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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 1, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. more criticism of kensington council as the london mayor calls for it to be taken over by the government. the council leader and his deputy resigned yesterday over their response to the grenfell fire, now sadiq khan says commissioners should run the authority. good morning it's saturday the 1st ofjuly. a former hospital employee opens fire with an assault rifle in new york, killing one doctor and injuring six other people. ten years after smoking was banned in public places in england, we'll be asking how much difference it's made. in sport, it's make or break for the british and irish lions in one of the most significant games in their history. lose to the all blacks, and the test series is over. and it's the sailing sport that sees
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you fly above the water — i've been having a go at foiling. much how fun does that look! amazing. and louise has the weather. a chilly start for most of the country. mostly drive with some sunny spells. first, our main story: kensington and chelsea council is facing more criticism over its handling of the grenfell fire. the mayor of london sadiq khan is calling for commissioners to be brought in to take over the running of the authority, which he says is "not fit for purpose". the council leader, nicholas paget—brown, and his deputy, both resigned yesterday. simonjones reports. after angry protests at the council
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officers and after a meeting of the council was cut short following an attempt to land the public and press... were you pressured by number ten to resign? the pressure for the leader got too great. this isa for the leader got too great. this is a huge human tragedy. many families. the task, successor is to ensure that the strengths which also characterise this place and north kensington in particular, seem to play their part in bringing the community together. but the mayor of london says that this cannot happen without a change of leadership from the existing councils. he said the authority is not fit for purpose. tate commissioners must be brought in immediately. he has the backing ofa in immediately. he has the backing of a community campaigner who says residents have been in lord forfar too long. trust in the whole of the cabinet has gone, confidence in the council has gone. they would
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complain if the yes and raise these issues and the aftermath has been disastrous, as we can all see and you people do need to be put in place that people can be confident in. one conservative member called the idea and democratic. the communities secretary said it was right that the leader stepped aside and the government remained focused on providing all necessary support to people affected by the tragedy. our correspondent, simonjones is outside kensington town hall this morning — simon, how likely is the government to intervene? this is where angry residents gathered two weeks ago to protest. some are up the steps behind me and managed to get up inside the building. they said their voices we re building. they said their voices were not being hurt when they made complaints about safety before the
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fire and that they had been abandoned by the council after that. the anger remains but for a government to step in and remove councillors elected by the public is a big deal but it has happened before in the past, in rather where the council was accused of not being fit for purpose are not dealing properly with child exploitation. and also in another occasion with a culture of cronyism was found. whoever takes over the council, if they councillors or commissioners, they councillors or commissioners, they have a huge task to restore confidence in the council and build bridges with residents who feel so badly let down. a man has opened fire inside a hospital in new york, killing a doctor and seriously wounding six other people. the gunman, who was a former employee at the hospital, later killed himself.
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nada tawfik reports from new york. the bronx—lebanon hospital is normally a place of care and concern but on friday afternoon, one doctor broke his oath to do no harm. a former employee entered the building with an assault rifle concealed under a white doctors coat. he has been identified as doctor henry bello. if i had numerous shots on the 16th and 17th floor of the hospital which struck many dog is on duty. thank god this was not an act of terrorism. it is an isolated incident. it appears to be a workplace related matter but that makes it no less tragic all no less horrible. emergency services responded and locked down the building. officers went floor to floor looking for the shooter, following a trail of blood. they
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we re following a trail of blood. they were told he was on the 17th floor and once there they found him dead from a self inflict it gun wound. one female doctor was found dead and six other and injured. some are fighting for their lives. there are still many an ansett questions, including how a man was able to enter a hospital with an assault rifle in one of the few places in the country where they are banned. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. james chapman worked closely with david davis, and told the bbc that the red lines set by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talks with the european union. there will be further talks between the northern ireland political parties today as they try to reach a deal to save the power—sharing agreement by monday. the northern ireland secretary james brokenshire, said the situation "cannot continue for much longer," after the dup and sinn fein missed a government deadline on thursday. a number of british airways cabin
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crew are launching a sixteen—day strike from this morning in a long—running dispute about pay and conditions. the airline says that no short—haul flights will be affected, but it has brought in aircraft and crews from qatar airways to reduce the impact. thousands of police have been deployed in hong kong, where celebrations are being held to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory's handover from british to chinese rule. the new chief executive carrie lam was sworn in this morning. our correspondentjuliana liu joins us now from live from hong kong. juliana, it's a day of notjust celebration, but tensions too? the new chief executor of hong kong, carrie lam, was sworn in by the chinese president, xi xingpin, on his first trip to hong kong as president of china. he reiterated
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his commitment to the one country two systems system in hong kong allowing it more freedom. he also let the people in the city who are calling for independence from china. let me share with you what he said which is, any attempt to endanger china sovereignty and security is absolutely impermissible. that is what he said this morning around the time of the duration, there were scuffles between pro— beijing and pro—democracy groups. these are scuffles took place for more than an hour and it was really a physical manifestation of the deep divisions in society today. thank you very much. if you were due to see adele at wembley this weekend, then we have some bad news. the singer has been forced to cancel both shows because she's damaged her vocal chords.
