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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2017 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... the government has indicated it won't bring external commissioners to run the kensington and chelsea council at the mayor of london cold for the measure in a bid to restore public confidence following the g re nfell tower public confidence following the grenfell tower disaster. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary david davis claims negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. the prominent film critic and former bbc presenter barry norman dies at the age of 83. the director—general of the bbc lord paul has described him as a first—class present and critic. also in the next hour... 20 years since the end of british control of hong kong — a new leader for the territory is sworn in and the chinese president warns against any challenges to his rule there. as ceremonial events marking the day take place, there have been protests on the streets of hong kong
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between demonstrators. the singer adele cancels her two concerts this weekend at wembley stadium — the singer says she is heartbroken but has damaged her vocal cords. in rugby, a late penalty from owen farrell secures the british and irish lions victory in new zealand, levelling the three—test series. cardiff is one of the uk's fastest growing cities — but is the welsh capital expanding too fast? cardiff's growing pains is on at 1:30pm on bbc news. good afternoon. the government has indicated it won't bring in external commissioners to run kensington and chelsea council following the grenfell tower fire disaster. the local government secretary, sajid javid, said it would monitor
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the process to elect a new leader of the authority following the resignation of nicholas paget—brown yesterday, and it would take further action, if it was needed. frankie mccamley reports. it was the breakdown of this, the first cabinet meeting at the council since the fire at grenfell tower, that led to the resignation of its leader nicholas paget—brown. that led to the resignation of its leader nicholas paget-brown. as council leader i have to accept my share of responsibility for these perceived failings. pressure had been mounting on the council following intense criticism of the way the disaster had been handled from day one. i completely understand the anger, the frustration of the local community, but of course, we weren't immediately quick off the ground. it was an enormous tragedy. i don't know if everyone realised how complex and how fast this fire was. i challenge any borough in the whole
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country to immediately have an action plan they could put into place. the resignation has been welcomed by many, including the mayor of london sadiq khan in a letter to the prime minister urged her to get a grip and immediately appoint commissioners to run the borough. he wrote... but some in this community that already feels like it has been failed by the authorities are sceptical of the appointment process. they cannot just impose their old boy network and theirfriends just impose their old boy network and their friends and family scheme that they seem to operate elsewhere. it needs to be a proper process for the selection of those commissioners and that has to be community led. they cannot do that on their own. we will not be imposed on at state level again. but despite these calls we re level again. but despite these calls were commissioners to be brought in it is not yet clear whether this
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will actually happen. it is understood the council will elect a new leader next week with the help of rebuilding trust with those who have had their lives shattered by this tragedy. with me is sian berry, chair of the housing committee of the london assembly. she is not speaking in a committee capacity, as an individualfamily mother. they are a green councillor, member of the green party, and you have been active on housing issues for a long time before you got onto the gla. what do you make for this coal commissioners to go in?” the gla. what do you make for this coal commissioners to go in? i have seen on the ground, i have been trying to help residents are unfair to manage the emergency response which from the council itself has been absolutely inadequate, so we have got the issues of who was liable, there will be an incredible —— criminal investigation as to what went on to the fire to happen but
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i'm not sure the best people to be managing the ongoing support of residents and how we had to a position where people on the ground and the community around their feel supported again, so i think something needs to change. i am a bit worried about the implication that commissioners willjust be imposed on the community from above. they are already feeling le aided by the council. we have already sent in a cross the council. we have already sent in a cross borough team to do more to help people who are recovering. and i think further promote the government to be imposed on them would not be ideal. if you are going to impose commissioners, some should come from the local community itself. that is good organisation there. i think some people could be co—opted from the script as commissioners to mixture its properly integrated with the community themselves want. properly integrated with the community themselves wantm properly integrated with the community themselves want. it sounds as though sajid javad is a bit relu cta nt to as though sajid javad is a bit reluctant to go down the red of doing anything to undermine the
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council independence from central government, presumably because he knows a central government picked up responsible to edward allred also pick up some of the blame if things did not pick up a speedy as they hope what about the broader question, as usualjoin london abiding ball across the uk, what do you do about these box, you could call these legacy blocks, some of them have been up a0 or 50 years? argue make sure you don't simply have to knock the whole thing down and start again? —— how do you. have to knock the whole thing down and start again? —— how do youlj smoke and start again? —— how do you.” smoke a lot of time with communities... —— i spent a lot of the time. these are technically it is all round london and they don't wa nt to is all round london and they don't want to be demolished. they have a very get that idea of what needs doing to make these places more allowa ble to doing to make these places more allowable to improve the safety under the conditions. and if councils want a build more homes in these areas would think of some councils do, people everywhere are making people's plans. they are getting volunteer architect in who are making plans to maybe put the
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home is where the guy designer. to put extra floors on top of buildings, extra wings, there is a lot you can do without demolishing and picking up a community that the people i really... do you think this fall of living has a long—term future? we have just been evacuating four of our blocks over the last week. thousands of residents there. i have been helping them to try and find new homes. i have met a single one who doesn't want to return to their home at the end of this post are confident that it is safe. the safety issues and configuration are com pletely safety issues and configuration are completely different. i think eve ryo ne completely different. i think everyone has different views on tall buildings and when we are building new homes we have to think very carefully about what the best way is to do it, but to waste the buildings we already have an break—up committees of already exist, we have the thing about the social and environmental cost of doing that. what is the most pressing thing for you that needs to be acted on with grenfell? think the community around there are still feeling any needed.
