the levels very often that we are forecasting today. we have some cloudy zones. spare a thought for those in the north—west of scotla nd thought for those in the north—west of scotland because there will be cloud around here and it is low cloud, shrouding the hills with fog and drizzle. any shelterfrom cloud, shrouding the hills with fog and drizzle. any shelter from the south—westerly wind will bring you brightness and sons shall iron across the east and south of scotland. —— sunshine. temperatures in the 20s across eastern side of
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ireland. and it will still be quite bright at times. for us, we start the day in the high teens and the temperature will whip up rapidly. it will be another hot day. just the outside chance, i must mention but it isa outside chance, i must mention but it is a rare chance, the late afternoon thunderstorm in east anglia and the south—east. it is where we see the intense heat and, yes, we will probably see higher temperatures than yesterday by one 01’ temperatures than yesterday by one or two degrees. another bit of information here, showers for the final day of golf in wisconsin. the heat is likely to hang around and we will start tomorrow warm and another hot day on the cards. more for you later. with humble beginnings in a shropshire garden, it has bloomed into one of the bbc‘s most iconic programmes — with an audience of up to 2.5 million
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people a week. so, as gardeners' world turns 50, kay alexander has been digging through the decades to investigate how a show, rooted in plants and personalities, has experienced such enduring success. 50 such enduring success. years ago the advent of col television 50 years ago the advent of colour television enabled the bbc to make a new hoarder cockerel programme and gardeners' world was born. it was presented by the legendary percy from his garden near shrewsbury. september. the sun still shining. from his garden near shrewsbury. september. the sun still shiningm my family, everything stopped dead for gardeners' world. my mother was a keen gardener and so was this little girl. i am still a big fan of the programme. peter was one of the presenters in the 1970s and is still a big influence on gardening today. percy was god and everybody watched
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every friday without question. and if he showed a plant on his programme than by ten a.m. the next day they would be sold out across the country. the effect was remarkable. in 50 years there are a number of personalities who have made their name on gardeners' world, including geoff hamilton whose garden was one of the eight gardens used over the years. after he died in1996, alan used over the years. after he died in 1996, alan titchmarsh became the next main presenter. if this does not make you drawl, nothing will. i think i am proud of having had a hand in gardeners' world and having been a part of its history. my mission in life is to impress upon people the pleasure to be gained from growing things and the importance of keeping our planet green. it is the sharp end of looking after the planet, gardening. since the programme debuted in 1967 it has gone through all sorts of
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fashions and trends and styles. is there a magic ingredient that keeps it fresh and exciting? what are the magical things about gardeners' world is the fact you can join the head gardener in their garden every friday. it is a value of looking over the garden gate to see what they are doing but at the same time it is about plans, passionate plants people in the those plants grow. lumbering outside broadcast vehicles of the past have been replaced by the latest technology. but what about the future of the programme? every gardener knows that every season every gardener knows that every seasonis every gardener knows that every season is different and new and exciting and if you can just capture the excitement, you will not have to worry about the future. just go with it. no problem there. so happy golden birthday, gardeners' world. and here is to the next 50 years! hgppy and here is to the next 50 years! happy birthday! that is a who's who of presenters. have you got some prize—winning peas
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or a spectacular display of summer blooms? we'd love to see photos of what you've been growing in your garden. get in touch in all the usual ways, details are on the screen. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the poet ian mcmillan is here to tell us what's caught his eye. thank you for coming in. good morning. trooping the colour in the times. i was thinking about... it is in all the papers. such a big story. i will hold up the express. here we go. i was thinking about the fact that there are certain photographs that are part of people ‘s lives. the photos were wedding, the photo when you graduate, and there is always a traditional trooping the colour balcony at buckingham palace shot.
