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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 1, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. more criticism of kensington council as the london mayor calls for it to be taken over by the government. the council leader and his deputy both resigned over their response to the grenfell tower fire. now sadiq khan says commissioners should step in and run the authority. good morning. it's saturday 1stjuly. a former hospital employee opens fire with an assault rifle in new york killing one doctor and injuring six other people. ten years after smoking was banned in public places in england we'll be asking how much difference it's made. in sport, it's make or break. for the british and irish lions in one of the most significant games in their history. lose to the all blacks and the test series is over. when tv turned technicolour.
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we'll look back on the end of black and white television 50 years ago. and louise has the weather. good morning. it's a chilly start in the far north of the country but not a bad weekend in prospect. mostly dry with decent sunny spells. more throughout the morning. good morning. first, our main story. kensington and chelsea council is facing more criticism over its handling of the grenfell tower fire. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, is calling for commissioners to be brought in to take over the running of the authority, which he says is not fit for purpose. the council leader, nicholas paget—brown, and his deputy, both resigned yesterday. simonjones reports. after angry protests at the council offices and after a meeting of the council was cut short following an attempt to ban the public and press..
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reporter: were you pressured by number 10 to resign? ..the pressure for the leader got too great. this is a huge human tragedy for so many families. the task for my successor is to ensure that the strengths would also characterise this place, and north kensington, in particular, are seen to play their part in bringing the community together. but the mayor of london says this cannot happen with a change of leadership from among the existing councillors. sadiq khan says the fire has shown the authority is not fit for purpose. what he called "untainted commissioners", government—appointed experts must be brought in immediately. he has the backing of one community campaigner who says residents have been ignored for too long. trust in the whole of the cabinet hasjust gone, confidence in the council has gone. they weren't confident in them years ago, while they were complaining and trying to raise these issues,
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and the aftermath has been disastrous, as we can all see, and new people do need to be put in place that people can be confident in. but one conservative memeber of the london assembly called the idea undemocratic. the communities secretary, sajid javid, said it was right the leader had stepped aside and the government remained focused on providing all necessary support to people affected by the tragedy. simon jones, bbc news. how likely is it the government will sendin how likely is it the government will send in commissioners to take over the council? let's speak to our correspondent simonjones outside kensing ston town hall this morning. that place has been the focus of a lot of unrest and protest, hasn't it, over the last ten days or so? yes, this is where angry residents gathered a couple of weeks ago. they actually ran up the stairs behind me and some of them got into the council building. they had said they hadn't been listened to before the
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fire when they raised safety concerns and they felt after the fire they had been abandoned by the council and that anger remains to this day. but for the government to sendin this day. but for the government to send in commissioners to take over a council is a big deal because effectively they're removing councillors who have been voted for by the public. but they do have form for doing this. it happened in rotherham where commissioners were sentin rotherham where commissioners were sent in because it was considered the council wasn't dealing sufficiently well with child sexual exploitation in the town. it also happened here in london in tower hamlets where the council was accused of running a culture of cronyism. we vice—president had any formal response from the prime minister to that letter written to her by the mayor. but whoever takes over, be it commissioners or councillors, they have a huge task to rebuild trust with the public who feel so badly let down. thank you very much. a doctor has been shot dead and six others were seriously injured,
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after a man opened fire inside a hospital in new york. the gunman, who was a former employee at the hospital, later killed himself. nada tawfik reports from new york. the bronx—lebanon hospital is normally a place of care and concern but on friday afternoon, one doctor broke his oath to do no harm. a former employee of the hospital entered the building with an assault rifle concealed under a white doctor's coat. media reports have identified him as dr henry bello. the 45—year—old fired numerous shots on the 16th and 17th floors of the hospital, which struck many doctors on duty. i want to say at the outset, thank god this was not an act of terrorism. it is an isolated incident. it appears to be a workplace related matter but that makes it no less tragic or no less horrible. immediately, emergency services responded and locked down the building.
