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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 2, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and ben thompson. pressure on the government over public sector pay. amid signs of growing concerns about austerity, the environment secretary michael gove suggests the 1% cap may need to be reconsidered. good morning, it's sunday the 2nd ofjuly. also ahead: a council under close watch — the government says "nothing is off the table" when it comes to ensuring survivors of the grenfell tower fire get the right help. could this be the future of flying? we'll take an exclusive look at an experimental electric plane. in sport... we will reflect on that incredible
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lions victory against new zealand and geraint thomas becomes the first welshman in history to claim the yellow jersey as he welshman in history to claim the yellowjersey as he wins the welshman in history to claim the yellow jersey as he wins the first stage of the tour to france. and wimbledon begins again tomorrow but where is the best place to win? we will get some expert insight. go on, andy. you are notjust will get some expert insight. go on, andy. you are not just saying that because we are andy's grandparents? in part, yes. and louise has the weather. some scattered showers but also sunshine and feeling pleasantly warm. more coming up later. good morning. first, our main story. pressure's growing on theresa may and the chancellor, philip hammond, to lift the 1% cap on pay increases for public sector workers. in a newspaper article today, the environment secretary michael gove suggests ministers should heed the recommendations of the pay review bodies that are currently examining the issue. our political correspondent emma vardyjoins us now from our london newsroom.
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emma, how much flexibility is there on this? because we heard on the campaign trail that this was not up for negotiation. that's right but the mood does seem to be changing towards austerity. there's been increasing pressure on the government since the election last month, and increasing hints that the limits on pay rises for public sector workers like nurses and teachers could be coming to an end. there's been a new signal from michael gove in an interview with the sunday times that the government could be set to ease up on this. there are pay review bodies which are expected to recommend pay rises seen and michael gove has said that ministers need to respect this. of course, because of austerity, because of the end to drive down the deficit, some 5 million public sector workers have had a i% deficit, some 5 million public sector workers have had a 1% limit on pay rises since 2013. so, this
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morning, should they feel more optimistic? well, it's unlikely that that pay cap is set to be scrapped across the board but it is a signal that things may so —— start to change. the mood does seem to be that number ten has told us that actually they are going to look at the recommendations on a case—by—case basis but it's reported that there is a rebellion threatened by backbench mps unless the money is found to scrap this pay cap. 0k, emma, thank you for now. "nothing is off the table" according to the government, when it comes to making sure kensington and chelsea council is able to respond properly to the grenfell tower fire. the local authority is set to elect a new leader this week — following three high profile resignations over the past few days. simonjones reports. the devastating fire that claimed so many lives has opened up a gulf between residents and the council elected to represent them. is this the first good decision you have made? the leader is on his way out but labour council member benazir, who hasjust returned
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to her home in the shadow of grenfell tower, says change is needed quickly. now that he has resigned, who is taking responsibility? who will he palm this off too? yes, he should resign but he needs to take responsibility. people need to be in place to manage what is going on here. as the community mourns the dead, the government says the new leader will be chosen by the council itself. commissioners from outside will not be sent in. it is warning it will intervene if it needs to. the absolute priority remains looking after the victims, their family and friends, making sure they get everything they need and in doing so, when it comes to local council, nothing is off the table. the council insist the disaster was so huge any authority would have struggled to cope. but it says it wants to learn lessons. when that new leader has been elected, we have to revise how we have come across and we have to be more proactive.
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we have to listen more, we have to show the residents that we really are on their side. it is a tough task. and a warning from both the government and residents — you must get it right this time. well, our correspondent is outside kensington and chelsea can hold this morning. what the residents really need now is leadership, so how quickly will this be resolved, do you think? there has been talk among some residents of a power vacuum. there will be a meeting here in the coming days to begin the process of picking a new leader. i think the council will feel pressure from the government and residents to sort this out quickly. the reason the government decided not to sending commissioners from outside is because they have already asked people from other councils to come in and help with the relief effort
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and the government has set up a task force which is meeting every two or three days. we understand from the council this morning that it is saying to residents of three blocks which are in the shadow of grenfell tower that if they return, they will not need to pay rent before the start of next year at the earliest. that is because those who have gone back have discovered they've got no hot water because the boiler serving those blocks was destroyed in the fire. we also heard from one campaign group that a resident who lived in the tower themselves found that they had been charged rent after the fire took place. the council said if that happened, it shouldn't have and they will rectify the situation. to complicate matters even further, one residence group have said they may consider boycotting the public enquiry because they do not believe the scope of it is wide enough. thank you, simon. we willspeak scope of it is wide enough. thank you, simon. we will speak to the leader of the opposition on
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kensington and chelsea council on this very shortly. iraqi forces say they have captured so—called islamic state's main base in mosul after days of intense fighting. the militants have been driven from a hospital compound where several senior i—s leaders were thought to have been hiding — but fighting is continuing around part of the old city. three men have been arrested on suspicion of murder — after a 24—year—old man was stabbed to death. officers were called to reports of men fighting in the street at grays in essex on saturday morning. three other men were taken to hospital with serious injuries. britain is withdrawing from an agreement which allows foreign countries to fish in its waters. the government says leaving the london fisheries convention will allow the uk to take back control of access to its fishing rights. daniela relph reports. the uk fishing industry is a multimillion pound business. but the government says britain's exit from the european union is a chance to build a new domestic fishing policy. the withdrawal from the london fisheries convention will prevent vessels from france, belgium, germany, ireland and the netherlands
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fishing within six and 12 nautical miles of the uk's coastline. it will not be a quick process. britain's departure from the convention will take around two years. the environment secretary michael gove said that triggering the withdrawal from the agreement would lead to a more competitive, profitable and sustainable industry for the whole of the uk. the london fisheries convention was signed in 1964. it currently allows other countries to catch 10,000 tons of fish from uk waters, worth approximately £17 million. the government believes leaving the convention will allow britain to take back control of its fishing policy. at least 28 people have been injured following a shooting at a nightclub in the us state of arkansas. police say two people are in a critical condition after the incident took place around 2.30 in the morning local time.
