Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2017 4:00pm-4:31pm BST

4:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at four. the government says it will keep a close eye on the situation at kensington and chelsea council as it prepares to elect a new leader. london mayor sadiq khan has called for commissioners to take over the running of the council. the priority remains looking after the victim, their families and friends, making sure they get everything they need and in doing so, when it comes to the local council nothing is off the table. thousands of people take to the streets in central london to march against austerity — labour leaders are due to address a rally in parliament square in the next hour a rally in parliament square in the next hour. the veteran film critic and former bbc presenter, barry norman, dies at the age of 83. the director—general of the bbc, tony hall has described him as a first class presenter and critic. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary david davis claims negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. pro—democracy protestors take to 2
4:01 pm
streets in hong kong as the new heard from the territory is sworn some scuffles broke out as the chinese president warned against any challenges to his rule there. against any challenges to his rule there. in rugby, a late penalty from owen farrell secures the british and irish lions victory in new zealand, levelling the three test series. and in half an hour — on dateline — jane hill and her guests will discuss the fragile nature of britain's new government and the campaign against the jihadist group isis. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the government will keep "a close eye" on kensington and chelsea council, after its leader quit over the grenfell tower fire,
4:02 pm
the communities secretary says. sajid javid said it was "right" that nicholas paget—brown stepped down, and said the process to select a successor would be "independent of government". london mayor sadiq khan has called for commissioners to take over the council. frankie mccamley reports. it was the breakdown of this, the first cabinet meeting at the council since the fire at grenfell tower that led to the resignation of its leader, nicholas paget—brown. as council leader, i have to accept my share of responsibility for these perceived failings. pressure had been mounting on the council following intense criticism of the way the disaster had been handled from day one. i completely understand the anger, the frustration of the local community. but i..., of course, we were not immediately quick off the ground, it was an enormous tragedy. i don't know if everyone realised how complex and how fast this fire was. i challenge any borough in the whole country to immediately have an action plan they could put into place. the resignation has been
4:03 pm
welcomed by many including the mayor of london, sadiq khan who in a letter to the prime minister urged her to get a grip and immediately appoint commissioners to run the borough. he wrote, commissioners who are untainted should take over the running of the council to act in the best interests of residents. but some in this community that already feels like it has been failed by the authorities are sceptical of the appointment process. they cannot just impose their old boy network and their friends and family scheme that they seem to operate elsewhere. there needs to be a proper process of selection of those commissioners and that has to be community led, they cannot do that on their own. we will not be imposed upon at state level again. it is understood that the council will elect a new leader next week
4:04 pm
with the hope of rebuilding trust with those who have had their lives shattered by this tragedy. frankie mccamley, bbc news. the resignation of the leader of kensington and chelsea council yesterday, it was his decision but i welcome the decision it is an opportunity forfresh welcome the decision it is an opportunity for fresh leadership, in terms of any kind of intervention for any council, whenever these kinds of decisions are made and they are infrequent and rightly so, because you would be overturning your democratically elected politician, they ares awayyjudicial
4:05 pm
decisions. but one thing is clear, the absolute priority remains looking after the victim, their family and friends, and in doing so, nothing is off the table told the bbc that the red line set by the prime minister had made his former boss'sjob very by the prime minister had made his former boss's job very difficult as he conducts talking with the european union. earlier i asked our political correspondentjonathan blake to expand on the latest comments. he specifically talks about the european court ofjustice, which is the eu's highest court. the eu has said clearly it wants it tot have a role and expect it to have one in guaranteeing the right of eu
4:06 pm
citizens living in europe. theresa may says it should have no jurisdiction in the uk. many people who voted leave may agree with that. but he spoke strongly about some other areas where he thinks david davis's job has been other areas where he thinks david davis'sjob has been made particularly difficult. she has taken particularly difficult. she has ta ken about particularly difficult. she has taken about some absolutist position, she set a red line for a conference speech that hamstrung the negotiations in my view. david davis, there isn't better to be doing the negotiation in my view, he isa doing the negotiation in my view, he is a tough resilient operator, the red lines have been set for him that make hisjob red lines have been set for him that make his job difficult. so he is a former adviser to david davis, do we have any idea how much his comments have been sanctioned by david davis? in short no, there has been no comment from the department oi’ been no comment from the department or david davis himself, to that end no comment from number ten either, but i think we can assume that it
4:07 pm
will be unlikely forjames chapman to come out and say these things without david davis's blessing. he was in thejob until without david davis's blessing. he was in the job until recently and as far as we know has no particular axe to grind on that basis. so, if indeed it reflects david davis's position, then maybe he is feeling frustrated, maybe he is feeling his hands are tied to an extent in what is already a very difficult and complex operation, others are saying this is david davis potentially using james chapman to get his excusesin using james chapman to get his excuses in early should the negotiations go wrong or fail. but i think we have to take james chapman's comments at face value and it is an interesting insight from somebody who was working right alongside the brexit secretary who is of course charged with negotiating the uk's exit of the eu. thousands of protesters are marching through central london calling for an end to government cuts. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, is due to address the rally when it arrives in parliament square shortly.