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(singing). in a series of tweets, adele said she was devastated and heartbroken as the shows were the biggest of her life. but she admitted she'd struggled vocally earlier in the week. on wednesday night she also told fans that this tour could be her last. it's exactly ten years today since the smoking ban was introduced in pubs and other licensed premises in england. it hasn't been popular with everybody, but campaigners say the legislation has helped two million smokers to kick the habit, as our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. over a decade ago, lighting up in restau ra nts, pu bs over a decade ago, lighting up in restaurants, pubs and bars, in fact any enclosed public space was the norm at all that changed with the band ten years ago bringing it in line with the rest of the uk.
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smoking rates are the lowest ever recorded, just ate million smokers are and that means 2 million people have given up. the proportion of 16 -24 have given up. the proportion of 16 — 2a year olds is just 17%. have given up. the proportion of 16 — 2a year olds isjust17%. an all—time low. — 2a year olds isjust17%. an all-time low. we are after a smoke—free generation. we at part way there. younger people dropping more people than other age groups. we are seeing them using ec greta small is innate to quit smoking and that seems to be particularly helpful. also services that can help them. but there have been criticisms about the ban, saying it has led to the closure of 11,000 pubs in england. public support for smoke—free areas has grown. a poll suggesting just 4% of people would like to see it overturned. just/
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1296. princes william and harry will attend a private service later to re—dedicate their mother's grave, on what would have been diana's 56th birthday. the princess of wales is buried at herfamily home, althorp house, in northamptonshire. our royal correspondent, peter hunt reports. september, 1997, and the last public moments of a funeral that transfixed the nation and indeed the world. this was diana princess of wales being roared home to althorp house, althorp house, near northampton where she lived althorp house, near northampton asa as a teenager and where her a ncestors as a teenager and where her ancestors had lived for generations. with their cameras present, the printers was buried on an island in the middle of an ornamental lake in the middle of an ornamental lake in the heart of this vast private estate. the precise location of the great has never been made public. the area has been redesigned in her
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honour on the significant anniversary year. 20 years, her ex—husband was there with their sons and brother and sister. 20 years on, the future king would be missing because easing canada with his wife. with his father absent, prince william will be joined by his wife and their children at this very private ceremony. they will attend a service for a mother—in—law and a grandmother they never met. when diana died, they werejust grandmother they never met. when diana died, they were just children and this is the start of a difficult time as they remember their mother, a mother who they say smothered them in love. today at a grave they will reflect a nd in love. today at a grave they will reflect and say prayers. a brand new photograph of her majesty the queen has been released this morning, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of modern canada. the queen, who is head of state, is wearing the platinum brooch set with diamonds on her left shoulder, if you look closely you can spot it. the piece ofjewellery has been worn
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by a succession of royal women including the queen mother and recently the duchess of cambridge. prince charles and camilla are celebrating canada day during a 3 day tour. it is 6:13am stop thank you for joining us. some very important spot. do you wish you were watching at? i will tune in later. it's "do or die" for the british and irish lions in new zealand today. that's the words of defence coach andy farrell. their second test against the all blacks kicks off just after eight thirty this morning. our sports correspondent katie gornall is at the westpac stadium in wellington. katie, the lions face a big challenge. it must be very tense of their?m is. i mean, there is a say much riding on this game. the tour
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captain described it as the biggest challenge of his career. in wellington, a game down, they have to come back against the world champion on home turf — it does not get any bigger than this. they were very outmuscled in the first test. there pride was wounded and a response is being demanded. it is this election in midfield having eve ryo ne this election in midfield having everyone talking. sexton and farrell together. it will take something special together to knock the all blacks of their perch. the weather is forecasting rain. that is not necessarily a bad thing. the weather could be a bit of a leveller, something for lions fans to cling on to. i was an event yesterday, there then kieran read, the all blacks, was coaching kids. normally you
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would expect them to be more tense but he was looking very relaxed. the lions will have to produce the game of their careers if they are to win their later. let there, and not here. it has been getting better this weekend. louise will tell you all about it —— wet they are. we have seen some heavy rain this week, but for the first weekend ofjuly are not looking too bad at all. the dominantly dry. it will be some sunshine and in the sunshine at this time of year, if you get it and keep it it will feel pretty warm as well. a beautiful start up into the north—west. in scotland, look at this in argyll & bute. the cloud will arrive today, so make the most of it as there is a weather front heading in your direction. rain through the motocross the south—east will ease
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away, —— reigned through the south—east will ease away. sunlight, patchy rain into the western isles a little bit later on. the best of the brea ks little bit later on. the best of the breaks in the cloud eventually shifting their way further east, and here in scotland temperatures will respond. cloud into northern ireland and through much of england and wales this morning. maybe the cloud thick enough was still a spot or two of drizzle in the extreme south—east, but conditions will improve. the cloud remaining fairly well broken towards the west and as well broken towards the west and as we go through the day will start to see some sunshine coming through. a big slice of sunshine from the west and cloud breaking up in the south—east as well so temperatures will respond. that weak weather front to the north and west producing some drizzle, 12 to 18 degrees. we might see 19 or 2a eastern scotland and highest values of 2324 in the south—east corner. that is the mid— 70s fahrenheit.
