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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 1, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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do not adjust your sets, twiddle any dials, or start climbing hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. more criticism of kensington council as the london mayor calls for it to be taken over by the government. the council leader and his deputy resigned yesterday over their response to the grenfell fire, now sadiq khan says commissioners should run the authority. good morning it's saturday the 1st ofjuly. a former hospital employee opens fire with an assault rifle in new york, killing one doctor and injuring six other people. ten years after smoking was banned in public places in england, we'll be asking how much difference it's made. in sport, it's make or break for the british and irish lions in one of the most significant games in their history. lose to the all blacks, and the test series is over. as canada marks the 150th anniversary of its founding — we'll find out how the home of downton abbey was also
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the birthplace of the nation. and louise has the weather. it is chilly start in the north of the country but not a bad start to the country but not a bad start to the day. good morning. first, our main story: kensington and chelsea council is facing more criticism over its handling of the grenfell fire. the mayor of london sadiq khan is calling for commissioners to be brought in to take over the running of the authority, which he says is "not fit for purpose". the council leader, nicholas paget—brown, and his deputy, both resigned yesterday. simonjones reports. after angry protests at the council offices and after a meeting of the council was cut short following an attempt to ban the public and press... reporter: were you pressured by number 10 to resign? ..the pressure for the leader got too great. this is a huge human tragedy for so many families. the task for my successor
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is to ensure that the strengths would also characterise this place, and north kensington in particular, are seem to play their part in bringing the community together. but the mayor of london says this cannot happen with a change of leadership from among the existing councillors. sadiq khan says the fire has shown authority is not fit for purpose. what he called "untainted commissioners", government—appointed experts must be brought in immediately. he has the backing of one community campaigner who says residents have been ignored for too long. trust in the whole of the cabinet hasjust gone, confidence in the council has gone. they weren't confident in them years ago, while they were complaining and trying to raise these issues, um, and the aftermath has been disastrous, as we can all see, and new people do need to be put in place that people can be confident in. but one conservative memeber of the london assembly called
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the idea undemocratic. the communities secretary sajid javid said it was right the leader had stepped aside and the government remained focused on providing all necessary support to people affected by the tragedy. simon jones, bbc news. our correspondent, simonjones is outside kensington town hall this morning — simon, how likely is the government to intervene? appoint commissioners to run the department? this is where president gathered a couple of weeks ago, some ran up the stairs and got into the building. they said their voices are not listened to. they had raised safety concerns before the fire and they said they were ignored after they said they were ignored after the fire. that anger has remained but for a government to step in and
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remove councillors elected by the public is a big deal. there have been appreciative. a councillor not dealing with child sexual explication and also over what was described as a culture of cronyism. no response from theresa may. but the reality is, whoever takes over has a huge task to restore confidence in the council and build bridges. a man has opened fire inside a hospital in new york, killing a doctor and seriously wounding six other people. the gunman, who was a former employee at the hospital, later killed himself. nada tawfik reports from new york. the bronx—lebanon hospital is normally a place of care and concern but on friday afternoon, one doctor broke his oath to do no harm. a former employee of the hospital
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entered the building with an assault rifle concealed under a white doctors coat. media reports have identified him as doctor henry bello. the 45—year—old fired numerous shots on the 16th and 17th floors of the hospital, which struck many doctors on duty. i want to say at the outset, thank god this was not an act of terrorism. it is an isolated incident. it appears to be a workplace related matter but that makes it no less tragic or no less horrible. immediately, emergency services responded and locked down the building. responding officers went floor to floor looking for the shooter, following a trail of blood. they were told he was on the 17th floor and, once there, they found him dead from a self—inflicted gun wound. one female doctor was found dead and six other are injured. one female doctor was found dead and six others are injured. five are in serious conditions,
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and fighting for their lives. there are still many unanswered questions, including how a man was able to enter a hospital with an assault rifle in one of the few places in the country where they are banned. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. james chapman worked closely with david davis, and told the bbc that the red lines set by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talks with the european union. there will be further talks between the northern ireland political parties today as they try to reach a deal to save the power—sharing agreement by monday. the northern ireland secretary james brokenshire, said the situation "cannot continue for much longer," after the dup and sinn fein missed a government deadline on thursday. a16
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a 16 day strike this morning from airline staff. the airline says it has brought in a kraft and crews from qatar airways to reduce the impact. after the last major dispute in the thousand ten, all new crewjoined under different pay conditions. that difference is the backdrop for this latest strike set to run for 16 straight days. up to 1400 set to run for 16 straight days. up to 11100 could go out in strike vote far fewer have done so previously. they describe pay levels as poverty pgy- they describe pay levels as poverty pay. ba denies this and has offered passengers a refund, rerouting all rebooking if they are worried. mixed fleet cabin crew are striking until
