Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

8:00 am
hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. thousands of people are told to leave their homes as high rise blocks in north london are evacuated over fire safety fears. concerns were raised over cladding and gas pipe insulation. more than 800 homes are affected. the council has called it an "unprecedented operation". i know it's difficult but grenfell changes everything and ijust don't believe we can take any risks with residents‘ safety and we have to put them first. the evacuation began late last night. some residents spent the night in hotels, on air beds in a leisure centre. others refused to leave. i'm staying put. i intend going back in there tonight. it's a knee—jerk reaction. they have to be seen to be doing something. it's creating chaos and pandemonium. 14 tower blocks have been evacuated.
8:01 am
sajid javid told breakfast money will be made available to councils that need it. they have to do whatever it takes to get their buildings safe and any necessary works they do, if they need support from the government, we‘ll help. good morning. first, our main story. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due to concerns about fire safety. good morning.
8:02 am
first, our main story. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, their safety could not be guaranteed. raised about fire doors and gas pipes. any area which was not com pletely pipes. any area which was not completely up to the best standards was of deep concern giving the combination. that was the message today. the issue was the combination of two factors and that is why we have taken the action we have taken
8:03 am
tonight. at the leisure centre, air beds were assembled to cater for up to 100 residents. it will take up to four weeks to remove cladding from the estate. during that time, people are urged to stay with family or friends or in hotels. camden council has already secured 270 rooms in london and have spent the night transporting people. some residents said the first they knew was on the news. there are children, families with babies, they have nowhere to go. and ijust think they left everything too late in dealing with it at this time of night, which is half one now. this is ridiculous. g re nfell tower was half one now. this is ridiculous. grenfell tower was destroyed from the bottom to the top. we now know that the fire started in a kitchen in the lower floor. police have also confirmed what eyewitnesses, the origin of the inferno was able to fridge freezer full of at least 11;
8:04 am
buildings in nine areas of england and now known to have cladding which has prompted fire safety can ten days on from the worst fires since world war two, it‘s —— its shadow looms large over social housing. earlier on breakfast, sajid javid, the local government and communities secretary told us that councils would get financial support for all works needed. local authorities have to do whatever it takes to get their buildings safe and any necessary works they do, if they need sup #30r9 from the government, we can work with them, absolutely —— support from the government.“ work with them, absolutely —— support from the government. is that a pledge that all that money will be found centrally or not? if there is a local authority and housing associations, let‘s not forget them. they own many of the tower blocks. if they need financial support, not all will need it, but if they do,
8:05 am
we‘ll work with them to make sure they have the resources to do this work, absolutely, that won‘t be put at risk. we can speak now to catriona renton who is outside the swiss cottage leisure centre in camden where some residents spent the night. catriona, how much information have people been given? we have seen more people arriving here, a steady stream of people coming and going all night, some coming and going all night, some coming to hotels, others arriving to get registered and find out what support they can get. some people, those are the ones that have decided to leave their homes. roger evans has decided to stay put. you live in the block that was evacuated first. tell us why did you decide to stay against the advice? because as far as i'm concerned nothing has changed in that building over the last few days or weeks. i've lived there for years, residents have been living there since they were built 50 years ago. they have done tests, found
8:06 am
that things need replacing but we we re that things need replacing but we were living in these conditions previously. the council should do works around us. this is a major overreaction to evacuate the building. the council have told people they should leave, the advice from the fire service is that it may not be safe. why would you stay in those circumstances, have you been put under any pressure to get out?” was very much discouraged from staying, then i had a knock on the door at 3. 40 this morning from a council worker and policeman checking up on me. when i left the building, there was a fire officer checking me in and out of the building. the general advice is to get out but until circumstances change, i intend staying put. you have come out to talk to us so you believe you will be able to get back in. i hope so, yes! we see many of your neighbours here coming here in a distressed state at the speed in
8:07 am
which they have been moved out of their homes. it‘s been a natural reaction. they have been told to leave they should do that? yes, people from the council go around knocking on doors telling people to evacuate and pack a bag and, you know, ijust feel for the neighbours with children, pets, where they've gone, if they have had to stay here and not got much sleep. we saw some distressed neighbours. it's perhaps an overreaction knee—jerk from the council and could have been done differently. the council, however, have done a fantasticjob in organising this which seems to be what i see. it's disconcerting and worrying. the building has regular checks. i had an electrical check on
8:08 am
my flat a week and a half ago. there are fire alarms that go off and people call. a fortnight ago we had four fire trucks outside the building so they have visited the building so they have visited the building regularly, they have seen the state of it and suddenly they have found these things causing concern. have found these things causing concern. the council have said they have to do this? they have to be seen to be doing something. there are options. time will tell whether this is the best option. thank you very much. we wish you luck. the council have said that they had to do this. we have to act on fire service advice, they say. they say there are questions on how this could have happened to the buildings and they want to ask those questions. they‘ll be answered, they say, and actioned. thank you very much. in the next few minutes, we‘ll hear from the shadow business secretary rebecca long bailey, who is mp for salford where cladding is to be taken off nine tower blocks as a fire safety precaution.
