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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 2, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and rachel burden. a council and close watch. the government says nothing is off the table when it comes to ensuring that survivors of grenfell tower flag at the right —— —— grenfell towerfire receive the right help. good morning, it's sunday the second ofjuly. also ahead: michael gove suggest that the 1% pay cap may need to be reconsidered. iraqi forces say they've captured so called islamic state's main base in mosul, and a final victory is in sight. in sport, we'll reflect on that incredible lions win in new zealand. and geraint thomas becomes the first welshman in history to claim the yellowjersey as he wins
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the first stage of the tour de france. wimbledon gets under way tomorrow — but who's best placed to win? we'll get some expert insight with a difference. it is eddie's time again to defend the title so i'm going to go for andy. that's very kind. you're not just saying that because we are his grandparents? and louise has the weather. a quiet sunday awaits with decent spells. good morning. first, our main story. "nothing is off the table" according to the government, when it comes to making sure kensington and chelsea council is able to respond properly to the grenfell tower fire. the local authority is set to elect a new leader this week — following three high profile
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resignations over the past few days. simonjones reports. the devastating fire that claimed so many lives has opened up the gulf between residents and the council rep that make elected to represent them. is this the first good decision you have made? the leader is on his way out but labour council benazir, who has just is on his way out but labour council benazir, who hasjust returned is on his way out but labour council benazir, who has just returned to her home in the shadow of grenfell tower says change is needed quickly. now that he has resigned, who is taking responsibility? who will keep oui’ taking responsibility? who will keep our missiles to? yes, he should resign but he needs to take responsibility. people need to be in place to manage what is going on here. as the community mourns the dead, the government says the new leader will be chosen by the council itself. petitioners from —— commissioners from outside will not be sent in. the absolute priority
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remains looking after the victims, theirfamily remains looking after the victims, their family and friends, making sure they get everything they need and in doing so, when it comes to local council, nothing is off the table. the council insist the disaster was so huge any authority would have struggled to cope. but it says it wants to learn lessons. when that new leader has been elected, we have to revise how we have come across a we have to be more proactive. we have to listen more, we have to show the residents that we have to show the residents that we really are on their side. it is a tough task. in a warning from both the government and residence if you must get it right this time. our correspondent, simon jones is outside kensington town hall this morning. simon, how soon is a new leader likely to be in place? we understand there is going to be a meeting in the coming days and there is no doubt that the council is under pressure from both the government and local residents to
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sort this out quickly. the reason the government decided not to sending commissioners is because they have already sent in council officials from other councils across london to help, both the government has set up a task force which is meeting every two or three days. the government thinks it is making progress on this issue. this morning, the local council has said that it morning, the local council has said thatitis morning, the local council has said that it is not going to charge rent to residents of three blocks which are in the shadow of grenfell tower, if those residents decide to return. up if those residents decide to return. up until now they have had no hot water in their houses because the boiler that provided it was destroyed in the grenfell tower fire. that is why they will have this rebate on their rent until next year. we have heard from one group representing the survivors, that they are very angry that one resident at least from grenfell tower has actually been charged rent since the fire. the council has told us since the fire. the council has told us if that happened, it should not have, and they will put it right. i
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think it shows once again the feeling of residents that the council here is not on top of the situation. later on in the programme we will be speaking to one of the former residence of grenfell tower to hear how they have been coping since the tragedy. pressure's growing on theresa may and the chancellor, philip hammond, to lift the 1% cap on pay increases for public sector workers. in a newspaper article today, the environment secretary michael gove suggests ministers should heed the recommendations of the pay review bodies that are currently examining the issue. our political correspondent emma vardy joins us now from westminster. iraqi forces say they have captured so—called islamic state's main base in mosul after days of intense fighting. the militants have been driven from a hospital compound where several senior is leaders were thought to have been hiding. our correspondent orla guerin reports from mosul. a symbol of victory, planted this morning in what was the main
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base of is in mosul. troops, weary after driving the militants from this vast medical complex, but vowing to hunt down every last one of them. "we will keep chasing them and those who support them," says this man, "and we will throw them in the garbage." commanders say they have removed a cancer here, but one that has already spread. "our message is daesh is not only an iraqi problem," says colonel falah al—wabdan. "it's international." explosion. he was interrupted by a booby—trapped bomb. the militants may have gone from here, but they left plenty of threats behind. and plenty of wreckage in iraq's second largest city.
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well, this is what victory looks like in mosul after more than eight months of fighting. the remaining is militants have been driven from here, but at what a cost. this hospital complex, which was a place of healing, now lies in ruins, like many other parts of mosul. the city may be regaining its freedom, but there will be a great deal of rebuilding to do. some of those who fought to reclaim this territory will never go home, the city is not fully liberated yet. commanders admit that even when it is, there is a real risk is could be back. orla guerin, bbc news, mosul. three men have been arrested on suspicion of murder — after a 24—year—old man was stabbed to death. officers were called to reports of men fighting in the street at grays in essex on saturday morning. three other men were taken to hospital with serious injuries. at least 28 people have been injured following a shooting at a nightclub in the us state of arkansas.