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we still have people who have not comport to say they're 0k we still have people who have not comport to say they're ok because they are scared of reprisals because they are scared of reprisals because they don't trust the authorities and you can see why. i think we need to be careful about imposing another layer of government on them and if we involve the community, actually get them running things, get them allocating resources, that would be allocating resources, that would be a much better way. thanks for being with us this lunchtime. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. james chapman worked closely with david davis, and told the bbc that the red lines set by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talks with the european union. the chinese president, xijinping, says his government won't tolerate any challenge to its sovereignty in hong kong. mr xi was speaking at a ceremony to mark the 20th anniversary of the handover of the former british colony to china. his comments came as several pro—democracy activists were arrested after clashing
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with both police and pro—beijing demonstrators. juliana liu reports from hong kong. an historic day for hong kong. government officials, including the incoming chief executive carrie lam, gathered for the flag—raising ceremony — marking 20 years since the city was handed from the uk to china. here she is being officially sworn in by the chinese president xijinping. mrs lam is the first woman to hold the position of chief executive and is vowing to restore trust in the local government. translation: we will provide more opportunities for young people to discuss, debate and participate in politics, to deepen their understanding and trust for the government, and to make them future leaders for our society. the president repeated china's commitment to the one—country, two systems formula which guarantees hong kong's freedoms, but he also had strong words for those calling
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for self—determination or even outright independence. translation: any attempt to endanger china's sovereignty, challenge the power of the central government, or use hong kong to carry out sabotage activities against the mainland, is an act that crosses the red line and is not permissible. this was the scene on the streets just outside the building where the inauguration took place. hong kong is a deeply divided city, between those who want more democracy, and those who want greater integration with china. it's too soon to say whether mrs lam will be able to bridge the gap. she's already talked about efforts to try to heal these divisions in society, because she does inherit a very polarised city and very polarised public opinion, but it's unclear how she will be able to succeed in doing that. she started out as a very popular career civil servant,
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but in the last few years her reputation has really changed. she's now widely seen as a beijing loyalist, which complicates efforts to bring disparate groups together. scuffles like this are visible examples of competing visions for hong kong. the differences are so great, that they're unlikely to be resolved any time soon. juliana liu, bbc news, hong kong. isn't that spectacular. they love to do this. every ten years. we had this on the tenth anniversary since the handover and they are doing it again. the night of the handover itself. some of the sounds of the fireworks, crackers exploding
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overcoming harbour. it is a beautiful, beautiful view of the nice guy but it is colour and noise, but does it signify anything? that has always been a great chance for hong kong. there has been the pomp and for the elections of both the candidate to get on the list, who are determined and have to be approved by beijing, to what extent does that represent democracy in hong kong? that is a big debate and it will continue to be debated because the protection of one country come to mac systems is only guaranteed for another 20 years and then everything is up for grabs. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has held a rally in hastings in what he says is the start of a tour of every marginal constituency in the country. the home secretary amber rudd held the seat of hastings and rye byjust 3a6 votes last month. and mr corbyn told supporters he hoped labour would soon be fighting the next general election.