4:08 pm
it comes after a labour bid to get bigger pay rises for nurses, firefighters and other public servants was narrowly defeated this week in the commons. we've been speaking to a couple of the people who are demonstrating. i have a disabled, severely disabled son, and the fight that i've had to have to try and get benefits for him, and to make sure he's got a standard of living has been unbelievable — i mean, that's another story. it's a real struggle. so i'm here for all those parents who are unable to come out today. austerity is one of the things that led, i believe, to the fire at grenfell. i'm here partly to make the link with that campaign today, because notjust the saving of money that led to having cheaper panels put on the outside, but the failures to have proper health and safety checks. our correspondent sarah smith is in parliament square. sarah, who is on the platform at the
4:09 pm
moment? well, at the moment we have a speakerfrom moment? well, at the moment we have a speaker from the public sector... cheering . jeremy corbyn is up next and he will receive a huge response from the crowd. every time his name has been mentioned. there have been cheer, chants, things we heard in hastings earlier, so he is up next. but the march started three hours ago, about two... before it started there was a minute's silence for the victims of the grenfell tower disaster. a men's applause for the —— minute's applause for the emergency service, we can see a connection is being made between
4:10 pm
austerity and public service cuts and austerity, the connection that jeremy corbyn has made, so we have heard from all sorts of people today, from trade union, the health service, from teaching, and they are all talking about austerity being as they put it, an ideological choice rather than... this afternoon they say it is going to be a carnival of resistance, but as i say, everybody here waiting forjeremy corbyn, who is up next. cheering 0k, sarah smith, thank you for battling through the noise there, many thanks, well, the labour leader has in fact held a rally in hastings in what he says is the start of a tour of every marginal constituency in the country. the home secretary amber rudd held the seat of hastings and rye byjust 346 votes last month. and mr corbyn told supporters he hoped labour would soon be fighting the next general election. he called for an end to the cap on public sector pay and what he said was a 40% cut to local councils. stay together to win hastings and rye.