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police say two people are in a critical condition after the incident took place around half past two in the morning local time. it is not thought to have been terror—related. one of south america's most notorious drug barons has been arrested in brazil — after evading capture for three decades. luiz carlos da rocha is thought to have run a cocaine production network in the jungles of bolivia, colombia and peru. he had undergone plastic surgery to hide from the police. britain is withdrawing from an agreement which allows foreign countries to fish in its waters. the government says leaving the london fisheries convention will allow the uk to take back control of access to its fishing rights. daniela relph reports. the uk fishing industry is a multimillion pound business. but the government says britain's exit from the european union is a chance to build a new domestic fishing policy.
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the withdrawal from the london fisheries convention will prevent vessels from france, belgium, germany, ireland and the netherlands fishing within six and i2 nautical miles of the uk's coastline. it will not be a quick process. britain's departure from the convention will ta ke departure from the convention will take around it nine years. michael gove said the triggering the withdrawal from the agreement would lead to a more competitive, profitable and to sustainable injury to the whole of the uk. the fisheries convention was signed in 1964. currently allows other countries to catch 10,000 tons of fish from uk waters, worth approximately £17 million. the government believes leaving the convention will allow britain to ta ke convention will allow britain to take back control of its fishing policy. 28 kilograms of strawberries and 10,000 litres of cream. it can only mean one thing. wimbledon starts tomorrow. monday will also be the first day for the duchess of cambridge in her new role as patron of the all england lawn tennis club.
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she's been talking to sue barker about her first memories of wimbledon. my my first chance was queueing up on a people's sunday or monday and being able to enter wimbledon and the part of what is amazing, the atmosphere is incredible. whether you are sitting on the hill or important enough to be on the ground caught it is hugely special and i was quite fortu nate is hugely special and i was quite fortunate that i got through. it was late in the day. but, luckily, play continued quite late. who would've thought that she would queue up with the rest of us. sue barker: 0ur wimbledon is on bbc one, this afternoon it's a pastime of many a friday afternoon — office chair racing. but if you think you've perfected the winning technique, this is the world championships, which have taken place in
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switzerland. here they are, rolling through the streets of 0lten, some doing better than others, and some in fancy dress. crash helmets and knee—pads appear to be essential pieces of kit, as well as your chair. so next time you're a bit bored sat around the office, maybe you could emulate the new world champions ben wissenberger and renato gasati, who won a travel voucher worth 500 swiss francs. they have to go to their destination ona they have to go to their destination on a wheelie chair. that looks like so much fun and! i am surprised at how quick they go. i can't imagine that you would risk life and limb for 500 swiss francs. it is tempting to do that at some point this morning in the studio. she would look at some of the morning's papers? lots of politics. the sunday
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telegraph ten plots exit walkout. this suggests that when it comes to the discussion about the so—called divorce bill on exiting the eu, theresa may use planning to walk out of talks if the eu and the 27 nations demand too much money from her. by the way, can i also show you this fabulous picture? a celebration of the lions win against new zealand. the first time they have defeated the all blacks in over 20 yea rs. defeated the all blacks in over 20 years. it was an incredible game and we will hear more about it later on. the front of the sunday times has a story about austerity but it is down the bottom. the top story is about a rogue sas unit accused of executing civilians. members of the special air service is alleged to have covered up evidence that they killed an armed afghan civilians in cold
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blood and falsified mission reports. they described it as potential warcrimes. drawing attention to another brilliant picture here as well. a british lines celebrating his win. the lead story again concerns the row over public sector pgy- concerns the row over public sector pay. a suggestion in the sunday times this morning that michael gove has said the government may be reconsidering the public sector pay cap. the blame game over last month's general election continues here, tory chaos over tuition fees u—turn. it's as theresa may is ready to consider a dramatic u—turn on tuition fees for university, a key pledge ofjeremy corbyn that he scratch fees. it has been a pretty miserable week weatherwise. lots and lots of rain around. in fact, all kinds of records being broken for
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june after the glorious hot weather that we had before then. how does it look today, will leave? you know what? we were discussing this yesterday. for the first weekend ofjuly, not too bad. i know i have cloud behind me but we were illustrating that this will all break up and we will see a decent day today. this is east sussex, just one hour ago and we have had a little rain, not as much as i would have liked for my garden. it has not brought enough or heavy rain. it will clear away from the south—east. this is what we have at the moment and we have sharp showers in the far north—west. as we go through the day, the cloud across england and wales will fin and break up and be a pleasa nt wales will fin and break up and be a pleasant day out there. if you have outside plants, you will not be too disappointed. there is more of a breeze up into the far north—west and we will see sharp showers. that
