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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 2, 2017 12:00am-1:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm alpa patel. our top stories: iraqi forces say they've taken control of the main base of the so—called islamic state in mosul, we report from the frontline. the remaining militants have been driven from here, but at what cost? this hospital complex which was a place of healing now lies in ruins, like many other parts of mosul. scuffles in hong kong as its newly appointed chief executive is sworn china warns against any challenge to its sovereignty. world leaders pay tribute to helmut kohl, uniter of germany and architect of the european union's expansion. helmut kohl gave us the chance to be involved in something bigger than ourselves, bigger than our terms of office.
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canada marks it's 150th anniversary. 500,000 people attend celebrations in ottawa. hello and welcome to bbc news. we begin in mosul, where, after intense fighting, iraqi forces say they've taken control of the so callled islamic state's main base. the militants have also been driven from a hospital compound, where several senior is leaders were thought to have been hiding. but fighting is continuing around part of the old city. commanders say they are confident a final victory is in sight. a symbol of victory, planted this morning in what was the main base of is in mosul.
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troops, weary after driving the militants from this vast medical complex, but vowing to hunt down every last one of them. "we will keep chasing them and those who support them," says this man, "and we will throw them in the garbage." commanders say they have removed a cancer here, but one that has already spread. "0ur message is daesh is not only an iraqi problem," says colonel falah al—wabdan. "it's international." explosion he was interrupted by a booby—trapped bomb. the militants may have gone from here, but they left plenty of threats behind.
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and plenty of wreckage in iraq's second largest city. well, this is what victory looks like in mosul after more than eight months of fighting. the remaining is militants have been driven from here, but at what a cost. this hospital complex, which was a place of healing, now lies in ruins, like many other parts of mosul. the city may be regaining its freedom, but there will be a great deal of rebuilding to do. some of those who fought to reclaim this territory will never go home, including four soldiers killed yesterday by another booby—trap. the body of one of them was found this morning by his friend. translation: yesterday, we were together, joking and laughing. he said, "i am not afraid of daesh, and you should not be either."
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then he went into the hospital and was mortared. the city is not fully liberated yet. commanders admit that even when it is, there is a real risk is could be back. orla guerin, bbc news, mosul. scuffles have broken out between pro—democracy demonstrators and police in hong kong. it happened just hours after the new chief executive was sworn in. it's 20 years since britain handed over hong kong to china. activists accuse beijing of clamping down on free speech. but president xi, who is visiting the territory, has warned against any challenge to beijing's authority. our china editor carrie gracie reports. not the images china wanted for the 20th anniversary of the hong kong handover. democracy activists trying to gate—crash the party. president xi was safely inside. swearing in a new government
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and delivering stern words about hong kong's future. translation: any attempt to endanger china's sovereignty and security, challenge the power of the central government is an act that crosses the red line and is absolutely impermissible. tough love was the message throughout his tour of hong kong. "greetings, comrades", he shouted. hong kong may be special, but it must learn to love the motherland. his just seems to be empire xi. but sorry, we are the ones who asked for democracy and we will not show our loyalty to the one party dictatorship leader. no sooner had president xi left, then the streets filled with protesters,
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marking the anniversary of the handover in their usual style. shouting at china patriots to go back to the mainland. taiwan flags among countless ways to defy one—party china. china controls the hard power in hong kong but this illustrates the problem it has with soft power. they didn't come out to welcome president xi, they didn't come out to celebrate 20 years since the handover of hong kong. they are here on the street to demand democracy and to cherish their right to protest. hong kong independence! 20 years since the handover and tacking between two masters is getting harder all the time. the hong kong public want more say in their lives. and so does beijing. tonight is china's show. but this city is profoundly uncertain about what the next 20 years of chinese rule might bring.