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he called for an end to the cap on public sector pay and what he said was a a0% cut to local councils. stand together to win hastings and rye. a general election. stand together to transform our society. achieve what is possible in this world. and that is the sharing and protecting of the world's riches and resources, not the everlasting trip down the road to misery which is the great gap between the richest and poorest. it is wrong, it is immoral, it is unnecessary. do you know what, we are changing things already. we have changed the nature of public debate. thousands of protesters are gathering in central london for a march against austerity. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell is due to address the rally when it arrives in parliament square later. it comes after a labour bid to get bigger pay rises for nurses, firefighters and other public
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servants was narrowly defeated this week in the commons. i have a severely disabled son and i have had to try and get benefits for him and for him to get the good standing of living and it has been unbelievable, a real struggle, iam here, one of those parents able to come out today. austerity is one of the things i believe led to the fire at grenfell tower. the things i believe led to the fire at gre nfell tower. i the things i believe led to the fire at grenfell tower. i am here to make the link with the campaign today, notjust the the link with the campaign today, not just the saving the link with the campaign today, notjust the saving of money the link with the campaign today, not just the saving of money that led to having sugar panels on the outside, the failure to have proper health and safety checks. that was the view before some people set of suffering. tom burridge is there. but the psyche pretty big
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demonstration. —— looks like a pretty big demonstration. people have literally just started pretty big demonstration. people have literallyjust started moving. i'd on regent street, centre of london. thousands of people here are placed. difficult to know the exact number at this stage, they will march from here probably for a0 minutes oran march from here probably for a0 minutes or an hour, so here towards the house of commons. the message is that austerity has had its day. people believe that public momentum is with them the election, progress that labour has made overjeremy corbyn and people believe austerity needs to be reduced. a lot of banners you can see, tories out, a bit of a celebratory mood. we have met firemen from west yorkshire and there were talking about a fire at g re nfell tower. there were talking about a fire at grenfell tower. because even though
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the public enquiry hasn't begun, it isa the public enquiry hasn't begun, it is a long way from beginning, and even though the investigation is ongoing itself, a lot of people here really make a connection between public service cuts and the fire at g re nfell tower. public service cuts and the fire at grenfell tower. a public service cuts and the fire at g re nfell tower. a pretty public service cuts and the fire at grenfell tower. a pretty lively atmosphere. a lot of people saying the government has had its day. a lot of people want to see a change in government. a lot of labour supporters here and the general mood is enough is enough in respect to austerity. tom burridge on his way to westminster the attenders, those attending that anti—austerity marched through central london. three men have been arrested on suspicion of the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism. detectives from the metropolitan police's counter—terrorism command, assisted by officers from sussex police, arrested two men in essex and a third in east sussex at around 6pm on friday. the men, two aged 28 and one aged 31, are being held in custody at a south london police station.
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the headlines on bbc news... councillors in kensington and chelsea council say they are preparing to elect a new leader out of the current one resigned and was already described as perceived failings in its handling of the g re nfell tower failings in its handling of the grenfell tower fire disaster. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary david davis claims negotiations to the eu are being undermined by theresa may's lack of flexibility. in the past he meant it has been announced that the veteran journalist and film critic barry norman has died, he was 83. sports now and we are all rugby fans in the bbc sport centre. here is mike bushell. good afternoon. the british and irish lions fought back from 9 points down with 20 minutes to go, to win the second test against new zealand, in wellington. it means they level the series with one match to play. the hosts can point to the fact,
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that they were a man down for much of this game. this report... what does it mean to be the best side in the world of rugby? but since 1993 have the lions beat and new zealand, not any more. it was billed as a physical bolt —— battle. sonny bill williams went too far. the first bike sent off in 50 yea rs far. the first bike sent off in 50 years and the alliance smell blood. a man to the good, gaining an advantage on the scoreboard proved trickier as owen farrell could only keep them level by half—time. a disciplined display could level the series but the penalties kept racking up as did the new zealand tallied. a position the lions find familiar. the libby volatile fund themselves somewhere he wasn't. the lions tales were up. jamie george barged through. conor murphy barged over. 21 all but ten minutes to play. just one chance would see that. it fell to the feet of owen