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averages are picking in the mid— 70s in the south—east corner. generally speaking a pleasant day. on a light breeze it will be nice and easy. more cloud in northern ireland. the same to northern england, then we get the showers. as much as 10— 20 millimetres on west facing slopes of scotland, but to the far north it will stay breezy. if you are struggling at the moment with hayfever that's because the pollen count across england and wales is pretty high. certainly worth bearing in mind if you are going to be outside. through the evening not much change in the story. we have the rain sinking slowly southwards. the weak weather front will push its way across england and wales. a very wea k way across england and wales. a very weak affair which will produce a few isolated showers. this system might bring heavier rain into tuesday across northern ireland in particular, but for the start of wimbledon it is looking pretty good. the weak weather front might run the
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risk of an isolated shower, but we will be really unlucky if it interru pts will be really unlucky if it interrupts play for the opening day of the wimbledon championships. this is monday in more detail. the weak front continues to sink southwards. more cloud around on monday, but we should, if we get brightness, it up to 23 degrees. fresh into the far north. more from me the morning. could it be good whether to fly an electric plane? apparently that could soon have a dramatic impact on the world. they are less noisy and less polluting and a lot of experts say electric engines are the key to building fleets of flying taxis in the future. we have been given special permission to fly in an experimental electric plane which is being shown in the uk for the first time. it isa it is a claim that will revolutionise flight. not the spitfire, this. the efusion looks
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quite ordinary, until you see it being refuelled. no trucks of kerosene, they just being refuelled. no trucks of kerosene, theyjust change the batteries. it is an experimental aircraft and the bbc has been offered a rare flight. the really obvious thing is how lovely and quiet it is. you don't get all the vibration. right. it's so co mforta ble vibration. right. it's so comfortable and smooth and everything reacts so nicely. is elected the way it is going? will we have elected planes in the future, electric cabs? definitely. we will have electric armour hydroelectric planes, and you can get up to 50 seats. maybe 100 seats. for regional aircraft, transporting people over distances of 500 nautical miles. the
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efusion can fly for about 30 minutes on one charter, something they want to improve. it will top 140 mph and has a range of about 60 miles. i am going to try and experiment and take my headphones. normally you do that in an aircraft and it is so noisy party yourself think. let's see what it is like. kenny heaney 0k? it's actually like being in a car on a motorway! —— can you hear me 0k? a lovely way to see the world! but this isn't just about lovely way to see the world! but this isn'tjust about how lovely way to see the world! but this isn't just about how we lovely way to see the world! but this isn'tjust about how we are going to go on holiday, it is about how we are going to pop to the shops. electric engines are cleaner and quieter, making them perfect for flying taxis. seems far—fetched? look at this! dubai is testing an electric air cab later this year and the giant taxi ride firm uber says
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it wants customers flying around in just six years. it's been seven decades since thejet just six years. it's been seven decades since the jet engine changed the world. electric engines could have a similar impact on our future. the very relieved face of rigid to be back on the ground! —— richard. we'll be back at 6:30. but now let's hear mark kermode's take on this week's new releases on the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? a mixed bag this week. we have a man called 0ve, which is a portrait of a grumpy old man. we have despicable me 3, the minions are back. and risk, a documentary.
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lots to talk about but my most important role this week is to get the pronunciation right of a man called 0ve. it seems to be "0ver". that is the closest. it is adapted from a bestseller and the blurb says, it will make you feel a new sympathy for the curmudgeons in your life. the tag line on the movie poster is, you will love him as much as he hates you. 0ve is widowed, he is embittered. he wants to end his life but it keeps being distracted by his neighbours to keep breaking the housing association rules, of which he is a stickler for keeping to. when a new family moves and he is furious about their presence, their noise, generally them being there. however, a woman sees behind that curudgeonly facade, he starts to break down his resistance and amazingly, she gets him to teach her to drive. here's a clip.
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horn blares a fantastic look of exasperation on his face. he has the most fantastic face. did you ever see the 100—year—old man who climbed out the window and disappeared? no. i know the one you mean, i didn't, sadly but i read about it. i struggled with that film, because it had that scandi humour think that i never really fell in with. with this, it looks like that kind of film but then we start to learn about his life story, young romance, childhood trauma, his relationship with his wife which is idyllic but faces tragedy, and you start to understand how he got to where he is and it is sweet and sentimental.
