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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 26, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11... theresa may is meeting the leader of the democratic unionist party in downing street to finalise an agreement on supporting a minority conservative government. this is the scene live in downing street. we will bring you details of any jjas it . , . , after cladding on 60 high—rise buildings across england fails fire safety tests. the prime minister will set out the full details of the rights the government wants to give eu citizens living in britain, after brexit. six police officers are injured during clashes in east london over the death of a man who was stopped for an alleged traffic offence. also... the dawn of a new era for the navy. a new aircraft carrier — hms queen elizabeth — is due to set sail for the first time from the rosyth dockyard in fife. and alarm on a spanish beach as a
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shark in majorca sends out of the sea. good morning. it's monday 26th june. i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. a deal between the conservatives and the democratic unionist party to support theresa may's minority government in parliament is expected to be announced very shortly. the prime minister is meeting senior dup figures inside downing street now, to finalise the details for a so—called "confidence and supply" arrangement — under which the dup‘s ten mps will vote with the 317 conservatives to form a majority in the house of commons. we will bring you the latest on
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those talks. let's go to chris mason in downing street. what are you expecting? well, they arrived, the dup, around 15 or 20 minutes ago, greeted by the prime minister on the steps of downing street. lots of beaming smiles on the expectation is that we should get details pretty soon, that we should get details pretty $0011, once that we should get details pretty soon, once that meeting breaks up, as do the exact nature of the deal that has been struck. as you say it is going to be what's known in westminster parlance as confidence and supply, one of westminster‘s ludicrous phrases. this one basically means that the dup will back the conservatives on a very big votes, so votes of confidence and votes, so votes of confidence and votes of supply, which is political speakfor votes of supply, which is political speak for money, so things like a budget. there are many interesting things to ask when we get the detail but what is interesting is that confidence and supply is not a wholescale coalition, which means there will be loads and loads of votes co m e there will be loads and loads of votes come on down the track where there will be big questions as to
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whether the dup will back the conservatives on what are deemed to be less concerned vegan —— significant votes and of course what kind of deal have the dup strut? in other words, what is for them? they're been questions about the amount of money the dup and northern ireland might benefit from as a result of this deal. the specifics of that we await when we hear details of exactly what kind of deal has been reached. how quickly should we get those details? we should get at least an outline, we understand, later this morning, perhaps as soon as that meeting is concluded. in fa ct, as that meeting is concluded. in fact, right now some camera crews and photographers are leaving the door of number 11 downing st. a few have been invited in to take some pictures at the top of this meeting so pictures at the top of this meeting so that suggests they are on to the nitty—gritty now that the cameras have been kicked out. we should get some details in terms of the outline arrangement. we are 18 days on now
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from the general election. itjust took five days for a formal coalition agreement with the liberal democrats and the conservatives in 2010. 18 days in democrats and the conservatives in 2010.18 days in and democrats and the conservatives in 2010. 18 days in and we're democrats and the conservatives in 2010.18 days in and we're going to get details of confidence and supply arrangement. what we don't know is just how much detail will actually be in the detail that is published. we will have to wait for them to roll that out but we will hope to hear from arlene foster, roll that out but we will hope to hearfrom arlene foster, the roll that out but we will hope to hear from arlene foster, the leader of the dup, here in the street after that meeting but we will have to wait and see what she has to say. that meeting but we will have to wait and see what she has to saym is an interesting comparison with what happened in 2010. just five days then. why is this taking so long? it is a fascinating comparison because just five days in may was the title of a book that was written by lord adonis, the labour peer immediately after those wrangles after 2010 and the extraordinary pace and was because the conservatives were having talks with the conservatives and to extend labour and after a very short period of time were able to announce a
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coalition agreement in which you had liberal democrats are sitting around the cabinet table and that kind of dolly political romance moment in the rose garden of downing street between david cameron and nick clegg. this time in order to reach an arrangement which is far, far looser, far more informal with far greater distance between the two parties in terms of the extent to which either can say, we are not com pletely which either can say, we are not completely in bed with one another year, has taken much longer. i guess there has been a lot on the prime minister's plate with groenefeld tower and the start of the browser negotiations but you hearfrom sources on both sides, conservatives and the dup, that the dup are very wily negotiators and wanted to get as good a deal as they could possibly get and in so doing were willing to play for time in order to secure it. the incentive has been to
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try to get a deal before the queen's speech is voted on an weapon states but afterwards there is going to be time for the other parties to look at exactly what has been agreed and if, as it seems, there is hard cash on the table, there will be claims that these votes have effectively been bought and amounts for other areas to have special treatment. what pressures arise from this? there has been a hope for some time that there would be some sort of deal arranged and announced before the votes on the queen's speech, the government's programme, coming in a couple of days, although funnily enough the timetable has kept slipping because a week or so ago people were speculating there would be some sort of announcement prior to the queen's speech the view was taken that given there would be any votes on it for the best part of the week afterwards, there wasn't any immediate rush and there has been an expectation from the very start that the dup would be willing to back the conservatives in those early queen's
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speech votes and a lot of discussion about the extent to which the negotiations going on were about votes further down the track, but to a nswer votes further down the track, but to answer your question about the pressures , answer your question about the pressures, there are huge political pressures, there are huge political pressures on the conservatives around the specifics of that deal with the dup because whilst, up torpoint, the conservatives can make the argument that investment in northern ireland is a worthy cause because northern ireland is a relatively poor at region of the uk, others will say, if that is the argument, how come it hasn't been happening to this extent before? and if you are an mp or a member of the devolved government in wales or scotla nd devolved government in wales or scotland or you are a mayor in one of the english cities or a council in one of the english regions, you might make the argument, what about money for us? politically, a very tricky one for theresa may to articulate. from the democratic unionist party point of view, why would you ask as much as you can get? that is the nature of the
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business politicians are in cost trying to get the best deals on their constituents and their region, so from that perspective the dup could make the argument that they're just doing theirjob. let me just interrupt you, chris, because we've been looking while we've been hearing from you at pictures of the two tea m hearing from you at pictures of the two team sitting opposite each other and this looks like now the signing. it is not live but we are just getting these pictures through and, as you can see, they are pretty rough and ready. jeffrey donaldson and gary williamson sitting... there you go, that's the moment. gavin williamson and jeffrey donaldson of the dup. the two chief whips signing each document. and counter signing. so, that is the deal that we've just heard outlined by chris. we don't have all the nitty—gritty of the
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deal but what that means is that the conservative party can now bank a majority when the queen's speech is voted on in the commons on wednesday, thanks to the support of those ten dup mps. that's the moment, then, chris. it is signed and sealed, we just need to hear exactly what they have properly signed up to. we can see evidence of it being signed and sealed without actually quite knowing yet, because the discussions are still ongoing behind me, exactly what they have signed and sealed up to. interesting seeing those pictures of the two chief whips. what a job they have got and what a partnership they are going to have to attempt to strike because even with the addition of those ten mps from the dup, the majority, such as it is, for the looser arrangement between the conservatives and the dup, is still pretty small. you will still only
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ever need a handful of conservative mps with a particular peeve about particular conservative policies to go to the chief whip and say, i'm not sure we can support you on this particular vote, and he will be under pressure because the numbers again still won't quite add up. so you can imagine the volume of text m essa 9 es you can imagine the volume of text messages and all the rest of it that are going to be flashing between the two chief whips in the coming months and years, if the agreement lasts that long... there will be a lot of them. everyone has been watching this and seeing how long it has taken to get a deal with the dup and how hard they have pushed, which is a clear indication of how much power anybody who wants to effectively withdraw support from the government will have. yes, exactly. if you want to articulate and get a sense of exactly how powerful the dup are, then yes, you can point to the time it has taken for this arrangement,
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18 days, to be arrived at but, as you say, they are ten mps out of 650. any other ten mps on the conservative and dup side effectively wield exactly the same amount of power because if they withdraw their support from any particular conservative proposal, theresa may is yet again struggling and that is another very big difference from 2010, the inevitable comparison we draw with 2010, when the conservatives failed to cross the conservatives failed to cross the finishing line of getting overall the door to themselves. when the conservatives did that deal with the conservatives did that deal with the lib dems, not only was it a formal coalition, which offer greater stability, they sat on a majority between the two of them but of around 50. the difference now is that you add together the conservatives and dup and the majority is still absolutely tiny, which means a very, very small number of conservative mps — pretty much the number you could fit in a big taxi — are sufficient to hold
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the prime minister to ransom at any point they choose to. thank you robert, chris. let's gone out our correspondent gareth gordon in belfast and we will be back to downing street as soon as there is any movement because they will be coming out and speaking, we hope. tell us first of all what the reaction there is going to be to this deal. that very much depends what is that deal. if itjust money alone, one can seems that the parties will ultimately welcome a deal. who is going to turn their nose but lots of money for education, and infrastructure, if thatis education, and infrastructure, if that is all it is? if there is anything political in it, then the main party that the dup have got to seal a deal with two put stormont back up again, sinn fein, of course the power—sharing executive has been down since sinn fein resigned in january... sinn fein will be all overla p january... sinn fein will be all overlap and if you thought it was difficult getting a deal at with the dup, i'm pretty much assure that the
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deal here at stormont is going to be even more difficult, so the parties here, particularly sinn fein, are going to want to know all that is that deal. they will take time to pour over it and we have a deadline of thursday or indeed tomorrow night if you believe sinn fein, they say because so much time has been lost and dup mps will be back over westminster for the queen's speech, for the votes on wednesday and thursday, so much time and sinn fein are going to want to know and go through this deal with a fine tooth comb before they can agree anything and even if they are happy with that deal, there are still other outstanding issues between the dup and sinn fein before a deal to withdraw —— restore power—sharing is agreed. the sun's political editor is saying on twitter that the deal is saying on twitter that the deal is worth £1 billion. we've got no more detail on that but it could be a considerable boost for northern ireland. tell us more about what you would anticipate to it what has been
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asked for? that depends who you ask and when you ask it. there have been figures in the public domain of the dup having asked for £2 billion. the dup having asked for £2 billion. the dup came out and said that was wide of the mark and there are also conservative sources who said the dup had been asking for too much. anotherfigure emerged dup had been asking for too much. another figure emerged last week of 750 million. we're pretty close to knowing exactly what the figure is an speculation isn't going to help. we will know soon but those are the type of figures one imagines we are talking about. just a bit more detail coming through. we are also hearing that the deal sees the pension strip a lot and fuel payments stay in place. that will be an interesting one. they are both issues that have been on the table. the work and pensions secretary david gauke is previously said the pension strip a lot is not sustainable, but the triple lock