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this year it is very interesting because we have prince george but rosella's hand is pointing off to the side and i think he's showing prince george went a gesture. you can see a bit of string attached from philip's hand to that of georges and he is showing him how to wave. you can't see the string, but would it not be great if you could? all of the generations are being photographed. and he's showing prince william the wrong way to do it. he does need to get it right. you have to get your wave right. the story from the mirror about passenger delays. i am always on the train and! passenger delays. i am always on the train and i am always late. the ra i lwa ys train and i am always late. the railways invented time as we know because before railways it was tend to fall in your village and 85 to
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fourin to fall in your village and 85 to four in bath and something else again in salford. the railways invented the idea of time happening at the same time all the time. what it says here is that we now have a 2996 it says here is that we now have a 29% rise in trains being cancelled or arriving late. it makes me think that maybe the railway companies are reinventing time again. so you turn up reinventing time again. so you turn up on time for your train but it is late and it doesn't really matter. maybe we just up like you did before the railways regulated time. the trains would be on time or often. i'm sure you're not the only one.” do try to get the train before the one i need. if i need to be somewhere return, i try to find a trend that arrives at nine. —— a train that arrives at nine. what is gorp? gorpcore? i'm going to go to
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gardeners' world. apparently it stands for granola oats raisins and peanuts. you need to keep those in your pockets of your giant shorts. i will get some giant shorts and hiking gear is the innit thing as well. the outsize shirts. that is the only way they seem to fit. a huge tent size shirt with some gorp in the pockets. denim cut-offs don't drag in the mud. lots of pockets because they are useful for festivals like glastonbury. and wellingtons. i have a pairfrom when i used to work on a building site and because of a frightened of you stealing them, used to get them in
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different colours. 0ne stealing them, used to get them in different colours. one thing, one blue. so i will go in my wanting, one blue pair. somebody will think you are making an incredibly cool fashion statement. fantastic. more next hour. let's return to our main story this morning. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. yesterday, residents and volunteers met with theresa may at downing street. we can speak now to conservative councillor, eve allison who sits on kensington and chelsea borough council. thank you for talking to us this morning. would you tell us what you have been hearing from residents? we have been hearing from residents? we have covered a lot about the horrific fire but, also, the emotion after it as people are frustrated about the information they are or are not getting. l0. can you hear me? good morning. good morning to you all. i would just like to say
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that the mood is sombre and we, the community will continue to do what we can. the danger is when hopes start to fade and from hope then what you find is despair. that is why i am willing to put my head above the parapet and come out and step up to the plate. i am going to go one step further to say it is on our watch. it is our responsibility. we do have a duty of care to our residents and whatever findings and failings come out, they have to come out soon because all the community, the victims of the families, people
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need answers and the longer things procrastinate like this i think, as isaid in procrastinate like this i think, as i said in my first sentence, hope will quickly dissipate and become despair and from that you will have disruption and problems as we have already seen. tell me about what complaints, if at all any, or what concerns any residents brought up from grenfell tower, because you are on the property scrutiny committee. iam indeed. on the property scrutiny committee. i am indeed. a committee that i have very little voice on so this is why it is important that i stand here and say what has to be said and all too often we are a little too concerned with how, if i could say it, the immediate streetscape looks, how a building fits into other
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buildings. does it detract from the immediate streetscape was to mark i think, maybe, iwas not immediate streetscape was to mark i think, maybe, i was not involved in the actual planning of the recent refurbishment, obviously i do sit on housing and property scrutiny committee. from what i am hearing, it would have been ideal if the part of the refurbishment package had looked at trying to gentrifying inside, notjust outside. that is what i would like to say. thank you very much for your time. the conservative councillor for the chelsea and kensington council. good morning. the andrew marr programme is on bbc one this morning at nine o'clock, this week hosted by nick robinson. sorry, andrew. what do you have coming up? we will be talking to
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residents of grenfell tower and the chancellor of the exchequer. we do not see much of him during the general election campaign but we would like to hear what he is to say about austerity and brexit talks to begin next week. we also have the brexit spokesman for labour as well in the studio. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: the travel show visits bermuda as its turquoise waters play host to the competition described as the formula 1 of sailing — the america's cup. stay with us — headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. coming up before 8am, helen will have the weather. but a summary of this morning's main news. church services will be held today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire in west london. police have revealed that 58 people are missing and are believed to have died but that figure could still rise. yesterday, theresa may met with volunteers and those left homeless. the prime minister admitted the government's response, in the hours following the disaster, had not been good enough.