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that is the mid— 70s fahrenheit. that weather front will gradually drift its way south and east as we move out of saturday towards the early hours of sunday morning and there could be some heavy bursts, thatis there could be some heavy bursts, that is good news for gardeners and growers. we could see some rain for gardeners through the night but it means a pretty grey, potentially wet start in the south—east with a smattering of showers into the far north—west. we start monday with contrasting weather conditions. the rain will ease away, and improving picture but we keep the risk of a few sharp showers and winds increasing here. they are likely to stay as quite a feature over the next day or so. top temperatures on sunday afternoon, we are looking at 13 to 23. more from me coming up later in the morning. we will not be complaining about that at all. we will be back at 6:30am. but now, let's hear mark kermode's take on this week's new releases, on the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? a mixed bag this week. we have a man called 0ve, which is a portrait of a grumpy old man. we have despicable me 3, the minions are back. and risk, a documentary. lots to talk about but my most important role this week is to get the pronunciation right of a man called 0ve. it seems to be "over". that is the closest. it is adapted from a bestseller and the blurb says, it will make you feel a new sympathy for the curmudgeons in your life. the tag line on the movie poster is, you will love him as much as he hates you. 0ve is widowed, he is embittered. he wants to end his life but it keeps being distracted by his neighbours to keep breaking the housing association rules,
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of which he is a stickler for keeping to. when a new family moves and he is furious about their presence, their noise, generally them being there. however, a woman sees behind that curudgeonly facade, he starts to break down his resistance and amazingly, she gets him to teach her to drive. here's a clip. horn blares. a fantastic look of exasperation on his face. he has the most fantastic face. did you ever see the 100—year—old man who climbed out the window and disappeared? no.
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i know the one you mean, i didn't, sadly but i read about it. i struggled with that film, because it had that scandi humour think that i never really fell in with. with this, it looks like that kind of film but then we start to learn about his life story, young romance, childhood trauma, his relationship with his wife which is idyllic but faces tragedy, and you start to understand how he got to where he is and it is sweet and sentimental. there is a lot of absurdist humour. there is an ongoing argument about whether saabs or volvos are the perfect car. how swedish. entire friendships fall out over these arguments but you start to see as a three—dimensional character. he has a strong moral compass and is somebody who has suffered and has been made bitter. inside that is the person he used to be. i went in thinking i would go for it, but i laughed and cried. i like any movie that makes me cry because it means that it's working, you believe in the characters.
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i really liked it. despite the tag line, you will love him as much as he hates you, which i thought would be a hard watch, it was easy to fall in with. i am looking forward to seeing that. good. alternatively, a third of any film, really, does the world need this? whether we need despicable me 3 is another question. here's the thing, i find the minions funny. they are running out of plots and they had to bring a twin brother in to make the plot work, but you see the minions before the titles and one pulls out a fart gun and ijust started laughing. i giggled like an idiot for the rest of the film because i think the minions are funny. the verbal staff is funny and they are perfect slapstick creations, they remind me of what was funny about old silent cinema.