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means people getting the pension get an annual increase of whatever is the highest between the rises in average earnings and rises in inflation of 2.5%, and that the work and pensions secretary says has a ratchet effect because pensions go up ratchet effect because pensions go up by ratchet effect because pensions go up by the hire of inflation or earnings and it is unsustainable. but it seems to be that, according to the initial reports... sorry about those pictures. we will go back to those pictures as soon as we can but those initial reports are that the pension strip a lot stays in place and also winter fuel payments, so a considerable commitment on expenditure by the tories if that is the case. it was in the tory manifesto that the triple lock would be reduced to a double lock so yet more unpicking of the party manifesto we assume since the party manifesto we assume since the election when the tories lost the election when the tories lost the majority, hence being a
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situation of doing the deal to get the support of those ten dup mps. we will be back with you at the moment, gareth, bulatov go to downing street because chris is there and i know you keep looking over your shoulder to see if anyone is coming out. we are hoping they will be out soon and we can heara are hoping they will be out soon and we can hear a bit more. but this is really interesting. the initial reports are that the pension strip a lot is apparently in place, and winter fuel payments stay in place, as well as the suggestion that there is £1 billion of spending for northern ireland. yet. we await official confirmation of the specifics but of those are confirmed that on the go would be a surprise, given that those were things at the dup were very keen on and things approved controversial in the conservative manifesto. what effectively is going on — we saw those pictures of the signing of a deal whilst we await formal confirmation of the exact nature of what the meeting includes relatively
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soon. . . what the meeting includes relatively soon... what those pictures didn't show but could just as well have done was the conservative manifesto, or release significant chunks of it, being torn up in public because that is effectively what it amounts to amber conceives —— conversation the conservatives have been having with the dup... conservatives have been having with the dup. .. because conservatives have been having with the dup... because the manifesto is a proposed programme the government of the two have had to go through that document, compare and contrast it with the dup‘s on document and work out where they can find overla ps, work out where they can find overlaps, where they can find what amounts to a common programme so on those two issues, where conservatives have wanted to make significant changes and where there was potential scope for considerable savings to the exchequer in terms of public spending, it would appear, so we hear, that those will be staying. but we await official confirmation of the deal and exactly how much money might be heading in northern ireland's direction, as my twitchiness as i look over my
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shoulder, continues. every time i look in your direction, i fear something is happening behind meet it up it is like being at a panto! like a panto, i will shout "behind you" if that door opens. where is the money going to come from to pay for all of this? that is what is officially known as a very good question and the question we will be asking to theresa may because, as we've heard, central to the politics of the uk for the past six or seven yea rs has of the uk for the past six or seven years has been the whole question of the deficit, the whole question of national debt and whilst it has receded in its political salience with the chancellor philip hammond making the argument for some time now that the government would push back the point at which the books would balance, the simple reality is, you look at any treasury document that comes out at the time of budgets and queen's speeches and that kind of thing and it points to the fab but government still spends more money than it earns in tax and
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that means that national debt continues to rise in terms of the overall raw number and the conservatives have had to keep pushing back that time when they say they would balance the books. you add to the fact that lots in westminster have concluded that one of the lessons of the general election is that the blood getting rather tired of what many see as austerity and then you think, hang ona minute, austerity and then you think, hang on a minute, on top of all of that as well as cancelled manifesto promises from the conservative perspective comes this whole issue of where you find money to fund what the dup wants because that, at some stage, requires additional taxation somewhere, or does it require taking money away from somewhere else? and then, crucially, where? where does that money come from? i haven't been able to answer your question because we don't know it yet but that will be an absolutely central question that theresa may will be asked. be an absolutely central question that theresa may will be askedm terms of values and conviction, it looks like we are seeing a government that is a hostage to
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fortune doing things because of political pragmatism, not obviously out of conviction because what we saw in the manifesto was presumably there conviction. going forward, is it absolutely clear what the position of this conservative government is on austerity, which is obviously one of the key issues, along with brexit? know, isn't absolutely clear. what we... we have clearly had hence of from philip hammond when he was on the andrew marr show eight days ago, a week last sunday, was that there is a recognition in the treasury that the whole business of cutbacks in public spending some people feel they have reached their tolerance for and the conservatives seem to be recognising that in some of their outlook on public policy and pushing back that self—imposed deadline about when they would get the books to balance. in terms of that whole question of political pragmatism of the deal,
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the argument they make is that the conservatives and dup share quite a lot of political ideals, they are both broadly on the right, both conservative with a small sea as well as a big sea in terms of the party in great britain but they often vote outside of any arrangements around confidence and supply in the same direction in the house of commons. so up to that point, they are natural partners. but on social issues like gay marriage and abortion there is 1 million miles between the political instincts of many in the dup and the political instincts of many within the conservatives. they will argue that very rarely will be an issue in the context of the deal they are striking at westminster but it will be an issue in terms of how awkward it will be upsetjunctures. be an issue in terms of how awkward it will be upset junctures.m be an issue in terms of how awkward it will be upsetjunctures. if the pension strip a lot and other things we re pension strip a lot and other things were in the manifesto out of
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conviction —— pensions triple lock and other things were in the ma nifesto and other things were in the manifesto out of conviction, why are they dumping it? i think ultimately, if there is a recognition from the conservatives that there are particular elements of the conservative manifesto — i still can't resist looking over my shoulder — that they are simply not willing to wear, the democratic unionists, the conservatives have faced absolutely no choice but to dump them, particularly if on policies theresa may and downing street fears that there might even be some conservative mps who would be some conservative mps who would be willing to be awkward around political policies. they may fear that certain ideas went down less well than others on the doorstep in the election campaign so anything that theresa may perceives to be remotely sensitive or controversial, or 0akley in danger of costing her a commons vote, those policies have simply had to bejumped and that
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extends beyond just things the dup might not be willing to buy because, as you were saying before, the time it has taken to strike this deal shows how important those ten dup mps are but that could be extended to any ten conservative mps who have a particular grievance about a particular issue, hence stripping back anything that is deemed to be too controversial. thank you very much. we will be back with you as soon as anyone does appear behind you but for now, greatjob. thank you but for now, greatjob. thank you very much. theresa may will be given an update later on the number of high—rise buildings that may pose a similar fire risk to grenfell tower. so far, samples of cladding from 60 tower blocks, in 25 local authority areas in england, have failed safety tests — every single one that has so far been tested. the government says it will offer support to councils, but hasn't put a figure on how much. housing minister alok sharma says testing is going on round the clock. we have put in place a very clear process to make sure that buildings that are identified
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with a particular type of aluminium cladding are tested. we have test facilities that are able to test 100 samples a day and that can be extended if required, and we're making sure that as soon as we find out that a building has failed and has got cladding which is noncompliant, immediately the local authority is informed, the local fire service is informed and they go to the building and do the right checks and clearly, in the case of camden, where it wasn'tjust cladding but there were multiple other failures when it came to fire safety, people had to be evacuated. i have nothing but admiration for the way people have dealt with that who have been affected by this. the key priority for us has to bid to keep people safe and that is why we are making sure this process works as quickly as possible in terms of testing. thousands of residents of four tower blocks in the swiss cottage area of north—west london are still being housed in temporary accommodation after being told to leave their homes on friday following fire safety concerns. 200 more are refusing to leave.
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0ur correspondent keith doyle is there. what is the latest there? good morning from the leisure centre here in swiss cottage. this has been used asa in swiss cottage. this has been used as a refuge for the thousands of people that have been moved out of the tower blocks which tower right across this part of london, just over to the side. we understand that around 1a people stayed in the leisure centre last night, so clearly that side of this operation is winding down. the council says it hopes to find accommodation for them today. indeed, we saw some people still leaving those tower blocks this morning, some people saying they had only just this morning, some people saying they had onlyjust come back to london, they did want to stay there and felt unsafe, they packed their bags and left it up you gave a figure of 200 people did we are unable to get an exact figure from camden council of how many people are still staying put in those tower blocks. we have been told is why
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there might be as many as 120 households, which would be more people have moved in. i am simply not able to give you those figures right at the moment but we do know that workers begun on those buildings. 200 fire doors were delivered, workers under way to make sure they're installed and they are self—closing fire doors. 0ther sure they're installed and they are self—closing fire doors. other work has been done on ceilings and walls. that work is under way, and i am joined by professor arnold dicks, and you were brought in by governments around the world to investigate fires and you were brought in after the camberwell fire a few years ago. what were the findings? i was involved in the investigation assisting in that and the coroner found there were issues with the cladding the way that it burned, there were serious questions in relation to the state put policy and there were also issues in
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relation to the renovations that occurred in lakenhall house. we done how many of those recommendations are being carried out. we have not been told that by the council but what these 60 blocks that have failed this fire safety test... what sort of work visit to bring them up to scratch, to make them safe, to follow these recommendations? to scratch, to make them safe, to follow these recommendation57m terms of following the recommendations, the engineering is very straightforward. 200 fire doors are coming from the building close to hear. that is exactly what you would expect to see if there was a fire in the building. i observed miller all being fire in the building. i observed millerall being taken, fire in the building. i observed miller all being taken, suggesting that what we call compartmentalised asian is an issue and they are onto it. this isn't difficult from an engineering point of view. is a matter of logistics, stage it and getting the job done. these buildings were saved it appears that this has been discovered not to be
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safe and they can make it safe again. the biggest of the cladding? camden said it was other issues. 0ther fundamental problems with these buildings if that is the case? this isn'tjust these buildings if that is the case? this isn't just about cladding. these buildings if that is the case? this isn'tjust about cladding. this is about a system that has gone wrong. that was the case in lakanal house as well. the coating isjust one of the parts that make a building safe so the cladding is unsafe, there are issues with compartmentalisation, you can see with the fire doors coming and there are fired problems did up the mineral wool means there are other issues with the joints and what have you. there are a series of problems collectively — catastrophic. you. there are a series of problems collectively - catastrophic. in your experience investigating fires around the world, is there a danger that the fundamental structure of these tower blocks might be at fault? no, i don't think so. whether what we are looking at are inherently correctly designed to tower blocks. when they were built they were safe. there has been the passage of time and people have lost their way. it is a form of
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intellectual corruption. just forgotten how they were meant to be put together. now camden has coming, they have done an audit and are getting it fixed. that is professor arnold dicks from the university of west syd ney arnold dicks from the university of west sydney to talk there were only around 1a people staying here last night and the council are saying this is going to turn into an information centre, rather than an overnight centre for people. so people who still want to be rehoused or moved have issues about where they are moved to, they can come here and discuss it with the council. for now, back to the studio. scotland yard says six of its officers were injured last night during a protest in east london over the death of a man last week, six days after he'd been stopped by police. bricks were thrown and bins set on fire near forest gate police station. the independent police complaints commission has said a postmortem examination on edir frederico da costa showed that, contrary to some claims, he had no spinal injuries caused by officers. a 16—year—old boy has been charged with the rape of an eight—year—old girl in a park in manchester.