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a report by the think tank the resolution foundation claims british wealth inequality is growing. they suggest the fall in the number of people that own their own home has resulted in a widening gap between the rich and poor. the government says income inequality is at its lowest level since the mid—1980s. the government says it intends to double the length of the new parliamentary session to two years to give mps the maximum possible time to scrutinise brexit legislation. the unusual move will mean next year's queen's speech will be cancelled. the government says the decision was part of measures to build the broadest possible consensus for brexit. at least 24 people have died so far and more than 20 others have been injured in a forest fire in central portugal. 16 of the victims died in their vehicles as they try to escape but became trapped by flames. portugal's been experiencing a heatwave with temperatures exceeding 40 celsius in several regions.
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seven sailors missing after a us warship collided with a container ship off the coast ofjapan have been found dead. their bodies were discovered by divers in flooded cabins. the ships commander and another sailor have been airlifted to hospital for treatment. french voters go to the polls today for the second round of the country's parliamentary elections. president macron's en marche! party, which was formed just over a year ago, is predicted to win up to 80% of the seats. it is currently ahead in 400 out of 577 constituencies. for opposition teams, the sight of 15 new zealand rugby players doing the traditional maori haka is intimidating enough. so imagine seeing more than 7,000 people take up the challenge. this is the world record attempt undertaken before the british and irish lions took on the all blacks yesterday in rotorua. they had to perform for five minutes to officially break the record
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previously held by the french. it wasn't just locals taking part, though, a number of lions‘ supporters also joined in. you told us this, kat, they were doing this outside the hotel where the british lions were staying? look at this fellow, he could be an all black in the future, couldn't he? the likelihood is there will be some in the crowd, rugby players and fans, 7000 turning up to watch the maori all blacks and new zealand, such a passionate rugby nation, probably a few all blacks in there. the first test next weekend? yes, a week yesterday, this time next week week yesterday, this time next week we will know how we are shaping up against them. but we will start with golf. tomorrow morning we will have a new major winner, of all 16 players at
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the top of the us open none have won a major and you would think one of them would hold on. after day three at golf‘s us open, england's tommy fleetwood remains firmly in contention at the top of the leaderboard. he sits just one shot behind the overall leader brian harman going into the final round in wisconsin. adam wild reports. for tommy fleetwood, there is plenty to smile about. for getting amongst the leaders in wisconsin is one thing, staying there is quite another. this weekend it is a crowded place. still he was making his presence felt, progressing steadily in the right direction. for others that didn't appear to be the case but here forjustin thomas even going in the wrong direction can work out perfectly in the end. his round of 9—under par is a tournament record and was enough to put him for the moment ahead of the rest. while he flourished, others floundered. england's paul casey's hopes of staying in contention lost somewhere in that deep, deep rough. they call day three moving day, there was now plenty of that
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on the leaderboard and with shots like this the american brian harman was heading towards the very top. fleetwood remains in the crowd just one stroke behind, plenty still to smile about but the us open has rarely been more open. adam wild, bbc news. this is my first time in contention in a major so whatever happens i'll be doing my best and seeing how well i can finish and that's that really. that's all you can do. but it will be a pleasure to go out on a sunday trying to win a major. warran gatland has named his side to face the chiefs on tuesday and has included all six controversial call—ups he made yesterday as replacements. ireland hooker rory best captains the side, with the bulk of the squad that beat the maori all blacks yesterday aren't playing so they can prepare for the first test against the all blacks next saturday.