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responding officers went floor to floor looking for the shooter, following a trail of blood. they were told he was on the 17th floor and, once there, they found him dead from a self—inflicted gun wound. one female doctor was found dead and six others are injured. five are in serious condition, and fighting for their lives. there are still many unanswered questions, including how a man was able to enter a hospital with an assault rifle in one of the few places in the country where they are banned. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu are being hamstrung by lack of flexibility. james chapman worked closely with david davis, and told the bbc that the red lines set by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talks with the european union. a number of british airways cabin crew are launching a 16—day strike from this morning in a long—running
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dispute about pay and conditions. the airline says that no short—haul flights will be affected, but it has brought in aircraft and crews from qatar airways to reduce the impact. if you were due to see adele at wembley this weekend — then we have some bad news. the singer has been forced to cancel both shows because she's damaged her vocal chords. in a series of tweets, adele said she was devastated and heartbroken — as the shows were the biggest of her life. but she admitted she'd struggled vocally earlier in the week. on wednesday night she also told fans that this tour could be her last. thousands of police have been deployed in hong kong, where celebrations are being held to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory's handover from british to chinese rule. the new chief executive carrie lam was sworn in this morning by the chinese president, amid tight security. clashes have taken place between pro—democracy and pro—beijing demonstrators, with more protests expected
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over the weekend. it's been exactly 10 years since the smoking ban was introduced in pubs and other licensed premises in england. it hasn't been popular with everybody, but campaigners say the legislation has helped two million smokers to kick the habit, as our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. over a decade ago, lighting up in restaurants, pubs and bars, in fact, any enclosed public space was the norm but all that changed with the ban in england on this day, in 2007, bringing it in line with the rest of the uk. smoking rates are now at their lowest ever recorded in britain — there are nowjust over eight million smokers. according to cancer research uk, that means 2 million people have given up cigarettes since the ban. the proportion of 16 — 2a year olds who smoke is nowjust i7%. an all—time low. what we are after is a smoke—free generation. we are part—way there.
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we see the smoking rate in younger people dropping more people than other age groups. we see them using e—cigarettes more as an aid to quit smoking than others, and that seems to be particularly helpful. as well as the range of nhs stop smoking services that we've got that can help them. but pro—smoking capaigners have criticised the ban, saying it has led to the closure of more than 11,000 pubs in england. public support for smoke—free areas has grown, however. a yougov poll today suggests just 12% of people would like to see it overturned. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. princes william and harry will attend a private service later to re—dedicate their mother's grave, on what would have been princess diana's 56th birthday. she is buried at herfamily home, althorp house, in northamptonshire. the ceremony will also be attended
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by the duchess of cambridge and prince george and princess charlotte. the prince of wales was killed in a car crash in paris in 1997. a brand new photograph of her majesty the queen has been released this morning, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of modern canada. the queen, who is canada's head of state, is wearing the platinum brooch set with diamonds on her left shoulder, if you look closely you can spot it. it's been worn by the queen mother and more recently the duchess of cambridge. prince charles and camilla are celebrating canada day during a three—day tour. louise will have the weather in a few minutes. michael molloy was just 18 when he died on his way home from a music festival in 2012. that's one year younger than the tyres of the coach he was travelling in. now his mum, frances molloy, has launched a campaign to ban the use of tyres more than ten years old on coaches, buses and minibuses.
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shejoins us now. good morning. good morning. thank you for coming in to talk to us. we will get to what you are campaigning for ina will get to what you are campaigning for in a moment. tell us what happened to your son. michael was travelling back from a music festival on the isle of wight. on the way back in surrey the coach crashed into a tree and killed him insta ntly. crashed into a tree and killed him instantly. we found out that the cause of that was a 19—and—a—half—year—old tyre. cause of that was a 19-and-a-half-year-old tyre. which had blown? which had blown. it came through a tunnel and it blew which obviously the driver then lost all of the steering and it forced the coach to crash. when you heard that those tyres were so old what was your immediate reaction? well, it was... it was unbelievable. you know, i say to people hearing about losing your child is the worst news you can ever hear in your life and
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nothing can prepare you for that. but the following year in surrey at the inquest to find out then it was due to a 19—and—a—half—year—old tyre was ex—cruciating and the barrister representing us said i need to you sit down when i tell up this news because even i am shocked but it's legal, this will come back as an accidental death verdict even though this tyre is so old. at the moment what are the guidelines that police say or transport officials say about how old tyres should be? say or transport officials say about how old tyres should be ?|j say or transport officials say about how old tyres should be? i actually went to see patrick mcloughlin when he was transport secretary about this legislation and not having tyres older than ten years. what he did do, which wasn't enough, he did issue guidance. there is guidance out there for coach operators to say that tyres older than ten years shouldn't be fitted to the front axel shouldn't be fitted to the front axel. however, it's guidance and guidance is the lowest form of intervention. it will not stop people still doing that and still putting old tyres on vehicles. you