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the attack is alleged to have happened on saturday evening in the moston area of the city. the boy is due to appear at manchester youth court today. theresa may will set out more details this afternoon of how the government plans to treat more than three million eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. last week, she outlined proposals to offer eu nationals "settled status" — which would give those who have spent five years in the uk equal rights on health care, education and benefits — but only if british people living in the european union were given similar entitlements. the former music moguljonathan king has appeared in court charged with 18 sexual offences relating to nine boys aged 1a to 16. the 72—year—old dj is accused of carrying out the offences between between 1970 and 1986. let's go to our correspondent lisa, who is at the hearing and this outside westminster magistrates court. tell us what happened. well,
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mr king appeared here under the name kenneth king, wearing a black suit, a white shirt and a blue tie. he stood in the dock to confirm his name, his age, 72, and that he lives in bayswater, west london. he is charged with 18 sexual offences relating to nine boys aged between 14 relating to nine boys aged between 1a and 16. three are for serious sexual assaults and the others are indecent assaults. he is accused of carrying them out between 1970 and 1986 in walton on thames and he nodded and smiled as he was bailed to appear before southwark crown court onjuly to appear before southwark crown court on july the 24th to appear before southwark crown court onjuly the 24th and afterwards, he posed for photographers, smiling and making a thumbs up sign. thank you very much. we are getting some comments through from to me is a and arlene foster on that deal between the tory party and the dup -- that deal between the tory party and
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the dup —— from theresa may and arlene foster. we are expecting the dup representatives, arlene foster and others, too, come out shortly. we saw the pictures of the signing of the deal inside downing street. we are expecting them to come out and speak to the media but arlene foster has said we are delighted that we have reached this agreement which works obviously for national stability in terms of the northern ireland executive, and we are determined to sit in place as soon as possible because we because we believe we need a strong voice in northern ireland when dealing with not least the brexit issue. speaking inside number ten, theresa may has said as we set out at the beginning of the talks, we share many values, in wanting to see prosperity across the uk, the value of the union and the uk, the value of the union and the different bond across parts of the different bond across parts of the united kingdom. we want to see that protected and enhanced and we share the desire to ensure a strong government able to put through its programme and provide for issues
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like brexit negotiations but also national suit you to issues. so the agreement we have come to is a very, very good one and we look forward to working with you. the prime minister's spokesman has said that all relevant documents from any deal with the dup will be published as soon as is of all. chris mason is in downing street, where all eyes and cameras are focused on the door, as we wait for any movement there. chris, we are hoping someone is going to emerge shortly to give us a bit more detail. yes, you and me both on that. the microphones are setup, three of those floppy microphone set up just outside the door. some of the delegation travelling with the leader of the dup, arlene foster, have already come out of the building, so any moment now, which is always a dangerous phrase for a reporter reporting live to use. the door
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opens, here comes arlene foster, let's see what she has to say. so, good morning. following the general election results and the mandate given to us by the people of northern ireland, we have been in discussions with the conservative and unionist party as to how we can support the minority conservative government in parliament. today, we have reached an agreement with the conservative party on support for government in parliament. this agreement will operate to deliver a sta ble agreement will operate to deliver a stable government in the united kingdom's national interest at this vital time. throughout these discussions, our guiding principle has been our commitment to acting in the national interest in accordance with our shared objectives for strengthening and enhancing our precious union. in concluding this
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wide—ranging agreement, we have done so on wide—ranging agreement, we have done so on the basis of advancing the security of our nation, building prosperity for all and supporting an exit from the european union that benefits all parts of the united kingdom. the details of our agreement and future working arrangements will be published in full. as part of our policy agreement, both parties have agreed that there will be no change to the pensions triple lock and the universal nature of the winter fuel payments across the united kingdom. we are agreed of meeting the nato commitment are spending 2% of gdp on the armed forces and we are further committed to the armed forces cove na nt committed to the armed forces covenant and its implementation throughout the united kingdom. following our discussions, the conservative party has recognised
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the case for higher funding in northern ireland, given our unique history and indeed circumstances over re ce nt history and indeed circumstances over recent decades. the uk government will publish, as an annex to ouragreement, government will publish, as an annex to our agreement, the details of financial support that will be made available to northern ireland. our aim in these negotiations has been to deliver for all of the people of northern ireland and the support measures which we are announcing will be to the benefit of all our people. they will boost the economy and invest in new infrastructure, as well as investing in the future of our health and education sectors and a range of other measures. we welcome this financial support of £1 billion in the next two years, as well as providing new flexibilities on almost £500 million previously committed to northern ireland. as a
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consequence, spending power of almost 1.5 billion will be available to address the unique circumstances of northern ireland and the effect these have had on the economy and its people. in furtherance of our overall agreement, the government and the democratic unionist party have established a coordination committee. this agreement will remain in place for the length of the parliament and after each parliamentary session, both parties will review the aims, principles and implementation of the agreement. i wa nt implementation of the agreement. i want to personally thank the prime ministerand her want to personally thank the prime minister and her negotiating team for the spirit in which these discussions have been conducted. i particularly wa nt discussions have been conducted. i particularly want to acknowledge and pay tribute through the two men standing beside me, the right honour of all nigel dodds and that the right honourable sir jeffrey donaldson mp, for their efforts. i
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wa nt donaldson mp, for their efforts. i want to thank other party colleagues andindeed want to thank other party colleagues and indeed our parliamentary party, who will be to the fore in working with these new arrangements. today, we have reached an outcome that is good for the united kingdom, good for northern ireland and allows our nation to move forward to tackle the challenges ahead. this afternoon, i will be returning to northern ireland to continue our discussions as we attempt to re—establish the northern ireland executive because now, more than ever, our political leaders both locally and nationally need to work together to find solutions for all of the people we serve. thank you very much. so, there they go, the leaders of the democratic unionist party, not taking questions, having finished and concluded a deal with the conservative party. they returned to their cars. this is the statement we
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got from arlene foster in the last couple of minutes, just to pull out some key elements from that, very interesting that she referred to the conservatives by their full title, the conservative and unionist party, clearly the maintenance of the union of northern ireland as part of the united kingdom is central to the dna of the dup. a couple of things in terms of our discussion earlier, joanna, about policies the conservatives were keen on that have been changed as a result of this deal. we now know that there will be no change to the pensions triple lock, the idea that the state pension will rise by the greatest amount of either to .5% earnings or inflation will stop the universal winter fuel allowance remaining in place and the conservatives and dup agreeing that the government will continue to give 2% of national income to the armed forces. and on that crucial issue of money, which is going to be massively
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contentious, i suspect, is going to be massively contentious, isuspect, as is going to be massively contentious, i suspect, as an element of this deal, confirmation that there would be money for northern ireland that would be spent on boosting the economy, infrastructure, education and health, amounting to £1.5 billion. £1 billion over the next two years plus what was described as an additional 500 million of money that will have now new flexibilities, which suggests a greater degree of local autonomy about how that money is spent. so those are the details of this confidence and supply arrangements between the dup and the conservatives, the conservatives able to now say they are no longer a minority government and with the help of the dup, they can govern with a majority, albeit a small one. the choreography is quite interesting, isn't it, in that the dup came out and spoke alone and we are yet to hear publicly from the prime minister on this. yes, so what we didn't have was a formal news
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conference with all of us lot invited into the garden, as happened seven invited into the garden, as happened seve n yea rs invited into the garden, as happened seven years ago with the liberal democrats. we didn't have two podiums with both leaders standing next to each other and sounding charming and friendly and all the rest of it. instead, the delegation of the dup departing themselves, making grand statements and making their own pitch first and we expect we will hear from damian their own pitch first and we expect we will hearfrom damian green, the first secretary of state, pretty shortly and there will be lots of questions coming in the direction of the prime minister as and when she is next in front of the cameras but in terms of choreography, in terms of what we have just seen here in the street, in visual terms, a recognition of how different this arrangement is from the one we got used to seven years ago between the conservatives and the lib dems. thanks very much, chris. the document has actuallyjust been put up document has actuallyjust been put up online already by the government. so there you go, that is the deal, the agreement between the