8:09 am
and drill ya leadsom has said it would help if the media were more patriotic. she made the comment to emily maitlis regarding talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected politicians saying it was a good start. of course it is very early days. it has been a year... it would be helpful... it would be helpful if broadcasters would be patriotic. the country made a decision... unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together as a country. we made a decision one year ago today to leave the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats
8:10 am
radiohead topped the bill on the opening night of glastonbury, 20 years after one of their most famous performances at the festival. today will see katy perry and the foo fighters take to the pyramid stage, as our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. # i wish i was special #. for thousands of fans, radiohead really are so very special.
8:11 am
later today, big names will be making an appearance on the pyramid skate the stage including katy perry, foo fighters and jeremy corbyn. weather and sport is coming up shortly. let‘s go back to the main story this morning, cladding is to be high—rise buildings in many areas and several england following the g re nfell tower and several england following the grenfell tower fire. in greater manchester it will be removed from nine top box as a precaution after tests revealed it was made from similar materials to those used the g re nfell tower. similar materials to those used the grenfell tower. joining us now is rebecca long bailey. thank you for joining us. your reaction to what has happened in north london? residents told to leave the building
8:12 am
because of fire safety concerns. residents told to leave the building because of fire safety concernslj think because of fire safety concerns.” think they have made the right decision. if there are any risks in terms of evacuating residents, they need to take robust action and i think they have made appropriate measures. fire services have investigated the building and told us investigated the building and told us they were not safe in terms of evacuation and current fire measures in place. can we talk about your constituency in salford ? in place. can we talk about your constituency in salford? nine tower blocks are being assessed. what is happening and what was the process in terms of fire safety assessments and residents, what they are being told? all housing associations and local authorities have been asked to talk to the government. looking at specifications, and the building control department, they have made the decision that they think the panels are the same as
8:13 am
those used at grenfell and likely to be similar. they are taking them off the buildings immediately. you have made the adjustment, not the fire department? the fire department has assessed the safety internally of all buildings, so that is why we don‘t have that situation in camden. we have reassured them that the standards are there. all nine blocks have got 24—hour guard monitoring every floor. all of the other safety measures, fire doors and the other things that will usually be assessed by the fire authority have been looked at in extreme detail. can you say categorically that they are absolutely safe. i don't think we can say categorically they‘re absolutely can say categorically they‘re a bsolutely safe can say categorically they‘re absolutely safe until we know the results of the cladding tests themselves. given the information that salford council has been provided with so far in terms of the
8:14 am
fulhamability and the fact that these panels will be similar or the same to grenfell, they have to take urgent action. if at any point, and i‘ve been vocal about this to the council and to other providers, if at any point the fire authority deems any buildings to be unsafe and that residents wouldn‘t be able to be evacuated immediately in the event of a fire, the buildings should be evacuated. what do you say to residents who‘ve been many the towers ? to residents who‘ve been many the towers? they are living in fear at the moment. i‘ve had hundreds of constituents contact my office over the last week asking me whether the buildings they live in are safe and what we can do and what the council can do. are they going to be moved, have they asked? i haven't had aniking to be moved but i would ask ifi aniking to be moved but i would ask if i couldn‘t be reassured of safety. i‘ve asked for immediate,
8:15 am
robust action. i‘m not happy that the process has been expedited enough by government. i think the process of an inquiry will take a long time. we need to make sure that residents are long time. we need to make sure that residents a re safe long time. we need to make sure that residents are safe now. there was a fire, a coroner‘s reporterzed fire, a coroner‘s reporter: ed recommendations to fire, a coroner‘s reporter:ed recommendations to the government to retro fit sprinklers in all high—rise blocks and to amend the building regular laces. the government needs to take urgent action. any funding required would be made available, it‘s been said so. be made available, it‘s been said so. there is your assurance isn‘t it, so if that‘s the case that the money is there, if someone asked you now, or said to you, i don‘t feel safe, i want to be moved, would you move them? yes. i understand salford council has been speaking to
8:16 am