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wa nt putting old tyres on vehicles. you want a law change? i want legislation. it's the only way. what happened with michael, even if there had been guidance in place, then the coach operators would still have not been prosecuted and still would have come back as an accidental death verdict. i imagine lots of people watching, most people with a car, will think i don't even think about hold the tyres are, i don't know how to check the tyres. how would you go about that in terms of age? in terms of age, on the side of every tyre is a code, if you look at the last four digits on that tyre that will give you the week and the year of manufacture. we have set up... for example, sorry to interrupt. we are seeing on the graphic the digits 1903. 19th week in 2003. right. 0k. that will tell you exactly when that tyre was made. we have set up a website and there
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is something on there that will help you calculate hold the tyres are.|j suppose it's not just you calculate hold the tyres are.|j suppose it's notjust the age of the tyre, you could have a much newer tyre, you could have a much newer tyre which is in a bad state or an older tyre which might be ok. i suppose the danger is we focus too much on the age rather than the condition. well, i think the age is really important. if you look at a passenger service vehicle on a coach then the tread on this tyre had a0%. it looked fine, what happens it from within you can't see inside a coach tyre, so it's made up of a lot of cords and rubber delaminates, that's what happened with this tyre. it exploded from within. it killed michael and the driver. have you been given indication there is legislation possible on this?” been given indication there is legislation possible on this? i have some way because i was working with steve rotherham, who was the mp for walton at the time, and we actually have a bill and we did get to a
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ten—minute rule but then it was talked out as the parliamentary process , talked out as the parliamentary process, they're quite difficult to get past. there is a bill actually there and this is something the government can do very, very easily. we have worked out for them how it could be done, it will cost — it won't cost the public purse anything. it's something that could be done at an annual mot. have you spoken to the transport secretary chris grayling? spoken to the transport secretary chris grayling ? no spoken to the transport secretary chris grayling? no he has refused to meet me which is really, you know, shocking, i think. meet me which is really, you know, shocking, ithink. i did meet me which is really, you know, shocking, i think. i did actually get to see patrick mcloughlin. i did write to chris grayling, or my mp maria eagle did. he didn't even sign the letter himself, he wrote back basically supporting what his colleague said and won't even negotiate this any further with me. we should say in terms of a reply, the department of transport has said ourfull the department of transport has said our full sympathies are with the
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families. you think it's not enough. the only thing that will stop operators is if they know there is a danger of prosecution. to them they wouldn't even get a fine. nothing wouldn't even get a fine. nothing would happen, if it's guidance and they could have those tyres on at mot and they could be younger than ten yea rs mot and they could be younger than ten years old. there is nothing to stop them once the mot is finished replacing them with older tyres, we do know it's a practice some operators have. they put good tyres on for the mot and store them because there is no age limit and ta ke because there is no age limit and take them off and put older tyres on for the rest of the year. because at the time of the crash it had been moted six months before and it would have failed because the rear tyre was down to the cord. we have to leave it there, sadly. it's a complicated issue. it's one that clearly means a lot to you. complicated issue. it's one that clearly means a lot to youlj complicated issue. it's one that clearly means a lot to you. i don't think it's that complicated. thank you. thank you very much. now the weather with louise.
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at this time of year there is lots of sports days and summer fetes. the story is positive really, dry weather this weekend. there will be sunny spells and if you keep the sunshine it's going to be warm. that said, there is a lot of cloud around at the moment but you can see some brea ks at the moment but you can see some breaks and that's allowing already lovely spells of sunshine. this cloud into the far north—west will bring rain later on. just look this morning at cornwall, that's where i would like to be right now. not a cloud in the sky. we will see the cloud in the sky. we will see the cloud that i showed you on the satellite picture breaking up through the afternoon. here is that weather front pushing into the north—west, it will bring showery rain as it drifts into scotland and northern ireland this afternoon. not particularly heavy. but it will be a nuisance. i suspect maybe eastern scotla nd nuisance. i suspect maybe eastern scotland will continue to see some
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brea ks scotland will continue to see some breaks and sunshine and temperatures perhaps peaking around 18 or 19. rain across the borders into the north—west of england, through the la ke north—west of england, through the lake district and maybe north wales by the end of the day but generally through england and wales the story is dry with some sunshine and temperatures perhaps into the low 20s. that will be pleasant, i suspect, for many out and about. this evening that weather front will gradually drift south and east, it's going to take its time, not really arriving to much of england and wales until after dark. it will bring some rain. some heavy as it moves south and east. a different start to our day tomorrow. behind it it's going to be windy in the far north of scotland, gales and showers to start the day. but those showers are set to continue into sunday. rain topping and tailing the country for sunday morning. the front clears off and then an improving picture. the risk of showers continues and the breezy conditions into the north—west condition. elsewhere, it's a pleasant afternoon. again
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highs of around 16—18 in scotland. highest values of 23 in the south—east. for those of you who are going to be glued to the weather forecast for the start of wimbledon it does look as though there is a potential maybe for a few sharp showers for the first day but it could be worse. more from myself later this morning and from carol there live on monday. lucky things. i know, i am sojealous. there live on monday. lucky things. i know, i am so jealous. it will rain and we will be warm in the studio instead! we always have the telly and the radio. she's not convinced. doctors and dentists agree that healthy teeth often mean healthy bodies too, with gum disease linked to higher risks of stroke, heart disease and diabetes. there are many people though — particularly those living on the streets or with drug and alcohol problems —