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there is a lot of absurdist humour. there is an ongoing argument about whether saabs or volvos are the perfect car. how swedish. entire friendships fall out over these arguments but you start to see as a three—dimensional character. he has a strong moral compass and is somebody who has suffered and has been made bitter. inside that is the person he used to be. i went in thinking i would go for it, but i laughed and cried. i like any movie that makes me cry because it means that it's working, you believe in the characters. i really liked it. despite the tag line, you will love him as much as he hates you, which i thought would be a hard watch, it was easy to fall in with. i am looking forward to seeing that. good. alternatively, a third of any film, really, does the world need this? whether we need despicable me 3 is another question.
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here's the thing, i find the minions funny. they are running out of plots and they had to bring a twin brother in to make the plot work, but you see the minions before the titles and one pulls out a fart gun and ijust started laughing. i giggled like an idiot for the rest of the film because i think the minions are funny. the verbal staff is funny and they are perfect slapstick creations, they remind me of what was funny about old silent cinema. there is steve carrell and a story about gru and his brother, a new super villain but for me i just find the minions funny. i laughed all the way through. even though i knew that i shouldn't, i did. you are allowed to do that. i am so fascinated by risk, your third choice.
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this is by laura poitras, who made citizenfour, about edward snowden which was brilliant. it was real edge of your seat stuff. she was in the hotel room when the revelations were made. he came across as self—effacing and shy in that documentary. someone who did not want to be the centre of the story. this is one aboutjulian assange, about whom the adjectives self—effacing and shy are not immediately applicable. the film is very conflicted about its subject. it looks like it began as a film about someone film maker admired, but that changes. the portrait we get is someone who is narcissistic, controlling, self obsessed, and has no self—awareness. here is a clip in whichjulian assange and his associate are trying to ring hillary clinton on the phone. this is an emergency. you are the emergency line and it will take a while? ok.
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do you want to do that now and i will wait. he would like to speak to her about that, yes. 0k, let me start by giving you my phone number. one moment, please. details including an unredacted cable set are about to go on the internet. i do not understand why you do not see the urgency in this. who is he? hello, this isjulian assange. to make it clear, we don't have a problem, you have a problem. that is the tone of the film.
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the story is well now rehearsed, i think people know the basic parameters. what is strange about this film is that it is very fragmented, it is nothing like as good as citizenfour. you can tell that it is a film in which the film—maker's relationship to the subject changed during it. when the film was first seen about a year ago, the film—makers said that julian assange demanded changes and got lawyers involved, which he did not have the right to do. in fact, she has made the film that she wanted to make. there is an irony in someone who is releasing information wanting to control it. we have seen this before in other documentaries and in the much—derided drama, the fifth estate. 0n the one hand you get an inside view, but it is fragmented and frustrating as a piece
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of film making because even when they are talking about the election and things you want the film to be more focused. it feels like it is falling apart in the film maker's hand. julian assange has said that the film will do his reputation no good at all and i think that he is right. which some people may take as a recommendation in itself. it depends where you stand on these things. it is interesting, also that it was made by a woman. what is your best out this week? 0kja. it caused a fuss when it was released at cannes because it was simultaneously released on netfix. it is basically a story about a young girl in korea who has raised a super—pig. she follows it to america to stop it being reclaimed by a corporation that wants to experiment on it and use it forfood. it is a film about where food comes from and how does capitalism hide
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behind a caring face. tilda swinton is a fantastically monstrous creation. the film uses brilliant cgi to bring the giant pig to life. the film is satirical and strange and i liked it. it is ideally seen in the cinema. it is very cinematic. it is thought provoting, it is not vegetarian propaganda but it will give you food for thought. i like that phrase, vegetarian propaganda. i'll do something with that and use it. what about dvds? yeah, heal the living, a film that wasn't widely seen, a small release. it's a story of a heart. the story of a young man he was involved in an accident and his heart may be used for a transplant to save someone else, to heal the living. so on the one hand it's a film about the miracle of medicine, but it's much more than that. it's a film about life
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and death, it is about transcendence, it takes poetic meanders into strange areas. it's really moving and very underplayed and does not feel like it is manipulating your emotions, but i was totally overwhelmed by it. everyone i know who has seen it has loved that. i am genuinely looking forward to that. a good tip this week. mark, as ever, good to see you. see you next week and a quick reminder that you will find more film reviews and news from across the bbc online. you know the address by now. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer as well. that's all for this week. enjoy your cinema going. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. coming up before seven louise will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. "nothing is off the table" according to the government,
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when it comes to making sure kensington and chelsea council is able to respond properly to the grenfell tower fire. the local authority has been criticised for its response to the grenfell tower disaster — with three high profile resignations over the past few days. it's set to appoint a new leader later this week. secretary of state for sajid javid said mps will be keeping a close eye on the council. later we'll be speaking to one of the former residents of grenfell tower to hear how they've been coping since the tragedy — that's at ten past seven. pressure is growing on theresa may and the chancellor, philip hammond, to lift the 1% cap on pay increases for public sector workers. in a newspaper article today, the environment secretary michael gove suggests ministers should heed the recommendations of the pay review bodies that are currently examining the issue. some backbench tory mps have argued austerity lost the party seats at last month's general election. iraqi forces say they have captured