4:11 pm
a general election. stay together to transform our society. achieve what is possible in this world. and that is the sharing and protecting of the world's riches and resources, not the everlasting trip down the road to misery which is the great gap between the richest and poorest. it is wrong, it is immoral, it is unnecessary. do you know what, we are changing things already. we have changed the nature of public debate. the sinn fein president gerry adams says he doesn't expect a deal to save the power—sharing agreement at stormont to be made by monday. that's despite further talks today between the northern ireland political parties. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, said the situation "cannot continue for much longer," after the dup and sinn fein missed a government deadline on thursday. three men have been arrested on suspicion of the commission,
4:12 pm
preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism. detectives from the metropolitan police's counter—terrorism command, assisted by officers from sussex police, arrested two men in essex and a third in east sussex at around 6pm on friday. the men, two aged 28 and one aged 31, are being held in custody at a south london police station. and anti—terror police have arrested two men at heathrow airport after they landed on a flight from turkey. both are aged 21 and are from leicester and birmingham. the chinese president, xijinping, says his government won't tolerate any challenge to its sovereignty in hong kong. mr xi was speaking at a ceremony to mark the twentieth anniversary of the handover of the former british colony to china. his comments came as several pro—democracy activists were arrested after clashing with both police and pro—beijing demonstrators. thousands of people calling
4:13 pm
for greater democracy in hong kong have marched through the city. juliana liu reports from hong kong. an historic day for hong kong. government officials, including the incoming chief executive carrie lam, gathered for the flag—raising ceremony — marking 20 years since the city was handed from the uk to china. here she is being officially sworn in by the chinese president xijinping. mrs lam is the first woman to hold the position of chief executive and is vowing to restore trust in the local government. translation: we will provide more opportunities for young people to discuss, debate and participate in politics, to deepen their understanding and trust for the government, and to make them future leaders for our society. the president repeated china's commitment to the one—country, two systems formula which guarantees hong kong's freedoms, but he also had strong
4:14 pm
words for those calling for self—determination or even outright independence. translation: any attempt to endanger china's sovereignty, challenge the power of the central government, or use hong kong to carry out sabotage activities against the mainland, is an act that crosses the red line and is not permissible. this was the scene on the streets just outside the building where the inauguration took place. hong kong is a deeply divided city, between those who want more democracy, and those who want greater integration with china. it's too soon to say whether mrs lam will be able to bridge the gap. she's already talked about efforts to try to heal these divisions in society, because she does inherit a very polarised city and very polarised public opinion, but it's unclear how she will be able to succeed in doing that. she started out as a very popular career civil servant, but in the last few years her reputation has really changed. she's now widely seen
4:15 pm
as a beijing loyalist, which complicates efforts to bring disparate groups together. scuffles like this are visible examples of competing visions for hong kong. the differences are so great, that they're unlikely to be resolved any time soon. juliana liu, bbc news, hong kong. the headlines now. the government says it will keep a close eye on the situation at kensington and chelsea council as it prepares to elect a new leader, the london mayor has called for commissioners to take over the running of the council. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary david davis claims negotiations with the eu are being undermined by theresa may's lack of flexibility. the veteran film critic and former
4:16 pm
bbc presenter barry norman dies at the age of 83. the director general of the bbc tony hall described him asa of the bbc tony hall described him as a first class presenter and critic. in sport the british and irish lions have levelled the series against new zealand. they won the second test by 2a.ed to 21. the decider is in auckland next saturday. novak djokovic defeated gael monfils in the eastbourne final. and the tour de france is under way with a time trial in dusseldorf, chris froome who is looking for a fourth tour title will be the last to go in the next hour or so. i will be back with more, a full update about 5.40. see you then. let us go back to that call by the
4:17 pm
london mayorfor let us go back to that call by the london mayor for commissioners to ta ke london mayor for commissioners to take over the running of kensington and chelsea council. we can speak to robert atkinson, a labour councillor on the council. he joins us from our blackburn news room. thank you for joining us. i think you support that call for commissioners to take over, why is that? well, straightforwardly because i think that the conservative administration has, the people of north kensington have lost all faith in the capacity of the council to assist them and to provide them the services they are still waiting for, i don't believe that anyone can emerge from that, from the ruling group in the council able to get the confidence of the people. as with some of the worries about having commissioners, there have been questions about who would choose them, would they be imposed by government, is that a good idea,
