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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 2, 2017 9:30am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the latest headlines. theresa may is under pressure to lift the 1% cap on pay increasing for public sector workersing. council tenants whose services have been disrupted by the grenfell tower fire. iraqi forces say they have taken control of the main base of so—called islamic state in mosul. mill tans were driven from a hospital compound, where several senior is leaders were thought to have been hiding. and could battery powered planes be the future of flying? the bbc has been given special permission to fly in an experimental electric plane which has been shown in the uk for the first time. coming up. our sunday
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morning edition of the papers. this morning's reviewers are the journalist and broadcaster james rampton, and prashant rao, deputy europe business editor at the new york times. first a full sportsround up. geraint thomas will wear the yellow jersey as the second stage of the tour de france gets under way later. no welshman has had that honour before. just to warn you, there is some flash photography coming up. he won this year's first stage in germany, a 14 kilometre time trial through dusseldorf in a time ofjust over 16 minutes. his sky team mate and defending champion chris froome came through the day unscathed, finishing sixth and well ahead of his main rivals. thomas says he'll support froome‘s bid for a fourth tour title — but is looking forward to a stint in the yellowjersey himself. amazing. it's the stuff of dreams.
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the tour is what got me into cycling. i remember as a ten—year—old i used to run home to watch the last ten k. to be on the other side of the camera and take thejersey is incredible, really. it is my eighth tour and to finally win a stage, and then the yellow jersey is a bonus. sean o'brien could miss the lions deciding test with new zealand next week. he's having a disciplinary hearing right now after being cited for allegedly striking an opponent. sonny bill williams will be suspended — he's been banned forfour weeks for his sending off in the lions' 24—21 victory in wellington. former lions hooker brian moore reckons the side have every chance of one of their greatest ever series wins. sports round up. the i can loon yobs know so far they have outscored the kiwis in terms of
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tries and chances, so while it is not an easy thing to do, the easy options or the easy achievements, targets a re options or the easy achievements, targets are there, because all they have to do is make the same number of chances they have made in both test matches and put them away and cut the penalties out and they have got every chance to carry off what would be a monumental victory in the series. all eight teams at the women's cricket world cup are in action in the third round of group games today. england are up against sri lanka at taunton and pace bowler anya shrubsole is looking forward to playing on her home ground. i think it's always nice to play at home, because you get a bit of, kind of familiarity of the surroundings. it's a bit different, a world cup, from a normal tour, kind of as you'd expect. there's a lot more people around, a lot more going on and things like that, so it's a little bit different from a kind of regulation home tour, but i think the opportunity to play a world cup in your home country gives people's families a real good chance to come and watch
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and things like that. so it's a really nice experience. that starts at 10.30. you can follow the action on our website bbc. co. uk/cricket. there will be in—play video highlights and commentary on five live sports extra. a record—breaking innings from england's alex hales helped nottinghamshire win the first trophy of the domestic cricket season. they beat surrey in the one day cup final. notts were chasing 297 to win but hales wasted no time helping his team reach that target. he got his century in just 83 balls and went on to make the highest ever one day score at lord's. he finished 187 not out, helping his side win by four wickets. australia's cricketers' association has said this morning that their players will refuse to go on their a team tour of south africa later this week, unless progress is made in talks over a new pay deal. players want to continue to get a percentage of revenue while cricket australia want to fix salaries. novak djokovic has had the ideal warm—up for wimbledon
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by winning his first title since january. he beat gael monfils in straight sets at eastbourne. djokovic doesn't usually do much to acclimatise to grass courts, but accepted a wild card to play on the south coast after his early exit from the french open. 6—3, 6—4 the score. it's the first time he's played in the week before wimbledon for seven years. the world number three karolina pliskova could be a good bet for the women's title at wimbledon — she had a walkover in her semifinal afterjohanna konta's withdrawal through injury, and beat former world number one caroline wozniacki in straight sets, to win the eastbourne title. manny pacquiao has lost his wbo world welterweight title to australia'sjeff horn this morning. the aussie beat the filipino on a unanimous decision after 12 rounds in brisbane. 38—year—old pacquiao, who has won world titles in eight divisions, had talked about trying to arrange a rematch with floyd mayweather, but may now consider
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another retirement instead. on the undercard, belfast‘s michael conlan won his third pro fight. england won their final warm—up match before the women's european championship. ellen white showed no sign of nerves, captaining her country for the first time, and scoring both of england's goals as they beat denmark 2—1 in copenhagen. that means the lionesses head into the euros with four wins from their last six games. i thought it was full of resilience and character, and you're dead right, it was a fantastic result for this england team, let's not that sweden came here in a competitive in a competitive qualifier and lost 2—0. we had a denmark team cheered on by a full house and a big crowd, and looking to put a good performance in, going to the european championships. so for us, a resilient