residents who‘re burglarly vulnerable and potentially at —— who‘re particularly vulnerable and potentially at risk and moving them to temporary accommodation. significant weight will be give tonne the voice of residents. if they don‘t feel safe, yes, i think provision should be put in place. they don‘t feel safe, yes, i think provision should be put in placem terms of salford. i understand vulnerable residents are being moved but because the fire authority has stated that the buildings themselves are safe in the event of a fire evacuation, they are not looking to decamp residents. i‘ve said quite strongly, and my views have been taken on board, that if at any point during assessments over the next few days that the buildings are deemed not to be safe, the residents should be decanted and given temporary accommodation. i‘m assured that is not the case at the moment. thank you very much. let us take a look at the weather
8:17 am
for the weekend with stav. thank you. starting with the satellite, you can see there is a lot of cloud in the west, the north—west, western wales and southern counties. the best of the sunshine in the midlands and north—east england and north—east scotland. it‘s a mixture this weekend to start off with. for the weekend, it‘s going to be a mixture of cloud, sunshine and showers. breezy and windy across the northern half. much cooler than last weekend. here is the culprit for the windy weather in the northern half of scotland. there‘ll be gale force winds to the northern half of scotland. a few showers as well across western parts of scotland this morning. the odd one there for northern ireland. cloud across north—west england and western wales and also southern counties of england. good sunshine through the midlands and the
8:18 am
north—east. could be some damp in somerset first thing this morning. could be a bit damp in glastonbury to begin with. looks like this afternoon should turn drier. we could see a bit of brightness in the afternoon. that is the theme for much of the country, variable amounts of cloud and sunshine. here are some blustery showers are the gales. further south it will feel warm. 17—21. we could make 24, 25 across the south—east. this evening, it will be another fair hi breezy one, variable cloud. it could pep up to be thicker with patchy rain across the higher ground. blustery showers continuing across the northern half of scotland. the low pressure system continues to
8:19 am
pull towards scandinavia, taking the winds with it. brighter skies slowly push south. scotland, northern ireland into northern gland, some sunshine, one oi’ northern gland, some sunshine, one or two showers. further south, thicker cloud and a few scattered showers here. top temperature at best 21 or 22, closer to the 18 mark. fresher on sunday. it's it‘s that time of the morning where we have a look at the papers. the former england cricketer lisa pearson is a head teacher and director for the pearson is a head teacher and directorfor the england pearson is a head teacher and director for the england an wales cricket board. good morning! morning. we'll talk to you in the morning, a few pieces have caught your eye, but first the front—pages. the daily telegraph, the front—page is taking a look at the risk to public buildings. so hospitals,
8:20 am
saying they‘re feared to be at risks of inferno. this is of course, as we have been reporting today, camden could civil, has evacuated 800 homes. the mirror devoted to the source of the fire in the first place, a revelation that it was a fridge freezer. they are looking at some of the testing that has been done over those items. the times is taking a look at the manchester killer and how he got advice or instructions to build a bomb. it‘s saying that web videos helped salman abedi do that. police being used more routinely in british policing, which is a contentious issue. and the daily mail nodding to a book about camilla and her relationship with prince charles. we‘ll with prince charles. we‘ ll start with prince charles. we‘ll start with a story close to home with you, tell us about that?
8:21 am
this is an article about a head teacher who has been told off really for spooking to the girls about wearing tight skirts or skirts that are too tight. i think she was being self—deprecating, she was a 16 size, she wanted to remind people to the degree of uniform regulations and she‘s been hauled in saying she‘s a poor role model and she‘s been told that girls should be able to dress in whatever they like. she was in an assembly and said, i‘m just going to quote to make it clear because it‘s been proved controversial "i‘m not a size 8—#10rks i wouldn‘t wear one", the implication being that if you aren‘t then you shouldn‘t and it‘s all about body shaming and the idea that perhaps girls could become even more paranoid and concerned about size? yes. i feel sorry for her because she was trying to say, look, here are the regulations, and there was a tendency to wear tighter
8:22 am
fitting skirts. that is what she was getting to. it‘s a sensitive topic andi getting to. it‘s a sensitive topic and i totally understand that. i think in our effort to say the right thing to girls, there can be an oversensitivity about it and she was putting herself forward saying, these are the choices and you have to be careful about the choices you make. so i felt sorry for her. how does it work in your school? i'm co nsta ntly does it work in your school? i'm constantly fighting the short skirt battle and the top button collar issue. i'm going off piste, but there was a story earlier this week about boys told they couldn‘t wear shorts to school. it‘s been so hot. so they said fine, we‘ll wear skirts. how would you have dealt with that? i think our boys wearing skirts, i wouldn‘t have been surprised if they turned up wearing that. the boys we are making a point, it was in exeter, and they‘ve won their battle to be able to wear shorts and of course now it‘s raining so maybe they‘ll have to wear something else. maybe they've become accustomed to it and will