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the 16th ofjuly in what began as a straightforward pay dispute that has 110w straightforward pay dispute that has now become more of an issue about the sanctions ba has applied to the strikers who took action in 26 previous days. to prevent further cancellations, ba has leased aircraft and crews from qatar airways. although unions say these crews would be in breach of industrial relations rules here, chris grayling has allowed it. if you were due to see adele at wembley this weekend, then we have some bad news. the singer has been forced to cancel both shows because she's damaged her vocal chords. (singing). in a series of tweets, adele said she was devastated and heartbroken as the shows were the biggest of her life. but she admitted she'd struggled vocally earlier in the week. on wednesday night she also told fans that this tour
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could be her last. thousands of police have been deployed in hong kong, where celebrations are being held to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory's handover from british to chinese rule. the new chief executive carrie lam was sworn in this morning. 0ur correspondentjuliana liu joins us now from live from hong kong. we can see people gathering, i am assuming it is celebrations but there have also been protests?” assuming it is celebrations but there have also been protests? i am at victoria park, which is the gathering spot for the annual first ofjuly pro—democracy rally. thousands of people expected to march from this park to the hong kong government headquarters. universal suffrage, voting rights and the immediate release of the
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chinese nobel prize winner. let me show you a poster one of the pro—democracy but it all parties has been giving to protesters. it says that save our one country to party system. this is an unpopularfigure holding ug el, a very controversial property controversy he is involved with. they want him to be prosecuted for this is a jet controversy. in the next all we are expecting more people to gather before they set out on their march. it's exactly ten years today since the smoking ban was introduced in pubs and other licensed premises in england. does it seem longer to get? i cannot
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believe it was just ten years ago. it hasn't been popular with everybody, but campaigners say the legislation has helped two million smokers to kick the habit, as our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. over a decade ago, lighting up in restaurants, pubs and bars, in fact, any enclosed public space was the norm at all that changed in fact, any enclosed public space was the norm but all that changed with the ban in england on this day, in 2007, bringing it in line with the rest of the uk. smoking rates are now at their lowest ever recorded in britain — there are nowjust over 8 million smokers. according to cancer research uk, that means 2 million people have given up cigarettes since the ban. the proportion of 16 — 2a year olds who smoke is now just 17%. an all—time low. what we are after is a smoke—free generation. we are part—way there. we see the smoking rate in younger people dropping more people than other age groups. we see them using e—cigarettes more as an aid to quit smoking than others, and that seems to be particularly helpful. as well as the range of nhs stop
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smoking services that we've got that can help them. but pro—smoking capaigners have been criticised the ban, saying it has led to the closure of more than 11,000 pubs in england. public support for smoke—free areas has grown, however. a yougov poll today suggests just 12% of people would like to see it overturned. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. a brand new photograph of her majesty the queen has been released this morning, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of modern canada. the queen, who is head of state, is wearing the platinum brooch set with diamonds on her left shoulder, if you look closely you can spot it. the piece ofjewellery has been worn by a succession of royal women including the queen mother and recently the duchess of cambridge. prince charles and camilla are celebrating canada day during a 3 day tour. it will be 20 years in august
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since diana, princess of wales was killed in a car crash in paris. later today, her children, princes william and harry and their immediate family will return to althorp estate where the princess was buried. in a private service they will rededicate the princess's grave on what would have been diana's 56th birthday. we can speak now to royal historian kate williams. a significant moment for prince william and prince harry? it is a very meaningful day. it would have been her 56 birthday, 20 years since she died. an important date for the family. in this ceremonial, remembering the positive, what
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diana's life brought to the world. a leading light in the anti— mining campaign, anti— bullying, all those things that the printers have continued doing. —— princes. the importance of the family and the wider world. the two princes have been open about the effect that her death had on the two of them while growing up? we have seen them open up growing up? we have seen them open up over the past few months. william talking about how role the grief was and how difficult it was to grieve in public. and prince harry talking openly about how he suffered, how he could not come to terms until later in his 20s because he could not cope with it, the grief and pain,
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thinking about how young they were. harry was just 12. a few weeks ago, harry was just 12. a few weeks ago, harry was just 12. a few weeks ago, harry was saying that he felt being asked to walk behind the coffin was too much, too much for a child to do that and we know that he walked to support. harry was saying no child should be asked to do this. 20 years this year since she died, we are seeing pictures of her cough and being taken to the funeral to be laid at rest. you are a historian. do we begin to get a sense of how diana will be remembered in history? of the role she has played, even in death, in shaping the future of the royal family? i think diana is one