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conservative and unionist party and the democratic unionist party on support for the government in parliament. that is the front page. i don't know how long the whole document is, but anyway, it is their online. it isjust document is, but anyway, it is their online. it is just three document is, but anyway, it is their online. it isjust three pages, so it is quite a tight document, but the key aspects of it, there you go, the key aspects of it, there you go, the signatures of the chief whips of the signatures of the chief whips of the conservative party and the dup. we saw them signing those documents just a short while ago. so with the bones of the agreement... northern ireland effectively has an extra £1.5 billion of spending. the £1 billion of that is an extra amount of money over two years, but they have got £1.5 billion, the dup was saying, greater spending power, as pa rt saying, greater spending power, as part of the agreement, £500 million that had previously been allocated will now have greater flexibility around how that is spent and also,
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as we were hearing, the pensions triple lock does not go, it stays, adders —— as does the universal winter fuel payments. chris, the business of government gets on and just because this deal, which was ha rd to just because this deal, which was hard to do, has happened, it doesn't mean life is going to be easy or straightforward. it doesn't. iwill pull out one additional line from that statement that we heard from arlene foster a couple of minutes ago, in addition to the details about money and then the promises that the two parties are willing to sign up to between the two of them. interesting, another additional line here which sounds quite technical but could prove absolutely crucial, this agreement, it says, will remain in place for the length of the parliament, as you would expect and after each parliamentary session, both parties will review the aims, principles and implementation of the agreement. we heard last week in the queen's speech that the conservatives' aim is that this
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current parliamentary session will last for two years. in other words, in two years' time, the dup could come back, if there hasn't been a general election between now and then and say, hang on a minute, we got £1.5 billion last time out, what can we arrange now? in other words, there is still room for negotiation within this parliament before the next general election, potentially, between the conservatives and the dup. just hearing from the prime minister, a statement from the prime minister, a statement from the prime minister, just being published on the conservative party website, saying, and i am scrolling down this asi saying, and i am scrolling down this as i talk to you, "i welcome this agreement which will enable us us to work together in the interests of the whole of the united kingdom, giving us the certainty we require as we embark on a departure from the european union and help us to bring a stronger, fairer society at home." and some further detailed further down the statement which plays right into the nature of the arrangement that the conservatives now have with the dup, that there is the huge issue back in northern ireland of
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recent hearing power—sharing government there, where of course the dup themselves are absolutely central players. thank you very much, chris. much more analysis and coverage of that still ahead and in a moment, we will have a summary of the business news this hour, but let's update you on the headlines bbc newsroom live. as we have been hearing, the dup has signed a deal to support theresa may's minority government. councils will be supported by the government to address fire safety concerns after cladding on 60 high—rise buildings across england fail safety tests. the prime minister will set out the full details of the rights it wants to give eu citizens living in britain, after brexit. good morning. in the business news, the co—0perative bank says it is no longer up for. sale meanwhile, it is
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about to announce fundraising proposals designed to safeguard its future. the bank was forced to put itself on the market in february because it could not prove its finances were in good enough shape to the bank of england. it says it is in advanced discussions with a group of existing at the magdalene investors on recapitalisation and they say the quote has been substantially agreed. japanese car parts maker takata has filed for bankruptcy protection in the us and japan. it is facing billions of dollars in liabilities over its defective airbags, which have been linked to at least 17 deaths worldwide. some of the airbags contained faulty inflators which expanded with too much force, spraying metal shrapnel. the uk could be set for years of weak and anaemic economic growth. that's the warning from trade body the british chambers of commerce. they predict growth ofjust 1.5% by 2020 whilst inflation could remain high and peak at 3.4% this year. it's says the inconclusive election
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result has made businesses wary. suren thiru is the head of economics at the bcc and he joins us now. he explained why they are expecting this period of sustained growth. there are a number of reasons, inflation is a key change for the uk economy, hurting businesses and consumers and will have a real impact on consumer spending, a key driver of uk growth, but what we will also see is some long—term structural issues facing the uk economy, spending drive growth will hurt the economy but we are also seeing that investment will be fairly weak, giving the political uncertainty and also brexit over the long—term. uncertainty and also brexit over the long-term. that is the view from the british chambers of commerce. however, despite all that, a survey from lloyds bank's shows business confidence at an 18—month high. this business in britain report has been on a bit of a roller coaster. in september, it hit a four—year low. now it's at 24% — double the level immediately after the eu
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referendum last year. it's based on expected sales, orders and profits. and it shows confidence surging in construction, retail, and other services sectors. gareth 0akley is head of sme business banking at lloyd's. there is one critical thing about this survey, it is done in may and we all know quite a lot has changed since may. do you think it is still releva nt? may. do you think it is still relevant? i think the context is quite important, the survey was undertaken after the result was actually given so it is possible that attitudes will have changed a little bit. very specifically, there was a point at the beginning of may, the middle of may, when everyone thought that mrs may, when everyone thought that mrs may was going to win with a huge majority and there was a great deal of certainty around. doesn't that... isn't that reflected in the survey? 0ne isn't that reflected in the survey? one of the things to put into
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context is the survey suggests an increase in confidence but that is only just fractionally above the 25 year average, so we are not saying that businesses are hugely optimistic, we arejust that businesses are hugely optimistic, we are just saying that they are more optimistic than they we re they are more optimistic than they were previously. one of the problems people are having at the moment it seems to be is finding skilled workers, not so much the unskilled, you point out it is skilled workers they can't get. that's right, the survey shows that businesses are looking to recruit, which is a good thing, that they are finding it very, very difficult to recruit skilled workers, so the balance of companies who are saying that is a difficulty is that 52%, so that is a ten year high. what about page? i'm not sure if your survey covers this but you think people, as a result of that, are going to put up pay to get those workers? it is interesting you say that, we do cover that and businesses looking to recruit are taking a very cautious approach when it comes to pay, so very few
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businesses are actually looking to see their salary bill rise over the next six months. i know you haven't done the survey after the election, but do you sense there is a change of mood now? i think we need to bear in mind that this is a survey which is more sme, saul and medium enterprises and they tend to have a very can—do attitude, they tend to be optimistic and tend not to be too distracted by things like political uncertainty but it is clear from the conversations i have with customers that there is a degree of concern and uncertainty as they look into things like brexit. ok, thanks so much. and in other business news. holland & barrett, the uk's biggest health food retailer, is being bought by a russian billionaire for £1.8bn. l1 retail is buying the 1,150—shop chain from us private equity firm carlyle. carlyle acquired nuneaton—based holland & barrett as part of its £3bn purchase in 2010 of us firm nature's bounty, now nbty. model toymaker hornby has once again
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said a takeover offer from its largest shareholder, phoenix asset management, "undervalues" the firm "and its future prospects". phoenix has launched a mandatory bid for hornby, after offering to buy a stake from another investor that would gave it a 55% holding in the firm. the italian government has committed to rescue banca popolare di vicenza and veneto banca for 17 billion euros, the biggest rescue of its history. the move comes two days after the european central bank warned that the banks were failing or likely to fail. the banks' "good" assets will be taken on by intesa sanpaolo banking group. italian prime minister paolo gentiloni said the rescue was needed to protect savers and ensure "the good health of our banking system". and a quick look at the market
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before we go. the ftse100 looking fairly healthy, actually, all looking pretty strong at the moment. that is the business news for now, we will be back with more later. thank you very much, see you later. six people have died and 16 others are missing after a crowded vote sank ina are missing after a crowded vote sank in a reservoir in colombia. around 1,000 passengers were on board, the vessel, with four decks, began taking on water on a cruise on the artificial lake outside a popular resort. there are no
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reported on why the vote sank. the royal navy's biggest of a warship is due to set sail for the first time later today. the 65,000 tonne hms queen elizabeth will leave dock from rossett in scotland, where she has been built, to begin six weeks of the sea trials. jonathan beale reports. the biggest warship ever built in britain is about to go to see for the very first time. it has been one of the largest, most complex engineering projects in the uk, that has taken years and cost more than £3 billion. but hms queen elizabeth is now ready to set sail. a crew of 700 are already finding their way around the labyrinth inside and getting used to life on board. yeah, the bed... just the beds alone are bigger than what you would get a normal chips anyway, so that's always a good start. on normal ships anyway, so that's always a good start. everything's better when it is newer, isn't it? this is just the start. it will be another year before the firstjets take off and land, and she won't be fully
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operational until 2021. but this is a significant moment for the royal navy. it will have been without an aircraft carrier for almost a decade. i think there are very few capabilities by any country that are as symbolic and totemic as a carrier strike capability. submarines you can't see. these are very visible symbols of national power, power projection. but first they will have to carefully manoeuvre this massive ship out of the dock with the help of 11 barges. just to give you a sense of scale, from one end of the deck to the other is about 300 metres. that is the length of the houses of parliament. as far as height, from the keel right up to the top of that massed, right up to the top of that mast, that is taller than nelson's column and, in fact, they're going to have to lower that mast as they slide her through this docks, some very narrow spaces, and eventually having to take her under the bridges out there.