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so—called islamic state's main base in mosul after days of intense fighting. the militants have been driven from a hospital compound where several senior is leaders were thought to have been hiding — but fighting is continuing around part of the old city. three men have been arrested on suspicion of murder — after a 24—year—old man was stabbed to death. officers were called to reports of men fighting in the street at grays in essex on saturday morning. three other men were taken to hospital with serious injuries. at least 28 people have been injured following a shooting at a nightclub in the us state of arkansas. police say two people are in a critical condition after the incident took place around half past two in the morning local time. it is not thought to have been terror—related. one of south america's most notorious drug barons has been arrested in brazil — after evading capture
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for three decades. luiz carlos da rocha is thought to have run a cocaine production network in the jungles of bolivia, colombia and peru. he had undergone plastic surgery to hide from the police. britain is withdrawing from an agreement which allows foreign countries to fish in its waters. the government says leaving the london fisheries convention will allow the uk to take back control of access to its fishing rights. the agreement lets irish, dutch, french, german and belgian vessels fish within six and twelve nautical miles of the uk's coastline. andy murray will start to defend his wimbledon title tomorrow. ahead of his game, the number one seed has spoken about the last minute nerves that still plague him before every match. the closer you get to going out there you are nervous. as you start to walk you start to wonder if you can play tennis, that you are terrible. as soon as you are on the court, it is ok once you are out
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there. can you imagine that walk to get to the court? that noise as well. it must be terrifying. sue barker: 0ur wimbledon is on bbc one, today at 20 past 5 this afternoon. we've already brought you news about the world office—chair racing championships, now it's time to bring you up today with another global event — wife carrying. it was a race to the finish, as the world championships took place in finland yesterday. couples had to overcome a water obstacle course, as well as a challenge on dry land. the length of the race is nearly 300 yards. wives must wear a helmet, and weigh 49 kilogrammes, that's 7.7 stone. and it doesn't have to be your own wife, it could be someone else's. and those pictures at the beginning... is there a rule for
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ducking your partner's head in? her entire head went under. a deep breath before hand, obviously. it is 25 minutes to seven. jess is here with sport. please, save us from the wife carrying. and i have so many questions. we will try and get you some answers. go questions. we will try and get you some answers. go on. so questions. we will try and get you some answers. go on. so it does not have to be your wife? surely that would cause friction between husbands? possibly. yes. iwould like to know if anyone out there has actually competed. please, get in touch with us. i have so many questions. i will look at those a nswe rs questions. i will look at those a nswers for questions. i will look at those answers for you while you tell us the sport. 0h, answers for you while you tell us the sport. oh, my goodness. you do not have to be a rugby fan to appreciate what the lions achieved
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yesterday. no—one expected them to do what they did and that was defeat new zealand. new zealand never lose. they have a home record that stretches back eight years. they have never lost and the lions came out yesterday. they would always need some luck on their side. i'm not saying that that tackle from sonny bill williams was larko but it did tip things in the favour of the lions. it certainly did. it was the first time an all black has been sent off in 50 years. itjust does not happen. england were good on the day. sorry, no, ishould not say england, lions were brilliant on the day. one of their greatest performances, i think. head coach warren gatland says the british & irish lions should expect "a ferocious response" from new zealand, after beating them to level the series 1—all. the deciding test is next saturday and flanker shaun 0'brien could miss out if found guilty of striking an opponent. he has a disciplinary
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hearing this morning, while his team—mates enjoy a few days off. we will see what happens over the next few days, they have a couple of days off after queenstown for a bit of skiing and recreation stuff. that was a joke. laughter make a couple of days off to recover and then start to think about a tough test in auckland. it will be brutal. it is all very well being good and gracious winners. we need to do the same when we are defeated. tonight we we re same when we are defeated. tonight we were defeated by a team played better than we did we to accept that we have to go away now as an all black team, prepare better, work harderand black team, prepare better, work harder and come out to try and win the series next week. geraint thomas has become the first welshman in history, to wear the yellow jersey
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of the tour de france. just to warn you, there is some flash photography coming up. he won this year's first stage in germany, a 14 kilometre time trial through dusseldorf, after completing it in an impressive time ofjust over sixteen minutes. his sky team—mate and defending champion chris froome came through the day unscathed, finishing sixth and well ahead of his main rivals. thomas says he'll be sticking to the plan, to ride to support froome's bid for a fourth tour title — but first he's looking forward to a stint in the yellowjersey himself. amazing. it's the stuff of dreams. the tour is what got me into cycling, as a ten—year—old i used to run home to watch the last ten k. to be on the other side of the camera and take thejersey is incredible, really. it is my eighth tour and to finally win a stage, and then the yellow jersey is a bonus. novak djokovic has completed the ideal warm—up for wimbledon by winning his first title since january.