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farrell. pulis, nerveless, priceless. the lions win in wellington, one more pics again, what that would mean. we kept the all blacks try this. i don't know the last time that happened. they haven't really stressed does from an attacking perspective and we think we are the ones who have played some positive rugby and we have felt we improved in certain areas and we know when we take a closer look over everything and work to improve on those areas for next week, hopefully there is one hell of a test match next week. genuinely we will be happy if we get the win next week. we have got one game, regardless of what happens, we will come back with some credibility and the lions moving forward and keeping the reputation of that but we will only be happy if there is a series when ross next week. gary ballance has been recalled to the england cricket squad for next week's first test against south africa at lord's. the yorkshire captain was dropped
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after a poor performance against bangladesh in october but he's the second—highest run—scorer in this season's county championship. uncapped middlesex bowler toby roland—jones is also included in the 12—man squad. surrey have made a bright start to their innings in the final of the one day cup at lord's. nottinghamshire have fought back with quick wickets at lord's. they have taken three in the last half hour to leave surrey now 197—5 with mark stoneman making his century in the last few minutes. full coverage on the bbc sport website including ball by ball commentary. that's all sports are now. i am off home now so i will see you soon. someone else bringing you the sport through the rest of the afternoon. i am pretty confident that he is not smoking outside the building because he is not smoking inside it because it has been ten years since the smoking ban
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was introduced in pubs around england. it hasn't been popular with everybody, but campaigners say the legislation has helped two million smokers to kick the habit. it is suggested that only 12% of smokers once the law reversed. so should we be celebrating the effect of the ban a decade on? with me to discuss what impact the smoking ban has had ten years on is deborah arnott, chief executive of the public health charity action on smoking and health. and also i'm joined from out cambridge studio by simon clark from the smoker‘s lobby group forest. good afternoon to you both. in ten yea rs good afternoon to you both. in ten years do you have any idea, deborah, how may times the two of you have debated? i think you could come to on the fingers of more than two hands or many hands probably. at the start the impact this ban has had. what is your case for the ban?
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start the impact this ban has had. what is your case for the bamm was workers health, because being exposed to second—hand smoke is not good for you. after the ban came into effect in the first year, the work 1200 fewer admissions to hospital with heart attacks, surely due to the introduction of the smoking ban. smoking rates going down had led to a decline in heart attacks anyway but it was increased by that. we have seen thousands fewer children every year admitted to hospital with asthma attacks because it also led to people, if it is not status for contempt of your workmate does not say to smoke in front of smoking at home when donald. hearing those sorts of exa m ples of donald. hearing those sorts of examples of the downside to this? donald. hearing those sorts of examples of the downside to this7m is difficult if you believe them but the reality is in 2007 there wasn't a significant evidence that passive smoking was a serious health risk to
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buy workers or anybody else. the jury buy workers or anybody else. the jury was to alive and it still is. we felt the smoking ban was excessive at the time and we still feel it is excessive. the fact is the labour government in 2005 election were talking about a smoking ban that would have exemptions for pubs that didn't serve food and private members clubs and we felt that was a reasonable compromise. the comprehensive ban which was pushed through without actually much public support because at the time but figures from the office for national statistics showed that only 30% of the public supported ban. most people wanted smokers to be accommodated in some respect. and even now. we have carried out show that the public is split down the middle when it comes to offering separate smoking rooms in pubs and clubs and we still think they should beat movement by the government to allow for separate smoking rooms because pubs have suffered enormously since the smoking ban. over 11,000 suffered enormously since the smoking ban. 0ver11,000 have suffered enormously since the smoking ban. over 11,000 have closed in england alone. we're not saying
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it isjust down in england alone. we're not saying it is just down to the smoking in england alone. we're not saying it isjust down to the smoking ban but clearly the smoking ban has had a significant impact on the closure ofa a significant impact on the closure of a lot of local pubs, that means local communities lose the hub of that community. in a sense i suppose, deborah, you are both looking for a correlation between the ban on something, in your case it is the reduction in life—threatening diseases, in simon's case it is the possible correlation with the closure of pubs. that is a downside. is it a trade—off that you tolerate? pubs. that is a downside. is it a trade—off that you tolerate ?m pubs. that is a downside. is it a trade-off that you tolerate? it is not a trade—off that they recognise exists. he would say that, wouldn't he? actually independent research and analysis by the bbc‘s own correspondent, mark easton, shows that actually what happened in the year after the legislation came into effect there was a reclassification because many pubs started to serve food, so actually there were over a000 increased licenses to serve