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that will be the beginning of her sea trials. do you feel like the driver of a spanking brand—new porsche about to take it out of the garage and you are petrified you're going to crash it? yes but i'm also taking a brand—new garage out of the post porsche out of the garage that has never been driven before so you assume a brand—new porsche has been driven from the factory at least a distance to get it there. she has been towed out of the dock, she will be towed into the river and the first time we put those levers forward will be the first time we have been under our own power and moving. by tonight, hms queen elizabeth should be heading out to sea under her own power. and later this year, if it all goes according to plan, the beach in majorca was closure
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today after a blue sharks and swimmers running out of the sea. photos appeared to show the shark swimming towards a group of people. it has now been captured. injusta injust a few in just a few moments, we will bring you a minute's silence to remember those affected by the terror attack invincibly park last week. headlines coming up after that on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we will say goodbye to viewers on bbc two but let's catch up with the weather. the heat and sunshine of last week will soon feel like a distant memory, some changes on the way, so some sunshine this afternoon, much like there is incentivising cambridgeshire, enjoy it, because things will get much more unsettled over the coming days. we will all see some rain, heavy persistent and by the end of the week, even with the wanton humidity earlier in the week, it will feel cooler and fresh and the reason is this area of low pressure fast approaching from the south—west and starting to increase
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the cloud. we can see the first bills of rangers creeping towards northern ireland and that rain will continue on its journey northwards through the day but for many of us, aside from one or two showers across scotland, it should be largely dry day through daylight hours, some good spells and sunshine, the best across central and eastern areas but that rain settling into northern ireland as we head the afternoon. this is apm, already much more cloud across south—east maka delete south—west england and wales, the best across south—east england, 22 or even a couple of degrees higher around london, but up to northern ireland, this rain making its presence felt and although temperatures could get up to 16 or 17, they will tumble as the rain settles in. aside from one or two showers across scotland, we should have a largely dry day but a fresher feel. as we head through this evening again, most places largely dry, some late spells of sunshine but that rain becomes fairly persistent and heavy across northern ireland and could bring some tricky travelling conditions and overnight, it transfers north and eastwards
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into north wales in north—west england and parts of scotland. not reaching the northern isles, it could be a chilly night here under clear skies and further south, mainly dry but mild and muggy. rain is still with us tomorrow and it is a fairly complicated picture, to areas of low pressure, this one bringing rain to scotland and northern england and this system generating showers, some could be heavy and thundery but it is clear the northern ireland through the morning, some heavy showers developing behind and a fairly wet day across scotland and northern england. further south, some dry and brighter weather but watch out the showers that could be heavy and could merge to give along the spell of rain. 20 or 21 celsius, quite a cool feel across scotland in a brisk north—easterly wind. if you have outdoor plans for wednesday, don't make this the last forecast you see because as you can see, it is a very complicated picture and further areas of low pressure are dominating the scene. dry across scotland but it will feel much fresher here. it isa it will feel much fresher here. it is a very unsettled week ahead. it will feel much fresher here. it
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welcome to islington town hall, where, ina welcome to islington town hall, where, in a moment, members of the local community, led by the head of counsel richard watts, will hold a minute's silence in remembrance of those affected by the attack just of the road in finsbury park. you will recall that nine people were taken to hospital after that incident and one 51—year—old man died from multiple injuries at the scene of the attack. as you can see, councillors and members of staff are gathered and in a moment we will hold a minute's silence. bell chimes big ben strikes the hour the leader of islington council, richard watts, is now speaking.
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ramadan, the holy month, ended at the weekend but this has been a sober end to the holy month. that's it from us here in islington. back now to your programming. martin bashir with coverage of that minute's silence, remembering those affected by the terrorist act in finsbury park last week. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday... the democratic unionist party sign a deal to support theresa may's minority conservative government. in concluding this wide—ranging agreement, we have done so on the basis of advancing the security of our nation, building prosperity for all and supporting an exit from the european union that benefits all parts of the united kingdom. the government says it will offer support to councils — after cladding on 60 high—rise buildings across england fails fire safety tests. the prime minister is to set out
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more details of the rights she wants to give eu citizens living in britain, after brexit. also... the dawn of a new era for the navy. a new aircraft carrier — hms queen elizabeth — is due to set sail for the first time from the rosyth dockyard in fife. good afternoon. it's monday 26th june. i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. a deal has been signed between the conservatives and the democratic unionist party, which will support theresa may's minority government in parliament. this morning, the prime minister met senior dup figures inside downing street to finalise the details for a so—called "confidence and supply" arrangement, under which the dup's ten mps
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will vote with the 317 conservatives to form a majority in the house of commons. here are some of the key point... as pa rt of as part of the deal, there will be no change to the pensions triple lock and winter fuel allowance, which have been part of the conservatives' election manifesto. the dup wanted those to remain. an extra £1 billion will be spent on northern ireland as part of the arrangement. the dup the darling foster spoke outside downing street after the meeting. —— dup reader arlene foster. our aim has been to deliver for all of the people of northern ireland and the support measures we are announcing will be to the benefit of all our people. they will boost the economy and
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invest in new infrastructure, as well as investing in the future of our health and education sectors and a range of other measures. we welcome this financial support of £1 billion in the next two years, as well as providing new flexibility is an almost £500 million previously committed to northern ireland. as a consequence, spending power of almost 1.5 billion will be available to address the unique circumstances of northern ireland and the effect these have had on the economy and its people. in furtherance of our overall agreement, the government and the democratic unionist party have established a coordination committee. this agreement will remain in place for the length of the parliament and after each parliamentary session, both parties will review the aims, principles and
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implementation of the agreement. i wa nt to implementation of the agreement. i want to personally thank the prime minister and her negotiating team for the spirit in which these discussions have been conducted. i particularly wa nt discussions have been conducted. i particularly want to acknowledge and paid tribute to the two men standing beside me, the right honourable nigel dodds and the right honourable sirjeffrey donaldson mp, for their efforts. i want to thank other party collea g u es efforts. i want to thank other party colleagues and our parliamentary party, who will be to the fore in working these new arrangements. today we have reached an outcome thatis today we have reached an outcome that is good for the united kingdom, good for northern ireland and allows our nation to move forward to tackle the challenges ahead. this afternoon, i will be returning to northern ireland to continue our discussions as we attempt to re—establish the northern ireland executive, because now, more than ever, our political leaders, both
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locally and nationally, needs to work together to find solutions for all of the people we serve. thank you very much. let's go to our political correspondent chris mason in downing street. did they drive a ha rd in downing street. did they drive a hard bargain? yes, it looks like they did. representatives of the dup have just been talking to us about some of the details of where that money will be going and that has been published on the government's website so we learn about particular money for transport pinch points in northern ireland, for mental health projects for schools and hospitals. also, crucially, unlocking some money that dup sources were saying was mighty hard for northern ireland to get access to, even though it had been promised by the previous government, and that is a £500 million referred to by arlene foster, in addition to the £1 billion in funding that was
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announced by her today. it is worth looking at some of these details and these are all online on the government's website and the extent to which this amounts to support for the dup from the conservatives. in other words, when will the dup actually back the conservatives in votes in the house of commons? the document says, "the dup agrees to support the government on all motions of confidence, the queen's speech, finance bills, money bills, supply and appropriation negotiations and estimates, in other words blows... in other words to do with money. they will back the government brexit and legislation pertaining to national security. here comes the killer line in terms of the stability of this arrangement in the coming years. "support on other matters will be agreed on a case—by—case basis." other matters will be agreed on a case—by—case basis. " there other matters will be agreed on a case—by—case basis." there are one heck of a lot of other matters whether conservatives will be very nervous, not certain as to whether
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the dup will support them. thank you very much. we can talk to the former northern ireland secretary theresa villiers, whojoins us northern ireland secretary theresa villiers, who joins us from northern ireland secretary theresa villiers, whojoins us from our studio in westminster. thank you for joining us. we've got the basic details of a deal out there. what is your reaction? i believe that as the public are given us a hung parliament it is our responsibility to make that work and producing workable government is greatly assisted by this confidence and supply agreement, which has been published today. workable. how difficult is going to be? it is very difficult is going to be? it is very difficult from when we have the coalition government in it was basically unity between the two parties to work together for a full term and it gave a working majority of around 50 mps. this is a working majority of ten individual mps. individual mps in both parties will have a lot of sway going ahead. individual mps in both parties will have a lot of sway going aheadm
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will be very different from the coalition with the lib dems. there will be challenges ahead. it will require hard work on all sides but, actually, minority government and arrangements of this sort are very common in many european countries. for example, in ireland they've had a minority government for some time and have had success in delivering on their programme i believe we can make it work in the national interest it up arlene foster has gone straight back to focus now on re—establishing the northern ireland executive. is there anything in this deal that might make it harder? 0ne thing that is potentially interesting is the agreement that she mentioned on extending the military covenant. that is something that sinn fein did not want to see happen. the military covenant is a more sensitive issue in northern ireland than it is elsewhere in the uk but much of it is just really strongly focused on excellence in public services and i think it
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should be possible to build more consensus in northern ireland for those aspects of the military cove na nt those aspects of the military covenant and i think it is also worth recognising that in the main, as far as worth recognising that in the main, as farasi worth recognising that in the main, as far as i understand it, on the whole the military covenant is already, i think, whole the military covenant is already, ithink, largely whole the military covenant is already, i think, largely upheld, successfully, in northern ireland. so there may be work to do, there may be arguments to win across the physical spectrum in northern ireland, but i think it is important to press ahead because of the importance of a military government to talk sinn fein have said they will go to the agreement line by line and they will be alive to any concerns that this deal undermines com plete concerns that this deal undermines complete impartiality by the british government, as it is bound under the terms of the good friday agreement. how tricky could things be?|j believe how tricky could things be?” believe that this agreement is... i think it is welcome. it will give an
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important degree of stability in relation to the uk government. i believe that there is nothing in it which would make it difficult for the stormont institutions to be re—established. i'm sure that james brokenshire, the secretary of state, and his team will continue to work really ha rd and his team will continue to work really hard with the northern ireland parties to get the devolved institutions up and running again and now we've seen significant additional resources analyst for northern ireland, there is even more important is being placed on a default set of ministers to implement those additional resources and also, we need to ensure that northern ireland's voices heard strongly in the brexit negotiations and that's going to be easier and more effective if it has devolved government. so for all sorts of reasons, it is vitally important that the talks under way in stormont actually deliver a return of power—sharing devolved government.