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there is steve carrell and a story about gru and his brother, a new super villain but for me i just find the minions funny. i laughed all the way through. even though i knew that i shouldn't, i did. you are allowed to do that. i am so fascinated by risk, your third choice. this is by laura poitras, who made citizenfour, about edward snowden which was brilliant. it was real edge of your seat stuff. she was in the hotel room when the revelations were made. he came across as self—effacing and shy in that documentary. someone who did not want to be the centre of the story. this is one aboutjulian assange, about whom the adjectives self—effacing and shy are not immediately applicable. the film is very conflicted about its subject. it looks like it began as a film about someone film maker admired,
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but that changes. the portrait we get is someone who is narcissistic, controlling, self obsessed, and has no self—awareness. here is a clip in whichjulian assange and his associate are trying to ring hillary clinton on the phone. this is an emergency. you are the emergency line and it will take a while? 0k. do you want to do that now and i will wait. he would like to speak to her about that, yes. ok, let me start by giving you my phone number. one moment, please. details including an unredacted cable set are about to go on the internet.
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i do not understand why you do not see the urgency in this. who is he? hello, this isjulian assange. we don't have a problem, you have a problem. that is the tone of the film. the story is well now rehearsed, i think people know the basic parameters. what is strange about this film is that it is very fragmented, it is nothing like as good as citizenfour. you can tell that it is a film in which the film—maker's relationship to the subject changed during it. when the film was first seen about a year ago, the film—makers said thejulian assange demanded changes and got lawyers involved, which he did not have the right to do. she has made the film that she wanted to make. there is an irony in someone who is releasing information wanting
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to control it. we have seen this before in other documentaries and in the much—derided drama, the fifth estate. you get an inside view, but it is fragmented and frustrating because even when they are talking about the electio,n you want the film to be more focused. it feels like it is falling apart. julian assange has said that the film will do his reputation no good at all and i think that he is right. which some people may take as a recommendation in itself. it depends where you stand on these things. it is interesting, also that it was made by a woman. what is your best out this week? 0kja. it caused a fuss when it was released at cannes because it is simultaneously released on netfix. it is basically as story about a young girl in korea who has raised a super—pig.
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she follows to america to stop it being experimented upon and being used for food. it is a film about where food comes from and how does capitalism hide behind a caring face. tilda swinton is a fantastically monstrous creation. the film uses brilliant cgi to bring the giant pig to life. the film is satirical and strange and i liked it. it is ideally seen in the cinema. it is very cinematic. it is thought provoting, it is not vegetarian propaganda but it will give you food for thought. i like that phrase, vegetarian propaganda. i will do something with that. what about dvds? heal the living was a small release. it is a story of a heart. it is a story about a young man he was involved in an accident and his heart may be used
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for a transplant to save someone else, to heal the living. it is a film about the miracle of medicine but it is more than that, it is about life and death, it is about transcendence, it takes poetic meanders into strange areas. it is very underplayed and does not feel like it is manipulating your emotions but i was totally overwhelmed by it. everyone i know who has seen it has loved that. i am genuinely looking forward to that. a good tip this week. mark, as ever, good to see you. see you next week and a quick reminder that you will find more film reviews and news from across the bbc online. we know the address by now. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer as well. that is all for this week. enjoy your cinema going.
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bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up before 7:00 louise will have this weekend's weather forecast for you. but first at 6:30, a summary of this morning's main news: kensington and chelsea council is facing more criticism over its handling of the grenfell tower fire. the council leader, nicholas paget—brown, and his deputy, both resigned yesterday. now the mayor of london sadiq khan is calling for commissioners to be brought in to take over the running of the authority, which he says is not fit for purpose. a doctor has been shot dead and six others were seriously injured, after a man opened fire inside a hospital in new york. dr henry bello, who used to work at the hospital, concealed an assault rifle under a white doctor's coat, shooting at those who were working, and then killing himself. the mayor of new york said it was not an act of terrorism. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu
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are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. james chapman worked closely with david davis, and told the bbc that the red lines set by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talks with the european union. a number of british airways cabin crew are launching a 16—day strike from this morning in a long—running dispute about pay and conditions. the airline says that no short—haul flights will be affected, but it has brought in aircraft and crews from qatar airways to reduce the impact. thousands of police have been deployed in hong kong, where celebrations are being held to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory's handover from british to chinese rule. the new chief executive carrie lam was sworn in this morning by the chinese president, amid tight security. clashes have taken place between pro—democracy and pro—beijing demonstrators, with more protests expected over the weekend. if you were due to see adele at wembley this weekend then we have some bad news.