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gatland says those involved on tuesday will be playing for themselves and for the whole squad. we brought you scotland's historic win over australia here on breakfast yesterday morning, and that was just the start of it as england completed a 2—0 series victory over argentina after winning the second test in santa fe. full—back mike brown broke clear before producing a brilliant off load to send piers francis over for a great try before half time. england went on to win 35—25 but eddiejones's squad was missing 30 of their best players, largely due to the lions tour. very pleased. today we found a way to win, we were outgunned in the first half, second half we came back in the forwards particularly and scrums and our maul defence improved and that got us back in the game and then our ability to score off their mistakes i thought was fantastic. england batsmanjason roy made a welcome return to form as surrey reached their third straight one day cup final. roy, dropped by england in midweek, smashed 92 as surrey beat worcestershire rapids by 153 runs at new road. they'll play nottinghamshire in the final on the first ofjuly. india take on arch—rivals pakistan
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in the champions trophy final this afternoon, india easy winners when the two sides met in the group stages. but with tickets at a premium for the match and talk of over half a billion people watching the game on tv, everyone's hoping for a classic at the oval later. i don't see any relevance of the first game here because you can never tell how the particular team starts a tournament. some teams start very confidently and they fade off, some teams may not have the best starts and they come back amazingly, which pakistan have done. everyone is aware of the kind of talent they have in their team. i said before the edgbaston game i thought they were very calm, but they're very excited right now and there's a hell of a good vibe in that dressing room. so let's hope we can to our a game on tomorrow cause if we can, i said it before the england game, if we put our a game together and we do the basics well
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we can beat anyone. johanna konta could become the first british woman since virginia wade 40 years ago at wimbledon to win a tour event on home soil. she's reached the final of the nottingham 0pen. after coming through in straight sets against magdalena rybarikova of slovakia. it's the first time the british number one has reached a grass court final. she'll face croatia's donna vekic, ranked 70th in the world. andy murray will play bedene at the queens first round next week, he beat him in the first round last year. wigan warriors are into the semi—finals of the challenge cup, surviving a late warrington fightback yesterday to win 27—26. four converted tries, including this from john bateman, and a drop goal had put wigan clear going into the final stages. but warrington could have forced extra time with the last kick
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of the game only for it to drift wide. castleford play hull fc this afternoon in the final quarterfinal. england strengthened their position at the top of their pool in the hockey world league semi—finals with a 7—3 thrashing of malaysia. samuel ward and mark gleghorne scored twice, as did captain barry middleton. as well as reaching the world league finals later in the year, the top five teams qualify for the world cup in india next year. scotland's men are in the other pool. a 3—0 defeat to the netherlands means they've lost both of their games so far. lots of hockey news on the website as well. the plan today is go home, have a snooze, it will be a late—night tonight seeing if tommy fleetwood can bring the us open title home. fingers crossed. he looks like quite a character. naga knows him from playing with him at we ntworth. knows him from playing with him at wentworth. i don't know him but i
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had the honour of playing with him at wentworth, very relaxed and he meditates as well. that's what it ta kes meditates as well. that's what it takes in golf, you have to be relaxed, all in the head. notjust a physical game, a mental game in all senses! thanks very much, kat! helen will bring us the weather a little later. a little over two weeks ago, the world watched in horror as another terror attack unfolded on the streets of britain. eight people were killed when terrorists drove a van into pedestrians on london bridge before launching a knife attack in borough market. the journalist and martial arts expert geoff ho was stabbed in the neck when he confronted two of the attackers to protect his friends. he's still receiving treatment for his injuries but was able to return to borough market on thursday to see it re—open. geoffjoins us now. thank you so much, geoff, for talking to us this morning. firstly, how are you? good morning, doing really well. great. tell us what
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happened if you wouldn't mind on that evening. absolutely. ijust finished watching the champions league final with my friends in one of the local pubs, the wheatsheaf, was minding my own business, i walked a few yards up the road and i saw two people attacking one of the bouncers. this was actually a separate incident. these two people attacked the bouncer so ijumped in to defend him, managed to hold them off for a few minutes and then the police rolled up, took these two people away. instead of going onto the tube and taking my train home i decided to go to the restaurant black and blue to meet up with some friends to get some food and another drink. that was the fateful decision and within literally the space of four minutes the terrorists arrived and tried to kick in the door and that's when i had to intervene. veainu they arrived, they got to the restau ra nt veainu they arrived, they got to the restaurant and tried to get into the restau ra nt — — restaurant and tried to get into the restaurant —— so they arrived. restaurant and tried to get into the