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it is not thought to have been terror—related. 28 kilograms of strawberries and 10,000 litres of cream. it can only mean one thing. wimbledon starts tomorrow. the duchess of cambridge will also start her new role as patron of the all england lawn tennis club tomorrow. she's been talking to sue barker about her first memories of wimbledon. my first chance was queueing up on a people's sunday or monday and being able to go into wimbledon and be part of what is amazing, the atmosphere is incredible. whether you are sitting on the hill or fortunate enough to be on the ground courts, it is hugely special and i was quite fortunate that i got through. it was late in the day. but, luckily, play continued quite late. sue barker: 0ur wimbledon is on bbc one, this afternoon at 5.20pm. it is one of those places that i
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have been lucky enough for work reasons to be out for several years and that first day, when you walk into the wimbledon complex, it is just about the most beautiful place i've ever seen. the flowers and the perfection of the court complex there is unbelievable. it is exactly 8:10am. you are watching bbc breakfast. three high profile resignations, calls for government intervention and hundreds still homeless. all against the backdrop of the charred remains of g re nfell tower. with former residents becoming increasingly frustrated, the council is under pressure to relinquish its control. leader of the opposition in kensington and chelsea robert atkinson joins us now. thank you very much for your time. i appreciate it's a very busy time for you and your colleagues at the moment. what is going to happen with the leadership of this council? can it carry on? i'm not convinced that
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it carry on? i'm not convinced that it can. i've said we will give them this weekend because otherwise we support the imposition of commissioners. they have had two weeks to get a grip of the situation and as your package said earlier on, i still have residents who are not housed, residents would no hot water and residents living in hotels which they are now sharing with wimbledon spectators. that is not a satisfactory situation. at the moment, the council itself has a significant conservative majority. what is going on behind the scenes? iama what is going on behind the scenes? i am a labour councillors so i would be the last person they would consult, although they should do because we are the councillors for north kensington. as i say, ijust say they have got enough amongst them to get a grip of the situation by tomorrow, because this is not just a constitutional thing. we need people who are in control and can give direction to council officers because some of the council officers have been giving —— doing an
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excellent job but on have been giving —— doing an excellentjob but on the housing side of it, there is still complete chaos. you were the first to call for resignations on the council but one question that springs to mind is whether those resignations help the residents? the residents, we have spoken to one this morning who lived on the 15th floor, he is now living on the 15th floor, he is now living on the 15th floor, he is now living on the —— in a hotel and on the 15th floor, he is now living on the —— in a hoteland has on the 15th floor, he is now living on the —— in a hotel and has been offered very little help. residents don't —— resignations don't help i understand that the chief housing officer has resigned but he is still being paid and not doing anything. he is not working for the benefit of residence. i am he is not working for the benefit of residence. iam not he is not working for the benefit of residence. i am not calling for the wholescale removal of people. i am asking for good management. people cannot do a good job without good management. 0ther cannot do a good job without good management. other local authorities have done a greatjob, taking care
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of children, getting them back to school, but the housing aspect of it, andi school, but the housing aspect of it, and i am not underestimating that there is an enormous crisis in emergency housing across all of london. it stretches all across london, to camden and other local authorities as well. that's why i think the government needs to give the mayor of london some authority here. we want our residents back in place as close developer community as possible as soon as possible. you stay as close as possible but for some of those who have been through this, it must be deeply traumatic for them to be in the shadow of g re nfell tower. for them to be in the shadow of grenfell tower. absolutely. this has been going on behind the scenes and i think every family needs to be allocated social worker of their reign to find out what each individualfamily reign to find out what each individual family wants. some family wa nts to individual family wants. some family wants to back to normal whilst some
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wa nt to wants to back to normal whilst some want to move away. our guest this morning said that he had no such person for help. that is why i am pushing for the imposition of commissioners. everybody else has got their act together. the response from the community, charities, other local authorities has been brilliant. 0n the housing issue, which is at the core of it, the council has made a terrible job of it. is the problem that the government is promising one thing and the council is simply unable to deliver that? whether that is the three—week promise, the person to coordinate, not only with the housing but with the psychological and social issues as well. those things will go on for years and yea rs. things will go on for years and years. why is the government raising expectations? you should perhaps ask the government about that. the government said that they would have eve ryo ne government said that they would have everyone within the area for three weeks but i'm afraid that they did