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who haven't seen a dentist in years and have shocking levels of tooth decay. brea kfast‘s graham satchell went to one pop—up clinic in manchester, which aims to help them. my my name is abdul and i am 24.” my name is abdul and i am 24. i am anna and i am 35 years of age.” my name is abdul and i am 24. i am anna and i am 35 years of age. i am tony, my age is now 57. and i am basically on the streets. how do you reach the hard to reach? for dentist ben and his team in manchester, you go to them. any medical problems we should be aware of? we are in a tiny side room at a
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drop—in centre for homeless people. you have a bit of a hole in it... we go to these sites and it a lot of different sites and they're shocked we have come to them. you are going to their environment, somewhere they feel safe. do you have a contact number? no. the trick is notjust to sign people like tony up but then to persuade them to come to the surgery. tony has lived on the streets for much of his life, he is having his teeth properly cleaned for the first time in years. it's like when you smile people look at your teeth and they see yellow or whatever. hopefully now they'll see white. recent study by the charity ground swell showed 7% of homeless people had no teeth, 15% had pulled out their own teeth and more than a quarter hadn't been to the dentist for five years. tony's teeth are
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done and he is happy. but not everyone is so lucky. vp but not everyone is so lucky. vp on but not everyone is so lucky. vpona but not everyone is so lucky. vp on a scale of one to ten, it's about eight out of ten, really, really painful. 13 tight at the top are all rotted. must be a lot of pain. yeah, i have taken... it doesn't help when you have teeth problems and that because it rots your teeth. ben's outreach dentistry is funded by nhs england and is believed to be the only project of its kind in the country. you have seen examples today of what i would call dixonsian dentist. there must have been pain to get to that stage n a rich society like our country not to care for these people
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is wrong.le. melissa will need 21 out of her teeth taken out as ben continues his mission to reach the ha rd to continues his mission to reach the hard to reach. you are watching breakfast. it's time to look at the saturday morning papers. dan sodergren is here to tell us what's caught his eye. first of all let's look at the front pages. the guardian leading on the resignation of the leader of kensington and chelsea council. the independent also leading on the g re nfell tower the independent also leading on the grenfell tower tragedy. more than two weeks on and still that story dominating the news and the implications. wimbledon starting next week but the sun is saying andy murray might not be fit. you have to rub the front
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page, lay a handy on andy to make his hip betterfor page, lay a handy on andy to make his hip better for wimbledon. page, lay a handy on andy to make his hip betterfor wimbledon. bound to bea his hip betterfor wimbledon. bound to be a success that! the telegraph have a story about brexit. theresa may has been told that prioritising the city should be crucial in those negotiations about the deal that the uk gets. the daily mail leading on a call for aid cash to be used for pay rises for police and nurses. dan, a story you have seen in the sun to start. it started by a little boy being bullied, it's become a sensation online. it's a nice story, it shows how social media can be used in a positive way. social media has helped people. the young lad was getting bullied. his father went on social media and said can you retweet a nd social media and said can you retweet and say happy birthday. they
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went with revenge is tweet. it's famous people doing it, even i did it. the point is it's the positive side of social media. i think it's really about being the change you wa nt to really about being the change you want to see in the world. sometimes we need more positive news stories. it's a great example of how technology and social media is there to boost someone up. obviously not just that guy but everyone being bullied, it's wonderful to get behind. so often much of that bullying is happening through social media. exactly, normally it's the negative side, there can be a positive side too. that's the positive. here is the negative. or not perhaps in terms of how countries are reacting to what's happening online. this is a story about facebook and how germany is going to fine facebook for not being able to delete enough of the kind of antisocial and criminal messages. and twitter, as well. it's £44
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million, but remember facebook makes about a turnover of about $9 billion, so it might not affect them hugely. it's a nice idea we could maybe use the government to try to ina way maybe use the government to try to in a way police social media. the problem i have, is it really facebook‘sjob to be problem i have, is it really facebook‘s job to be deleting these things? if theirjob to be doing this and should we have sensorship in social media? it's a nice idea, could it be too far—reaching? in social media? it's a nice idea, could it be too far-reaching? what if you set up a forum and said i am providing you with a voice or a vehicle to express your voice and people put hatred on that, shouldn't you have responsibility about who is allowed on that forum and allowed to spread hate? two things there. is it the individual has the responsibility, is it the company like facebook? or is it the government overriding it? the government overriding it? the government should be there to protect its people. if it's not doing something, then the people have a right to challenge that. yeah, the other thing is if it goes
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too far, what happens if it becomes censorship? what we see as criminal might bea censorship? what we see as criminal might be a freedom fighter. because we are spending so much time checking social media apparently it's changing the way not only what we do with our time, changes the way we do with our time, changes the way we walk. this mobile phone story, we are walking like pensioners a p pa re ntly are walking like pensioners apparently or more slowly. pensioners will take offence to this, iam pensioners will take offence to this, i am sure. this is looking at the speed teenagers are walking, it's as slow as many older people are walking because they're spending time walking and checking. what i find really interesting is this is what happens, you are checking your phone and walking. do you do that? i must phone and walking. do you do that? i m ust co nfess phone and walking. do you do that? i must confess i do. naga says she's never done that. in some countries they have different lanes for people on phones. if that's true, which country? japan does it. ok ifjapan does that, i was injapan recently,