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restaurant -- so they arrived. yes, they kicked in the glass door. i saw one of my friends and others scrambling for the back, some hid under tables, some went into the booths, some went to the back of the restau ra nt. booths, some went to the back of the restaurant. 0ne booths, some went to the back of the restaurant. one of my friends was behind me and i knew right there and then that unless i delayed them they would be... the worst could possibly happen. i knew! would be... the worst could possibly happen. i knew i had to delay them because the police were in the area, ijust because the police were in the area, i just needed to because the police were in the area, ijust needed to buy them time. u nfortu nately i ijust needed to buy them time. unfortunately i saw what looked like suicide vest is on them so i knew i couldn't head straight at them and attack them because they could have detonated the vests and that would have been the worst possible outcome soi have been the worst possible outcome so i had to somehow keep them at bay. they started yelling everyone get on the floor, i knew if anyone had done that that would be game over instantly, they would have killed them there and then. the attackers came at me, they started barking at everyone to get on the floor, i told them no. barking at everyone to get on the floor, itold them no. i kept telling them know and then they
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snapped and they started to charge at me with knives. they attempted to sta b at me with knives. they attempted to stab me in the throat, unfortunately they succeeded on that front, they attempted to stab me in the stomach, they didn't in that instance, i managed to jump out of the way and avoid that blade and all i got was a couple of scratches on my stomach. then unfortunately they got me on the side of the face. they are attacked my friend, he suffered superficial injuries and they ran off and within a minute the police arrived. geoff, you have been described as a hero, you have described as a hero, you have described to us what happened to you, having read what did happen as well, i wonder if you can tell us a bit more about the bit where you defended other people from these attackers selflessly. what happened was they came into the restaurant, i knew instantly because everyone was scrambling that i had to buy them time so! scrambling that i had to buy them time so i engaged with them, i engaged with the attackers. they
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came at week with knives, i tried to block the first one, unfortunately the first right to the throat wasn't that successful, i got injured, got out of the way of the second blade at the same time as i was trying to dodge the attack to the stomach, i tried throwing a couple of punches, i think tried throwing a couple of punches, ithinki tried throwing a couple of punches, i think i landed at least one. i tried to put myself in the way to make sure they couldn't get to my friend behind me. these attackers we re friend behind me. these attackers were obviously very determined, could you see the intent they had? they had no respect... there was no respect for human life. you could see in their eyes, they were full of rage, theyjust see in their eyes, they were full of rage, they just wanted see in their eyes, they were full of rage, theyjust wanted to hurt as many people as possible and they didn't care who they attacked. you have been receiving treatment for your injuries, how is that progressing? are you recovering well? i'm recovering well. the paramedics that treated me on the day before i got to hospital, the staff at the royal london hospital,
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the surgeons, the other doctors and nurses were all wonderful. i'm being looked after at the moment by my local gp and the nurses there. i'm going really well, the recovery is really going well. good to hear. would you have done anything differently would you think?” would you have done anything differently would you think? i try not to think about it to be perfectly honest, i would have done exactly the same thing... hopefully i will never have to put myself in that situation again. to be honest ori that situation again. to be honest or i needed to do was to buy people time to get away. i get it, that was myjob, i'm time to get away. i get it, that was my job, i'm happy time to get away. i get it, that was myjob, i'm happy with that —— all i needed. your friends and the people in that restaurant will be very grateful i'm sure and i'm pleased you are recovering well, thank you for talking to us this morning. thank you for your time, appreciate it. somebody who does something so brave and so selfless being so humble and modest, incredible. good morning, helen. he led to both
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of you. another hot day. if anything, a little hotter than yesterday. we have pictures coming in left right and centre and they are beautiful. this one shows the sunshine coming through the leaves. it is one little bit earlier. a beautiful start of the day a little cloud around. any mr is melting away. there is more definite cloud across parts of western scotland. in northern ireland as well. where we see the sunshine, it is as strong as it gets. not usual to see high levels of uv. are very strong sunshine indeed. across the uk today. especially noticeable across eastern scotland where we see the sunshine east of northern ireland and in wales —— eastern england. and although he even if you feel cool compass sun is just a strong. it is not depend on the temperature. the temperature is starting to leap up