8:23 am
keep it going. tell us a bit about what this is about? today sees the start of the world cup cricket derby, between england and india. this is an article about charlotte edwards. it‘s a year on, charlotte is the most successful england captain in cricket we have ever had. aier on, she was dismissed about a year ago and it was a little bit difficult, but actually in this article she‘s sort of really, really positive about the year she‘s had and saying actually she wouldn‘t now wa nt to and saying actually she wouldn‘t now want to be in that. she feels her life has moved on. i think it‘s a lovely article talking about her commitment to girl‘s sport and she‘s doing an awful lot of outreach work and support. she remains very much and support. she remains very much an important part of cricket and is an important part of cricket and is a fantastic ambassador. it‘s good to see bad things happen, things don‘t work out the way you want but there is life after that. it's always interesting talking to people who‘ve
8:24 am
been at such a high level in sport who then leave that world and how much thought do you get from your particular sport body, how much sup important do you get? she's remained an ambassador, in the article she talks about how being an england captain, though, she was in a bubble and hadn‘t realised how stressful it was and now she‘s returned to a better sense of herself. an elite athlete, you have to commit everything and when you finish, it can be traumatic but charlotte is showing that there is life beyond and she can watch the flowers grow in her garden and she wishes england well. what were you like when you left sport? i was lucky. well. what were you like when you left sport? iwas lucky. iwas working at the same time, full—time, and playing for england. that became difficult. the kids were a great leveller. you could be playing in a
8:25 am
world final and two days later you are back in the classroom and the kids will be saying, miss, you haven‘t marked my books, what have you been doing, so you remain grounded. i wonder, with your combined expertise about having played elite sport and also being a head teacher, yours is a mixed school, so is this kind of thing impacted on the girls at your school in terms of getting them more interested in sport? yes. girls are wanting to play more traditionally male orientated sports than ever before, no doubt, so there is girls by, before, no doubt, so there is girls rugby, football, cricket, whereas the more true fissional sports are disappearing. but, there is still a real challenge around sufficient media coverage still of all the sports. this is interesting because they‘re saying over the next few yea rs they‘re saying over the next few years there are some huge tournaments, the world cup, the football tournament and women‘s rugby world cup. then you have got
8:26 am
hockey and netball. it‘s an exciting time for young girls and it‘s a challenge on a legacy, how do we ensure the girls are taking up these sports. have you heard of hobbyhorse show jumping? sports. have you heard of hobbyhorse showjumping? no! it's featuring on the programme. watch it later this morning, it‘s all about encouraging girls to play sport. interested to hear your opinion later on. i'll hear your opinion later on. i‘ll look forward to it. universities need to raise teaching standards in order to flourish. you picked up this article, why? because the teacher framework within universities has come out. it‘s a significant move where we often rank universities in a certain perception, but with the fees going up perception, but with the fees going up and it looks like they will go up further, i think something like lse, which has had a hard time, has had its bronze rating showing it‘s a
8:27 am
good research university but it‘s a teaching university, it‘s got a lot of work to do, it‘s a good way for stu d e nts of work to do, it‘s a good way for students considering university to reconsider where they will be best spending their money. in about three minutes, the all blacks kick off, when you come back it will be half time. what will the score be? that's mean! what will the score be? that would require me to understand how the scoring system works. ok! but i reckon... who is going to be winning? i think the all blacks will be. there you go. we'll test you in an hour‘s time. be. there you go. we'll test you in an hour's time. great! you thought it might be a pleasant morning.” did. never mind. this is all about hobbyhorse show jumping, coming did. never mind. this is all about hobbyhorse showjumping, coming up in the next half hour. it began in finland and it‘s coming on in leaps and bounds in the uk and it‘s holding its inaugural national championships this weekend. who else would we send along to try this out but mike and that‘s his trusty steed charlie. he‘s been giving it a go.
8:28 am
headlines soon. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before nine, holly will be here with the sport and stav will have this weekend‘s weather. but first, a summary of this morning‘s main news. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due to concerns about fire safety. the buildings are clad in similar material to grenfell tower, where at least 79 people died in a fire last week. camden council told people in five towers on the chalcots estate to move after the fire service said their safety could not be guaranteed — which left some residents feeling angry. i feel for my neighbours with children and pets. where have they gone? we recently saw some very distressed neighbours. it is perhaps an overreaction, a kneejerk by distressed neighbours. it is perhaps an overreaction, a knee jerk by the council. some people suggesting an