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not discuss that with the local authority. we are two weeks into the three weeks and i do not see that is happening. apart from the blame game of who is at fault for so many elements of this, what would you like to see happen? what is the answer? i would like to see the imposition of commissioners who will work with the mayor to work on the housing crisis. we can have elections in six months‘ time and go back to democratic control at that point. in the meantime, i want my residents to have decent housing, out of those hotels, with hot water, andi out of those hotels, with hot water, and i want them to be listened to. there has also been a lot of discussions about how many people died in this incident. 0fficial figures at the moment say it is 80 but we know a lot of people locally believe it to be much higher, including residents. believe it to be much higher, including residentslj believe it to be much higher, including residents. i don't know the numbers either. i do know that the numbers either. i do know that the reluctance to face up to these numbers and to issue information has
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been the root cause... it‘s not surprising that residents don‘t trust comment or the local authority when they can‘t have a more accurate number. that has been left up to unofficial bodies who are collating the electoral register, the number of children missing from schools. it should be possible to be done and it should be possible to be done and it should have been done by the local authority. clearly lots more still to discuss, lots more still to play out, but for now, it‘s good to speak to you, councillor robert atkinson, leader of the opposition at chelsea on kensington council. we will take a look at the weather 110w. we will take a look at the weather now. how is it looking, louise? lovely, actually. cry at whether which extends to the opening of wimbledon. —— quiet weather which extends to the opening of wimbledon, thatis extends to the opening of wimbledon, that is the possibility of the odd showerfor that is the possibility of the odd shower for the that is the possibility of the odd showerfor the opening that is the possibility of the odd shower for the opening day on monday. a heads up that if you are heading there on wednesday, 23
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degrees is perhaps conservative. it could be 25 or 26 degrees, getting towards the high 70s. for the time being, we have got showers around in the north—west the highlands and the north—west of scotland looking like they will see the worst of the weather today. some breaks in the cloud, sundays and sunny spells coming through. we have seen some sunny skies with the odd spits and spots of rain in the south—east, but many of us are getting out and about two scenes like this this morning. a glorious day across much of england and wales. the story into the afternoon and evening is a little bit of cloud but very pleasant. the wins will remain strong. gusting 20 to 30 mph across west facing coasts. here we could see 20 to 30 millimetres of rain but i suspect almost this afternoon it will look like this and feel very pleasant. 1920 degrees at four o‘clock this afternoon, the cloud will not be too much of a nuisance and it will be a
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very pleasant day for many. a little bit of cloud into northern ireland and southern scotland, but richards day dried. any showers will be fairly —— it should stay dry. any showers will be fairly isolated. this is a weather front which is going to sink south—east but ahead of it, pollen is high or very high across the north—east of england. but as this front thinks down, it should improve that situation. this little fella here could cause a fly in the augment the start of wimbledon. hopefully it will be a very wea k wimbledon. hopefully it will be a very weak affair and it won‘t cause too much of an issue. more significant rain on tuesday from this area of low pressure but only likely to affect northern ireland and north—west england. so some drizzle pushing across, behind it is much brighter and 23 the high. thank you, louise. electric airplanes could soon
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have a dramatic impact on the world. they‘re less noisy and less polluting than the ones flying around today, and plenty of experts believe electric engines are the key to building fleets of flying taxis in the future. the bbc‘s been given special permission to fly in an experimental electric plane, which is being shown in the uk for the first time. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, went for a ride. it‘s a plane that will revolutionise flight. not the spitfire, this. the efusion looks quite ordinary, until you see it being refuelled. no tanker trucks and kerosene, you just change the batteries. it‘s an experimental aircraft and the bbc has been offered a rare flight. the really obvious thing is how lovely and quiet it is. yeah. and you don‘t get all the vibration. right. it‘s so comfortable and smooth
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and everything reacts so nicely. is electric the way it‘s going? will we have electric planes in the future, electric cabs? definitely. we will have electric planes, hybridelectric planes of all different sizes. you can get up to 50 seats. maybe 100 seats. for regional aircraft, transporting people over distances of 500 nautical miles. the efusion can fly for about 30 minutes on one charge, something they want to improve. it‘ll top 140 mph and has a range of around 60 miles. i am going to try and experiment now. i‘m take my headphones off. normally, if you do that in an aircraft, it‘s so noisy you can‘t hear yourself think. let‘s see what it‘s like when i talk into the microphone. ah, can you hear me 0k? it‘s actually like being in a car on a motorway! it‘s a lovely way to see the world! turning left...