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theresa villiers, fall in northern ireland said, thank you very much. let's go to gareth gordon, who is at stormont. everybody is going to be picking over everything that emerges as soon as it comes out. are you getting any sense of reaction there? absolutely not. i've spoken to someone from sinn fein in the last 15 minutes. he'd told me what was pretty obvious, that they are now going through that document pretty much line by line. they will take their time, they will look for any potential pitfalls, things they don't like. the money is all well and good. one imagines they won't turn their nose of the bat but arlene foster will be back here from london in the afternoon, there will bea london in the afternoon, there will be a leaders' meeting at which all the parties will put her through it and at some point we will want to hear particularly from sinn fein as to what they are going to say about this statement. but there are other things they must agree with the dup
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before stormont returns, over and above this deal. this deal is all well and good, set it to the side and move on with other things like and move on with other things like an irish language at that sinn fein want, a thing called the petition of concern, effectively blocking mechanism in the stormont assembly which the dup have used on several occasions to block the introduction of same sex marriage bill top if they are not agreed, even though this deal has been agreed in westminster, there will be no return to power—sharing. we have a deadline this week — it is either thursday afternoon or the unofficial deadline is tomorrow night because the dup mps will be in westminster on wednesday and thursday, voting on the queen's speech, so a lot to be done and not much time to do it. thanks very much, gareth. let me bring your reaction to the deal from the first minister of wales, carwyn jones. he has said that today's deal represents a straight blog to keep a faltering prime minister in office.
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last week we were told that priority was to build a more united country, strengthen the bonds between england, northern ireland, scotland and wales. this deal flies england, northern ireland, scotland and wales. this dealflies in england, northern ireland, scotland and wales. this deal flies in the face of that and weakens the uk and all but weakens the idea of fair funding for the nations and regions. it is outrageous that the prime minister believes she can secure her own political future by throwing money at northern ireland, while com pletely money at northern ireland, while completely ignoring the rest of the uk. i have spoken to the secretary of state for wales this morning to clearly state my view of this unacceptable deal. as well as a voice of the cabinet table, he has a duty to fight against this deal and secure additional funding for our country. plaid cymru have been saying that any commitments for northern ireland should be matched for wales. that is if the dup has got, as we have been hearing, a £1 billion increase in public spending. survey are saying wales's population share would mean that wales should get a boost of around £1.7 billion.
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already a sense of the reaction from other political parties, and regions that are going to be reacting to that are going to be reacting to that news, that considerable cash boost for northern ireland as a result of that deal between the tory party and the dup. let's bring you up—to—date with our headlines. the dup has signed a deal to support theresa may's minority government. theresa may's minority government. the government says it will offer support to councils after cladding and 60 high—rise buildings across and 60 high—rise buildings across and failed fire safety test. the prime minister will set out details was afternoon of how the government plans to treat more than 3 million eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. wimbledon qualifying is under way at roehampton,
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where marcus willis, who made such an impact at last year's championships, is among those in action. he'll face the world number 146 andrej martin of slovakia in the first round. there's plenty of british interest at eastbourne. kyle edmund is playing the american donald young but the british number two lost the first set 6—4. he's since broken serve in the second and leads 4—1. over on court one, wild card naomi broady is currently a set down against kristyna pliskova. the czech took the first 6—2. it's broady who leads 11—3 in the second set. heather watson and cameron norrie both play later. lewis hamilton described formula one championship rival sebastian vettel‘s driving as "disgusting" after the two collided during an incident packed azerbaijan grand prix. the race included three safety cars and lots of crashes. it was won by red bull's daniel ricciardo, but his victory was overshadowed by the incident everyone is talking about —
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vettel penalised for hitting hamilton's mercedes as they prepared for a re—start. hamilton led the ferrari with 19 laps to go, but his headrest came loose. he ended up fifth, behind vettel who's extended his championship lead over the briton to 1a points. if he wanted to prove that he is a man, ithink if he wanted to prove that he is a man, i think we should do it out of the car, face—to—face. driving dangerously which in any way can put another driver at risk, let alone himself, if we were going faster it could've been a lot worse. imagine all the young kids watching to see that behaviour from the four—time world champion... what a big week it's going to be for the british and irish lions. they face the hurricanes tomorrow before the must—win second test on saturday with the all blacks. lions coach warren gatland criticised their opponent's tactics after the first test defeat — but all blacks coach steve hansen hit back, live on new zealand radio. it was predictable comments from
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gatland. two weeks ago when they cheated in the scrums, now he is saying that. it is disappointing because he is implying that we are intentionally going out to injure somebody and that is not the case. we have never been like that and other new zealander, i would expect him to know that they are not intentionally trying to hurt anybody. crystal palace will officially name former ajax and inter coach frank de boer as their new boss this afternoon. he was the first choice of chairman steve parish and succeeds sam allardyce, who left after keeping palace in the premier league. that is overland. i will be back with more. theresa may will be given an update later on the number of high—rise buildings that may pose a similar fire risk to grenfell tower. so far, samples of cladding from 60 tower blocks, in 25 local authority areas in england, have failed safety tests — every single one that has so far been tested.
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the government says it will offer support to councils, but hasn't put a figure on how much. housing minister alok sharma says testing is going on round the clock. we have put in place a very clear process to make sure that buildings that are identified with a particular type of aluminium cladding are tested. we have test facilities that are able to test 100 samples a day and that can be extended if required, and we're making sure that as soon as we find out that a building has failed and has got cladding which is noncompliant, immediately the local authority is informed, the local fire service is informed and they go to the building and do the right checks and clearly, in the case of camden, where it wasn'tjust cladding but there were multiple other failures when it came to fire safety, people had to be evacuated. i have nothing but admiration for the way people have dealt with that who have been affected by this. the key priority for us has to be to keep people safe and that is why we are making sure this process works as quickly as possible in terms of testing.
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theresa may will set out more details this afternoon of how the government plans to treat more than three million eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. last week, she outlined proposals to offer eu nationals "settled status" — which would give those who have spent five years in the uk equal rights on health care, education and benefits — but only if british people living in the european union were given similar entitlements. let's speak to our political correspondent leila nathoo at westminster. how quickly do they think they might seal a deal on this and what are the fundamentals of it? joanna, the eu has said that they will be studying theresa may's proposals line by line when they are published later this afternoon. she has already outlined the broad thrust of what she intends to offer those eu citizens who have been living in the uk for five years lawfully. she wants to, as you say,
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guarantee them settled status, and new immigration status which would give them rights to things like education, benefits, health care and pensions. but what there hasn't been so farfrom pensions. but what there hasn't been so far from theresa may is detailed. so, when will the cut—off point, for example, be for those eu citizens who have come to the uk? what will the date be from which their five—year status will be judged? who will arbitrate over this new system? this is a big battle ground yet to come. will it be britishjudges residing over this youth system? will be european judges? residing over this youth system? will be europeanjudges? will it be european court of justice will be europeanjudges? will it be european court ofjustice judges, something theresa may has said she wa nts to something theresa may has said she wants to withdraw from the jurisdiction of? also the battle still to come and we expect some of these points to be outlined later today when theresa may make this statement to the house of commons in this document outlining this proposal is published. but, critically, this is a reciprocal agreement. she is saying she is only going to offer this to eu citizens,
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those 3 million eu citizens in the uk, if british citizens abroad are guaranteed things along the same lines. so i think there is some way to go before this, although this is a crucial part of the better negotiations. there was going to be a lot of negotiations around the detailed. is there any suggestion that british citizens wouldn't get reciprocal rights? well, there has definitely been an intention displayed by both sides, both britain and eu countries, that they wa nt to britain and eu countries, that they want to deal with this central issue as soon as possible, so me both british citizens are valued in eu countries at the same way as eu citizens are valued by the british government. but there has not been detailfrom either side government. but there has not been detail from either side about what they intend to do. there were some suggestions when theresa may outlined a specific proposals that they were not quite acceptable or sufficient and that the eu sides wa nted sufficient and that the eu sides wanted to see more detail but there is not yet any clarity on whether the eu is going to offer a similar
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deal in return for what theresa may is asking. thanks very much. scotland yard says six of its officers were injured last night during a protest in east london over the death of a man last week, six days after he'd been stopped by police. bricks were thrown and bins set on fire near forest gate police station. the independent police complaints commission has said a postmortem examination on edir frederico da costa showed that, contrary to some claims, he had no spinal injuries caused by officers. a 16—year—old boy has been charged with the rape of an eight—year—old girl in a park in manchester. the attack is alleged to have happened on saturday evening in the moston area of the city. the boy is due to appear at manchester youth court today. the former music moguljonathan king has appeared in court charged with 18 sexual offences relating to nine boys aged 1a to 16. the 72—year—old dj is accused of carrying out the offences between between 1970 and 1986. 0ur correspondent lisa hampele was at the hearing in westminster magistrates‘ court. mr king appeared here under the name
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kenneth king, wearing a black suit, a white shirt and a blue tie. he stood in the dock to confirm his name, his age — he is 72 — and that he lives in bayswater in west london. he is charged with 18 sexual offences relating to nine boys aged between 1a and 16. three serious sexual assaults and the others are indecent assaults. he is accused of carrying them out between 1970 and 1986 in walton—on—thames and he nodded and smiled as he was bailed to appear before southwark crown court onjuly to appear before southwark crown court on july 24. afterwards, to appear before southwark crown court onjuly 24. afterwards, he posed for photographers, smiling and making the thumbs up sign. the royal navy's biggest ever warship is due to set sail for the first time later today. the 65,000—tonne hms queen elizabeth will leave her dock at rosyth in scotland,
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where she's been built, to begin six weeks of sea trials. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale, reports. the biggest warship ever built in britain is about to go to sea for the very first time. it has been one of the largest, most complex engineering projects in the uk, that has taken years and cost more than £3 billion. but hms queen elizabeth is now ready to set sail. a crew of 700 are already finding their way around the labyrinth inside and getting used to life on board. yeah, the bed... just the beds alone are bigger than what you would get a normal ship anyway, so that's always a good start. everything's better when it is newer, isn't it? this is just the start. it will be another year before the firstjets take off and land, and she won't be fully operational until 2021. but this is a significant moment for the royal navy. it will have been without an aircraft carrier for almost a decade.