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the singer has been forced to cancel both shows because she's damaged her vocal chords. (singing). in a series of tweets, adele said she was devastated and heartbroken as the shows were the biggest of her life. but she admitted she'd struggled vocally earlier in the week. on wednesday night she also told fans that this tour could be her last. it's been exactly 10 years since the smoking ban was introduced in pubs and other licensed premises in england. it hasn't been popular with everybody, but campaigners say the legislation has helped two million smokers to kick the habit, while take—up among those aged 16 to 24 is at an all—time low. how good are you at walking and looking down at your phone to text? it makes me clench my hands. they
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are called smart phone zombies. according to some new research texting on the hoof leads people to change the way they walk, to reduce the risk of tripping. i think it is insulting that you compare them to pensioners. one not all pensioners walk slowly, most pensioners look where they are going and these people do not to be compared to anybody who are half smart. i cannot bear it. just don't do it. ok, i will not. that's smart. i cannot bear it. just don't do it. ok, iwill not. that's very passionate. in japan, they do it. ok, iwill not. that's very passionate. injapan, they do it everywhere. it is on the roads. we heard about people in cars but
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bashing into someone... i am going to stop. my biggest beef is tourists looking at london bridge through an ipad. isaw looking at london bridge through an ipad. i saw a few lions fans doing that this morning!. what do you think of the weather in terms of the effect? the all blacks are used to all that. they have not lost their in17 all that. they have not lost their in 17 years. coach andy farrell says, the underdog has always had its day, as the british and irish lions, face, one of the most significant games in their history. the lions will lose the series if they fail to beat the all blacks in wellington this morning. if their ambitious selection pays off, a victory, would take it to the final test, in auckland next weekend. it is about character this week for
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us. it is about manning up and putting everything on the line because if that situation, isn't it? it is do or die for us. andy murray's says he's feeling good, despite limping through three hours of practice yesterday. murray has a sore hip and though he was hitting the ball and serving smoothly, in between rallies he was limping and grimacing. he still plans to begin the defence of his wimbledon title on monday, against alexander bublik. novak djokovic plays, gael monfils, in the final, at eastbourne later, after beating, daniil medvedev. djokovic isn't quite back to his old self, but he hasn't dropped a set this week. british number three heather watson declared herself, "ready for wimbledon", after pushing former world number one caroline wozniacki, to three sets in the semi—finals, at eastbourne. she said a run of good results, had left her feeling confident and optimistic.
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wozniacki will face karolina pliskova, in the final. contador pulled out after a nasty fall injured her back. she is still hoping to be fit for wimbledon. it isa it is a big tournament next week for all of us but it is something that i have to disregard when it comes to my health. my health has always come first and my health. my health has always come firstand i'm my health. my health has always come first and i'm definitely doing all i can to be ready for wimbledon but i will do whatever is best for my health. england'sjodi ewart shadoff is very well placed in the women's pga championship in chicago. she sank five birdies in a blemish—free round of 66, to move to within one shot of the leaders, se young kim and danielle kang. this is the second women's major of the season. castleford tigers, continue to dominate, rugby league's super league. they held off a strong fightback, from hull fc,
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to win by 24 points to 22, to go eight points clear at the top of the table, with just three games, of the regular season to play, before the super 8s. chris froome has signed a three—year contract with team sky on the eve of the tour de france. the tour, gets under way in dusseldorf in germany this afternoon and froome's hoping to complete, his third straight win, and fourth victory in five years. but he knows it won't be easy. the level of my rivals and the course we are racing on this year makes it a much more open race and it will be the biggest challenge for me, for sure. to win a fourth tour de france would be incredible. i mean, ido de france would be incredible. i mean, i do not want tojinx it. it would just be... unreal. now its a big weekend of sailing, with the "round the island race",
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which happens around the isle of wight, and i've been in those waters, for an exclusive look at how, the sport of foiling, in which you fly along above the water, is becoming more accessible to all. if you thought the sort of sailing we've seen recently, in the america's cup, was just for the most experienced is it isita is it a boat or is it a plane? well, it tries to be a bit of both. it is trying to bring the thrill of the america's cup sailing to all of us. it changes the game massively in terms of how much fun you can have. the kids are going to love this. until may, the sport of foiling us andy bean for the most daring because the consequences could be serious. every time you make a small
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mistake, you capsize of the boat and most people have got three or four in them before it is all too much. this is a new challenge. these paralympic this is a new challenge. these pa ralympic gold—medallist is this is a new challenge. these paralympic gold—medallist is used to sailing in the water and ijoined her on her third attempt at this for a bit ofa her on her third attempt at this for a bit of a crash course. incredible! we are not even touching the surface. we have lift off! is this all there, that is what makes it a lot safer for novices because we crashed the water but did not go over. we will carry on and tried to get lift off again. these boats make it more accessible for more people. out of the water, that happens roughly... did we crashed?”