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but this isn‘t just about how we‘re going to go on holiday, it‘s about how we are going to pop to the shops. electric engines are cleaner and quieter, making them perfect for flying taxis. seems far—fetched? look at this! dubai is testing an electric air cab later this year and the giant taxi ride firm uber says it wants customers flying around injust six years. it‘s been seven decades since the jet engine changed the world. electric engines could have a similar impact on our future. anyone who lives under a flight path i think would warmly welcome electric planes. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers.
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edwina currie is here to tell us what‘s caught her eye. we‘ll speak to edwina in a minute. first let‘s look at the front pages. the front page of the sunday express , the front page of the sunday express, here it is. no foreign fishing in our waters. something we alluded to in ourfirst fishing in our waters. something we alluded to in our first chat with edwina earlier run, but they are saying that british fishermen will have exclusive rights to the coastline around britain after we ta ke coastline around britain after we take back control,‘ is, of our fishing. take back control,‘ is, of ourfishing. and an article saying that the 1% pay cap could be scrapped, with theresa may under pressure from top tories. cash for schools and what they say a national debate on
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student debt. the sunday telegraph claims to have details of some of number ten‘s negotiating strategy when it comes to the brexit talks, suggesting theresa may may well walk out of brexit talks in september if they come unstuck over the very sticky issue of the uk divorce deal, whatever the uk might have to pay in the process of exiting the eu. city bosses have been told to prepare for theresa may walking away. and a heartbreaking image on the front of the sunday mirror. you can see young bradley being cuddled by jermain defoe and the picture really says all you need to know. cradling their six—year—old boy who it says touched the nation‘s art, being surrounded by friends and family in what they think will be his final
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hours. welcome back, edwina, and we start with the daily telegraph and the funeral of her mccole. did you know and admire him? i admired him enormously and he is being given tributes he should have. he helped to unite and unify germany. when the berlin wall came down, his reaction immediately was, we are one country. we must come back together again. he was was rather sad that margaret thatcher was hostile to him. he said, iam a thatcher was hostile to him. he said, i am a free market person. he worked with her on a whole host of issues to make the eu work better. why didn‘t she wanted him? because she was german —— because he was german. simple as that. his plan was that germany should be embedded in europe so that never again would you have a german europe. he would or would have germany as a democratic country, very much at the heart of
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europe with european values and that actually has happened. again, angela merkel was an eastern european, so she gained herfreedom merkel was an eastern european, so she gained her freedom when that wall came down and the country was united. she, like many people, oh him a lot and he was eventually taken down the rhine on a barge with the german flag on and a lot of people i do think the same thing. so, a good man. thank you, chancellor kohl. now, the sunday mirror, you might be forgiven for letting a performer have a drink before he goes on stage.|j letting a performer have a drink before he goes on stage. i love this. this is about paul mccartney. he is 75 and he is still touring but he now says he can‘t have a drink before he goes on stage or he forget the words. i love this picture they have pulled out here from his beatles days as well, particularly unflattering picture of him having a
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pint, but he said he now saves the wine until he has come offstage. he isa wine until he has come offstage. he is a seriously good guy. we all went to the same school, guys on one side, girls on the other side, and he had totally rescued the place. he turned it into the liverpool fame academy. i want to say something controversial. he is 75 and still going out touring. i wonder if the dell 50 years from now will still be touring? i hope so. she has particular vocal challenges though, i think. but maybe she should talk to him about it? now, love island, we didn‘t think we would be taken here by you this morning, edwina? yes, this article saying that this is pawn tv and only working—class
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people do this. actually, i have asked several purse —— several people who love it, love love island, and they say it is an antidote to all the grim stuff going on out there and i have a lot of sympathy for that. i am reminded of course that it is nowjuly. we are into the season of recruiting people. the come dancing, which i was on. i am looking at brown and i‘m looking at rachel and i‘m saying, who knows? the same might be ringing. our phones are not ringing. but if they do, i would say, do it. these celebrity programmes are lovely. two of 3 million people watch love island. more still, 11 or 12,000 do enjoy watching sticky. which was better, thejungle or so strictly? the jungle was easier. it
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was much shorter. now, bigger brain splitting woman in front in the iq sta kes — — splitting woman in front in the iq stakes —— putting women in front in the iq stakes. yes, women have brea ks the iq stakes. yes, women have breaks of a litre whilst men‘s are bigger. and that is what they are saying. this kind of study, you have to wonder what the purpose of it is. people‘s brains work in different ways and if you set an iq test, you have to set it in a better way to generate a certain level of answers ina certain generate a certain level of answers in a certain pattern of working. as we we re in a certain pattern of working. as we were saying earlier, if you want to have the babies, kiddo, go ahead. with pleasure. let mejust to have the babies, kiddo, go ahead. with pleasure. let me just explain this. this was a story a little
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earlier. this was about womb transplants. yes, the possibility of wind transplants. maybe that is where... but wind transplants. maybe that is where. .. but the wind transplants. maybe that is where... but the whole iq testing system was effectively set up by men anyway, wasn‘t it costa iq tests are treated with the greatest care because they are highly culturally significant. if you set them up in one way, a group will come out with a different school. it‘s to do with the knowledge and skills you have. what most women will tell you is that we can multitask, we can do lots of things at once, and men find it much easier to do a single thing and that‘s often why men are very successful at doing a single job whilst women have to do half a dozen things at once. see, i disagree with that, they are now telling me time is up but i am also listening to you. that‘s a good piece of multitasking. coming up in the half an it was the series finale
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of dr who last night, and apart from a christmas special, it‘s goodbye to peter capaldi. we‘ll be discussing all the front runners to take over from him before the end of the show. stay with us — headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and rachel burden. coming up before nine, louise will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning‘s main news. pressure is growing on theresa may and the chancellor, philip hammond, to lift the 1% cap on pay increases for public sector workers. in a newspaper article today, the environment secretary, michael gove, suggests ministers should heed the recommendations of the pay review bodies that are currently examining the issue. some backbench tory mps have argued austerity lost the party seats at last month‘s general election. "nothing is off the table" according to the government, when it comes to making sure kensington and chelsea council is able to respond properly to the grenfell tower fire. the local authority has been criticised for its response to the grenfell tower disaster — with three high profile resignations over the past few days.