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i think there are very few capabilities by any country that are as symbolic and totemic as a carrier strike capability. submarines you can't see. these are very visible symbols of national power, power projection. but first they will have to carefully manoeuvre this massive ship out of the dock with the help of 11 barges. just to give you a sense of scale, from one end of the deck to the other is about 300 metres. that is the length of the houses of parliament. as far as height, from the keel right up to the top of that mast, that is taller than nelson's column and, in fact, they're going to have to lower that mast as they slide her through this dock, some very narrow spaces, and eventually having to take her under the bridges out there. that will be the beginning of her sea trials. do you feel like the driver of a spanking brand—new porsche about to take it out of the garage and you are petrified you're going to crash it?
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yes, but i'm also taking a brand—new porsche out of the garage that has never been driven before so you assume a brand—new porsche has been driven from the factory at least a distance to get it there. she has been towed out of the dock, she will be towed into the river and the first time we put those levers forward will be the first time we have been under our own power and moving. by tonight, hms queen elizabeth should be heading out to sea under her own power. and later this year, if it all goes according to plan, she will be sailing into her new home of portsmouth. let's catch up with the weather. tomasz schafernaker has the details. the weather is looking not bad at the moment. we've got a lot of fair weather out there but behind me, the
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clouds are looming and there is a fair bit of rain on the way so i think from tomorrow, all of us at one point or another will need the brollies. but for the time being, let's enjoy the sunshine if you have got it today. arena is already by the latter part of the afternoon in place across northern ireland, then south—western parts of scotland, north—west of england and wales gets a bit of rain. you can see more central and southern parts through tonight are dry and the far north of scotla nd tonight are dry and the far north of scotland dry as well but pretty chilly for ourfriends in scotland dry as well but pretty chilly for our friends in shetland, only 6 degrees. for tomorrow, the heaviest of the rain across the north—western portion of the uk. to the south, hit and miss showers and. there could be downpours. wherever you are tomorrow, just take a brolly if you are popping up for any length of time. hello, you are watching bbc newsroom live with joanna hello, you are watching bbc newsroom live withjoanna gosling, the main headlines: the dup will support theresa may's minority conservative government. the two parties signed
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the deal at downing street — which will see arlene foster's party back the government's programme over the next two years. today, we have reached an agreement with the conservative party on support for government in parliament. this agreement will operate to deliver a stable government in the united kingdom's national interest at this vital time. councils will be supported by the government to address fire safety concerns after cladding on 60 high—rise buildings across england fail safety tests. the prime minister will set out the full details of the rights the government wants to give eu citizens living in britain, after brexit. an inquest opens into the deaths of five young friends, who drowned during a day trip to camber sands last summer. a minute's silence is observed in memory of the victim of the finsbury park mosque terror attack, where one man died and several people were injured.
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a deal has been signed between the conservatives and the democratic unionist party, which will support theresa may's minority government in parliament. a short while ago, the prime minister met senior dup figures inside downing street to finalise the details and here are the key points. it will ta ke and here are the key points. it will take the form of the so—called confidence and supply arrangement. the dup's 10 mps will vote with the 317 conservatives to form a majority in the house of commons. as part of the deal, there will be no change to the pensions triple lock and winter fuel allowance, which had been part of the conservative's election manifesto — the dup wanted it to remain. an extra £1bn will be spent on northern ireland as part of the arrangement. the dup's leader arlene foster, spoke outside downing street after the meeting. so, good morning, following the general election results and the mandate given to us by the people of
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northern ireland, we have been in discussions with the conservative and unionist party as to how we can support the minority conservative government in parliament. today, we have reached an agreement with the conservative party on support for government in parliament. this agreement will operate to deliver a sta ble agreement will operate to deliver a stable government in the united kingdom's national interest at this vital time. throughout these discussions, our guiding principle has been our commitment to acting in the national interest in accordance with our shared objectives for strengthening and enhancing our precious union. in concluding this wide—ranging agreement, we have done so on the basis of advancing the security of our nation, building prosperity for all and supporting an exit from the european union that benefits all parts of the united kingdom. the details of our
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agreement and future working arrangements will be published in full. as part of our policy agreement, both parties have agreed that there will be no change to the pensions triple lock and the universal nature of the winter fuel payments across the united kingdom. we are agreed to meet the nato commitment of spending 2% of gdp on the armed forces and we are further committed to the armed forces cove na nt committed to the armed forces covenant and to its implementation throughout the united kingdom. following our discussions, the conservative party has recognised the case for higher funding conservative party has recognised the case for higherfunding in northern ireland, given our unique history and, indeed, circumstances over recent decades. the uk government will publish, as an annex to our agreement, the details of financial support that will be made available to northern ireland. our
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aim in these negotiations has been to deliver for aim in these negotiations has been to deliverfor all of aim in these negotiations has been to deliver for all of the people of northern ireland and the support measures which we are announcing will be to the benefit of all our people. they will boost the economy and invest in new infrastructure, as well as investing in the future of our health and education sectors and a range of other measures. we welcome this financial support of £1 billion in the next two years, as well as providing new flexibilities on almost £500 million previously committed to northern ireland. as a consequence, spending power of almost £1.5 billion will be available to address the unique circumstances of northern ireland and the effect these have had on the economy and its people. in furtherance of our overall
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agreement, the government and the democratic unionist party have established a coordination committee. this agreement will remain in place for the length of the parliament and after each parliamentary session, both parties will review the aims, principles and implementation of the agreement. i wa nt to implementation of the agreement. i want to personally thank the prime minister and her negotiating team for the spirit in which these discussions have been conducted. i particularly wa nt discussions have been conducted. i particularly want to acknowledge and paid tribute to the two men standing beside me, the right honourable nigel dodds and the right honourable sirjeffrey donaldson mp, for their efforts. i wanted to thank other party colleagues and indeed our parliamentary party, who will be to the fore in working these new arrangements. today, we have reached an outcome that is good for the united kingdom, good the northern ireland and allows our nation to
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move forward to tackle the challenges ahead. this afternoon, i will be returning to northern ireland to continue our discussions, as we attempt to re—establish the northern ireland executive, because now, more than ever, our political leaders both locally and nationally need to work together to find solutions for all of the people we serve. thank you very much. arlene foster on that deal struck between the dup and the tory party. an inquest is due to open today into the deaths of five young friends who drowned during a day trip to camber sands on the south coast. the men — who were aged between 18 and 27 — all lived in the london area. they ran into difficulties at camber sands beach, near hastings, last august. there's been intense fighting overnight in the iraqi city of mosul, as government forces try to recapture the last districts held by so—called islamic state. the iraqi military says there were two attempts by the militants to counterattack using large number of suicide bombers in different parts of the city, in northern iraq, but the affected areas were quickly
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brought under control. is has now been squeezed into a square mile of territory in mosul‘s old city. six people have died and 16 others are missing after a crowded passenger boat sank in a reservoir in colombia. around 170 passengers are thought to have been on board. the vessel, which had four decks, began taking on water during a cruise on an artificial lake outside the popular resort of guatape. there are no details yet on why the boat sank. chinese officials say fewer people are missing than first thought after a landslide over the weekend — but the figure still remains high, at almost 100. it's emerged that several of those reported missing, from xinmo village in sichuan province, had been outside the area when the landslide took place. thousands of rescue workers are in the area. so far, 15 deaths have been confirmed. firefighters in southern spain are battling to stop a huge forest fire causing widespread damage
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to the donana national park that's home to rare species of wildlife. the blaze in a pine forest about 50 kilometres southwest of seville, in andalucia, has led to the evacuation of more than 2,000 people. surgeons have told the bbc that nhs england is using mesh to repair hernias which leaves many patients in chronic pain. one woman told the bbc‘s victoria derbyshire programme that she was left "screaming on all fours" from the agonising pain. nhs england say mesh implants had been successfully used to treat hernias for several decades. it follows a report on the victoria derbyshire programme in april that more than 800 women were taking legal action against the nhs over the use of vaginal mesh implants. 0ur reporter anna collinson has been investigating. nhs england says a mesh repair is its recommended method when treating a hernia, and it's the most widely—used technique. the nhs carried out more than 60,000 groin hernia repairs in england between 2015 and 2016.
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what happens if something goes wrong? helen ablett had a groin hernia repair in 1998. a few years ago, helen started feeling pain and has spent most of this year off work sick. it feels like something is either moving or loose inside me and is pulling, when i stand and when i walk. whether it's moved or it's attached itself, i can feel, it feels like a foreign body inside me. we've heard from lots of people who've had hernia mesh operations and now live with chronic pain. they came from across the uk, varied in age and gender, but some similarities were striking. they say they were never warned about the risks of chronic pain. they claim they've been in painforyears and some have problems walking. they say they've had many scans and tests, which have all come back clear. they also claim gps mainly
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only offer pain relief, and some suggested psychiatric help. and doctors have apparently repeatedly told them mesh is not the cause. martin kinsey had a groin hernia mesh repair in 1999 after a bike accident. for a long time, he was fine, but then he started getting abdominal pains. it's as if i've been stabbed with something hot. i don't want to eat. i don't want to venture out too far. my worst day is getting up and feeling twice my age and not being able to put my underwear and socks on. although at least one in ten groin hernia mesh repair patients will experience chronic pain, nhs england have told this programme the technique has been undertaken extensively and successfully for several decades and no significant level of concern has been raised. for years, martin has been suffering. he was unaware there were people across the country who have similar stories to him, and that
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one even lived nearby. hello. hiya. hi, i'm helen. martin, you 0k? nice to meet you. and you. take a seat. i've had an operation really i didn't need, and, you know, six years' worth of investigation. yes, meeting you has been a complete revelation. it's helped confirm everything that i knew inside but was beginning to doubt. i will fight tooth—and—nail to get what i'm entitled to. they've done this to me. i can't remove it, they've got to take it out. the uk's economic growth will remain "anaemic" until the end of the decade, according to the british chambers of commerce. the group of business leaders says it doesn't expect growth to be more than 1.5% by 2020 and that
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inflation may end up higher than expected. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. despite some predictions, britain's economy grew robustly immediately after the referendum last year, but it has slowed down a lot this year, and now it is the weakest in europe. the british chambers of commerce, representing thousands of small and medium—sized companies, says their gdp will remain anaemic for another few years. it says growth this year will be 1.5% but dip to 1.3% next year before rising slightly back to 1.5% in 2019. it expects inflation to peak at 3.4% this year, and hold back company investment. but it thinks growth in exports and the construction sector will be higher this year than previously thought. the biggest changes to our forecast revolve around the economy, we think growth will remain flat over the next three years and around inflation, which is going to spike higher before we see some relief.