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now and that will continue as that strong sunshine beats down across the uk not for all, however because we have rain coming and going. that will allow some brighter skies into 0rkney and shetland today. from where we see the heat across many areas and the intense heat across the south—east and east anglia it is worth mentioning it could trigger a late thunderstorm. the exception rather than the rule but i need to mention a. that will rumble out through the evening. this weather fronts with little south so it is going to be a damp night for more than scotland but for most of us, look at these temperatures. i was thinking daytime averages, it will bea thinking daytime averages, it will be a fairly warm night. increasingly uncomfortable for sleeping full of my girls were struggling last night. the heat baked a little in the north through the course of tomorrow and in the south is still with us was just able more cloud creeping in. the heat is with us across england
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and wales in particular through monday and tuesday, a cumulative effect of a few days of high temperatures and overnight temperatures and overnight temperatures close to 18 and 19, it will make it very uncomfortable for farm. despite that fact is a lovely day again for most. it really is wonderful. it will be nice on the beach then. yes, it will be. you do a good job of saying the name of that beach in wales. thank you very much, helen. we will be back with the headlines at eight o'clock. you know, i don't think we need to watch the travel show. it is too glorious here, why do we need to watch the travel showers bermuda? here, why do we need to watch the travel showers bermuda ? no, here, why do we need to watch the travel showers bermuda? no, what should and we will see you soon. —— now, watch it and we will see you
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soon. this week on the travel show we are in bermuda. this week coming to you from bermuda, which this year is hosting one of the world's biggest sporting events, the america's cup, right here in the north atlantic ocean. the america's cup is the formula one of the boat world, the most prestigious event in sailing. over the past few weeks, six international teams have been racing across the waters of bermuda's great sound in superfast hydrofoil catamarans. and this weekend, the competition reaches its dramatic climax, with the start of the finals, when the titleholders, team 0racle from the usa,
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face their challengers for the cup. it is so exciting to be here. there's a real buzz in the air. now, over there, some of the teams are practising and i've never seen boats like these before. when they raise up out of the ocean on their hydrofoils, it's just an incredible sight. they are so fast, so awesome — it's like they're flying across the sea. this is a massive event and it's the first time bermuda has hosted the cup. tens of thousands of spectators have headed here, plus an estimated 50 million people around the world are watching on tv. but here in bermuda, the spotlight isn'tjust on what's happening above the water — what's going on underneath the waves is being seen as just as important. the water is obviously our playing field, so obviously it's
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within our own interests to highlight the issues that there have been globally with plastics in the ocean. it's forecast that by 2050, there could be more plastic in the ocean than fish. that's scary. clearly, that's a major issue that we've got to get on top of. i think through sailing, through the america's cup, if we can help to highlight some of these issues and also some of the solutions to it. the numbers are mind—boggling. it's estimated there are now five trillion pieces of plastic floating across the world's oceans. but whilst waste and pollution are a huge concern, they aren't the only things impacting on the environment here in bermuda. this place is gorgeous, but beneath these beautiful waters, a species is lurking that is having an absolutely devastating effect on the ecosystem here. it's a creature that is presenting the biggest challenge
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to marine life in bermuda. they are called lionfish. they're striking to look at, but they don't belong in the atlantic. they are native to the coral reefs of the pacific ocean. scientists reckon they may have ended up in these waters after being released by aquarium owners. but here, they have no natural predators, so their numbers have grown and they are now rapidly destroying the ocean's marine life. they're extremely gluttonous. they can just overconsume at an exorbitant rate and the problem with that is that the fish that live in the atlantic ocean don't recognise the lionfish is a potential threat, and so the lionfish just opens its mouth and gobbles in all of these little tiny fish and it's having a huge impact on fish populations around the caribbean and western atlantic. wow! that is cold! experts here believe the only way
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to control the lionfish population is to cull them. the ecosystem can't evolve fast enough to deal with this new species. and since we put it there, it's our problem to try to control it. conservation groups such as the reef environmental education foundation regularly organise and sanction fishing trips aimed at reducing the population. uniquely, here in bermuda, these lionfish tend to congregate in very deep waters, so it's really hard for fishermen to catch them in large numbers, but now it's hoped that pioneering technology could provide a more effective answer. this is one of our prototypes of a robot that we've built to go overboard. you sit down at your computer screen, just like you're playing