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it‘s set to appoint a new leader later this week. secretary of state for communities and local government sajid javid said mps will be keeping a close eye on the council. speaking earlier the leader of the 0pposition speaking earlier the leader of the opposition in kensington and chelsea said he would like to see external commissioners brought in. said he would like to see external commissioners brought inlj said he would like to see external commissioners brought in. i would like there to be the imposition of commissioners, who will co—operate with the mayor to work on the housing crisis, now we will have elections in six months‘ time, we can go back to democratic control at that point, but for the time b i wa nt that point, but for the time b i want my resident to have decent housing, i want them to be moved out of the hotels i want them to have hot water and i want them to be listened to. iraqi forces say they have captured so—called islamic state‘s main base in mosul after days of intense fighting. the militants have been driven from a hospital compound where several senior i—s leaders were thought to have been hiding — but fighting is continuing around part of the old city.
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where several senior is leaders were thought to have been hiding — but fighting is continuing around part of the old city. three men have been arrested on suspicion of murder — after a 24—year—old man was stabbed to death. officers were called to reports of men fighting in the street at grays in essex on saturday morning. three other men were taken to hospital with serious injuries. at least 28 people have been injured following a shooting at a nightclub in the us state of arkansas. police say two people are in a critical condition after the incident took place around 2.30 in the morning local time. it is not thought to have been terror—related. britain is withdrawing from an agreement which allows foreign countries to fish in its waters. the government says leaving the london fisheries convention will allow the uk to take back control of access to its fishing rights. the agreement lets irish, dutch, french, german and belgian vessels fish within six and 12 nautical miles of the uk‘s coastline. it‘s a pastime of many a friday afternoon — office chair racing.
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but if you think you‘ve perfected the winning technique, this is the world championships, which have taken place in switzerland. here they are, rolling through the streets of 0lten, some doing better than others, and some in fancy dress. crash helmets and knee—pads appear to be essential pieces of kit, as well as your chair. so next time you‘re a bit bored sat around the office, maybe you could emulate the new world champions ben wissenberger and renato gasati, who won a travel voucher worth 500 swiss francs. fast and furious as was the i can lions game. there were times where i was tearing my hair out but by the
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end we had smile op ourfaces. they look worn out. it was so thrilling an before the match, so many people had written them off because new zealand they don‘t lose, but they have now, and the lions, fantastic what a thrilling, thrilling victory. and their coached says that the lions should expect a ferocious response from the all blacks. the deciding test is next saturday and flanker shaun 0‘brien could miss out if found guilty of striking an opponent. he has a disciplinary hearing in the next hour, while his team—mates enjoy a few days off. we will see what happens over the next few days, they have a couple of days off after queenstown for a bit of skiing and recreation stuff. that was a joke. laughter. a couple of days off to recover and then start to think about
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a tough test in auckland. it will be brutal. it is all very well being good and gracious winners. we need to do the same when we are defeated. tonight we were defeated by a team played better than we did we to accept that we have to go away now we have to accept that. we have to go away now as an all black team, prepare better, work harder and come out to try and win the series next week. geraint thomas will wear the yellow jersey as the second stage of the tour de france gets under way later. no welshman has had that honour before. just to warn you, there is some flash photography coming up. he won this year‘s first stage in germany, a 1k kilometre time trial through dusseldorf in a time ofjust over 16 minutes. his sky team mate and defending champion chris froome came through the day unscathed, finishing sixth and well ahead of his main rivals. thomas says he‘ll support froome‘s bid for a fourth tour title — but is looking forward to a stint in the yellowjersey himself. amazing.