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exports will do well this year, but less well in years to come. so we do face a situation where our growth is pretty anaemic, not as good as it could be, and certainly is not as good as other countries around the world. the bcc has urged the government to spend more on infrastructure, especially broadband and mobile phone connectivity, and described the british road network as heavily congested. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the democratic unionist party has signed a deal to support theresa may's minority government. the government says it will offer support to councils — after cladding on 60 high—rise buildings across england failed fire safety tests. the prime minister will set out more details this afternoon of how the government plans to treat more than 3 million eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. tony and eddie both have autism.
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they're both in special hospitals farfrom home and have been for many years. six years ago, when the bbc highlighted abuse of vulnerable patients in the winterbourne view unit, the government promised to bring people with learning disabilities out of hospitals to be supported in their own communities. jayne mccubbin went to meet the families of tony and eddie. they told us that he would be there for nine months. he is still there, 16 years on. he is still there. pam's son tony is 120 miles from home in a secure hospital. he is autistic and he has learning disabilities. his room has stayed the same ever since he was admitted and later sectioned 16 years ago. i think we died that day. when panorama exposed the abuse of patients with learning disabilities in winterbourne view, the government made a promise.
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homes not hospitals. they said people should be supported in their own communities, not locked in institutions farfrom family. much time has passed since that promise was made, longer since pam's son tony left brighton. if he had killed somebody he would be out by now. he has done 16 years, life sentence. he went there as a young man, 23. he will be 40 in august, 40. in 2014, the government was criticised for failing to take another action after winterbourne view. in 2015, transforming care partnership areas were created in england with £40 million of investment. they were to build the right community support needed to help bring people home. but one third of those areas haven't seen any of that money yet. published nhs data shows that the number of people in one of these institutions today is roughly the same
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as it was back in 2014. that is back when the government was told it must take urgent action to get numbers down. that is taken from published nhs data that shows a third of inpatients like tony have beenin third of inpatients like tony have been ina third of inpatients like tony have been in a unit for more than five yea rs. the man originally behind the call for change says he is appalled. this is a disgrace and something that this country should be shamed by. we are not unique in this regard. but in this day and age, to abuse people's human rights in this way, i think is utterly shocking. tony's care provider and local authority both agree he should be back in brighton. i'm frightened he is going to die there.
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like tony, eddie is on the autistic spectrum. he also went into a unit after crisis. he was 12. he was in a solitary block that they called the extra care unit. in fact there has been a 26% increase in young people with learning disabilities referred to a secure unit in the last 12 months. why? the national audit office says there is not enough support for families like this to help them avoid a crisis. we were told that he would be there between 12 weeks to nine months. we're four and a half years down the line. eddie ended up 120 miles from home in st andrew's. criticised by the cqc two years after winterbourne view, not enough staff, not enough training, not enough care. we had an e—mail to say he had defecated a seclusion room. we discovered that he been in this seclusion room for 24 hours and there is no access to a toilet. st andrew's say:
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are objective criteria set out the st andrew's unit is rated good by the cqc, eddie has moved on to another unit where he is doing better, but it is in newcastle. his family live 300 miles away in bristol. they want him back. we wish we never asked for any help. i don't want this to happen to any more autistic young people. nhs england told us they are clear, hospitals should not be seen as homes. new high quality community services are essential and are being created. the department for health tell us £25 million is being spent on this to improve outcomes, but the national audit office warns this is all happening far too slowly. syrian refugees in leven on continue
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to face difficult living conditions and access to medical care is a big issue. the un covers 75% of the cost promote medical issues but for the majority of refugees, the remaining balance can be hard to afford. what the un does not cover is cancer coverfor the un does not cover is cancer cover for children. their only hope is support from a small charity but even that is limited by how much money is donated every month. the bbc spoke to one family who cannot afford their son's treatment and the charity cannot afford to keep on treating him. it is playtime, but his playground isa it is playtime, but his playground is a hospital ward. add four years old, he has been receiving chemotherapy for most of his life for leukaemia. the doctor tries to cheer him up, while doing a regular checkup. but it is still too painful.
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his family come from war—torn aleppo. his father works as a handyman and hardly makes enough to feed his family. he tells me that the un doesn't cover cancer treatment and he has been seeking ngo's help for the last two weeks. making any $500 a month, he says that having to pay $330 each week for his son's chemo just isn't possible. treatment so far has been provided by a small charity, for free. relying on donations from individuals, they are often faced with tough financial decisions, like having to stop treating a child. the
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doctor is one of the people who established the charity. it is the only hope for having the chance to live, to survive their battle with this cancer. you have lost children you have treated? yes, the last one was a little girl, she was two years old. she had neuroblastoma, she re cove red old. she had neuroblastoma, she recovered from the treating but at some point, we ran out of funds for her so we had to stop her treatment, so we had —— she had to get back to syria to get treatment there but unfortunately, she passed away. going back to syria would be the last resort for this family, and the odds are not good. there are almost no cancer medication left in the country. although born in syria, he has no memory of his own country and
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has no memory of his own country and has never seen the war that has torn it apart. if money can be found, if he survives cancer, he will still face the uncertain future of every syrian, waiting for the day they can return home. ed sheeran closed the glastonbury music festival last night — just six years after his debut performance to a crowd ofjust 500. but while his rise has been meteoric, other artists on yesterday's bill have been in the business for more than half a century. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. for many, glastonbury‘s final day was disco day. there were bee gees classics from barry gibb. # ha, ha, ha, ha # stayin' alive, stayin' alive! # ha, ha, ha, ha # stayin' ali—ive... watching from the sidelines, nile rodgers, who later took to the stage with chic, for disco hit after disco hit. # i'm coming up
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# i want the world to know. # got to let it show # everybody dance # ooh—ooh—ooh # clap your hands. a huge crowd watching them in the somerset sunshine. # upside down # boy, you turn me... # freak out # le freak, c'est chic... but it's notjust people famous from the world of music who have been performing at this year's festival. yes, that's american film and tv star kiefer sutherland playing country music with his band. # drag your feet across the floor # memories high in the hall... he said performing at glastonbury was particularly special. the people that have played here, the fact that 200,000 people are circulating around almost 100 stages, the fact that it started off with one person and an idea and that
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it's been allowed to blossom and grow like this. again, it is almost like being invited into a part of history. # i need you, darling # come on, set the tone # if you feel me falling... closing this year, ed sheeran. his headline set an emotional climax to a festival that won't be back until 2019. # and they say... crowd sings: # she's in the class a team # stuck in her daydream # been this way since eighteen # but lately her face seems... in a moment, the news at one with simon mccoy. first, the weather with tomasz schafernaker. well, there's quite a bit of rain heading our way. we're not all going to get a deluge, but i think most of us will need the brollies this week and,
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in fact, after today, the best day of the week, we'll see rain dotted around the rest of the country for the rest of this week. so, the first spell of rain is already heading in our direction. this is the weather front that's moving in the direction of northern ireland right now. this is the first place that's going to see the rain, and there's more weather systems here and they're being pushed by the jet stream and, actually, this week is going to be a lot, lot cooler, below par for this time of the year, so temperatures really will be struggling, particularly across northern areas of the uk. today, as i said, it's the best day of the week. there is actually a lot of sunshine out there. the best of the sunshine is across the south—east and east anglia. in fact, clear blue skies here but the clouds are already starting to increase across these western areas in advance of this spell of rain you can see across ireland here. it is just about nudging into northern ireland at 4pm. northern england and scotland, rather than that weather front moving through, today we just have a few showers developing, so hit and miss spots of rain.
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that's pretty much it. still a decent day in the north. through the course of tonight, that's when the rain could turn quite heavy. i suppose the good news is that the worst of the weather is going to sweep through tonight, so a really soggy night in northern ireland, soggy across the southern half of scotland. the north—west of england in particular, around lancashire, could see some heavy rain and also that heavy rain is clipping north—western parts of wales but to the south of that, it is going to be dry. and then things change as we head into tuesday. in fact, we are going to be affected by two weather fronts, two lows, one sitting on top of us and then this other one just about wafting in from the south. so tomorrow, the weather is very hit and miss, it's sort of all over the place. we've got thunderstorms in one or two areas across the south—east. could be some downpours again in northern ireland and just generally a lot of cloud and the temperatures are very much dependent on how much sunshine we're going to get. if it stays cloudy all day, it will hardly get up to 20 degrees. you can see these lows are just sort of lingering across the uk through the middle part of the week
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so, again, a fair bit of rain to come and this weather front, i think particularly across central areas, will give a good soaking on wednesday. it will have a tendency to drift a little bit further north but look at that — northern scotland gets away with it. the deal is done — the dup signs an agreement with the consevatives to bolster theresa may. it's taken 18 days for a confidence and supply deal to be hammered out. at its heart — money — an extra billion pounds for northern ireland over two years. this agreement will operate to deliver a stable government in the united kingdom's national interest at this vital time. and what about its implications for the resumption of power—sharing at stormont? also this lunchtime. government concern as all tower blocks so far tested for combustible building materials after the grenfall tower
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block fire have failed. eu nationals living in the uk will get more detail later — of what rights they can expect to have after brexit.
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