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ididn't does that, i was injapan recently, i didn't see that. i got bumped into by people. i don't do it, because it's inconsiderate. it's thoughtless. but you are connected. it's a good use of time. there are people around you, connect with them! use your phone in your own time. we are seeing the advertising around it, as well. i hope if you bump into someone you say sorry. it will be your fault. if you are looking at your phone. if i see you outside the studio on your phone.” will be standing still in a corner out of the way of people. we like this monkey, don't we? we do, it's a lovely story. it's about the self—obsessed monkey taking selfies. this is how clever phones are. even primates now can be taken selfies. we ta ke primates now can be taken selfies. we take millions of selfies, around about 93 are taken every day. it's a stunning amount. they say you might spend an hour a year taking selfies
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which is a scary amount of time. those monkeys then walk too slowly, people bump into them, it's a nightmare! have you seen naga's party trick. i haven't. there is the monkey. spot the difference! even better, i will take a shelfy at the same time. you see not only do you walk along the street... perfect timing! it's all gone a bit crazy. dan, come back next hour and be more sensible. we will all be. coming up in the next half an hour we are not just talking about modern media, we are talking about the history of telly. it was all black and white. and snooker worked in black and white. it was always a black. headlines are coming up. see you shortly. hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up before 9...
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louise will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. kensington and chelsea council is facing more criticism over its handling of the grenfell tower fire. the council leader, nicholas paget—brown, and his deputy, both resigned yesterday. now the mayor of london sadiq khan is calling for commissioners to be brought in to take over the running of the authority, which he says is "not fit for purpose." a doctor has been shot dead and six others were seriously injured, after a man opened fire with an assault rifle inside a hospital in new york. dr henry bello, who used to work at the hospital, concealed an assault rifle under a white doctor's coat, shooting at those who were working, and then killing himself. the mayor of new york said it was not an act of terrorism. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. james chapman worked closely with david davis, and told the bbc that the red lines
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set by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talks with the european union. a number of british airways cabin crew are launching a 16—day strike from this morning in a long—running dispute about pay and conditions. the airline says that no short—haul flights will be affected, but it has brought in aircraft and crews from qatar airways to reduce the impact. if you were due to see adele at wembley this weekend — then we have some bad news. the singer has been forced to cancel both shows because she's damaged her vocal chords. in a series of tweets, adele said she was devastated and heartbroken — as the shows were the biggest of her life. but she admitted she'd struggled vocally earlier in the week. on wednesday night she also told fans that this tour could be her last. thousands of police have been deployed in hong kong, where celebrations are being held to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory's handover from british to chinese rule.
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the new chief executive carrie lam was sworn in this morning by the chinese president, amid tight security. clashes have taken place between pro—democracy and pro—beijing demonstrators, with more protests expected over the weekend. it's been exactly ten years since the smoking ban was introduced in pubs and other licensed premises in england. it hasn't been popular with everybody, but campaigners say the legislation has helped two million smokers to kick the habit, while take—up among those aged 16 to 24 is at an all—time low. how many times have you been stuck behind someone dawdling as they try and walk and text? they've even got their own name — "smombies" or smart phone zombies. ina in a world of their own as they try
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to do the right thing walking down the road. now researchers have found that some people have developed a slow and exaggerated stepping action when they walk — so they don't trip up. lots of people getting in touch map. nick said he nearly ran someone over because they work text ink and checking their apps on the phone. inconsiderate and dangerous. mike would never do that. the next 18 minutes also will be so crucial not just for the the next 18 minutes also will be so crucial notjust for the test the next 18 minutes also will be so crucial not just for the test series that many suggest for the future of the lions. sam warburton captains the lions. sam warburton captains the side. it has been pouring for hours in wellington. it could get very messy. new zealand have not
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lost in wellington since 2003 when england won. the lines will be the underdogs. it is more of a physical match for the all blacks and this time last week and the defeat last weekend. now there was some concern in wellington earlier, about the health of the former lions coach, sir ian mcgeechan, who was taken to hospital after collapsing at the westpac stadium. he was due to be working on the tv coverage there. now he did manage to walk himself to the ambulance, and mcgeechan‘s daughter has tweeted "spoken to my dad, geek, and he is fine, justa bug. thank you everyone for all your best wishes. andy murray's says he's feeling good, despite limping through three hours of practice yesterday. murray has a sore hip and though he was hitting the ball and serving smoothly, in between rallies he was limping and grimacing. he still plans to begin the defence of his wimbledon title on monday, against alexander bublik. novak djokovic plays gael monfils in the final, at eastbourne later, after beating, daniil medvedev. djokovic isn't quite
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back to his old self, but he hasn't dropped a set this week. british number three heather watson declared herself, "ready for wimbledon", after pushing former world number one caroline wozniacki, to three sets in the semi—finals, at eastbourne. she said a run of good results, had left her feeling confident and optimistic. wozniacki will face karolina pliskova, in the final. pliskova went through, when british number one johanna konta pulled out. she'd injured her back in a nasty fall, during her victory over world number one angelique kerber, in the quarter—finals. she's still hoping to be fit for wimbledon — but she won't push it. it is a big tournament next week for all of us but it is something that i have to disregard when it comes to my health. my health always has got to come first and i'm definitely doing everything i can to be ready for wimbledon but definitelyjust taking it a day at a time and whatever is best for my health. england'sjodi ewart shadoff is very well placed in the women's pga championship in chicago. she sank five birdies in a blemish—free round of 66, to move to within one shot of the leaders, who are, se young kim and danielle kang. this is the second women's major of the season. castleford tigers