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he beat gael monfils in straight sets at eastbourne. djokovic doesn't usually do much to acclimatise to grass courts — but accepted a wildcard to play on the south coast after his early exit from the french open. 6—3, 6—4 the score. it's the first time he's played in the week before wimbledon for seven years. the world number three karolina pliskova could be a good bet for the women's title at wimbledon. she had a walkover in her semi—final afterjohanna konta's withdrawal through injury, and beat former world number one caroline wozniacki in straight sets, to win the eastbourne title. a record—breaking innings from england's alex hales helped nottinghamshire win the first trophy of the domestic cricket season. they beat surrey in the one day cup final. notts were chasing 297 to win but hales wasted no time helping his team reach that target. he got his century in just 83 balls and went on to make the highest ever one day score at lord's.
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he finished 187 not out, helping his side win by four wickets. australia's cricketers' association has said this morning that their players will refuse to go on their a team tour of south africa later this week, unless progress is made in talks over a new pay deal. players want to continue to get a percentage of revenue while cricket australia want to fix salaries. in the last hour, manny pacquiao has lost his wbo world welterweight title to australia'sjeff horn. the aussie beat the filipino on a unanimous decision after twelve rounds in brisbane. 38—year—old pacquiao, who has won world titles in eight divisions, had talked about trying to arrange a rematch with floyd mayweather, but may now consider another retirement instead. england won their final
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warm—up match before the women's european championship — captain ellen white scored both their goals as they beat denmark 2—1 in copenhagen. this was her first time as a captain for this side. that means the lionesses head into the euros with four wins from their last six games. i thought it was full of resilience and character. you are dead right. it was a fantastic result. sweden came through a competitive qualifier, and denmark were cheered on bya qualifier, and denmark were cheered on by a full house and a big crowd. for us, it was a resilient and character building wind which is important. the british trials for next month's world championships continue in birmingham today, and selectors already have their first headache after yesterday's action that's after cj ujah withdrew from men's100 metres. in his absence, reece presscod won the final, with james dasaolu second.
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they‘ re both guaranteed a spot in the squad, meaning the final third spot will go to either adam gemilli or ujah. the women's100 metres was more straightforward. asha phillip won herfourth british title with daryll neita coming home second. both of them are into the squad. dina asher—smith, who is returning from injury, finished fourth. the 200 metres will be her main event though in london next month. what a busy weekend. and i want to talk to you about wife carrying a little later on. perhaps when i come back? yes. i have the rules. i have some of your answers here. specific rules such as incurring a 15 second penalty for dropping your wife. more on that later. looking forward to it. for supporters of andy murray, it's always tense watching him play, but his grandparents roy
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and shirley erskine, feel it more than most. they've done a special preview for bbc scotland's timeline programme, which sent them to grill three giants in the world of tennis on their grandson's chances of winning the tournament for a third time. we are the grandparents of andy and jamie and two of their biggest fans. believe me, we are very proud of what they have achieved. this postbox in dunblane marks andy's 0lympic gold—medal win in london and we love seeing it everytime we pass it. but that's enough nostalgia. wimbledon isjust it. but that's enough nostalgia. wimbledon is just around the corner.
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and wejust wimbledon is just around the corner. and we just love it. wimbledon is just around the corner. and wejust love it. so wimbledon is just around the corner. and we just love it. so we are reporting on our grandson's chances. we are speaking to some great tennis legends. it's very rare that i would be nervous before an interview but i'm definitely nervous. who do you think will win at wimbledon this year? men's or ladies? i think we are talking about the men here. isn't that a loaded question? there are isn't that a loaded question? there a re two isn't that a loaded question? there are two people sharp this year, roger federer and a certain person you may now named andy murray. pre- win auburn, when i do a lot of different interviews are normally say different person in each interview and then i will be right somewhere. cover all the bases. interview and then i will be right somewhere. coverallthe bases. i felt like this was right to choose mr murray. i think maybe it is andy's time again so i will go with sandy. that is kind of you. you're
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not saying that because we are grandparents? in part, yes. what an honest man. u 17 grand slams. and he has only 13. no-one has played in a tough year than your handy so, no, i would not say that i am better than him. he also has two olympic gold medals which i don't have. i got a couple of davis cups. he has a davis cup. i think... is couple of davis cups. he has a davis cup. ithink... is there couple of davis cups. he has a davis cup. i think... is there anything you change about him? if i said there was one area that i would change, i would say the one area where i would probably think that the others are better than him on a consistent basis is that type of... that emotional self—control on the court. that would be one area. another area that he could massively improve if backgammon. he was always
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very average of backgammon. i should elaborate and paying his debts backgammon. very... a good payer is a quick pay and he has always been a slow payer of debts. well, it sounds like andy is in pretty good shape. we usually go to wimbledon but, sadly, this year we had to settle for watching it on the telly. let's see if my nerves can ta ke telly. let's see if my nerves can take it. got a feel, —— what a feeling for the grandparents! what will the weather be like? not bad for wimbledon! i think the organisers will be happy. this is the story at the moment. east sussex, cloudy skies. there it is.