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out of the water, that happens roughly... did we crashed? i am learning at the moment. we have had a couple of crashes but it was steady, it did not capsize. the difference is, normally in a boat, it isa difference is, normally in a boat, it is a noisy but when you get up on these boats, it goes quiet and there is this sense of speed and flying through the air. the only guaranteed way to flip these boats over is back on dry land. it looks a something out of star wars. it is that because it does have the float so it is a boat but the whole point of this is we tried to get it to fly. this is the automatic height control. these gauges how high the boat is out of the water. it will soon be available for thrill seekers across the uk stop whether you have had sailing experience or not. you see the america's cup, it seems hard to get
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to that level but with this boat you can take it out and even if as a beginner you can start straightaway. you should not worry about the boat capsizing but do be prepared to get rather wet. these boats will give people the experience of the america's cup but at six knots so the danger is much lower. what does it feel like when hejumps in the air? lower. what does it feel like when he jumps in the air? at first you feel quite scared but once in the air, it is fine. does it feel like flying? absolutely. the sound goes. it goes quite silent. very eerie but brilliant. well done. a very lucky boy. it's that time of year when many of us will be starting to think about our summer holiday, but as we've been hearing this morning some british airways staff
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begin a 16 day strike over pay today. the airline says most of it flights will go ahead as planned, but there's bound to be concern from some passengers. let's get some clarity now from the independent‘s travel editor, simon calder. good morning. i have just good morning. i havejust been good morning. i have just been down to heathrow terminal 5 where things are fairly calm, only a couple of cancellations. everything else i have checked is are going is normal 01’ have checked is are going is normal or rather not quite as normal you may turn up and fly on a different airline? kata airway? -- qatar qatar qatar has loads of planes and pilots and cabin crew on the ground because
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they are not allowed to fly because ofa they are not allowed to fly because of a row in the gulf to places like abu dhabi and dubai and saudi arabia say they have loads of planes spare. british airways was given permission by the transport secretary to use qatar qatar airways and in the next two minutes makes light out to brussels is going to go and the lucky passengers in business class again to find that instead of sitting like this in very confined seat they have a 6—foot seven bed flat. although it is only an hour across so they will not enjoy that is too long. no one complains about those. why are we seeing these disputes? a brief answer but it all goes back to 2010 and the bitter british airways cabin crew dispute.
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after that ba is said everyone who joined cabin crew willjoin out mixed fleet unit — 5500 people. they have been involved in a very long and bitter dispute over what they call poverty pay. they are employed on inferior terms and my understanding is the pay bit has been sorted out what this strike is about is sanctions that the union says we re about is sanctions that the union says were imposed on 1400 strikers are taking part in the previous 26 days of strike action. as ever, thank you very much all your wisdom. you don't need to go abroad for a holiday, stay in britain for a useful summer. i am sure in edinburgh, as they have just had
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their wettestjune, edinburgh, as they have just had their wettest june, they probably won't agree with that in some respects. but yes, it is glorious out there this morning in the far north—west. lots of blue sky and sunshine at the moment. the cloud is on its way, unfortunately, so get up and off early to avoid it. looking at nottingham, quite a lot of cloud around at the moment which will break up and you will see some sunshine is to go through the day. so things are looking a little bit more promising. a bit of drizzle across the extreme south—east from a wea k across the extreme south—east from a weak weather front. sandwiched between the two is a good deal of dry weather through the day. this little fellow will produce the cloud and drizzle into the north—west later on but will not spoil the day. much of eastern scotland should cling on to the sunshine as we go through the morning and into the afternoon. not a bad start to the day as we have seen through that weather watcher's picture. not bad in northern ireland, predominantly dry, and we see across much of england and wales are cloudy start this morning but the cloud should break up and you will continue to
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see some sunshine. so generally speaking a promising day. temperatures will respond so as you go through the afternoon hopefully the cloud will then and break in the south—east. a real window of sunshine moving its way across much of central and eastern england. our wea k of central and eastern england. our weak weather front producing some outbreaks of showery rain. so up into the north—west we are looking at 12 to 18 degrees. with sunshine in the eastern scotland, 19 or possibly 20. highest values of 23 or 24, that is the mid— 70s. it will feel quite promising. the weather front will matter is way south—east and we could see some rain just pepping up and we could see some rain just pepping up for a time down across central and southern parts of england. a bit of a watering for the garden is, that is good news through saturday night but it could be lingering first thing on sunday morning across the south—east corner. maybe a different start to the day here, a scattering of showers in the north—west. a windy start in the far north of scotland but it stays quite breezy, with showers, in the scotland on sunday.