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it‘s the stuff of dreams. the tour is what got me into cycling. i remember as a ten—year—old i used to run home to watch the last ten k. to be on the other side of the camera and take thejersey is incredible, really. it is my eighth tour and to finally win a stage, and then the yellow jersey is a bonus. novak djokovic has had the ideal warm—up for wimbledon by winning his first title since january. he beat gael monfils in straight sets at eastbourne. djokovic doesn‘t usually do much to acclimatise to grass courts, but accepted a wild card to play on the south coast after his early exit from the french open. 6—3, 6—4 the score. it‘s the first time he‘s played in the week before wimbledon for seven years. the world number three karolina pliskova could be a good
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bet for the women‘s title at wimbledon — she had a walkover in her semifinal afterjohanna konta‘s withdrawal through injury, and beat former world number one caroline wozniacki in straight sets, to win the eastbourne title. manny pacquiao has lost his wbo world welterweight title to australia‘sjeff horn this morning. the aussie beat the filipino on a unanimous decision after 12 rounds in brisbane. 38—year—old pacquiao, who has won world titles in eight divisions, had talked about trying to arrange a rematch with floyd mayweather, but may now consider another retirement instead. 0n the undercard, belfast‘s michael conlan won his third pro fight. a record—breaking innings from england‘s alex hales helped nottinghamshire win the first trophy of the domestic cricket season. they beat surrey in the one day cup final. notts were chasing 297 to win but hales wasted no time helping his team reach that target. he got his century in just 83 balls
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and went on to make the highest ever one day score at lord‘s. he finished 187 not out, helping his side win by four wickets. australia‘s cricketers‘ association has said this morning that their players will refuse to go on their a team tour of south africa later this week, unless progress is made in talks over a new pay deal. players want to continue to get a percentage of revenue while cricket australia want to fix salaries. australia‘s women are under contract to the end of the world cup. all eight teams are in action in the third round of group games today. england are up against sri lanka at taunton and pace bowler anya shrubsole is looking forward to playing on her home ground. i think it‘s always nice to play at home, because you get a bit of, kind of familiarity of the surroundings. it‘s a bit different,
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a world cup, from a normal tour, kind of as you‘d expect. there‘s a lot more people around, a lot more going on and things like that, so it‘s a little bit different from a kind of regulation home tour, but i think the opportunity to play a world cup in your home country gives people‘s families a real good chance to come and watch and things like that. so it‘s a really nice experience. england won their final warm—up match before the women‘s european championship. ellen white showed no sign of nerves, captaining her country for the first time, and scoring both of england‘s goals as they beat denmark 2—1 in copenhagen. that means the lionesses head into the euros with four wins from their last six games. i thought it was full of resilience and character, and you‘re dead right, it was a fantastic result for this england team, let‘s not that sweden came here in a competitive in a competitive qualifier and lost 2—0. we had a denmark team cheered on by a full house and a big crowd, and looking to put a good performance in, going to the european championships. so for us, a resilient character building win, which is going to be important come tournament time, so a really good exercise.
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the british trials for next months world championships continue in birmingham today, and selectors already have their first headache after yesterday‘s action that‘s after cj ujah withdrew from men‘s 100 metres. in his absence, reece presscod won the final, with james dasaolu second. they‘re both guaranteed a spot in the squad, meaning the final third spot will go to either adam gemilli or ujah. the women‘s 100 metres was more straightforward. asha phillip won herfourth british title, with daryll neeta coming home second. both of them are into the squad. dina asher—smith, who is returning from injury, finished fourth. the 200 metres will be her main event though in london next month. with katerina johnson thompson away focusing on heptathlon training, morgan lake took advantage to win the highjump, with a personal best of1 metre 96.
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i don‘t know what you are up to a week today but cancel everything because the british and irish lions will be in action in the final test, it proves it is going to be brilliant. it will be so much... we will talk about that now you might wa nt to will talk about that now you might want to stick owned. as you heard during jess‘ sports news, there‘s going to be an almighty battle between the british and irish lions and the all blacks when they meet for their decisive match next saturday. the big question is could the lions win a test series against new zealand for the first time since 1971? joining us now from our london newsroom is former british and irish lions hooker, brian moore. brian, good morning, great to talk to you this morning. first of all give us your impression of the game yesterday. well, it was, you have to put it in context, because the lions we re put it in context, because the lions were coming off the back of a co mforta ble were coming off the back of a comfortable loss, where they were
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outscoring tries and outthought and outfought, and they came back, certainly to match the all blacks, physically, and there was a tenacious display where they scored two tries to nil, so that is the context of it. in that context, irrespective of the fact that the all blacks were down to 1a men for approximately 60 minutes that is a good win. i was tearing my hair out, because the lions had this one man advantage yet they were spilling penalties all over the place. it was luck that barrett wasn‘t totally on form kicking for new zealand, so you have to have a little bit of luck, don‘t you. have to have a little bit of luck, don't you. yes, you do. they rode that, barrett quite uncharacteristically shots that were kickable and in normal circumstances he would have put those over, but thatis he would have put those over, but that is not anything that the lions can do about, they have to play what