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decent spells already. the only place staying miserable if the far north of scotland. a beautiful start in devon this morning. the sunshine will dominate the story through the bulk of the country. not bad sunday in prospect. quite pleasant as well. we have sharp showers in the far north and west and here they might lingerfor much of north and west and here they might linger for much of the day. some of them possibly heavy. maybe the odd rumble of thunder. elsewhere in the sunshine it feels pleasantly warm. high teens, may be low 20s, baby as high as 24. very nice indeed in the south—east. a sunny afternoon for many. if you have outside plant that will keep you happy. more cloud towards the scottish border. a few sharp showers into the far north—west of scotland. top temperatures of14— north—west of scotland. top temperatures of 14— 15 and the winds
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gusting to up to 30 mph. if you suffer from hay fever the gusting to up to 30 mph. if you sufferfrom hay fever the pollen count is pretty high. that's worth bearing in mind. as we go through sunday evening and overnight the weather front is going to continue to trundle steadily southwards. a very wea k to trundle steadily southwards. a very weak affair. cloud and rain pushing into northern england and wales by the day. that could increase the risk of cloud and maybe the chance of a shower towards wimbledon on monday, but this is the only heavy rain that we are likely to see into northern ireland and north—west england. the risk of an isolated shower on monday, but all in all not looking bad. now it's time for click. this is salad, grown the old —fashioned way.
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you know, in shipping containers under led lights without soil in an optimised water and nutrient mix. as farmer spock called it, good old hydroponics. in all seriousness, it's been suggested that the type of intense farming going on here at local roots in los angeles could help solve the world's food problems in years to come. transport costs can be produced by growing plants wherever they are needed, even in areas of famine where the land and climate are too harsh. you get higher volumes and many more crop cycles during the year, too. lettuce can be grown in 30 days instead of up to 90 outdoors, and a new crop can be grown immediately. all in all, one of these containers yields the same as five acres of land over the course of a year.
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it's very similar to the strawberry farm that we saw in paris in the spring and in miyagi injapan in 2015 where the land had been ruined by the tsunami. but this project has much bigger ambitions and this one is also using artificial intelligence to make some quite unusual tweaks. but before we talk about the vegetables of the future, we are off to san francisco where kat hawkins has been looking at the meat of the future. i've come to this lab in the heart of silicon valley to visit impossible foods. they claim to have invented the food of the future, a completely meatless meat made entirely of plants. it's big, its light. it's actually remarkably important to get that state of mind perspective but actually it's also useful for interpreting the colour of meat. this is where the research happens.
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the aim is to reverse engineer the flavour and texture of meat using only plant extracts. and as someone who very much enjoys their meat tasting like meat, i wanted to find out how they're doing it. what is it about the flavour of meat that makes it so damn delicious? why is it so agreeable, what is it that triggers your mind to say "mmm. . . bacon" or . burger"? there is a lot that goes into that and it turns out that flavour is about 75 or 80% aroma and about 20 or 25% taste. impossible foods found that the key ingredient that gives meat its characteristic irony taste is heme, a molecule found in most living things and especially in animal muscle. luckily, it's also found in plants. so this is your magic ingredient, right? this is your plant—based blood? right. and it provides the explosion of flavour you get that makes the difference between white meat chicken with a beefburger. the company has recently flipped
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the switch on its meatless meat—packing factory as it ramps up production. they will eventually make 4 million burgers a month and the next aim is to move into chicken, pork and lamb. but it's one thing being a scientist who's enthralled by food tech and another to be a chef, using the ingredients produced on your carefully crafted menu. i think we eat way too much meat in general. so i think this is a way to be as close as possible to how meat looks and tastes. the impossible burger is now the only one rocco has on his menu and he sells 250 of them a week. it seems like at this stage it might be a novelty for silicon valley diners with money to spend but of course, as always, the true test is in the tasting. ok. it's about to happen. it's really good.