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carrie gracie, bbc news, hong kong. let's ta ke let's take a look at some of the other stories. ukraine says russian security services were involved in the cyber attack on the country earlier this week. the authorities in kiev said they believed the attack to have been carried out by the same hackers who targeted ukraine late last year. the kremlin dismissed the allegations as "unfounded". qatar has rejected the list of demands made by several gulf states led by saudi arabia. but it says it is ready to engage in dialogue under the right conditions. the qatari foreign minister spoke two days before an ultimatum set by those countries runs out. efforts involving russia are continuing to try to resolve the worst crisis in the gulf for many years. the european union says it's ready to support italy, as large numbers of migrants arrive via the mediterranean. the country is threatening to close its ports,
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after nearly 11,000 migrants arrived on italian shores injust five days last month. the eu's migration commissioner said he understood why the situation was untenable. the world health organization has announced that 1,500 people have now died as a result of the cholera outbreak in yemen. the who said there were nearly 250,000 suspected cases of the disease in the country. cholera, which thrives in places with poor sanitation, took hold in yemen two months ago. for the first time, thousands attending singapore's annual gay—rights rally have had to show identity cards to prove they are citizens or permanent residents of the country. checkpoints were set up around hong lim park to comply with new rules, which prohibit foreigners from taking part in the event, also know as pink dot. overseas companies were also banned from providing sponsorship. helmut kohl, the father of german
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reunification and the country's longest serving chancellor in modern times, has finally been laid to rest. the service took place in speyer cathedral, dr kohl's home town. the former chancellor's coffin was then taken away by an honour guard for burial in the grounds. earlier, world leaders, old and new, paid tribute at a ceremony in the european parliament in strasbourg. hugh schofield was there. at the end of the day they taught him down the rhine in a boat from the place where he was born and died to the mediaeval town of speyer, whose mediaeval cathedral was a place he loved. as a boy in the war he sheltered there from allied bombs. and in the cathedral they
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held helmut kohl's mass. he was a catholic, this was his home, these we re catholic, this was his home, these were his people. this is provincial germany bidding farewell to the chancellor. it is important to remember that alongside the international colossus, there was also helmut kohl the politician, a man deeply embedded in his homeland here. earlier in the day it was a very different farewell, as world leaders, past and present, very different farewell, as world leaders, pastand present, came very different farewell, as world leaders, past and present, came to pay homage. this is where they remembered the great achievement of helmut kohl, the man who made germany one nation again, but within europe and without waking dark memories of the past. tributes came from friends, like the former spanish prime minister gonzales, and bill clinton, who delivered a rhetorical force. helmut kohl gave
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us rhetorical force. helmut kohl gave usa rhetorical force. helmut kohl gave us a chance to be involved in something bigger than ourselves, we given our terms of office, bigger than our fleeting careers. given our terms of office, bigger than ourfleeting careers. because all of us sooner or later will be in all of us sooner or later will be in a coffin like that. and the only gift we can leave behind is a better future for our children and the freedom to make their own choices, including their own mistakes. angela merkel, who had a notoriously difficult relationship with helmut kohl in recent years, said all that was now forgotten and that europe would be forever grateful for what her predecessor had done. translation: thank you for the trotters and opportunities that you gave me. thank you for the chances that you gave to many others as well. thank you very much for the chances that we as germans and europeans have received, thanks to you. you achieved a huge amount. they you rest in peace. now it's up
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to us to actually preserve and guard your legacy. i bow before you and your legacy. i bow before you and your memory in gratitude and humility. it was of course a sad occasion. the presence of helmut kohl's widow was a reminder that this was death of a man, notjust a politician. —— the death. but it was more than that. for europe's leaders it was also an uplifting occasion, a moment the community ideals and the spirit of one of their greats. helmut kohl, who was laid to rest today. plenty to come. as canada celebrates its anniversary of independence, we explore the connection with a popular british tv drama.
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china marked its first day of ruling hong kong with a series of spectacular celebrations. a huge firework display was held in the former colony. the chinese president said unification was the start of a new era for hong kong. the world's first clone has been produced of an aduu first clone has been produced of an adult mammal. scientists in scotland have produced a sheep called dolly that was cloned in laboratory using a cell from another sheep. for the first time in 20 years russian and american base craft have docked in orbit at the start of a new era of cooperation in space. the challenger powered past the lighthouse at almost 50 knots, shattering the record that had stood for many years and there was no hiding the sheer elation of richard branson and his crew. this is bbc news.