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continue to dominate rugby league's super league. they held off a strong fightback from hull fc, to win by 24 points to 22, to go eight points clear at the top of the table, with just three games, of the regular season to play, before the super 8s. chris froome has signed a three—year contract with team sky on the eve of the tour de france. the tour gets under way in dooosseldorf in germany this afternoon — and froome's hoping to complete his third straight win, and fourth victory in five years. but he knows it won't be easy: the level of my rivals and the course we are racing on this year makes it a much more open race and it going to be the biggest challenge for me, for sure. i would be right up there, to win a fourth tour de france title would be incredible.
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i mean, i don't want tojinx it. it would just be. ..unreal. another tour de france winner, sir bradley wiggins, is returning to competition, at the london velodrome, but in the, british indoor rowing championships. wiggins, a five—time olympic champion, retired from cycling in december, and took up rowing to keep fit — but his times have been so good, he said he may even consider, going for another gold medal at the tokyo games in 2020. he said "i might be being a bit delusional but the times suggest i'm not." still scoreless after three and a half minutes in the crucial lions test. now it's a big weekend of sailing, with the "round the island race", which happens around the isle of wight. i've been in those waters, for an exclusive look
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at how the sport of foiling, in which you fly along above the water, is becoming more accessible to all. if you thought the sort of sailing we've seen recently, is it a boat or is it a plane? well, it tries to be a bit of both. it is the boat that is trying to bring the thrill of the america's cup racing to all of us. up on the foils and flying over the water and yet at much lower speeds and without the danger. it changes the game massively in terms of how much fun you can have at a low wind speed. the kids are going to love this. until now, the sport of foil racing has only been for the most daring and experienced because get it wrong in the air and the consequences can be serious. every time you make a small mistake, you capsize of the boat and most people have only got three or four capsizes in them before they are terribly tired and it's all too much.
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this is a new challenge. the london 2012 paralympic gold—medallist elena lucas is used to sailing in the water and ijoined her on her third attempt at this for a bit of a crash course. whoa! incredible! just flying across the water now. we are not even touching the surface. whoa! we have lift off! as you saw there, that is what makes this a lot safer than previous attempts at this for novices because we crashed into the water but did not go over. we can carry on and tried to get lift off again. absolutely great demonstration of why these boats make it more accessible for so many more people. look at that, we're on the foils, out of the water, that happens roughly... did we crash? i am very much learning at the moment. we have had a couple of crashes but it's great because the boat is really steady, it did not capsize. you pick it up and get going again. the difference is, normally in a boat, the faster you go, the noisier it gets, but when you get up on these foils,
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it suddenly goes quiet and there is this sense of speed and this flying through the air that's absolutely amazing. the only guaranteed way to flip these boats over is back on dry land. looking at it underneath, it looks something out of star wars — half plane, half boat. it is that because it does have the float so it is a boat but the whole point of this is we're trying to get it to fly. and this bit here? this is the automatic height control. these gauges how high the boat is out of the water. it is hoped this will soon be available for thrill seekers to try right across the uk whether you have had sailing experience or not. you see the fast cats in the america's cup, it seems hard to be able to get to that level of sailing but with this boat you can take it
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out and even if as a beginner you can start straightaway. and if it is your turn soon, you should not have to worry about the boat capsizing but do be prepared to get rather wet. do not adjust your sets or twiddle any dials or that we have just gone back to black and white for a few minutes because we are marking the 50th anniversary since the very first colour broadcast in british television. let's have a look at some bbc classics before and after the dawning of colour. you are absolutely right, wilson. the fingernails of filthy. and it is great to be back. one read on the table. with the rest
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of the colours, the break would be 35. back to normal. 50 years ago today colour began on the bbc. let's talk now to elinor groom, from the national science and media museum. you could have won even right colours morning. i was surprised it started on bbc two rather than bbc one. most people will be surprised about that. bbc two was quite ground—breaking. it was the first channel to be broadcast in ultrahigh frequency. people already had to adapt their television sets in the 19605 adapt their television sets in the 1960s in order to prepare for bbc two. when colour came along again, it was also bbc two that was the one that was leading the way. only a few hours a week initially. which programmes worked better? we saw some clips of the speaker. that is
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an obvious one. did people feel they we re an obvious one. did people feel they were missing out elsewhere? essentially. david attenborough, controller of bbc two, he was one of the people who was charged with making it happen in making it work. programmes like pot black were a really good example. that is where colour was so fundamental, to sports broadcasting, a lot of the time was the first colour broadcast on bbc two was from wimbledon, from a fourth—round match. two was from wimbledon, from a fourth— round match. there two was from wimbledon, from a fourth—round match. there has always been this idea that sport should be living colour. lots of people getting in touch, remembering seeing colour tv for the first time. people would come from around the neighbourhood to see the first colour programmes on television. it was a big deal. it was a big deal.