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of the most significant women and the most significant people of the 20th century. her impact in terms of charity, in revolutionising the royal family, in being so much more open with people, hugging aids victims and cancer victims, being engaged with the public, that revolutionised the royal family and we have seen william and harry continuing that but also her death had the hugest constitutional impact on the country, on the queen, on the royal family, and it really forced the royal family to make a great change in terms of the way that they treated people who married into them, and the way they overall treated the press and the public and their engagement with people. because the thing was, diana was insta ntly because the thing was, diana was instantly adored when she married since charles, she was instantly loved and she was like a movie star to the people. when she went on walkabouts with charles, it was diana that people wanted to see. that was a real shock to the royal
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family. they had to recognise that things have to change and they had to transform in terms of their recognition of what the people wa nted recognition of what the people wanted from them. that was engaging close to them, talking to them, and as william and harry have done, engaging in these cinderella causes, thatis engaging in these cinderella causes, that is continuing what diana did, not the easy causes but the things which are most difficult. you mentioned prince charles and his second wife, camilla, are both observing the anniversary of modern canada. does that remove a potential awkwardness today in terms of this rededication of diana's grave? that might have been a private and difficult moment. well, yes, prince charles and the duchess of cornwall are in canada at present, so they are in canada at present, so they are away from the service and that service will be the spencers, the earl and his wife, and their daughter, and also prince william
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and prince harry, conducted by the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, so prince charles will not be there, he will be overseas. i am sure prince charles has her in his thoughts and is thinking about her. thank you very much indeed for joining us on breakfast. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. london mayor sadiq khan has called for the government to take control of the council responsible for the g re nfell tower of the council responsible for the grenfell tower collapse. 0ne doctor has been killed and six other people have been injured after a former employee opened fire with an assault rifle at a new york hospital. here is louise with a look at this morning's weather. i always love the fact is we learn, that edinburgh had its worstjune in terms of rainfall. in fact, they
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started off with just shy of 60 millimetres in the first three or four days of june so millimetres in the first three or four days ofjune so with the rain we have had this weekend it was pretty miserable. it was horrible, but we have some sunshine in scotla nd but we have some sunshine in scotland and parts of eastern scotla nd scotland and parts of eastern scotland will see a decent day. just look at argyll & bute at the moment. make the most of it. the cloud is on its way, a different story in the far south—east. really threatening looking cloud here but it is heading away from kent now. still a little bit drizzly and you will get some sunshine later in the afternoon. 0ne of the reasons for this is a weather front which has been pushing its way across the near continent through the night. behind it a brief ridge,
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quite mean things down, but this little fella will bring more cloud and rain into the far north—west. so and rain into the far north—west. so a little bit cloudy and drizzly by the middle of the afternoon. the winds starting to strengthen but a good slice of sunshine after a cloudy start. and improving picture for many of us as we head into the afternoon. looking at the afternoon in more detail, eastern scotland perhaps faring best. parts of aberdeenshire might see 18 or 19 degrees and edinburgh will see decent spells of sunshine, outbreaks of drizzly rain around as well. a similar story into northern ireland, perhaps fringing into the lake district into the afternoon but heading further inland there will be some sunshine coming through. we could see highs of 23 or 2a in the south—east if we are lucky and it will feel quite warm with the sunshine. the rain is on its way through the evening across the midlands and down into the south—east corner of. some heavy bursts as well from time to time through the night from this weak front. that is good news for gardeners and growers. some rain to encounter first thing across the south—east corner. windy in the far north with some sharp showers developing through the latter stages of the night. a wind is quite a
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feature across the northern isles. blustery, breezy, showery day into the far north—west but once that cloud clears away we will see some sunshine coming through and relatively dry and promising, highs likely of 13 to 23 degrees on sunday. for those of you who have not realised, it is the start of wimbledon into monday, and there is the potential for this little fella to bring some showers. we are keeping ourfingers to bring some showers. we are keeping our fingers crossed they stay away and do not interrupt play for the start of the wimbledon championships. i am sure that is what the players will be keeping their fingers crossed for as well. canada is celebrating 150 years since the british and french bonded together to form a confederation. it is a little—known fact, but the declaration of independence was drafted at highclere castle, the real downton abbey, back in 1867, because the fourth earl of canarvon was friends with canada's first prime minster. ben moore got exclusive access to the library there. the libraries of england's grand
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houses harbour many secrets. but amongst the 8000 books at highclere, better known to viewers as downton abbey, was a corker. this was the birthplace of the nation. at the bottom of this page are three names, which i didn't really know. john mcdonald, ge cartier and bolt. which i didn't really know. john mcdonald, ge cartierand bolt. so did a bit of research and within one second realised what i was about to find. john mcdonald became the first prime minister of canada and lead this delegation posted by the fourth pearl paint over the year they drafted the british north america act. actually quite a bit of the constitution was written here in this library. perhaps they discussed at around this dining room table, perhaps they stood by the saloon fire ona perhaps they stood by the saloon fire on a cold, wintry day. and i feel so lucky. i discovered it all