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the rain clears away and generally speaking not a bad day. a good deal of sunny weather in the story and temperatures responding. perhaps not quite as warm as today but nevertheless not bad at all, 13 to 22 or 23 degrees, the overall higher. it is going to be a dry story this weekend, some sunny spells around and in the sunshine it will feel pleasantly warm. i will ta ke will feel pleasantly warm. i will take that for the first weekend of july, wouldn't you two? pretty nice u nless july, wouldn't you two? pretty nice unless you are in edinburgh! we will be back with the headlines at 7:00am, but now it is time for click. this is salad, grown the old —fashioned way.
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you know, in shipping containers under led lights without soil in an optimised water and nutrient mix. as farmer spock called it, good old hydroponics. in all seriousness, it's been suggested that the type of intense farming going on here at local roots in los angeles could help solve the world's food problems in years to come. transport costs can be produced by growing plants wherever they are needed, even in areas of famine where the land and climate are too harsh. you get higher volumes and many more crop cycles during the year, too. lettuce can be grown in 30 days instead of up to 90 outdoors, and a new crop can be grown immediately. all in all, one of these containers yields the same as five acres of land over the course of a year. it's very similar to the strawberry farm that we saw in paris in the spring and in miyagi injapan in 2015 where the land had been ruined by the tsunami.
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but this project has much bigger ambitions and this one is also using artificial intelligence to make some quite unusual tweaks. but before we talk about the vegetables of the future, we are off to san francisco where kat hawkins has been looking at the meat of the future. i've come to this lab in the heart of silicon valley to visit impossible foods. they claim to have invented the food of the future, a completely meatless meat made entirely of plants. it's big, its light. it's actually remarkably important to get that state of mind perspective but actually it's also useful for interpreting the colour of meat. this is where the research happens. the aim is to reverse engineer the flavour and texture of meat using only plant extracts.
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and as someone who very much enjoys their meat tasting like meat, i wanted to find out how they're doing it. what is it about the flavour of meat that makes it so damn delicious? why is it so agreeable, what is it that triggers your mind to say "mmm. . . bacon" or . burger"? there is a lot that goes into that and it turns out that flavour is about 75 or 80% aroma and about 20 or 25% taste. impossible foods found that the key ingredient that gives meat its characteristic irony taste is heme, a molecule found in most living things and especially in animal muscle. luckily, it's also found in plants. so this is your magic ingredient, right? this is your plant—based blood? right. and it provides the explosion of flavour you get that makes the difference between white meat chicken with a beefburger. the company has recently flipped the switch on its meatless
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meat—packing factory as it ramps up production. they will eventually make 4 million burgers a month and the next aim is to move into chicken, pork and lamb. but it's one thing being a scientist who's enthralled by food tech and another to be a chef, using the ingredients produced on your carefully crafted menu. i think we eat way too much meat in general. so i think this is a way to be as close as possible to how meat looks and tastes. the impossible burger is now the only one rocco has on his menu and he sells 250 of them a week. it seems like at this stage it might be a novelty for silicon valley diners with money to spend but of course, as always, the true test is in the tasting. 0k. it's about to happen. it's really good. the texture's just like meat.
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it doesn't taste like minced beef. it tastes like mushrooms, but i know there's no mushrooms in there. ijust tasted it and it's delicious. but it doesn't taste quite like meat to me. is that something that you noticed? yes, it's a little bit leaner, as a meat. i would say like bison meat. but it looks like it — it's got that kind of umami flavour of the irony part of the blood. close enough. it tasted good as i was eating it but afterwards it left a slightly strange taste in my mouth — very strong, very irony. still, it's healthier than meat and has zero cholesterol so maybe it's worth it. what comes across talking to rocco, though, is how important it is for his customers that the flavour is close to meat while still being ethical. but what if you could serve actual animal flesh without a single creature being harmed ?