4:18 pm
given that residents and people on the ground want greater local involvement? i would agree with that, but we need to get a short—term fix so that things can start to happen. the local authority has been paralysed for the last two weeks, we have had some officers doing very good work but without political trekkion, or any direction at all, it is very difficult to get things, get things sorted. i still have residents unable to return to their home, i still have victims of their home, i still have victims of the fire who are being accommodated in unsuitable hotel accommodation, someone in unsuitable hotel accommodation, someone has got to get a grip, and if the conservative group can't do it, then, then a commissioner would be the right way of going. what sort of person should that be? well, it's, it needs to be someone who has the authority and the empathy to be able to go to north densing on the, to listen to people, to find out what they want and then to do
4:19 pm
something about it. kensington. given that the government says at the moment, that it's, its keeping a close eye on event, it is minded not to go down the commissioner root for the moment —— route, for the moment. what do you think should happen now? i think, why don't we give the conservatives until monday, to find, to find someone, and if not, i would go back, i mean the government did intervene last week, to remove the chief executive of the council, they put pressure on the, on the previous leader to go, so they are watching the situation carefully, i think that have as many doubts as i do about the capacity of the current council leadership to get a grip of this situation, and i would urge the government, if it is not clear by the, by the end of the weekend, that then the government does need to act and appoint commissioner, i would
4:20 pm
also say nothing can be sorted out until we have done something about the housing crisis and perhaps the housing, the emergency housing crisis goes beyond kensington now, there is an emergency housing crisis across london and perhaps a commissioner will be able to do something beyond the borders of kensington. and i would remind you, we have elections next may, so the political control can be sorted out at that election, and i hope the electorate across the borough will bearin electorate across the borough will bear in mind the shameful way this which the council has failed to respond. 0k. robert atkinson we must leave it there, thank you for your time, and mr atkinson had some unexpected company there for which we apologise. the film critic barry norman has died aged 83, his family have said. the journalist and former bbc presenter died in his sleep on friday night. norman was best known as the host of film on bbc one from 1972 until 1998. the director general of the bbc
4:21 pm
tony hall has paid tribute. he said: with me is the film critic, jason solomans. thank you for coming injason. just sum up what barry norman meant to film criticism? he was film notjust criticism, he embodied what the movies were, we had a warmth and intelligence and a certain calm, he wasn't part of this frenetic kind of modern sense of criticism where eve ryo ne modern sense of criticism where everyone gives their two pence worth on twitter ten minutes after the film has finished. he was considered. he was the last word and
4:22 pm
the fist word. so through him, a certain type of movie became popular and reined at the box office, it was movie with scripts, he was romantic about the movie, he liked woody allen, bringing up baby he liked the classics, when special effects were very good, with spielberg for example he appreciated them. he had a sensibility and ability to convey his passion and his intelligence, but never be pretentious, that is why he was on telly for 26 years. that is astonishing. not bad going! we arejust here that is astonishing. not bad going! we are just here for a brief moment. i suppose it was another time and that format has changed over the yea rs that format has changed over the years and now there is a guest host and many people chime in, there are so many film critics now, because of barry norman, he was the one critic, there was that era where there was
4:23 pm
him in alexander walker and philip french and derek malcolm, these people be strode film and they were co mforta ble, people be strode film and they were comfortable, men in scrum pers, with opinions, barry was the one in the middle. philip was the intelligent one, barry was the sort of voice of reason throughout them all. he wasn't controversial in his opinions but when he didn't like a film, he has enough wit and, to lacerate it with his tongue, he was an interviewer, people forget, he was a great show business editor, the daily mail, so he was a journalist at heart. he had film in his blood. his father was leslie thomas who filmed dunkirk. there is going to be a big blockbuster but barry's father's film getting a reprint. that legacy he had, goes on, his daughter emma and samantha are in the movies and wrote books with their father, the movies and wrote books with theirfather, i think the movies and wrote books with their father, i think of them today. he has been ill for a couple of
4:24 pm