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the latest headlines: iraqi forces say they've taken control of the main base of the so—called islamic state in mosul. thousands have been demonstrating in hong kong, calling for greater democracy twenty years after the territory's return to chinese rule. president trump has attacked us states refusing to hand over personal information — to a commission he created to investigate alleged voter fraud. more than twenty states have declined the requests, saying they are unnecessary and violated privacy. i asked our washington correspondent laura bicker what happens next. welcome his tweed kind of says a look at, what are you doing? what are you trying to hide by not giving us are you trying to hide by not giving us this information? but the states that have been asked, over 20 of
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them are refusing to comply. let's go back a bit but remember he set up this election integrity commission backin this election integrity commission back in may because donald trump leaves that millions of voters are committed fraud during the presidential election. one of the reasons he believes this is because it is said that hillary clinton won the popular vote. he won the electoral college vote. that is counted state—by—state. he believes there are millions of voters that have been counted wrongly all there has been widespread voter fraud. have been counted wrongly all there has been widespread voterfraud. the commission was set up and on wednesday all states were sent a letter asking them to give the birthdates, addresses, social security numbers and any felonies, misdemeanours that the voters may have committed in the past, hand over all information within two weeks. well, some states are simply refusing. they say it is unnecessary. california, for
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instance, says... remember, this is a democratic state, this would serve to only legitimise the false and debunked claims of massive voter fraud made by the president. it is not just democratic state that are pushing back against this demand. there are others. mississippi, for example. they say they rejected on privacy grounds, believing the information could be hacked by cyber security hackers. mississippi residents should celebrate independence day and their states right to protect the privacy. they can gojump in the gulf of right to protect the privacy. they can go jump in the gulf of mexico and mississippi is a good place to jump and mississippi is a good place to jumpfrom. so, and mississippi is a good place to jump from. so, quite clearfrom mississippi there. so what donald trump does now, we will have to wait and see. it is an extraordinary argument. what do you think will happen next, given the fact that these states have refused to give
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out this information. why is the president so obsessed with this issue, even attacked him in an the election? these claims have no evidence to back them up, the claims of widespread voter fraud. there are some examples in some states where 100 votes have been found to perhaps not contain a name and address of a voter. pa rt of not contain a name and address of a voter. part of the problem is the registration of voters it right across a 200 million voters across the united states. he believes that some people who perhaps have died in the past have been kept, stayed on the past have been kept, stayed on the voter registration list. and then someone has gone and voted on their behalf. one of the police and see that —— one of the reasons he believes this is because of the popular vote, hillary clinton winning the popular vote and he believes there has been widespread voter fraud believes there has been widespread voterfraud and believes there has been widespread voter fraud and that many people did not vote for him because they were registered republicans. he is
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looking to see this, the election or integrity commission is looking to see who voted when, where and how they voted in the past. the idea is to perhaps trace any voter fraud them they then fine. and as you heard, so far, no evidence has been put forward to back this up and states sated give all this information in two weeks, over 20 states have said they simply cannot do it. let's catch up with the sports news. we start with rugby union, and the british and irish lions have become the first side to beat the all blacks on home soil since 2009. the 2a points to 21 victory levelled the series ahead of next saturday's third test. our sports correspondent katie gornall reports from wellington. many said it could not be done. not against the world champions and certainly not here on home turf. but they have pulled off one of the great wins in history and kept the
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series alive. sonny bill williams was sent off in the first half as shoulder charge and he was not the first all—black to be sent off in 50 yea rs first all—black to be sent off in 50 years but he gave the lines —— lions hope. a1—man years but he gave the lines —— lions hope. a 1—man advantage is no guarantee against the all blacks. they had an 89 lead. it was beginning to fade but the lions sprang into life. first crash over the corner and then converted try brought them level. with minutes remaining, when farrell held his nerve to kick it the lions to a famous victory and one that keeps the dream alive. britain's geraint thomas won the opening stage of the tour de france — 8111 kilometre time trial in dusseldorf, germany. the team sky rider clocked 16 minutes four seconds to claim the leader's yellowjersey, with team—mate and defending champion chris froome 12 seconds back in sixth. sunday's second stage goes from dusseldorf to lierge in belgium. thomas is the first welshman to ever wear the yellow jersey. amazing. it's the stuff of dreams.
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the tour is what got me into cycling, as a ten—year—old used to run home to watch the last ten k. to be on the other side camera and take the jersey is be on the other side camera and take thejersey is incredible, really. it is my eighth tour and to finally win a stage in the yellowjersey, jersey isa a stage in the yellowjersey, jersey is a bonus. novak djokovic proved his form for wimbledon by beating gael monfils 6—3 6—4 to win the aegon international. the three—time wimbledon winner has had a below—par season but did not drop a set in his first eastbourne appearance. it was the 12—time grand slam champion's first title since january and the 68th of his career. it is always special winning tournaments on grass. this is to be
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the most common sport —— surface we had in sport. now we only have three 01’ had in sport. now we only have three orfour had in sport. now we only have three or four weeks had in sport. now we only have three orfour weeks of had in sport. now we only have three or four weeks of the entire season played on grass. this is the best possible buildup for me in preparation for what is coming up next week and hopefully i will be able to take it from you. —— there. huge crowds have been celebrating canada's 150th birthday. the prime ministerjustin trudeau, said he was proud his nation, was known for its compassion and diversity. britain's prince charles told the crowds that canada was an example to many. from ottawa, our chief correspondent gavin hewitt reports. prince charles was driven in a coach flanked by royal canadian mounted police through the capital, ottawa, as the country celebrated its 150th anniversary. he was representing the queen, who remains canadian head of state. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, introduced prince charles to his children. there was recognition that the celebrations were taking
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place on the ancestral lands of the algonquin people — indigenous canadians. also among the performers was bono, with his own message. when others build walls, we'll open doors. it was a message expanded on by prime minister trudeau. we don't care where you are from or what religion you practice or who you love. you are all welcome in canada. cheering and applause. justin trudeau defined canada as a country built on diversity, of welcoming refugees. a country where tackling climate change was an obligation, not an option. prince charles didn't mention canada's british ties but he paid tribute to canadian values. around the world, canada is recognised as a champion of human rights. applause.