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by chance. with the government now modelled on the british parliament, modern canada was born on the first ofjuly 18 67. i certainly was not aware of it, and i don't think enough canadians were aware. the setting is hugely important, but it is also the important role of the people. i look forward to actually having the chance to make sure that it gets better known. diaries, telegrams and letters have been uncovered, adding real colour to these negotiations. uk—based canadians invited to the castle were certainly moved. don't stop! why is it so emotional? well, this is coming home. this is... england is home to me, even though we have lived in canada a0 years. home to me, even though we have lived in canada 40 years. it wasn't just the constitution of canada that was drafted in this library. the name of this new territory was decided as well, although there were other suggestions. franklin was one, quickly followed by guefeleland,
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before lord, than had his way and canada was chosen —— lord canarvon. had left a legacy for both countries. it is a slice of british street life as familiar as black taxis or red post boxes — the group of smokers huddled outside a pub. in fact, the smoking ban inside licensed premises was introduced in england just ten years ago today, and only slightly longer in the rest of the uk. in a moment, we will speak to the chief executive of cancer research about the legacy of the ban. before that, we asked shoppers in salford for their views. the pubs were really smoky, and used
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to go in and use to end up with sore eyes. i don't miss that. putting restrictions on people doesn't necessarily change things, it just makes it more difficult, that's all. people will still find a way to do it, so no, i do beginners change anything, really. on aeroplanes it has been an absolute lessing. use a shudder if you are the row ahead of the smoking area. everything feels cleaner, everything feels pressure, and having quit smoking as well, that was huge for me not be able to go out and be surrounded by the smell of smoke all the time. go out and be surrounded by the smell of smoke all the timelj go out and be surrounded by the smell of smoke all the time. i stood out in the cold weatherjust to have a cigarette. so i don't go out so much now. if i want a cigarette, i have one in the house. let's talk now to sir harpal kumar from cancer research uk. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. do you think the smoking ban has... 0r this morning. do you think the smoking ban has... or how much of an impact do you think the smoking ban has had, in correlation to the number of people who are no longer
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smoking, or taking up smoking? well, we have just published smoking, or taking up smoking? well, we havejust published new smoking, or taking up smoking? well, we have just published new estimate this morning which are that roughly speaking just under 2 million people, 1.9 million people, have given up smoking in the ten years since the band, which is a considerable proportion, actually. it's about 20% of all smokers since that time —— ban. and smoking rates now are at their lowest level ever recorded. and what is particularly encouraging is the way that attitudes have changed over time, so that italy among young people, the 16 to 24—year—old group, —— particularly among young people. we are now seeing the lowest growth recorded, and that promises huge gains, huge health gains in the yea rs gains, huge health gains in the years ahead. so we think it is very positive, and the ban has had a profound affect. what tangible health gains can be measured from this? well, so we know for example that smoking causes 14 different types of cancer. of course, most
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people tend to think of lung cancer as the predominant impact of smoking, what we know it also results in heart disease, and a whole range of other health conditions. now, what we also know is that some of those effects happen relatively quickly. heart disease most particularly, and breathing problems. in terms of cancer, we tend to see the effect up to 20 yea rs tend to see the effect up to 20 years after smoking rates change, and so the real gains that we will see an cancer rates are still to be seenin see an cancer rates are still to be seen in the years ahead. and of course, this is and remains the biggest single cause of all cancers. indeed, it is responsible for more than a quarter of all cancer deaths, and indeed, just under a fifth of all deaths from all causes. so this is profoundly important for society. people still smoke, even though we hear the warnings, we hear about the impact it can have on our health,
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you think there will ever be a time when it is just not done? you think there will ever be a time when it isjust not done? well, we would hope so. and one of the things that we also think is incredibly important, in celebrating the success of this smoking ban is to recognise how much further we have to go. we still have about 8 million aduu to go. we still have about 8 million adult smokers in the uk, roughly 16% of the population, and we need continued action. we need continued pressure, continued government action, to see those smoking rates continue to come down over time. and one of the things that we are particularly calling for is for government to publish a new tobacco control plan. we haven't had one now in england for well over a year, and it is the first time for some considerable period that we haven't had dedicated activity to focus on future reductions in smoking rates. we do need to continue to work at it, because smoking rates don't come
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down on the road. but yes, in answer to your question, we do project forward and think that it is possible to imagine a time when effectively we are smoke free, by which we mean fewer than 5% of the population smokes. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. we we re much forjoining us this morning. we were talking about facts earlier. 0ne were talking about facts earlier. one of the earlier smoking bans, guess where it was. it was in 1575, one of the earliest smoking bans. it was a roman catholic church regulation which forbade the use of tobacco in any church in mexico. plenty of incense, i suspect. we are talking about lots of anniversaries today, the anniversary of the smoking ban, of modern canada, and another one today... if you are one of our younger viewers, do not adjust your sets. this really is what tv used to look
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like until this day 50 years ago. we will be looking back at five decades of colour tv later in the show. snooker in black and white would have been slightly limited. tell us what is the best thing you have ever seenin what is the best thing you have ever seen in colour television. or maybe you still have a black—and—white tv. a p pa re ntly you still have a black—and—white tv. apparently there are a couple of thousand people who still claim a black—and—white tv licence. headlines coming up, we will see you hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up before 8:00 louise will have this weekend's weather forecast for you.