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is in front of them, and eventually, they did mind, they did find enough discipline to stop giving the penalties away, but that is something which i think sam warburton, when he was interviewed afterwards, highlighted strongly, i think he did twice and he knows and we all know that in the third test they cannot afford to give so many penalties away. in fact we saw the celebrations there at full—time, sam warburton said immediately the job is not done, it is all about the third test. how critical do you think he was, bringing him back as captain, playing the full 80 minutes to the success of that team yesterday? it was his best game on tour, and he led by example with a back row, and the pack, and the close guards, body guards in defence we re close guards, body guards in defence were really good, at stopping new zealand getting momentum, which is what they did in the first test and how they undid the lions so critically, and it is a much
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different game when you are stopped on the gain line and you have to play with the ball going backwards, especially within you are down one man, the new zealanders like any other team struggled do that. everyone will have heard this, but 24 years, since the lions last beat new zealand, you were involved in that tour, 1993. 46, the number of games new zealand have gone unbeaten on home soil, until the lions beat them. it gives you an idea of the kind of scale of this victory yesterday. the question is how can they capitalise on that now, do they have a chance? we know that new zealand will produce an immense display next weekend? they will, but one constituency, which will have caused them immense satisfaction was the fact that the all blacks got into the lions 22. only three time, they only came with three point, thatis they only came with three point, that is very very urn usual. if they
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can keep that statistic, they won‘t keep it that loy, if they can minimise the number of incursions that the all—plaques can make into their 22, that will cut down the number of points they can make. the lions know that so far, they have outscored the kiwis in terms of tries and in terms of chances, so while it is not an easy thing to do, the easy options, or the easy achievement, targets are there, because all they have to do is make the same number of chances they have made in both test matches and put them away and cut the penalties out. they have every chance to carry off what would be a monumental victory, it would be, because new zealand have lost 600 caps since the world cup but they have come out and they area cup but they have come out and they are a better team, they have what sirgraham are a better team, they have what sir graham henry called the best lock pairing and they have stars all over the place, and as you say, they
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haven‘t lost for so long, it would bea haven‘t lost for so long, it would be a fantastic achievement, they are perfectly capable of doing that. capable of doing it. we have to hope they can. i know you are a proud former lions watching yesterday, thank you for your time. great the talk to you. this is where we say goodbye to ben who‘s going to read the news for andrew marr, i‘ll be here through to 9. goodbye from me, and here‘s louise with a look at this morning‘s weather. it is not bad. i have found a shower cloud picture and that is where the worst of weather is likely to be in north—west scotland, i have found some beautiful weather watcher‘s picture, look at north yorkshire an hour ago there is a good slice of sunshine now starting to develop. even this this cloud in the south—east will fin and break and it is san improving picture, the only exception to that rule is the extreme north of scotland, gusty winds, sharp showers likely to continue through much of the day but elsewhere we keep the sunshine. it
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will feel pleasant, perfect temperatures for most of u 19—24 degrees and the cloud willjust tend to come and go from time to time but not spoil the story at all northern england, northern ireland, here we could see more in the way of cloud, but it should stay dry, the showers just confining themselves into the far north of scotland, but eventually we will see showers into the borders and they will gradually difficult southwards overnight. this isa difficult southwards overnight. this is a weather front. it is weakening affair as it pushes south and‘s. ahead it stays quiet, and for the start of the new working week it looks as though that front will continue to push its way south—east, but weaken off all the time. the more significant rain is likely on tuesday, if you are heading off for wimbledon, it looks likely there might be the odd spot of light rain round on monday, hopefully not spoiling proceedings too much. things could be into the mid 20s through the middle of the week, so that weather front sinks south this
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is the question mark for wimbledon, how much rain is still going to be left there, it will warm with it, a lot of cloud but hopefully easing away and it won‘t spoil the opening day of the 2017 championship, i will be on andrew march in half an hour. —— mar. as you heard earlier, the top tennis players from around the world are getting ready for wimbledon, which starts tomorrow. 0ne couple who will be sitting on the edge of their seats while they watch is andy and jamie murray‘s grandparents. roy and shirley erskine have done a special preview for bbc scotland‘s timeline programme, which sent them to grill three giants in the world of tennis about their grandson‘s chances. we are andy and jamie‘s grandparents and two of their biggest fans. believe me, we are very proud of what they have achieved. this postbox in dunblane marks andy‘s 0lympic gold—medal win
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in london and we love seeing it every time we pass it. but that's enough nostalgia. wimbledon isjust around the corner. and we just love it. so we are reporting on our grandson‘s chances. we are speaking to some great tennis legends. it‘s very rare that i would be nervous before an interview but i‘m definitely nervous. who do you think will win at wimbledon this year? men‘s or ladies? i think we are talking about the men here. isn‘t that a loaded question? there are two people who look sharp this year, roger federer and a certain person you may know named andy murray.