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and as a powerful and consistent example of diversity. this was a day that underlined that in north america, canada's voice is distinctive and increasingly different to that of america. gavin hewitt, bbc news, ottawa. it's a little known fact that part of canada's declaration of independence was drafted — not in north america — but here in the uk. the venue — highclere castle, where the british tv series downton abbey was filmed. ben moore explains. the libraries of england's grand houses harbour many secrets. but amongst the 8,000 books at highclere, better known to viewers as downton abbey, was a corker. this was the birthplace of a nation. at the bottom of this page are three names, which i didn't really know.
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john macdonald, ge cartier, and galt. so i did a bit of research, and within one second realised what i was about to find. john a macdonald became the first prime minister of canada, and led this delegation hosted by the fourth earl. over the year, they drafted the british north america act. actually, quite a bit of the constitution was written here in this library. perhaps they discussed it around this dining room table, perhaps they stood by the saloon fire on a cold, wintry day. and i feel so lucky. i discovered it all by chance. with the government now modelled on the british parliament, modern canada was born on the onejuly 1867. i certainly was not aware of it, and i don't think enough canadians were aware. the setting is hugely important, but it is also the important role of the people. i look forward to actually having the chance to make sure that it gets better known. diaries, telegrams and letters
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have been uncovered, adding real colour to these negotiations. uk—based canadians invited to the castle were certainly moved. don't stop! why is it so emotional? well, this is coming home. this is... england is home to me, even though we have lived in canada a0 years. it wasn't just the constitution of canada that was drafted in this library. the name of this new territory was decided here, as well, although there were other suggestions. franklin was one, quickly followed by guefeleland, before lord canarvon had his way, and canada was chosen. for his work, the fourth earl had a town named after him in canada but left a n town named after him in canada but left an international legacy for both countries. fellow once again. sunday is shaping
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up fellow once again. sunday is shaping up to bea fellow once again. sunday is shaping up to be a half decent day for many parts of the british isles safe for parts of the british isles safe for parts of the british isles safe for parts of scotland well the impression will be slightly twisted by the fact that will see showers. moderate goldstar wherever you may begin the day, temperatures possibly in single figures in the glens of eastern scotland. once we got rid of the last saturday's rents in the south—east, a lot of england and enjoys a super day. more cloud for northern ireland more at in the way of showers were scotland. a quick look at some of the detail, not unbroken sunshine but much improved for the far west of wales. the far south—west of england intending into saturday we had all the cloud and a bit of rain as well. a dry day in prospect here for the greater part of england and wales. although, as we drift back across the irish sea towards northern ireland, more cloudier, possibly a passing sport of rain. there will be a lot more about the showers and longer spells of rain once we come to the heart of
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central and western scotland. the wind will eventually ease down from a gale force across the northern ireland with the wind and ever present feature for much of scotland for much of the day. come the evening in the first part of the night, some of the showers in the north could turn just a wee bit thundery. through monday we were just drag this weather front down and across the british isles. in fa ct and across the british isles. in fact it will link up as a band of cloud back to something brewing in the atlantic. in its western portion it has something about it to be producing some cloud, rain and drizzle. thankfully in the south—east, wimbledon gets off to a cloudy start but as the day goes on we may find just the chance of a shower as things brighten up later on in the day. for many of you, however, if you do happen to see a shower away from the south—western water weather will more cloud could this rain those showers will be fleeting. some will stay dry right throughout the day on monday. it is to come again, not that this time year. but nothing warranting a
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postcard home. on tuesday we will push this area of cloud right through the heart of the british oui’s. through the heart of the british ours. it does keep moving such that as by wednesday we will build a ridge of high pressure from the atla ntic to ridge of high pressure from the atlantic to try and settle things down in many areas. while that little one is around, it will bring some wet weather to some parts of northern ireland, the borders of scotland, the north of england, the north of wales. to the finals it is a cool fresh look with a scattering of showers and a drain them as far south. . wednesdays and extra sunny speu south. . wednesdays and extra sunny spell with a couple of sharp shower was thrown into the mix. this is bbc news. the headlines: iraqi forces say they've taken control of the so—callled islamic state's main base in the city of mosul. the militants have been driven from a hospital, where senior is leaders were thought to be holding out. a large fireworks display has marked the 20th anniversary of the handover
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of hong kong to china. chinese president xi jinping says he won't tolerate any challenge to its sovereignty. scuffles broke ahead of his speech. a requiem mass and burial has been held in the german city of speyer for the former chancellor, helmut kohl, who died two weeks ago. earlier, world leaders paid tribute at the european parliament. canadians have been marking 150 years since the country was created. the prime minister told crowds that canada's strength lay in diversity. now on bbc news, a special programme: cardiff's growing pains. i was born and bred in this city. the streets where i grew up haven't
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changed much. you can't say that for the beating heart of the capital. now i know not everyone enjoys hearing counter—attacks and many people view me with suspicion. and ina way people view me with suspicion. and inawayi people view me with suspicion. and in a way i can see why, because cardiff has benefited just from being our capital city. fair play to the place, it has taken its chance, reinventing itself against all the odds.