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the texture's just like meat. it doesn't taste like minced beef. it tastes like mushrooms, but i know there's no mushrooms in there. ijust tasted it and it's delicious. but it doesn't taste quite like meat to me. is that something that you noticed? yes, it's a little bit leaner, as a meat. i would say like bison meat. but it looks like it — it's got that kind of umami flavour of the irony part of the blood. close enough. it tasted good as i was eating it but afterwards it left a slightly strange taste in my mouth — very strong, very irony. still, it's healthier than meat and has zero cholesterol so maybe it's worth it. what comes across talking to rocco, though, is how important
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it is for his customers that the flavour is close to meat while still being ethical. but what if you could serve actual animal flesh without a single creature being harmed ? that is what several companies, including this small tech start—up in the heart of silicon valley are working on. they plan to grow actual fish from stem cells. it might sound like an unnerving prospect but they believe is the future. fish consumption is demanding, fish demand is rising but the production cannot go higher. 52% of all fisheries are fully exploited. 25% above that are in collapse, they are overextended. so we only have 23% of the world's fisheries left that we can use to increase production. so if we still want to eat fish at the rate that we're eating it, we have to do this. finless foods takes a small sample of cells from real fish and cultures it up.
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one cell can theoretically become one tonne of fish meat but they're not there yet. we'll be on the market in three years with products that are new versions of fish that people haven't had before and in 5 or 6 years we'll have steaks and filets like the fish that you currently eat at the supermarket, just like what's inside of the fish that you'd normally see in the ocean. and they're not the only company working on what some have dubbed clean meat. just this week hampton creek claimed they will hit the stores with their lab—grown meat by 2018. and around the corner at memphis meats, they have already produced fried chicken and meatballs from stem cells. but at $80,000 for a pound of beef, there's a long way to go. scaling up will mean finding a new medium to help grow the stem cells. currently, the blood of calf foetuses is used, which is extensive and of course, if you don't want to hurt animals, pretty self—defeating. with the population due to increase to 9.7 billion by 2050, many people feel current approaches to food production are unsustainable. cultured meat promises to reduce
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environmental impacts and meat looks set to be the latest thing to be given the silicon valley overhaul. much like we expect from our phones, from our cars, that it will be better, cheaper, faster, safer, year by year, we should expect the same thing from ourfood. but once you start thinking about food, a cow, as a pure piece of technology, and you apply those same technological insights we use elsewhere in our lives, you can start really thinking about what food should be, what food could be. that was kat. i think i'll stick to the salad for the moment. which is lucky, because i'm surrounded by the stuff. the thing that really hits you inside one of these containers is the smell. it's just lovely, all this concentrated fresh lettuce. and you don't even get this, i don't think, in an open—airfield. because it will float away but in here — wow, it's lovely. everything looks lovely and fresh.
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i'm inside what is called a food computer, where every aspect of the plant's growth cycle — the temperature, nutrient mix, humidity and light is monitored and controlled. this kind of computer—controlled hydroponics is allowing food scientists to notjust replicate but improve on mother nature's recipes. so every plant that we grow has a finely tuned growing algorithm to optimise its growth, its yield and its flavour profiles in nutrient characteristics. not only does each variety get its own unique growing conditions but artificial intelligence and computer vision are monitoring the plants, looking out for and treating any problems as soon as they're spotted. local roots hopes to place between 20 and 50 of its so—called ‘terrafarms‘ right next to supermarkets‘ local distribution centres. it means the veg won't have to travel so far and it will be fresher when it hits the shelf.
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i've always needed a dressing on my salad because i thought it tasted quite bland without it but this is really full of flavour. because it is so fresh. i could even eat an entire bowl of this without any dressing. but some researchers don't like the idea of individual companies doing research by themselves. putting life in a box is incredibly complex. it requires biology as much as chemistry, as much as plant physiology and biochemistry. and so right now it's being tackled by a lot of start—ups and it's hard for those start—ups to have such a multidisciplinary approach. this is why all of our work is open sourced — the hardware, software — so we can get people thinking on the issues and we can ask them for advice. at mit's media lab, the open agricultural initiative, or openag, wants to create a worldwide collection of food hackers. one of the things that we've
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invented here we call the personal food computer and it's like a hacker kit for plants. what we've done is distributed all the plants, all the materials, all the tutorials, open source. and it exploded. we now have a community of over 40 countries, over 1000 people. the great thing is that their experiences are being recorded by sensors. artificial intelligence can look for patterns among these data points which are the results of thousands of experiments and the more wide—ranging those experiments, the better. we might learn inside of a food computer what set of climate attributes causes the best expression of protein in a snow pea. now we might say, hey, where in the world are these collections of attributes naturally occurring? and then we should plant that genetics, those snow peas in that place. so not only might food computers improve on nature
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but they could also teach us more about how to get the best out of the earth that we have. and that's it for this short cut of click for this week from my little lettuce farm here in california. the full version is up on iplayer to watch right now and you can find us on twitter at bbc click and on facebook, too. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and ben thompson a council under close watch — the government says "nothing is off the table" when it comes to ensuring survivors of the grenfell tower fire
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get the right help. we have heard this morning about how more help

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