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alcohol which included restaurants as well as pubs. i think that is really crucial, basically pubs didn't die, they evolved and the carried on evolving. a lot of closed though in that time frame. you'd think it could have contributed to the? but in the year after the legislation. there has been a closure of pubs and some did close, yes, but the overall trend was an increase. and people... that he has key on the health question, your organisation is concerned about the impact of e—cigarettes, is it the case that really a lot of smokers, they haven't given up their habits, asa they haven't given up their habits, as a result of measures that the smoking ban they have simply gone to an alternative way of getting that craving satisfied and therefore actually these sorts of bands only deal with a relatively small number of people, those who can be persuaded or kind of pushed into giving up? well, over half of our own surveys show half of people who
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switch to e—cigarettes have quit smoking, and actually most smokers who take up e—cigarettes do it because they want to quit. it has not been just a simple transfer. people switch we think that is a good thing because it is not nicotine that harms you, it is smug. simon, last word on this.” nicotine that harms you, it is smug. simon, last word on this. i think e—cigarettes were interesting because it is hilarious deborah to claim that the smoking ban is contributing to a fault in smoking rates, the big impact has been the popularity of e—cigarettes. rates, the big impact has been the popularity of e-cigarettes. that is just not true, i am sorry that is not true. we think it is very important that the government encourages the use of e—cigarettes because what we want in the future is education and we want as much choice as possible. simon only is started supporting e—cigarettes once the tobacco industry wouldn't hurt. people have been forced to quit. we have got to allow people to make
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their own choices. we have to leave it there. thank you for being with us on it there. thank you for being with us on this anniversary of the smoking ban in england. the film critic barry norman has died aged 83, his family have said. his family and friends say he had been suffering from lung cancer. the journalist and former bbc presenter died in his sleep on friday night. norman was best known as the host of film on bbc one from 1972 until 1998. lord hall the director—general of the bbc paid tribute and said by norman was a first—class presenter and critic. he was always essential viewing. on the line is the film criticjames king. james, you yourself to the bbc on
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radio one and reviewing films. was he somebody you held up as someone you would hope to be able to match their achievements as a broadcaster? absolutely. he was the reason i wa nted absolutely. he was the reason i wanted to get into the job. i coincided in terms of going up with his heyday on the film show in the 80s and the 90s, started in 1972 but by the 80s and 90s it had really become part of the furniture in a very good way. it was a giant amongst film critics and the film critic that everybody knew. he only started reviewing films as i understand it when he was recruited by the bbc 2% was initially a programme only shown in london and the south—east in england it took a while to go national. before that he had been a jobbing journalist, a very good one but one had to turn his hand to anything. do you think he still had enough of a film buff in him to make his criticism is credible to the experts as it were?
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he had a film background, he started asa he had a film background, he started as a film—maker. and you look at his wedding photos, richard attenborough and things at his wedding, so he was certainly... and his sister still is i think. i certainly... and his sister still is ithink. i believe certainly... and his sister still is i think. i believe so, yes. certainly... and his sister still is ithink. i believe so, yes. he certainly... and his sister still is i think. i believe so, yes. he has done film reviews were some showbiz journalist. he wasn't prominently known —— was prominently known to the tv show but there were other things on that well but i think that was part of the charm. when he came from the tv show he was quite naive really about a television work because he wasn't some kind of polished, desperate wannabe tv presenter. he was a print journalist. that is what he was. up down to earth charm that he had came from his printjournalism background. he was a better tv presenter because he never really wa nted presenter because he never really wanted to be a tv presenter. they would have been proud that they had
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got their hands on him. pleasure to speak to you about by norman ‘s death has been announced that lunchtime. thank you very much. we are going to take a look at the weather on the other side of the studio. good afternoon to you, chris. hello. things looking reasonable to the rest of this afternoon. not completely dry. this area a cloud around scotland in northern ireland. not very heavy rain. the rain lasting a couple of hours. but sky is falling. the cloud continues to break up some sunshine. pleasa ntly warm continues to break up some sunshine. pleasantly warm with temperatures va ry pleasantly warm with temperatures vary widely into the high teens. a peak of about 23. over the night these fronts per server is bringing cloudy skies and a few patches of rain. not particularly extensive or heavy but given the cloudy weather overnight it will be quite a mild night. 12 to 15 celsius. quite windy across northern scotland weather will be gales.

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