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i used to come here to go to the mosque. it was the docks back then. derelict and pressed. old, heavy industries were shrinking, as was the population of khadi. but then things began to change. just look at cardiff now. the city has completely transformed itself in around 20 yea rs. transformed itself in around 20 years. thejobs are in government, media and leisure and also in shopping. it describes itself as europe's youngest capital and it has even more growing to do. my my dad used to be a bus driver and finished up on this very root, taking tourists around. the city's population is predicted to go up by another 80,000 over the
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population is predicted to go up by another 80 , 000 over the next population is predicted to go up by another 80,000 over the next 20 yea rs, another 80,000 over the next 20 years, and increase of a quarter. i've really enjoyed watching it grow, but i've got my concerns too. tonight i am trying to find out what the future may hold for my city. first up, peter finch, who has been charting the changing city in his books. he remembers the old days well. well, they were dark. the buildings were dark. everything was grubby. street lights were dimmed, pavements were cracked and narrow by comparison to what we've got now and you felt the place was a place of work, a place for people who went to work. dirty work. cardiff wasn't a place you can do because you wanted to come here, you would pass through it. of course i am going to say it it. of course i am going to say it it was wonderful, and it was. but it wasn't the same. this ability to go to so many destinations, to sit in a cafe on the street. now we've got
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cafes on the street everywhere. the place is riddled with eateries from an end to the other, which makes it an end to the other, which makes it a tourist city, a destination, a great place to live. that's why so many houses are now going up all around the city. they can't build them fast enough, as more people are drawn here. people like this couple. nice to meet you! they moved first to cardiff bay from swindon, when she got a job in insurance. my job brought us the cardiff and once we came here we kind of like this place and also he studied in cardiff, so he actually had a natural order it —— orientation towards khadi. he actually had a natural order it -- orientation towards khadi. but you haven't told your wife about your student days! no. we will have to explore that again! they then moved here the north cardiff for a bigger house. now we are thinking to
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start a family, so we thought since we like cardiff we would get settled here and find a bigger house and then we can work on our plans. cardiff is growing. when i was here, all i knew about cardiff was it was all i knew about cardiff was it was a city, like a small town, but now it is growing across and even work wise there are quite a lot of companies in cardiff, compared to ten years back. it is these growth pressures and housing shortages that have meant cardiff councils had to give planning permission for thousands of new homes on green fields north, west and east of the city. there has been a slowing down of housebuilding and it's important that we now inject some pace into bat, support welsh government in delivering more housing. the latest figures suggest there are 115,000
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homes to be built in the next ten yea rs homes to be built in the next ten years in cardiff. cardiff is not alone. big, successful cities everywhere are getting bigger. most economists say i'll future is urban. because when you get enough people and ideas rubbing up against each other, more growth happens. andrew carter heads up one of the uk's most influential think tanks on cities. because of the investment that many of our cities have made in terms of making their places nice places to live and spend time, workers want to live and spend time, workers want to live in those areas as well, so there's a double whammy. firms want to be there because they gain a lot and workers want to be there the firms are there but our cities are increasingly nice places to live. cardiff has done well attracting
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business and people. we've seen tens of thousands of newjobs, but some rival cities have done better, creating more highly paid employment and there are other challenges. on education, to many of its schools are simply underperforming and when it comes to deprivation, nearly one third of households in the city, that's over 41,000 homes are deemed to be living in poverty. so the place has work to do, but it has now caught on to something long pursued by some of its rivals, creating the latest urban design around major transport hubs. large sections of the city centre here in red will be transformed in the coming years by several major office developments, like this one, central
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square. in charge of it is paul mccarthy, one of a new generation of moderate —— modernising property developers. he took me around the new bbc world headquarters. he says it is key to cardiff's regeneration. the key to this location is of course having the train station here, which links cardiff with the world. so for you, for instance, you can have a meeting here in the morning, be on the 11 o'clock train to manchester and be in studio by the afternoon. this hold of element has been a team effort from the office. the combination of the council going out at risk and putting them, like a generator projects like this, funders bringing hundreds of millions of pounds to the area and people like as using our skills to enable the delivery of sometimes public — private sector partnerships and today this worked well. some would say property developers in cardiff haven't always prioritised design quality, but when paul mccarthy saw these images he