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it took the best part of ten years for colour television sets to outnumber black and white television sets. why was that, the cost? some of these sets are in the hundreds. imagine that is thousands in today's money. and the tv licence. when colour was introduced tv licence was double the price. it is a bit like the wizard of oz. from the original and into technicolor. it gives you a sense of the transformation. it became much more realfor people. i think so. it was such a privilege. the people in the neighbourhood with the colour tv set. the neighbours would come round and you would suddenly make friends with everyone. not only that but the bbc was quite keen to beat germany. oh, yes that there was always that thing. when
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they actually took those colour cameras to wimbledon, we have approximately 1000 pieces of equipment from the bbc history. the cameras are not small. they had to have three tubes, red, green and blue inside the casing. they had to lug those to wimbledon, just for this one moment butjust for this experiment. they had to do it so quickly in order to beat germany. you can imagine, it was incredibly nervous to see if it would work. that is what we do. it brought reality into people's lives. it was something that looked real rather than removed and alien. in 50 years' time, where is television heading in the future? we are going through it
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now with 3d telly. is that catching on? that is what i mean. in the 19605 on? that is what i mean. in the 1960s there were people who would have thought that colour was only a passing fad. ten years from now, we might all think we are being silly for not getting on board with it. we will be sitting with virtual reality headsets and so on. exactly. letters now if you remember the day you first saw colour telly changing your life. everyone kept black—and—white in the spare room. the main stories this morning... london mayor sadiq khan has called for the government to take control of kensington council, after its leader resigned over the grenfell tower disaster. one doctor has been killed and six other people have been injured after a former employee opened fire with an assault rifle at a new york hospital. you know we were just discussing how
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television has moved on foot black—and—white to colour, hd and 3d. can you imagine if the weather was like touchable weather? i'm thinking about seeing louise's charts and feel the rain and the thunder. it is hard enough to describe in colour. it would be impossible in black and white. edinburgh had its wettestjune ever. a pretty wet month with only one or two places seeing below average rainfall. it was hot. in central and east england there were bright orange and red colours, denoting temperatures above average for the time of year. we have quite a lot of
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cloud around at the moment. temperature is not as optimistic. you see this slice whether cloud sta rts you see this slice whether cloud starts to break up the sunshine. that window is going to shift its weight steadily eased as we go through the day. the cloud will break up and we will have sunshine coming through. in the far north and west, we could see more in the way of cloud and outbreaks of light rain asa of cloud and outbreaks of light rain as a weather front moves in. the rain is not too significant. it will bring patchy rain into western scotla nd bring patchy rain into western scotland for a time. in the east we should see high teens likely. if you managed to cling on to the sunshine, it will feel reasonably pleasant. in north wales there is light rain. for much of england and wales it is a dry, sunny story into the afternoon. temperatures perhaps up to 22, 20
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three. through the night whether france will sink south and bring some rain. hopefully, a decent amount of rain for a time for the gardens. that still has to clear away in the south—east first thing on sunday morning. the wings are strengthening into scotland and there will be some squalling showers as we go through the day on sunday. elsewhere we will have this window of fine weather. the cloud. to meet away. top temperatures, sunday, 16 degrees in the north and 23 degrees in the south—east corner. a new way of pricing could mean the end of the sandwich shop queue at lunchtime — but could also mean you pay more for your blt at peak times. it's called ‘dynamic pricing' and involves paper price labels being replaced by electronic ones, which allow for food retailers to change the cost of their goods throughout the day. paul lewis from radio 4's money box
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has been looking into this. physically, what will we see? what is different with this? this is for a fridge. it has the price and the details of the product. this price can be changed at any moment by head office or the office at the back of the shop. it looks like paper in two colours. this is the big thing, it is on colours. this is the big thing, it isona colours. this is the big thing, it is on a fridge. the small ones, but tiny size, will be on the shelves for biscuits and vegetables. also some ages. are they mini screens which can be controlled? because they look like paper, at a quick glance, you do not see the difference. i have been speaking to someone who runs a one—stop shop, a 24—hour shop. he has just
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someone who runs a one—stop shop, a 24—hour shop. he hasjust started doing this. he says he does not change prices dynamically throughout the day. what it means is on thursday, the promotion day, when things come off offer and on offer, he can do it all from his computer. before, it in bold two all three staff going around the shop and changing pricing on the shelves. occasionally there would be a mistake. here, the price you see is surprised that till nose. it is all automated. he says it has changed him versus abbey saved him a lot of time. at the end of the day, instead of going round with red stickers on the lows and saying, half price, he can do that automatically. he sees great advantages without disadvantage in customers. you know where you are with this sticker. i