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but first at 7:30, a summary of this morning's main news: kensington and chelsea council is facing more criticism over its handling of the grenfell tower fire. the council leader, nicholas paget—brown, and his deputy, both resigned yesterday. now the mayor of london sadiq khan is calling for commissioners to be brought in to take over the running of the authority, which he says is not fit for purpose. a doctor has been shot dead and six others were seriously injured, after a man opened fire inside a hospital in new york. dr henry bello, who used to work at the hospital, concealed an assault rifle under a white doctor's coat, shooting at those who were working, and then killing himself. the mayor of new york said it was not an act of terrorism. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. james chapman worked closely with david davis, and told the bbc that the red lines set by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talks
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with the european union. a number of british airways cabin crew are launching a 16—day strike from this morning in a long—running dispute about pay and conditions. the airline says that no short—haul flights will be affected, but it has brought in aircraft and crews from qatar airways to reduce the impact. if you were due to see adele at wembley this weekend — then we have some bad news. the singer has been forced to cancel both shows because she's damaged her vocal chords. (singing) in a series of tweets, adele said she was devastated and heartbroken as the shows were the biggest of her life. but she admitted she'd struggled vocally earlier in the week. on wednesday night she also told fans that this tour could be her last. thousands of police have been deployed in hong kong, where celebrations are being held to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory's handover
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from british to chinese rule. the new chief executive carrie lam was sworn in this morning by the chinese president, amid tight security. clashes have taken place between pro—democracy and pro—beijing demonstrators, with more protests expected over the weekend. it's been exactly 10 years since the smoking ban was introduced in pubs and other licensed premises in england. it hasn't been popular with everybody, but campaigners say the legislation has helped two million smokers to kick the habit, while take—up among those aged 16 to 24 is at an all—time low. how many times have you been stuck behind someone dawdling as they try and walk and text? they've even got their own name — ‘smombies' or smart phone zombies. now researchers have found that some people have developed a slow and exaggerated stepping action when they walk so they don't trip up.
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ido i do not think we need a new word for them, idiots, i do not think we need a new word forthem, idiots, inconsiderate people. they drive you nuts. lots of people. they drive you nuts. lots of people agreed with me this morning. it is inconsiderate and it is not safe. you should not be walking down the street barging into people. text in and tweet in. how are you? are you agree with you. it is dangerous. it is also dangerous not to agree with her. we all use iphones and ipads. tourist attractions, they are seen through a lens. sporting events and concerts. it is a bit of an
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obsession. i hope we will be remembering this match for all the right reasons. people are saying that if the lions were to lose this series 3—0, it could question the whole setup. it matters to them. new zealand have not lost in wellington since 2003. the england team that beat them went on to win the world cup. only an hour away now. lions defence coach andy farrell, says the underdogs can have their day, in new zealand in one hours time. their second test against the all blacks kicks offjust after eight thirty this morning. we are here in the rain and wind but this do or die match for the lions.