yea rs he has been ill for a couple of years and i have been conversing with him on e—mail and sharing jokes as well. he supported a rival football tea m as well. he supported a rival football team to mine. despite him being a spurs fan he had a great wit about that plight as well. he was unfussed about things but you don't hold a job of 26 year on prime time bbc tv without being powerful and discerning. it was appointment viewing, it was a different age and a different time, but people would make sure they watched film, that particular evening and so he had a sort of influence that possibly these days is much more diffuse?” mean some film—makers would hang on monday night, what was barry norman going to say? it could make or break that movie. he would like that responsibility of being able to do that and say there are other people who can do the same but not quite with barry norman, i think he held the generation young people myself, iam here the generation young people myself, i am here today, i am a critic
4:25 pm
because of barry for man.” i am here today, i am a critic because of barry for man. i was going to ask you. why not i could say to you. that became his catch phrase. rory bremner used to do it with baggy eyes that looked like he had been up all night, he never said why not. he was happy to have that asa why not. he was happy to have that as a catch phrase, his autobiography was entitled why not. he was happy to ta ke was entitled why not. he was happy to take that misquote and run with it. he had a great life, really, barry norman, very relaxed. he was producing pickled onions to a fiery standard later to his mother's old recipe. they were sweet yet fiery in the middle and that is what barry norman was. marvellous. jason, very good to talk to you. many thanks. william and harry are to attend a service to redead cat their mother's
4:26 pm
grave on what would have been her 56th birthday. our royal correspondent reports. september 1997, and the last public moments of a funeral that transfixed a nation, and indeed a world. this was diana princess of wales being brought home to althorp house near norm hampton where she lived as a teenager and her ancestors had lived for generations. with no cameras present, the princess was buried on an island in the middle of an ornamental lake. the precise location of her grave has never been made public. the area is being redesigned in her honour in this significant anniversary year. 20 years ago diana's ex—husband prince charles was there with their sons and her brother and sisters, 20
4:27 pm
yea rs sons and her brother and sisters, 20 years on, the future king will be missing as he is in canada with his wife the duchess of cornwall. with his father absent prince william will bejoined at his father absent prince william will be joined at today's very private ceremony by his wife kate, and their children george and charlotte. they will attend the service for a mother—in—law and grandmother they never met. for william and harry who were just children when diana died, this is the start of a difficult time, as they remember their mother, a mother who they say smothered them in love. today, at her grave, they will reflect a nd today, at her grave, they will reflect and say prayers. peter hunt. bbc news. now the weather. cloud has been breaking up nicely in england and wales, so some more sunshine to come through the rest of the day, to the north—west of the uk, though, this strip of cloud you can see moving in across scotland and northern ireland isa across scotland and northern ireland is a weather front, it will continue to push southwards so the cloud will thicken up, with outbreaks of rain
4:28 pm
getting into north—west england and wales as we head through this evening, brighter skies following on. overnight that strip of cloud works into the south. patchy outbreaks of rain developing on the front. no if the a huge amount. it will be patchy in nature, many areas will be patchy in nature, many areas will stay dry. windy in scotland for the northern isles, but a mild night for most. sunday starts off with those brisk winds, easing for the northern isles. plenty of showers drink into the western side of scot. some will be heavy. the early morning rain moves away from southern england and cloud will break up like today with sunny spells forecast on sunday, we are looking at similar temperatures, 18-23. this is bbc news. the headlines at 4.30. the government says it will keep a close eye on the situation at kensington
4:29 pm
and chelsea council as it prepares to elect a new leader. the london mayor has called for commissioners to ta ke mayor has called for commissioners to take over the running of the council. the former chief of staff to the brexit secretary has said negotiations with the eu are being "hamstrung" by theresa may's lack of flexibility. james chapman said the prime minister made his former boss' job very difficult. the veteran film critic and former bbc presenter, barry norman, has died. he was 83. thousands of people are central london taking part in a protest against austerity. labour leaders are due to address a rally in parliament square this afternoon. the british and irish lions have beaten new zealand in a thrilling second test to level the series. now on bbc news: dateline london. hello and welcome
4:30 pm
to dateline london. i'm jane hill. this week we discuss the still fragile nature of britain's new government, and we try to assess where we are with the campaign against the jihadist group isis. with me this week — michael goldfarb, host of the podcast frdh, first rough draft of history. steve richards, the political commentator and broadcaster, and writer of the recently published rise of the outsiders. can't think who you're writing about there, steve! that may come up. suzanne lynch of the irish times, now in dc after your

55 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on