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just worry that by the time you get something to the tail, they have changed the price. people have not really explained how you can solve that. they're rather two ways. one used to have a delay. on the shelves it changes and then it changes at the till. if it has been changed from the person on the till will say, was this the price you were offered? you say, was this the price you were offered ? you will say say, was this the price you were offered? you will say which price you were offered. i think it can be resolved but it does make it more difficult. if you were open all night ina difficult. if you were open all night in a big city you might put prices up at midnight and put them down at six o'clock to reflect the higher cost of being open. we know major supermarkets are trialling it and marks & spencer ‘s are trialling cheap earth summit is at 11:30am to stop the lunch hour rush. —— cheaper
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sandwiches. i think we should all be prepared for the electronic price tag in our shops. it's notjust books on offer at the bradford literature festival — where poetry, music and celebrity speakers come together to reflect the cities diverse community. held over ten days, around 50,000 people are expected to attend this year. lets speak now to the women turning the literary festival upside down, syma aslam and irna qureshi good morning. tallis about the bradford literary festival. it does not seem to always hit the headlines perhaps as much as it should. not seem to always hit the headlines perhaps as much as it shouldm not seem to always hit the headlines perhaps as much as it should. it is quite a new festival. new kids on the block. it is one of the most inspirational festivals. the block. it is one of the most inspirationalfestivals. people are starting to notice it is there. we have seen that with visitor numbers, the speakers we have at the festival this year. it has been a really fantastic experience. we have said
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it is not just fantastic experience. we have said it is notjust books you can buy. what would you come away with? our starting point is it is about books. there is nothing in the world there is not a book about. you can talk of anything. we have poetry, comedy, anything. we have poetry, comedy, anything that has a narrative. film, dance, theatre. everything. there are so many events and festivals. comedy festivals, music festivals, literary festivals. how do you stand out and attract 50,000 people around the uk? our programme is distinct. it is different from anything else. we bring together people from all sorts of different backgrounds. we programme events which don't just follow the new book trends we talk about topics which are important. we
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will bring together speakers who are the best to talk about. our panel tends to be eclectic. what are you going to talk about? we have got everything from infobubbles, where we just talk about ourselves, and people talking about opinions. everybody thought we were going to remain. just how important social media is. there is a really eclectic range. there you are entering some controversial ground. on thursday, juno dawson pulled out of the literary festival. there will always be people who think some of the speakers you choose to bring on are more than controversial. they are
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inflammatory. audi you manage that? we have a big range of speakers. we regretted the fact thatjuno pulled out because it took away a transit voice from festival. that is something we worked really hard on. the thing is, we are always going to have speakers others do not agree with. we programme things last year which other communities found challenging. with the festival, we are trying to portray lots of different opinions and trying to create a space where you can talk about different things. that will a lwa ys about different things. that will always happen. a lot of people will assume that literary festivals are cosy, easy—going and passive and it is just about selling books. cosy, easy—going and passive and it isjust about selling books. is it? not for us. books are really important. we want to get books out there. we want to create excitement
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about reading and inspire children. this is also a space. we wanted to create a space, a safe space for people to come together and have discussions. it is difficult to have nuanced conversations about anything. you can be called racist or is anything. you can be called racist orisa anything. you can be called racist or is a phobic. these are challenging times. literary festivals are the space to talk about your differences with respect. that is what we are lacking at the moment and what we are moving away from. i am not going to agree or disagree. thank you for coming in and talking to us. it starts today. it started yesterday. already under way. the bradford literature festival runs untiljuly 9th. as a single mum she started writing because she couldn't afford a tv —
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now martina cole is the biggest—selling female crime author in the uk. she'll be here to tell us how she did it before 10. stay with us. headlines are next. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. more criticism of kensington council as the london mayor calls for it to be taken over by the government. the council leader and his deputy both resigned over their response to the grenfell tower fire.
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