8:29 am
overreaction, others are saying it was appropriate. we will get details from the leader of camden council, asking questions about why that decision was taken. the leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom has said it would be helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk‘s position in talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected politicians saying it was a good start. of course it is very early days. it has been a year... it would be helpful... it would be helpful if broadcasters would be patriotic. the country made a decision... unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together as a country. we made a decision one year ago today to leave the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron, has described
8:30 am
andrea leadsom‘s remarks as "a sinister threat to the free media" — and said she should apologise. more than 100 people are missing after a landslide in south western china. around 40 homes were destroyed when the side of a mountain collapsed in the sichuan province. a rescue operation is now taking place to try to locate the missing. katy perry and the foo fighters will top the bill at glastonbury today. last night, radiohead took to the pyramid stage, 20 years after first being the headline act at the festival. it‘s expected around 135,000 people will be in attendance over the weekend. sorry! was that one of those moments when you felt a sneeze coming?m was just there, when you felt a sneeze coming?m wasjust there, i‘m when you felt a sneeze coming?m was just there, i‘m so sorry. when you felt a sneeze coming?m wasjust there, i'm so sorry. has this ever happened to you? i almost a lwa ys this ever happened to you? i almost always find they go away. it is something to do with live broadcasting. a little bit of adrenaline. someone told me to stare
8:31 am
into the light, to make you sneeze. we have a game kicking off, the all blacks against the british and irish lions. right now there are these preparations, including many people that don‘t know rugby very well, they will have seen the hakka? in case we were in any doubt of who those people supported, just in case. indicates the shirt wasn't enough. it is happening in one minute. we have seen some of the crowds out there, some people saying on twitter even the all blacks fans we re on twitter even the all blacks fans were looking around them and going, look at all of the red shirts, it's incredible. they are going to bring the haka, incredible. they are going to bring the ha ka, we incredible. they are going to bring the haka, we will bring the face paint! it is worth saying, as well, in these games it is more like a
8:32 am
religion, isn‘t it? the whole nation comes to a standstill. there were some great interviews with children at the school. about 40 children have ended up being in the all blacks. they spoke to these kids and said that is what inspires them, they want to be an all—black. said that is what inspires them, they want to be an all— black. said that is what inspires them, they want to be an all-black. a lot of people are saying they‘re planning, in this country, to get together in groups and watch it, it‘s a big event here? together in groups and watch it, it's a big event here? you can see it's a big event here? you can see it on social media, everybody got up early in the morning to watch. you can imagine the crowds at the moment. they have been following them for the warm up matches, and they have been improved, so there is a lot of excitement around it. we will bring you some pictures and show you the atmosphere. the haka really is something else. we do have big hopes. this is 23 years, the re cord big hopes. this is 23 years, the record that the all blacks have
8:33 am
there. unbroken! you're going to ta ke there. unbroken! you're going to take us through the rest of the sport? yes. two jason roy became the first player in international t20 cricket history t20 cricket history to be given out for obstructing the field, as england lost to south africa byjust three runs at taunton. england were cruising towards their target of 175 when south africa claimed roy had deliberately got in the way of a throw — and he was dismissed. england needed a four from the last ball — but liam dawson missed it. the series decider is at cardiff tomorrow. the women‘s cricket world cup starts today, with the icc hoping it‘ll be a turning point for the women‘s game. england go into the tournament on the back of some strong warm—up performances — they take on india in the opening match in derby, where a sell—out crowd of three—thousand is expected. here‘s our sports correspondentjoe wilson. in derby, a group of professional sportswomen prepare for a competition which aims to be noticed around the world. they are england and england
8:34 am
is where it began. in 1973, birmingham hosted the final of the first—ever women‘s world cup, won by england and these players is basically had to pay to play. had a year into her captaincy. —— heather knight is a year into her captaincy. first game against india, the winning nation this year, gets $666,000. money has come a long way. is it the incentive? something the players will think about? i don‘t think so. it is a nice touch by the icc to show where the women‘s game is at the moment. i think it is a good statement by them, but in terms of practicalities it doesn‘t change it. globally, the key is to unlock the potential of india. that is the market for cricket. signs of progress — well, there was a kit launch featuring women‘s players alongside the men. india‘s women have never won the world cup and are outsiders again this year.