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they have to win here to keep the series alive. we will ask the fans. i love the effort you have gone too. do you think the lions would get something tonight? it is going to be a breeze. can we are going to smash them as well. he is very confident. you are taking on the world champions. it will be quite simple, we will win 23 — 22 and then we will go to eden park and win the final test. job done. very specific. do you share his confidence? absolutely kicked in the corners, pushover tries. we will do it! they are pretty confident stock it is making
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me quite confident as well but it will take something quite special to beat the all blacks this if it was a singing contest the lions should win them. knowing katie, she will be singing right along with them. andy murray's says he's feeling good, despite limping through three hours of practice yesterday. murray has a sore hip and though he was hitting the ball and serving smoothly, in between rallies he was limping and grimacing. he still plans to begin the defence of his wimbledon title on monday, against alexander bublik. novak djokovic plays, gael monfils, in the final, at eastbourne later, after beating, daniil medvedev. djokovic isn't quite back to his old self, but he hasn't dropped a set this week. british number three heather watson declared herself, "ready for wimbledon", after pushing former world number one caroline wozniacki, to three sets in the semi—finals, at eastbourne. she said a run of good results, had left her feeling confident and optimistic. wozniacki will face karolina pliskova, in the final. pliskova went through,
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when british number one johanna konta pulled out. she'd injured her back in a nasty fall, during her victory over world number one angelique kerber, in the quarter—finals. she's still hoping to be fit for wimbledon — but she won't push it. it is a big tournament next week for all of us but it is something that i have to disregard when it comes to my health. my health always has got to come first and i'm definitely doing everything i can to be ready for wimbledon but definitelyjust taking it a day at a time and whatever is best for my health. england'sjodi ewart shadoff is very well placed in the women's pga championship in chicago. she sank five birdies in a blemish—free round of 66, to move to within one shot of the leaders, se young kim and danielle kang. this is the second women's major of the season. castleford tigers, continue to dominate, rugby league's super league. they held off a strong fightback, from hull fc, to win by 24 points to 22, to go eight points clear at the top of the table, with just three games, of the regular season to play,
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before the super 8s. chris froome has signed a three—year contract with team sky on the eve of the tour de france. the tour, gets under way in dusseldorf in germany this afternoon and froome's hoping to complete, his third straight win, and fourth victory in five years. but he knows it won't be easy. the level of my rivals and the course we are racing on this year makes it a much more open race and it will be the biggest challenge for me, for sure. to fourth tour de france win would be incredible. i mean, i do not want tojinx it. it would just be. ..unreal. another tour de france winner, sir bradley wiggins, is returning to competition, at the london velodrome, but in the british indoor rowing championships. wiggins, a five—time olympic champion, retired from cycling in december, and took up rowing to keep fit —
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but his times have been so good, he said he may even consider going for another gold medal, at the tokyo games in 2020. we have seen some sports start doing from swimming to cycling but it is very different going from cycling to vote. how long until we very different going from cycling to vote. how long untilwe know if he is any good? he will go to the championships in december and depending on the time he baby on course. have you done in the rowing? you have to be quite creative visually. you will make it work. the weather in just a few minutes.
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as the political fallout over the grenfell tower fire continues, so does the impact on the families who have been left bereaved and homeless. in the direct aftermath of the disaster, many residents voiced their anger at the lack of information and support offered by the council and government. joining us now is linda magistris her organisation has been helping those affected. good morning. a couple of weeks ago now that it happened but in terms of helping people, how much need is there and what cases are you dealing with? there is a massive, massive need. i lost my partner a couple of years ago and i had sporadic, quite inadequate bereavement support, and that seems to be the case in the uk. it isa
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that seems to be the case in the uk. it is a lottery. as far as grenfell tower is, i was compelled to get down there on the sunday after it happened on the wednesday. i met the red cross and it was pretty chaotic. since then i was called by one of the residents. i had a word with one of the schools and i realised there was a massive lack of support. i started to speak to residents and survivors after a week and they had not been offered anything. they were in their pockets but no one was going in to offer help. what help should be on offer? we're not talking about the practical side of these, like housing... that has been dealt with. the good grief trust, the name, good grief... positive. it
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is never again to be good, clearly, but their reason better way to do it and by bringing people together, under the one roof, this is an umbrella charities that it brings all the groups together, you click a button and they come out altogether. how do they know what they need?m is early on but let me read something to you, a piece of research to do with psychologically supporting children. adults recalling experiences of losing a pa re nt recalling experiences of losing a parent isa recalling experiences of losing a parent is a child, report being ignored, isolation and believe what would have helped was an acknowledgement of their lost and a kind word. go and find them... i spoke to a survivor yesterday, she was in one of the hotels, nobody had