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a game, and you can see through the camera and you drive it down, look fora lionfish, put the lionfish between the electrodes, push the stun button and the lionfish will lock up with the electricity so it can't move, then you push another button and suck it up into the tube and go looking for the next lionfish. each robot can scoop up around 15 lionfish in a single trip and, crucially, the final design will operate well below depths that can be reached by divers. down to 1,000 feet. actually, the best way to approach them is from above, from in front, towards the spikes, and he'll basically say, come on, then, deal with the spikes. he's not expecting you to electrocute him and slurp him into a tube. hunting the lionfish here might seem to go against our usual idea but by controlling the lionfish population now, scientists say that will give the underwater ecosystem a chance to repair,
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evolve and adapt and remain here for generations to come. part of the problem they've got on their hands here is that locals aren't keen on eating this rather scary—looking and venomous fish and that's why they've started a project called eat them to beat them. so, is it safe to eat lionfish? it definitely is safe to eat. once you remove these spines, you're moving from malicious to delicious. does that help you out? i like that. malicious to delicious. chef ming has been teaching at bermuda college for 20 years but he's onlyjust added lionfish preparation to the curriculum. the students are cooking up a whole range of lionfish dishes from tacos to fish and chips and chef tells me he's got a plan for what to do with all this lovely grub.
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today, it's a special opportunity to have you guys here. it's bermuda day. a beautiful day. there will be thousands of people lining the streets to watch our parade and what we're going to do today is leave bermuda college with cooked samples — free samples, by the way! that's the best price. that's one way to get it on board. free samples of lionfish. one way to get them on board is with people who haven't tried it. then they can spread the word about the goodness of the lionfish. so, what's your plan for this bad boy? well, this bad boy, i'm going to remove the spines, then fillet it so i end up with two sides, then i was going to flatten the fillets and stuff them with lobster thermidor, ok, let's see you do it then. the first thing that you want to do is remove the spines. is it ok to touch? it is ok to touch but try not to puncture yourself. they are like little needles.
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those spines can deliver a nasty sting, so the fish need to be handled with care. by teaching the students here how to deal with the venomous needles, it is hoped they'll take their lionfish skills to the restaurants of bermuda when they graduate. don't you mess with the environment again! yeah, look at you now! come on then. oh, wow. that is so tasty. chef, you've done a wonderfuljob. thank you very much. i appreciate that. we should take this out to the parade, all of this food, because it looks good, and we should give the people a taste of lionfish.
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yeah, by all means. in bermuda's capital, hamilton, the streets are ram packed with locals and tourists. this is just incredible. today marks the start of summer and it seems the whole island's out here celebrating, although they probably weren't expecting me to crash the party with a plate of lionfish. so, have you tried lionfish before? a wonderful taste. i love it. be honest, now. i think i would eat some more after this. sadly, that's all we have this week. join us next week. i will be looking
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back at some of our favourite trips so back at some of our favourite trips so far this year. from dancing monks in india to getting to grips with lively reindeer in lapland. so make sure you join us for that if you can. in the meantime, you can keep up can. in the meantime, you can keep up with all our travels on the road in real time by following us on social media. all the details are on your. for now, from me and all the travel show team here in bermuda it is goodbye. i have a party to go to! see you later! hello. this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. church services will take place today to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. police say at least 58 people are believed to have died.
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residents and volunteers expressed their anger at a meeting with theresa may in downing street. it was a robust discussion. there was forceful emotion in the room. people were able to say what they wa nted people were able to say what they wanted to say and we felt that was listened to, and listened to carefully. good morning. it's sunday 18th june. also ahead: claims of growing inequality across britain. a new report says the gap between rich and poor is getting wider. next year's queen's speech is due to be cancelled to give mps the maximum time to debate plans for brexit. a forest fire in portugal claims the lives of more than 20 people, including motorists trying to escape the blaze. in sport: tommy fleetwood remains
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firmly in contention at the us open in wisconsin. he isjust firmly in contention at the us open in wisconsin. he is just one shot off the
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