8:35 am
but victory would speed up the quality. but victory would speed up equality. this is a stage where most of the matches are televised and broadcast and it increases the viewership and, you know, india is a country where cricket is a religion. boys in state schools in england and wales still get more opportunity to play cricket than girls. inspiration often comes from the top. the world cup, the opening batter will miss this match through injury. the captain is fit, calm and ready. british men‘s tennis number three dan evans said he‘d let a lot of people down, after being provisionally suspended for testing positive for cocaine. he‘ll miss wimbledon, of course, but he could be banned for up to four years. i was notified a few days ago that i‘d failed a drugs test in april, where i tested positive for cocaine. this was taken out of competition
8:36 am
and the context was completely unrelated to tennis. i made a mistake and i must face up to it. i do not condone or one second to anyone that this was acceptable behaviour. i‘ve let a lot of people down, my family, my coach, my team, sponsors and the british tennis and my fans. i can only deeply apologise, from the bottom of my heart. we are going to talk about the by, we are going to talk about the rugby, it is finally under way. the british and irish lions first test against new zealand in auckland. it has been captained by peter o‘mahony. they are hoping to end the all blacks formidable record. they haven‘t lost at eden park for 23 yea rs. haven‘t lost at eden park for 23 years. it will not be easy for them. they have had sex warm up games, four victories. we‘re hoping the recent performance, two wins in the last few days, will continue on. as they run out, this is extraordinary,
8:37 am
they run out, this is extraordinary, the stadium. the all blacks, it is worth repeating, they have not lost their 423 years. 23 years, just incredible. 1994, france. even in that game, it was the last try in the last few minutes. they are a force to be reckoned with. we will keep you updated on what happens there. it is going to be quite some occasion. watching. since it started in finland, it‘s proved to be hugely successful at getting girls active for the first time. now hobby horse showjumping has arrived in the uk. ahead of this weekend‘s inaugural national championships we sent mike along for a canter round the course. it‘s the stuff of dreams for seven—year—old olivia. her imagination running free in a real
8:38 am
showjumping ring as she races against the clock, hoping for a clear round ahead of the inaugural national championships. i like jumping because you can go as high as you want and i find that really cool. here we have mike riding breakfast charlie. this horse is a great steed for him. for those of us who cannot afford a horse or have been challenged by lack of riding ability, this is an ideal way of experiencing a showjumping competition. it is my first one ever, and i am being put through my paces. it is all about the angles and getting as tight as you can around the course. the fences may not be huge, but in heat, in the summer it is certainly a physical challenge. exhausting. and try telling 5—year—old eli that this is somewhat silly. he did not know when he was beaten and had the stamina to keep going. he was glowing with pride when he eventually finished,
8:39 am
especially because he had made his own horse. his name is invisible. he looks fantastic. did you enjoy that? yes. everybody can get on. small kids can have a go and also the big kids. and not everybody has an opportunity to be around a horse but hobbyhorses are. they are far less work compared to a real horse as well. and less time involved on the training side, lam sure. it all began in finland to encourage girls, mainly in the inner city, to get more active in equestrian sport. now tens of thousands turn up for competitions. their story is told in a new movie, the hobbyhorse revolution, which reflects the height of the fences now and shows how competitive it has become. while for the show in berkshire, the first national championship was the answer
8:40 am
when they could not show real horse jumping any longer. the olympics did great work for us and i think everybody is excited about horses. if we can bring more people into the game, that would be really good. you can see what it feels like when the horse jumps so you have that feel, the excitement. it is funjumping around. satisfying when you clear the jumps. there is now a dressage section. dancing to music with hobbyhorses. but it‘s the jumping that has most newcomers in the saddle. an extraordinary event, no escaping that. we will have the weather for you shortly, and a full look at the newspapers coming up later. let‘s bring you back to the main story this morning. 4000 people were asked to evacuate their homes in camden overnight after the leader
8:41 am
of the council, georgia gould, said that their safety could not be guaranteed. and georgia gould joins us now from the swiss cottage leisure centre in camden where some residents spent the night. thank you for your time this morning. i wonder if you could update us on the number of people that have been evacuated from the tower blocks? so, we've had a huge effort overnight to evacuate people. we had 650 households that have moved out of the tower blocks. we have had everyone, council staff, volunteers, different councillors, all coming together with the fire service to move people safely out of their accommodation. i've heard accou nts their accommodation. i've heard accounts from some individuals that say they are going to stay in their homes. have they been told they have to to evacuate or have they been requested to do so? we have 83 people that chose last night to stay
8:42 am
in the property. we did have the fire service is going to talk to those people, explaining the risk. they chose to stay overnight. we are going to start knocking on doors again this morning and telling people it is not safe to stay in those buildings and that is the advice of the fire service. we are going to be moving them into accommodation. but the council position is that this is a voluntary arrangement? you are not going to force people to leave, correct? we have voluntarily evacuated those buildings. that was on the basis of advice i had from the fire services yesterday, i met them at 5pm and they told me it was not safe to stay in those buildings. obviously the last thing i wanted to do was cause this huge distress, moving people out of their homes. i asked if there was anything we could do, we could put in place fire stations outside the buildings, but they said there was nothing we could do to secure the building overnight and that it was not safe. we asked people to move. if people, after things are
8:43 am