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decided foster and partners were the only ones for his bbc headquarters. architecture to get me wrong is very subjective. some people love a certain building and some people hate it. that's the nature of architecture. at this building presents a new phase of the city to the people who arrived here for the first time, orfor the people the people who arrived here for the first time, or for the people who come here every day to work all show up come here every day to work all show up andjust want come here every day to work all show up and just want to be proud of the city. right into this corner where the trees are... cities have become more like businesses and like many in his world paul mccarthy sees them as competing in a beauty contest for international investment. what we need now is people like deutsche bank who are for instance relocating out of london to birmingham, to take cardiff seriously. at the take cardiff seriously. at the take cardiff seriously. at the take cardiff seriously they needed to be on an architectural map, like those cities, and i think this development will begin to do that. the cardiff needs to look good to attract the big names and businesses? well, to
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attract anything we need to look good to start! paul is a cardiff boy, like me, and is passionate about the place. but i've still got worries. if all the new work is in the centre and all the new homes are on the outskirts, how are people going to get between the two? how are 80,000 extra people going to get around this city? and without making pollution worse? with buses and trains packed already, the council admits all this extra growth will only pile more pressure on the roads. this route from the city centre heading north—west is already the most congested in wales. the council says traffic will increase by one third. that means on average journeys will be extended by around seven minutes and on routes like this already congested you can see how busy it is on cathedral road,
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the delays could be even worse. using traffic is getting worse? yes. no doubt. especially during rush—hour, you always expect to be taking this time —— taking time on this road. always bumper—to—bumper. there is concerned there will be more congestion still after new developments like this one. lead developers are building a small town here. over 20 years will see up to 7000 homes, schools and leisure facilities. we will create 350 acres of open space. we will create opportunities for people to live, work and play in their environment. this is a 21st—century garden city that will offer a great lifestyle full of people. they are contributing £28 million for transport here and are in agreement with the council under section 106.
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these images to germany cars. instead people are walking, cycling, on buses and trams. the council wa nts on buses and trams. the council wants developers to emphasise public transport as part of its so—called 50- 50 transport as part of its so—called 50— 50 vision. we went to the council's hq where a new leader has just taken up the reins. we had to get the master plan right and make sure the investment is there and we are delivering that. there is a section of £28 million and we have to look at behaviour change. we have to look at behaviour change. we have to look at delivering a shift in the way people travel around the city. we wa nt way people travel around the city. we want 50% transport by car and 50% by sustainable means, be that walking, cycling and public transport. we need to invest wisely to put those options before people and encourage them and give them the option is to do that. so the council wa nts to option is to do that. so the council wants to reduce carjourneys to half
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the total. iron at meeting a former planner who thinks that is unrealistic. cardiff has got to grow, but it should be growing in a more sustainable place than this, at least initially. this is way out in the countryside, as you can see. public transport is very poor in this area. he studied the plans and thinks the new housing estates here are going to make things worse before they get better. people don't like travelling by bus if they don't have to. people will only use public transport if it is better than the private car, if it is reasonably priced and accessible and not those things apply in this area. nearby areas, between 75% and 85% of people commute by car and i expect the same could happen here, because it's a similar sort of area. that's how people behave and developers have got to provide car parking spaces in their area. so everyone is going to have a car. i reckon about 5000 extra journeys in just this area
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alone. in cardiff youth got this rather pathetic number of sporadic bus lanes, which just increase the congestion. because, you know, they aren't continuous bus lanes and they can't be because of physical obstacles. there is already serious congestion in the area at times. most of these cars have just one passenger. there aren't many cyclists and even fewer pedestrians. some bus lanes have been built, but they disappear at bottlenecks. you can see how much bus lanes are needed whenever you get on a bus.|j get up around 7am, get ready, have a quick breakfast and leave at about 7:50am. i work in town, so i catch a bus from a bus stop near my house to reach the office every day. this woman is one of 35,000 people in east cardiff not served by a railway