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usually when i do a lot of different interviews, i normally say a different person in each interview and then i will be right somewhere. cover all the bases. i felt like this was right to choose mr murray. i think maybe it is andy's time again so i will go with andy. that is kind of you. you‘re not saying that because we are grandparents? in part, yes. what an honest man. you have 7 grand slams. andy has only 3. no—one has played in a tougher era than your andy so, no, i would not say that i am better than him. he also has two olympic gold medals which i don‘t have. i got a couple of davis cups. he has a davis cup. ithink... is there anything you would change about him? if i said there was one area
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that i would change, i would say the one area where i would probably think that the others are better than him on a consistent basis is that type of... that emotional self—control on the court. that would be one area. another area that he could massively improve is backgammon. he was always very average with backgammon. i should elaborate and paying his debts from backgammon. very... a good payer is a quick payer and he has always been a slow payer of debts. well, it sounds like andy is in pretty good shape. we usually go to wimbledon but, sadly, this year we had to settle for watching it on the telly. let‘s see if my nerves can take it. if you‘re a dr who fan and didn‘t
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watch last night‘s episode, you may want to step out the room, because we‘re about to discuss the end of an era for two of the show‘s key figures. both the doctor, peter capaldi, and the head writer, steven moffat are leaving the show after the christmas special. so what does the future hold for the time lord and his companions? we‘ll discuss that in a minute, but first let‘s take a look at last night‘s episode. rin r in half an hour. you said you could fix this. you would get me back. did you say that? idid say would get me back. did you say that? i did say that, yes. were you lying? no. were you right? no. kilt, kit
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ill, kill it. you may be a doctor but i am the doctor. the original i might say. the original i might say. joining me know is comedian and dr who fan toby hadoke. how are you, how was it? still recovering from that. yes, because i think that the rumour, i think it must be terribly difficult writing a television programme because of the
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internet and stuff gets leaked and there were a couple of big twists that were out there, everyone was expecting to see the new doctor. we normally get the regeneration. and in fact we got the old doctor, who is an actor that is long dead, william hartnell, but david bradley who we saw there played him in a film, three years ago when it was celebrating doctor who, it was a film about the early days. what was the idea, the story twist, why bring him back? i don't know. that is the beauty of it. that is wonderful. i think event television is so hard to do now, because stuff is leaked, but eve ryo ne do now, because stuff is leaked, but everyone watched that and we have to wait until christmas. nobody was expecting that. no, welll don't think so, because i have seen every episode of doctor who, i think it outlawed in the geneva convention how many times i have seen it, old episodes, i try and stay spoiler
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free, so i, a couple of times said we heard, had an inkling, that is why it is so difficult, but i think it was genuinely a shock that i think a lot of people were thinking are we going to see the new doctor, that would have been a massive coup of tv, for the first time, if peter capaldi of tv, for the first time, if peter ca paldi changed of tv, for the first time, if peter capaldi changed into the new doctor, i don‘t think you could do that now. what about steven moffitt leaving, how much of a difference? it will be sad, because the lead writer creates doctor who in his own image and steven doctor who in his own image and steve n m offat doctor who in his own image and steven moffat has been a big writer. he took overfrom steven moffat has been a big writer. he took over from russell t davis but doctor who rely on change, the reason it is this long running phenomenon is that it, it retains its essence, it is a funny action adventure, that is quirky and
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celebrates difference and change. change.? we celebrates difference and change. change. ? we still like the nostalgia and that is why i think everyone will have enjoyed the cybermen making a return. and the first cybermen, those, the sort of cloth faced cybermen were the very first ones. the originals. they didn't have the technology we have now, and i love those, because i‘m a geek, i see body horror where other people see body horror where other people see stockings, the fact they recreated those for the modern era and made them, the episode last week where it was a hospital where people we re where it was a hospital where people were having their bits replaced was terrifying, they were taking an absurd creature from beyond my childhood. it is still a kids show? it grans you when you are a kid. it can be scary, that is ok, fairy tales are scary, i think... it should be scary, that is the point. it reprayers you for the real world, i says life is terrifying and not a lwa ys i says life is terrifying and not always pretty or nice, but you can have fun along way and be brave. so
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the new doctor? you see again, i think it will, i think it will be, i love peter capaldi. he has been a good actor, the three of them have been brilliant. i think, good actor, the three of them have been brilliant. ithink, i good actor, the three of them have been brilliant. i think, i don‘t know. i think it will be somebody young and handsome from one of those shows that i don‘t watch because i can‘t bear to watch young and handsome on the tv. male? i think so, ithink handsome on the tv. male? i think so, i think a female doctor will come. but maybe not this time. it is isa come. but maybe not this time. it is is a pleasure to see you. we will drag you back in at the end of the next series. great to have you here with us. that is it for today. dan and louise will be here from six o‘clock tomorrow morning, and carol and sally will be at wimbledon on the opening day at the tournament as well so we will hope for good weather, from me and all of us here, have a lovely weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news. i‘m ben brown. the headlines at 9am. pressure on the prime minister to ease austerity — michael gove joins cabinet ministers calling for higher pay rises to public sector workers.
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council tenants whose services have been disrupted by the grenfell tower fire have had their rent suspended. iraqi forces say they‘ve taken control of the main base of the so—called islamic state in mosul. we report from the frontline. also in the next hour — could battery powered planes be the future of flying? we‘ll take an exclusive look at an experimental electric plane. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 — this morning‘s reviewers are the journalist and broadcaster james rampton and prashant rao, deputy europe business editor at the international new york times.
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