explained today, are still not moving, it would become a matterfor the fire services. could you take us through some of the specifics on the reasons for evacuating people? we spoke to sajid javid earlier this morning and he talked about multiple other failings. that is aside from theissue other failings. that is aside from the issue of the cladding. could you ta ke the issue of the cladding. could you take us through what the elements are that lead to you making the decision to evacuate, as opposed to leaving people in while you change the padding? we reacted very swiftly to test blocks following the tragedy in grenfell. we were the first of the testing centres with the cladding. the results were not what we expected. we found the installation was safe, but the external cladding was combustible material, which is not what we have commissioned. obviously that was deeply disappointing. we immediately shared that with residents and we held a public meeting on thursday evening. at that time, our message
8:44 am
was that we still believed the box to be safe, because of the insulation. but residents at that meeting raised a number of concerns around fire safety. we asked the fire services to come in and they did the checks on the box all day and identified a number of issues around insulation, around gas pipes going into flats, around fire doors. the message to me was that the combination of the flammable external cladding and these issues inside the block meant that the building was safe. a lot of people, as you mentioned, people have been saying to us that they are praising the council for the swift response. it remains the case, though, that these people had been living in a building, ora number of these people had been living in a building, or a number of buildings, that they should never have been in? imean, it that they should never have been in? i mean, it raises huge questions for us i mean, it raises huge questions for us and we are going to investigate every element. questions for us locally, nationally about fire regulation. i think post—grenfell we
8:45 am
are ina regulation. i think post—grenfell we are in a completely different situation and we have to ask all of these questions. right now, my number one priority is to get residents securely out of the building, to get them into secure temporary accommodation and do the work we need to do to make the buildings safe. you made the decision yourself. have you got reassu ra nces decision yourself. have you got reassurances from central government about costing? have you asked if the money will be provided, firstly to do the work and second to housestyles many families? we have acted as swiftly as we possibly can. we booked hotel rooms ourselves, we are working with student halls, with other boroughs around temporary accommodation. we are not stopping and waiting for anyone. we just have to get on and move people safely because it is distressing enough. we have been here all night talking to people that have been asked to leave their homes on a friday evening, at such short notice. that is deeply, deeply upsetting. i think the number one concern is to move those people safely into accommodation and we are
8:46 am
not worrying about money at the moment. obviously we will be having conversations with central government later on. we are taking legal advice around some of the contracts around the cladding. right now, the only thing that is our priority is to move people swiftly into secure accommodation.“ priority is to move people swiftly into secure accommodation. if i could just go back to the issue we we re could just go back to the issue we were talking about a moment ago, i understand a lot of this is unprecedented in terms of how you reacted and how this is handled. i was left slightly confused, those people that want to remain in the tower blocks, and you said there are 83 people, currently, can you just clarify, if, after a conversation today, they say they still want to remain, will they be ordered to leave the buildings? is that the point we are reaching?” leave the buildings? is that the point we are reaching? i need to clarify two things. there is one tower block, blashford, that we
8:47 am
worked on overnight and we believe to be safe. it is the smallest tower block and there were far less works identified by the fire services. we said to the residents in that block that they can stay there. we were saying to other people that they can go home, in that one particular building. otherfour, we expect go home, in that one particular building. other four, we expect the way to take between two and four weeks. we are doing everything to make that happen as quickly as possible. for the people in those blocks, our firm advice possible. for the people in those blocks, ourfirm advice is possible. for the people in those blocks, our firm advice is that they need to move out of those blocks because they are not safe. if they absolutely refuse to, we have to discuss that with the fire services. the decision as to whether they would literally be forced to move from their homes, that would be one that you make or is that decision made by the fire service?” that you make or is that decision made by the fire service? i think at that point we would have to request support from the fire services. at that point, they would be obliged to move? i know you haven‘t reached
8:48 am
that point yet, but we have spoken to some people that say they want to stay and don‘t see why they have to leave. last night, it was late, some people... you know, in any normal circumstances we are always open and transparent. we discuss this with people, we explained our concerns. we were told this at 5pm. we had to move swiftly to guarantee people‘s safety. it was late in the middle of the night, we were asking people to come out of their homes. that was a huge amount of distress. being cried on, shouted at, everything, people are very distressed. in the morning, we will have the fire services in the box, talking to those people, talking to them about temporary accommodation. i hope we can have a real conversation. their strong advice to us is that the blog is not safe. there is going to be a public inquiry. you were alluding to your own inquiries that will be happening before that. people are saying they wa nt a nswe rs
8:49 am
before that. people are saying they want answers quickly. can you tell usa want answers quickly. can you tell us a little bit more about your own investigations? yes, over the next couple of weeks our absolute priority is to be having people securely accommodated and then moving them back into those blocks when we‘ve do not work. moving all resources to do the work as quickly as possible. we know we want to get home. after that, we need to do a review of everything. how we work, with pfi contracts, which is what the block was, fire safety, every element of this. we stand ready to work with the fire services, to work with national government, to do that review. but we have a lot of questions. georgia gould, thank you very much for your time. that was the leader of camden council, following the decision to evacuate the tower blocks. four million homes now use smart meters — devices that are meant to give us more control on how much gas and electricity we use. we will be talking about this
8:50 am