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come to see her. you have hundreds and hundreds of people which may not be directly grieving but are certainly traumatised and this will be going on the years. i spoke to one of the charities, some specialised in helping children and parents, and they have would a strategy in place now and it will be ongoing. what sort of strategy? they will speak to the parents, the children and the staff in the school and in the wider community so hopefully they can support people in the schools and communities directly. during the summer holidays, they will be supporting people in the community. we are going down to put together projects so people can share their stories. thank you for the work you do. we
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focus on much on the practicalities, accommodation and food... we put together a health card. at the moment they only have limited resources. . . moment they only have limited resources... thank you very much. here is louise with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, you were talking to me earlier about how you like my statistics. i have had a couple of coffees and found the proper statistics. it was one of the wettest ju ne statistics. it was one of the wettest june is statistics. it was one of the wettestjune is on record and you can see the dark blue denoting rainfall which is more than average, and you can see that certainly eastern parts and southern parts of scotla nd eastern parts and southern parts of scotland had some pretty intense rainfall. but we also had some heat, not too bad across the south—east in particular. you will remember the extreme heat we had in the middle of
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the month. will we get at this weekend? not the month. will we get at this weekend ? not really, the month. will we get at this weekend? not really, it is the beginning ofjuly. a lot of dry weather around, some sunny spells as well, and if you get the sunshine for any length of time, it is going to be warm. taking a look at exactly what has been happening through the night, this little fella has brought some cloud and drizzle. a brief lull, and then outbreaks of drizzly rain as we move through the day. sandwiched between the two we should see cloud breaking up so if it is rather dull where you live, hopefully an improving picture. by the end of the afternoon, this weather front bringing outbreaks of rain, mostly light and patchy across scotla nd rain, mostly light and patchy across scotland and the winds starting to strengthen. if you cling to the sunshine you will see some warmth as well, highs of 18 or 19 degrees. a similar story for northern ireland, north—west england and wales but anywhere through central and south—eastern areas we will see the
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cloud breaking up. with sunshine coming through it should feel quite pleasant. generally 19 to 22, we might see 23 degrees if we're lucky in south—east corner. this weather front will pick up a little bit as it moves across wales into the midlands, ringing heavy bursts of rain, and it will still be sitting potentially across the south—east first thing tomorrow morning. so it could be dull, damp start the south—east. a good excuse for a sleep in on sunday morning, squally showers continuing and those showers will stay with us for scotland tomorrow. elsewhere some decent, sunny spells. louise, i love your fa cts . sunny spells. louise, i love your facts. you a bit of a geek, like me? of course i am? now on bbc news it is time for newswatch, with samira ahmed. hello, and welcome to newswatch, with me, samira ahmed. coming up: emily maitlis clashes
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with andrea leadsom on newsnight. is she and other bbc presenters guilty of being too negative, and interrupting rudely? and is this government minister being given too hard a time on bbc news? as the aftermath of the west london fire continues to dominate the news agenda, it has been a tough week for housing minister alok sharma. on wednesday he was faced on the victoria derbyshire show with an emotional group of residents of the grenfell tower. i want a permanent accommodation. if you don't give me a permanent accommodation, i'm not going to accept it. i'm notjust going to take anything else you give me. if you give me a house i don't want, i am not going to take it. i was happy in my house.
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i work hard, i work hard, i had a good house. i am not going to accept it. i'm not going to accept it. 0k. no, no, please... right, you know what, we will come to you, sid, i promise. i promise. so victoria... just a minute. some viewers told me they felt victoria derbyshire lost control of the conversation, with michael bailey e—mailing... well, we mentioned last week another bbc item about the grenfell tower fire, which had incurred the wrath of some viewers. an interview with the prime minister conducted by a emily maitlis.
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the newsnight presenter has done a number of attention—grabbing interviews recently, and last friday she was involved in another spiky encounter, this time with the leader of the house, andrea leadsom. it was a year to the day since the vote for britain to leave the european union, and the preparations for brexit were under discussion. you've got a negotiating position which is completely unclear. you're hearing that from the president of the eu parliament. well... you've got a political system which is unstable. many believe our economy is unfair. living standards are falling. what can you point to now and say, that's going well? european politicians are actually very keen that we keep a strong relationship going forward, and that's what we're going to do. and it is actually the elected politicians who are the important thing here. come on, ms leadsom. you haven't even got a deal with the dup on the table. they're laughing at us, and saying they can walk all over whatever she puts up now. well, that's blatantly not true, is it? angela merkel said it was
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an interesting start. we had mark rutter saying he was quite positive and optimistic about it. we had various different eu politicians, the elected politicians, saying it's a good start. of course, it's very early days, but it would be helpful... it's been a year, it's been a year... it would be helpful if broadcasters were willing to be a bit patriotic. the country took a decision. this government is determined to deliver on that decision. sorry, it's unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going, questioning whether you have the position of strength that she said she wanted? andrea leadsom denied calling emily maitlis unpatriotic, but some viewers thought the general point being made by the former conservative leadership candidate was a fair one. here is sheila justice. charlotte bedford agreed.