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station. so many take to the road with predictable results. sometimes i get with predictable results. sometimes igeta with predictable results. sometimes i get a seat, sometimes i don't. it depends how busy it is. from here to about newport road it will be quite busy at this time of the day. her busy at this time of the day. her bus glides past or the traffic in bus glides past or the traffic in bus lanes, they often peter out when the road narrows. it is almost 9am, i think the road narrows. it is almost 9am, ithinki the road narrows. it is almost 9am, i think i will be late to work today. hopefully not. let's see. she arrives five minutes late. today the number 45 has taken more than one hour to cover for number 45 has taken more than one hour to coverfor miles. number 45 has taken more than one hour to cover for miles. and that's the express. my my father used to work in this bus depot and here i am, waiting to meet the boss. since he wants the council to invest in lot more bus lanes. the city is bustling and you know that the journeys are city is bustling and you know that thejourneys are going city is bustling and you know that the journeys are going to be quicker. i think it is quicker. it
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helps to keep traffic moving. we need bus lanes and we need to change our habit. we need to see buses as a solution, not a problem. she also says she needs 40% more buses to cope. will the council give her the money for this? i would like more buses. i would like more money for this? i would like more buses. iwould like more bus money for this? i would like more buses. i would like more bus lanes. in terms of the money, i will not commit on any individual scheme but there is a desire there and the recognition that we have to invest into alternative transport means unless we will be faced with gridlock. but can you answer me that? how do you get a bus lane through the small roads?|j that? how do you get a bus lane through the small roads? i cannot comment on specific roads or specific examples. as part of the ldp, those rapid transport corridors have been identified and we achieve —— we aim to achieve them. have been identified and we achieve -- we aim to achieve them. council say they will encourage rather than force a switch to public transport. others think the opposite. do you
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think that this will get people out of their cars and onto trains and buses, will work? it will not work under the current plan is which seemed to be that they want to make, the city council wants to make driving such a horrible experience that people will be forced out of their cars and the buses. there is another way the council thinks cardiff can help reach an ambitious transport target. it wants one in five of all to be made by icicle by 2026. really? —— bicycle. iam a cardiff cyclist for the last ten yea rs or cardiff cyclist for the last ten years or so i have cycled regularly from home to work. had my fair share of scrapes along the way. one thing i have learnt in the past decade is that cycling around cardiff is not safe and it is certainly not easy. where the hell are you going?!
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regular cyclists say there are too many incidents like this and the city needs a lot more safe cycle routes to separate them from motorists. i am with cycling campaign drew. cyclist in a stage where they are taking their lives into their own hands, being forced to share space with, you know, two ton metal boxes in an environment that has been designed around motor traffic rather than human traffic you tend to limit the diversity of people riding bikes. the council has been working with danish experts on a plan for been working with danish experts on a planfora been working with danish experts on a plan for a network of cycle lanes and other improvements are similar
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to london's cycling groups welcomed the plan ‘s principles that there's also scepticism. putting it into practice and implementing those changes will be a monumental challenge. far and above anything that happened in cardiff before. i don't think we the council have been brave enough to claim priority from motor traffic. evidence shows it is worth segregating lanes like this all when you eliminate traffic altogether, that you really boost cycling. london spent £17 per head on cycling facilities. what cut cardiff, £3. this is our only segregated by claim. all 80 metres of it. —— bike lane. the council says there will be more safer routes and denies that cycling targets are unachievable. we will be looking at
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what infrastructure interventions we need to make. north—east west and across the city to enable the transit of people on bikes into the city centre and across. so more walking, more cycling, more buses, we hope stop anything else? oh, yes. the underground. it opened in nine months ago. —— two months ago. the underground. it opened in nine months ago. -- two months ago. we are proud to announce that cardiff underground is officially... april fool! got to see you. the man behind the prank and this map agrees cardiff needs a much better transport network. it is a fantasy but if it did exist it would be amazing. cardiff is growing so you will need a massive improvement in infrastructure and public transport.