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that is what several companies, including this small tech start—up in the heart of silicon valley are working on. they plan to grow actual fish from stem cells. it might sound like an unnerving prospect but they believe is the future. fish consumption is demanding, fish demand is rising but the production cannot go higher. 52% of all fisheries are fully exploited. 25% above that are in collapse, they are overextended. so we only have 23% of the world's fisheries left that we can use to increase production. so if we still want to eat fish at the rate that we're eating it, we have to do this. finless foods takes a small sample of cells from real fish and cultures it up. one cell can theoretically become one tonne of fish meat but they're not there yet. we'll be on the market in three years with products that are new versions of fish that people haven't had before and in 5 or 6 years we'll have steaks and filets like the fish that you currently eat at the supermarket, just like what's
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inside of the fish that you'd normally see in the ocean. and they're not the only company working on what some have dubbed clean meat. just this week hampton creek claimed they will hit the stores with their lab—grown meat by 2018. and around the corner at memphis meats, they have already produced fried chicken and meatballs from stem cells. but at $80,000 for a pound of beef, there's a long way to go. scaling up will mean finding a new medium to help grow the stem cells. currently, the blood of calf foetuses is used, which is extensive and of course, if you don't want to hurt animals, pretty self—defeating. with the population due to increase to 9.7 billion by 2050, many people feel current approaches to food production are unsustainable. cultured meat promises to reduce environmental impacts and meat looks set to be the latest thing to be given the silicon valley overhaul. much like we expect from our phones, from our cars, that it will be
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better, cheaper, faster, safer, year by year, we should expect the same thing from ourfood. but once you start thinking about food, a cow, as a pure piece of technology, and you apply those same technological insights we use elsewhere in our lives, you can start really thinking about what food should be, what food could be. that was kat. i think i'll stick to the salad for the moment. which is lucky, because i'm surrounded by the stuff. the thing that really hits you inside one of these containers is the smell. it's just lovely, all this concentrated fresh lettuce. and you don't even get this, i don't think, in an open—airfield. because it will float away but in here — wow, it's lovely. everything looks lovely and fresh. i'm inside what is called a food computer, where every aspect of the plant's growth cycle — the temperature, nutrient mix, humidity and light is monitored and controlled. this kind of computer—controlled
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hydroponics is allowing food scientists to not just replicate but improve on mother nature's recipes. so every plant that we grow has a finely tuned growing algorithm to optimise its growth, its yield and its flavour profiles in nutrient characteristics. not only does each variety get its own unique growing conditions but artificial intelligence and computer vision are monitoring the plants, looking out for and treating any problems as soon as they're spotted. local roots hopes to place between 20 and 50 of its so—called ‘terrafarms‘ right next to supermarkets‘ local distribution centres. it means the veg won't have to travel so far and it will be fresher when it hits the shelf. i've always needed a dressing on my salad because i thought it tasted quite bland without it but this is really full of flavour. because it is so fresh.
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i could even eat an entire bowl of this without any dressing. but some researchers don't like the idea of individual companies doing research by themselves. putting life in a box is incredibly complex. it requires biology as much as chemistry, as much as plant physiology and biochemistry. and so right now it's being tackled by a lot of start—ups and it's hard for those start—ups to have such a multidisciplinary approach. this is why all of our work is open sourced — the hardware, software — so we can get people thinking on the issues and we can ask them for advice. at mit's media lab, the open agricultural initiative, or openag, wants to create a worldwide collection of food hackers. one of the things that we've invented here we call the personal food computer and it's like a hacker kit for plants. what we've done is distributed all the plants, all the materials, all the tutorials, open source.
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and it exploded. we now have a community of over 40 countries, over 1000 people. the great thing is that their experiences are being recorded by sensors. artificial intelligence can look for patterns among these data points which are the results of thousands of experiments and the more wide—ranging those experiments, the better. we might learn inside of a food computer what set of climate attributes causes the best expression of protein in a snow pea. now we might say, hey, where in the world are these collections of attributes naturally occurring? and then we should plant that genetics, those snow peas in that place. so not only might food computers improve on nature but they could also teach us more about how to get the best out of the earth that we have. and that's it for this short cut of click for this week from my little lettuce
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farm here in california. the full version is up on iplayer to watch right now and you can find us on twitter at bbc click and on facebook, too. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. do not adjust your sets, twiddle any dials, or start climbing hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. more criticism of kensington council as the london mayor calls for it to be taken over by the government. the council leader and his deputy resigned yesterday over their response to the grenfell fire, now sadiq khan says commissioners should run the authority. good morning it's saturday the 1st ofjuly. a former hospital employee opens fire with an assault rifle in new york, killing one doctor and injuring six other people. ten years after smoking was banned in public places in england, we'll be asking how much difference it's made.
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in sport, it's make or break for the british and irish lions in one of the most significant games in their history.
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