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and gloria buckle put it like this. another viewer, tony wright, recorded this video for us, with these thoughts. please, bbc, can you rein in emily maitlis? she should be taught how to hold a civil conversation. most of her hapless subjects are subject to a barrage of contentious, inflammatory, aggressive, and often insulting interruptions. i have no great love of politicians, but i have to commend them for holding their temper during a typical maitlis interview. she interrupts so much that the people are never allowed to get their answer out. and that, for us, the viewers, doesn't allow us to make a judgement
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of what they're actually trying to say. the interview is therefore pointless. viewer tony wright there. well, with me right now is ian katz, the editor of newsnight. ian, thank you for coming newswatch. the reference that andrea leadsom made to patriotism has been much mocked, but some viewers say she really did have a point about the focus of brexit coverage being relentlessly negative. the first thing i should say is that i thought it was an excellent accountability interview. i think — i'm sure there are some viewers out there who will agree with some of these complaints. i think the vast majority of people who saw it will think that calling an interviewer unpatriotic when they ask some awkward questions is sort of somewhere — somewhere between hilarious and slightly sinister. it's the sort of thing that happens in moscow and beijing, but not really in a place with a free media. well, there is an interpretation issue there, because of course andrea leadsom went on to say
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in that interview that she wasn't calling her unpatriotic. i don't think it's really open to interpretation. you only have to watch it to be pretty clear, and the viewers that you have just reported the complaints of were actually making the point that it was fair to call emily unpatriotic. newsnight is very good at turning around this kind of interview as a social media clip, to go viral, which is exactly what happened. but watching it back, on the whole, the whole of it, do you not see how many viewers felt it was heavy—handed ? well, i think if you're making a point about partial extracts from an interview, and how some of those can gain circulation outside the context of an interview, i think that's a really interesting one. and that's one that we really need to think quite a lot about, because sometimes you'll have a sort of minute—long fragment from an interview which gets seen by huge numbers of people, outside the context of the broader interview. i think that's an interesting point. but i think that, you know, this was a classic accountability interview on a really
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contentious issue. i mean, this is about the future shape, relationship, of the country with the continent we're in, and it's absolutely right that emily conducted a really tough, ha rd—hitting accountability interview. we all understand that politicians can go on too much, they can need to be brought back to answer the question. but there was a lot of interrupting here. we heard that one viewer there at the end say it's really frustrating not getting to hear andrea leadsom finish her answers. well, you know better than anyone, interrupting is a really sort of fine line in interviewing. i've got quite a lot of sympathy with viewers who feel that we're sometimes too interrupt—y. i mean, we owe subjects the sort of fairness of allowing them to set out their case. set against that, there are, i won't name any names, lots of interviewees who essentially come into an interview with the aim of sort of filibustering their way through it, and just sticking to two or three homilies. but in this case? well, this was a very interesting case, the andrea leadsom case.
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it was supposed to be a 15—minute interview. for reasons to do with when andrea was able to start it, it ended up being a much shorter one. it was more like seven or eight minutes, and it was a down—the—line interview. and in those situations, the interviewer is under a lot more pressure to stop, to keep the interview moving along, and to address all the questions they're trying to address in the interview. let's move on to another issue. last week we featured complaints about another interview emily did, with the prime minister, about the grenfell tower fire. let's watch a clip. we have yet to find out what the cause of the fire was. the fire brigade, the fire service, are doing that. you could have stopped it spreading by spending £2 more on the cladding. the fire service are looking at what the cause of the fire was. and it's important that we get to the bottom of this, that we find out exactly what happened. that's why. .. but you were recommended this in 2013. you were in government there, and the coroner said you can stop this with a sprinkler system in every block. the criticism there is she seemed to be putting personal blame for everything on theresa may.
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the use of the word "you," particularly in relation to who bought the cladding, and that just wasn't fair. well, the figure of speech emily was using was, "you could do this," as in, "one could do this." she was saying one could have bought a more expensive cladding. she said, "you could have spent £2 more." yes, in the same way you say, you can get up... well, it got the prime minister... i think what viewers were saying is some of that focused anger perhaps should be directed at the right people, that this is a scattergun approach. save it for the council. well, i don't think that's right. the prime minister is also the leader of the conservative party. it was a conservative borough. it is entirely reasonable to say there is a set of responsibilities that lie with national government, with local government. you are the leader of the party that runs the council. it was absolutely appropriate to hold her to account. i think, in that particular case, i don't think what emily maguire means is you personally
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chose the cladding. i think what she was saying is, one could have held different cladding for £2 different. well, language matters, doesn't it? and what you think she said is not what viewers felt they got out of it. well, clearly — you're right that clearly some viewers construed it differently. i don't think the majority of viewers would have construed that way. tone is also very important, and a lot of viewers said it came across as angry and emotional. isn't it a bbcjournalist‘s job to remain very calm and measured? i think that's a good question, and i think it often is, and i think... but i think one of the responsibilities of an interviewer to is channel the questions that the viewers would want asked in a particular situation. and i think that, on that friday, emily brilliantly channelled the — the questions, the mood, to some extent, of a lot of the country, around the handling of the aftermath of that disaster. nothing you would do differently, looking back? i think they were two really exemplary interviews. ian katz, thank you very much. finally, there was plenty of coverage across the bbc last weekend of the glastonbury festival, and it even made it onto bbc news, courtesy of an appearance there byjeremy corbyn.
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around 14 minutes of the speech given by the labour leader was covered live on the news channel, prompting phil campbell to comment... thank you for all your comments this week. please do share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs by calling us, or e—mailing. you can find us on twitter, and do have a look at previous discussions on our website. that's all from us. we will be back with your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. more criticism of kensington council as the london mayor calls for it to be taken over by the government. the council leader and his deputy both resigned over their response to the grenfell tower fire. now sadiq khan says
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commissioners should step

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