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what i am worried about suburban development. they are expanding quickly. maybe we just need to suck up quickly. maybe we just need to suck up and swallow, as long as we have a pa rt up and swallow, as long as we have a part of the green belt protected. but i felt sorry for people living in these new neighbourhoods without necessarily getting the infrastructure in the public transport they need to get around cardiff. traffic is so bad on the road already, what will be like when other places are coming in in ten yea rs other places are coming in in ten years time? rail commuters are well aware of the pressure already on the trains. it is predicted there will be an extra 7 million journeys a year into cardiff by 2026. that is an increase of 50%. how will the network cope was to mark well, this could be the answer. the much talked about metro. trains, or trams, could be the answer. the much talked about metro. trains, ortrams, going every 15 minutes, all linked to buses. supporters say it could be a
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game changer, creating morejobs in the valleys and relieving housing pressure on cardiff. new stations like this could help people get across the city, east — west. like this could help people get across the city, east - west. it is happening. it is tied up with a deal, there is money invested in this and we are committed over the next ten years. a fantastic investment, it is a seachange in how people get around notjust cardiff but across wales. and it is making places equitable and making sure that the economic development of cardiff dries the equality into the valleys as well. but will a difference in time for the growth? the first phase should be completed in 60's time. that should help with congestion coming into cardiff from valleys to the north. but that is no use to commuters in the west or east. any metro for them looks years off. they could be in for a tough
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time. there has been a long development process you going back yea rs development process you going back years and years. i am impatient to get that started as soon as possible. i want to bring what i can bring to make that happen. funding public schemes in cities today is largely about council is doing deals and making the most of it. billions of pounds are changing hands in cardiff between landowners and developers. the council is cash strapped but as the planning authority, it does have power. used it well? we are not spending the money on the infrastructure. we're not doing that first and then building the development afterwards. we could have asked the assembly government to put the money up for that first and then built. we could have demanded more from a developer. the developers themselves need to extra ct a the developers themselves need to extract a certain amount of return from their investment and there comes a point where, i suppose, they
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say, well, we could build another 400 houses here we can put money into the highway. and the 400 houses are not the highway. you think the council need more sharks, more deal breakers? it would have been useful if there had been someone in their batting a little bit more on the side of the people who live here. but that is painting and extreme picture. the council has been accused of not being up to the job of negotiating with the private sector to get the best deals. of negotiating with the private sector to get the best dealslj don't accept that. i think it has been a strong partnership in that partnership will deliver for cardiff. others say it is time to give city is much more power to finance their growth. when you look at cities on the continent of europe or in north america, they are much more empowered. they have more responsibilities, more powers, more financial levers to be able to respond to pressure that they have. this is part of the story in the uk.
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we need to move towards a system where cardiff and other cities are more empowered to really make the decisions on investments that will benefit their place and people. ca rd iff's benefit their place and people. cardiff's spectacular growth is a mark of its success. but the next few years could be a bumpy ride for its citizens. this city needs to keep building to provide homes the growing families like this one can afford. but if a place grows too fast without another public transport, commuters but this woman will suffer even more. the challenge is to spread the benefits of growth to everyone, people living in the valleys a nd to everyone, people living in the valleys and ca rd iff's to everyone, people living in the valleys and cardiff's deprived communities. and to ensure its citizens do not suffer the cost of yet more congestion and a reduced quality of life. if cardiff does not get that right, people will quite
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rightly be asking who is all this growth actually for? hello once again. sunday is shaping up to be a half decent day for many parts of the british isles save for parts of scotland where the impression will be slightly twisted by the fact they will see showers. not a cold start wherever you may begin the day, temperatures possibly in single figures in the glens of eastern scotland. once we got rid of the last of saturday's rains in the south—east, a lot of england and wales enjoys a super day. more cloud for northern ireland more in the way of showers for scotland. a quick look at some of the detail, not quite unbroken sunshine but much improved for the far west of wales.
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the far south—west of england and tending into saturday we had all the cloud and a bit of rain as well. a dry day in prospect here for the greater part of england and wales. although, as we drift back across the irish sea towards northern ireland, more cloud here, possibly a passing spot of rain. there will be a lot more about the showers and longer spells of rain once we come to the heart of central and western scotland. the wind will eventually ease down from that gale force across the northern isles with the wind an everpresent feature for much of scotland for much of the day. come the evening and the first part of the night, some of the showers in the north could turn just a wee bit thundery. through monday we just drag this weather front down and across the british isles. in fact it will link up as a band of cloud back to something brewing in the atlantic. in its western portion it has something about it to be producing some cloud, rain and drizzle. thankfully in the south—east, wimbledon gets off to a cloudy start but as the day goes on we may find
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just the chance of a shower as things, perversely, brighten up later on in the day. for many of you, however, if you do happen to see a shower away from the south—western quarter where there will be more cloud, this rain, those showers will be fleeting. some will stay dry right throughout the day on monday. temperatures not bad for the time of year but nothing warranting a postcard home. on tuesday we will push this area of cloud right through the heart of the british isles. it does keep moving such that by wednesday we will build a ridge of high pressure from the atlantic to try and settle things down in many areas. while that little runner is around, it will bring some wet weather to some parts of northern ireland, the borders of scotland, the north of england, the north of wales. to the far north it is a cool fresh look with a scattering of showers. wednesday an mix of sunny spells with a couple of sharp showers thrown into the mix.
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this is bbc news. our top stories: iraqi forces say they have taken control of the main base of the so—called islamic state in mosul. the remaining militants have been driven from here but at what cost? this hospital complex which was a place of healing now lies in ruins it -- place of healing now lies in ruins it —— we win this like many other parts of mosul. the un calls for italy to be given greater supportas it deals with record numbers of migrants crossing the mediterranean. president trump attacks more than 20 states for refusing to pass personal information to his commission on voter fraud. canada marks the 150th anniversary of its confederation. 500,000 people attend celebrations in the capital.
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