shortly with paul lewis from money box. not too bad this weekend. there is sunshine around. weather watchers have been out and about taking photos of the blue sky. it will not be as blue and hot as it was last weekend. still a lot of usable whether to be had both today and tomorrow. quite a lot of cloud across southern areas and into was the west, sunshine across central and eastern areas. that is how it is going to be into the afternoon as well. the wind is coming from the west and we have shelter to the east. the low pressure will bring quite a windy day to the northern isles of scotland, with gales developing across the north of the highlands. a little bit of cloud, or two showers. in southern counties, we have a west weather front,
8:51 am
producing outbreaks of live and patchy rain. it could be a damp start in glastonbury this morning. temperatures between 18 and 20 degrees. through the afternoon, i think it is an improving picture. the best of the sunshine is to the east of the high ground, the east of wales and into the south—east, spells of sunshine. gales, unseasonably windy across scotland this afternoon. quite a warm feeling. even where you have the cloud. particularly in the south—east, we are looking at 2425 degrees. a fine end to the day. aq showers across the south—east which will clear away. through the night, it looks like we could see cloud back western areas and across western hills, blustery showers again for the northern half of scotla nd again for the northern half of scotland and the northern isles. that is because this area of low pressure will be slowly moving away. more north—westerly wind and it will
8:52 am
introduce slightly fresher air. what that will also do is introduce brighter skies to the north, for scotland, northern ireland. some good spells of sunshine. further south, it will be cloudier. a few spots of rain. top temperatures 2122 and a cooler, fresherfeel further north and west. a next weekend. there is some good sunshine out there. we were talking about smart meters earlier. they are expected to give us more control over how much electricity we use. the government wa nts electricity we use. the government wants every home to have won by 2020. there are concerns that the robot programmes running behind schedule. although this is from radio 4 money box. what issues are you looking at? smart meters are supposed to put you more in control. you have a display in your home showing you how much you are using in pounds and pence. that is
8:53 am
supposed to help us reduce the amount we use and save money. it also means you should get accurate bills, rather than estimated bills. there was concern this week when, to everyone‘s surprise, the government announced it will take longer powers to oversee this scheme, the powers for the government to intervene were going to end next year. now they are going to end next year. now they are going to end next year. now they are going to be extended to 2023. there is some fear that the energy industry is not going to meet its target of getting everyone a smart meter by 2020. how necessary is it to have them? well, the government insists it is a necessary thing. it will help save money, it will save the industry money. one big problem is that the meters that are currently being fitted and will be fitted until the end of this year, they stop you doing the other thing they stop you doing the other thing the government says we should do, which is switching supplier. these smart meters will not work with a
8:54 am
different supplier. once you have got one, if you switch supplier, your meter will go dumb, in almost every case. so there is a disadvantage in terms of getting the best deal, but has not been trumpeted by the government. best deal, but has not been trumpeted by the governmentm doesn‘t seem amazingly thought out. it doesn‘t seem my people will be jumping on the bandwagon? everybody has been offered one, i am sure the viewers have been offered them by the energy company. if you say yes, you will get one. you don‘t have to have one at the moment. my view, myself, is that if i was to have one i would wait until the new version, sometime later this year or early next year, so you can still switch supplier. the whole programme is costing at least £11 billion. at the moment, as you say, there are real problems. problems with who is in charge, is it the government department, energy uk, individual
8:55 am
suppliers, smart meters gb, which is responsible for promoting it? we are talking about england, scotland and wales, not northern ireland, which decided not to take part in this. how smart are they? do they use mobile phone data? the current generation do, which means not everybody can have one because some people don‘t have adequate mobile phone coverage. that is why each supplier uses a mobile phone system and you cannot switch supplier. the new meters that are due out later this year, maybe early next year, they use a specially built communications network which, incidentally, cost £3 billion. that has been switched on and is not being used except for testing. they will send this data back over the special communications network. 99% of homes in the country will be able to use it. that is supposed to be
8:56 am
secure. gchq, the government communications network, have been involved in designing it. we believe it will be secure. there are concerns about security, there are concerns about security, there are concerns about security, there are concerns about hacking and there are concerns about hacking and there are concerns that, really, we will not make the savings to match the cost of £11 billion. least this should end estimated bills? the toing and froing you have an energy suppliers? yes, that is one of the big advantages. the energy company knows how much you have used every half—hour, if you let it. it can send an accurate bill, like they used to every quarter, and you can pay that off. the disadvantage for some people is that it means in the winter, your bills will be much bigger than in the summer. people do like spreading it out. i suspect some people will want to carry on with estimated bills. yes, accurate bills are one of the selling points of the new system and that should work. some people are already
8:57 am
getting the accurate bills. 4 million households, as you mentioned, there is about 24 million households to go, i think. there is a big task to fit the meters. at the moment, they have been fitted at a rate of about 1 moment, they have been fitted at a rate of about1 million every three months, that have to do with drupal to meet the target by 2020. that is why there is some scepticism the industry will meet it. thank you very much. always lots of numbers. very well explained. thank you very much. headlines are coming up. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. thousands of people are told to leave their homes as high rise blocks in north london are evacuated over fire safety fears. concerns were raised over cladding and gas pipe insulation. more than 800 homes are affected. the council has called it an "unprecedented operation". post—grenfell we are
8:58 am
8:59 am
9:00 am

38 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on