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character building win, which is going to be important come tournament time, so a really good exercise. that's all the sport. now on bbc news here's ben brown with the papers. hello, and welcome to our look at the sunday papers. with me are the journalist and broadcasterjames rampton and prashant rao, deputy europe business editor at the new york times. this morning's front pages. the mail on sunday, which claims that the prime minister theresa may is considering a dramatic u—turn on university tuition fees to attract younger voters to the conservative party. the observer reports a tory revolt against public sector cuts, suggesting theresa may is facing pressure from within her cabinet, who are demanding a radical overhaul of state funding for public services. the sunday telegraph reports claims
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that number 10 has told business leaders that theresa may could walk out of brexit talks over the so—called "divorce bill". the express reports that british fishermen will be given exclusive rights to a12—mile zone around the coastline under post—brexit plans. and "rogue sas unit accused of executing civilians" is the headline on the cover of the sunday times. easy thing to do, the easy options oi’ easy thing to do, the easy options or the easy achievements, targets are there, because all they have to do is make the same number of chances they have made in both test matches and put them away and cut the penalties out and they have got every chance to carry off what would bea every chance to carry off what would be a monumental victory in the series. so, let us begin then, and the sunday telegraph. number ten plotting a brexit walk outment do we think they really are?” plotting a brexit walk outment do we think they really are? i am fascinated by this, it really hiss the tightrope that number ten is walking over brexit negotiations, this story is interesting, it talks about how this is something for domestic consumption, you are doing
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these negotiations notjust in a negotiating room in brussels or in london, european ministers will be briefing against you, pro brexit, anti—brexit mps will be briefing against you, you have to stage these dramatic things like walking out of negotiation in which you have 18 months to complete. it is probably not a good idea in advance to say you will lose out. it loses the element of surprise. to say you will lose out. it loses the element of surpriselj to say you will lose out. it loses the element of surprise. i travel a lot for myjosh i was in stockholm and met an italianjournalist, he said you do realised you have become a laughing stock, in the uk, the way you have behaved, and he said and this was a terrible insult. he said it is worse than sylvio berlusconi what you have done. i can't disagree. if you read the foreign press they say what is the uk doing? if mrs may is threatening that, they will be laughing, she has no legs to stand on. she doesn't even have a conservative majority government, so
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he is going to europe, throwing her weight round, talking about being a bloody difficult woman and you you, you know, no deal is better than a bad deal. they are saying fine, off you go then. they have all the cards now, so... and her points are saying with the dup negotiations, she ended up with the dup negotiations, she ended up giving them a billion pounds. now other ministers are haggling over that money for schools and education and it was no problem to give them that and fly them back on the raf flight that and fly them back on the raf flight from london to belfast, mine, don't get me started! also, on the sort of post—brexit sunday express saying no foreign fishing in our water, brexit bonus, britain takes back control of the coasts. so this is other countries not able to fish within 12 miles of uk... we shouldn't overstate the economic impact this will have. it doesn't account for a huge amount of the
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fishing that happens in british water, we are talking about single digits. it is a significant move. i don't mean to down play it. we should put it in the proper context. it is an interesting move. it is parliament of the broader brexit negotiation. it won't happen tomorrow, but as and when it happens, this is all the various, you know, as we were talking about in the eu election, so the brexit cap page —— campaign, there is is a litany of... this was signed in 1964, before britainjoined the... this is one of those things where there is all kinds of agreement in which the eau is directly or otherwise involved. i cannot wrap my head round the sheer size of what is going to happen. i would say the sunday express is a great flag waver for brexit, this is classic symbolic britannia rules the waves territory, you know, the seas, it is a very
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important emblem for our power we once had which we no longer have, the way in which we dominated —— dominated the world, for certain people, the resonance of that is still very important, and to say we are going to take back control of the 12 mile zone, it sound great but you are right, the numbers aren't going to add up to much. symbolically it is important. this story that seems to be bubbling away there is a volt within the tory party, within the cabinet, even, against austerity, really, in the wa ke against austerity, really, in the wake of the election, what do you make of that? we are talking earlier a billion pounds here or there, sooner or a billion pounds here or there, sooner or later a billion pounds here or there, sooner or later we are a billion pounds here or there, sooner or later we are talking about real money. some serious ministries are asking for more money. we are talking about health, education, damian green was quoted last night in which he said we might have to rethink the tuition fee situation and university, i can't remember which paper say that is estimated to
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be £8 billion. this is a lot of money along with the 1 billion for northern ireland, all of a sudden we are talking about serious... from a tory strategy point of view, is this the best way of deflating labour and jeremy corbyn, if they do ease up on austerity, do they take some of the wind out of labour's sails the observer has an interesting poll in which they were talking about april 19th, only about a little more than two months ago. theresa may had a net positive... a lifetiming a. plus 21, jeremy corbyn negative 35. now, theresa may negative 20, jeremy corbyn plus four and labour has a six point lead in the polls. the tories in their arrogant way, thought you know, we will call an election and have 150 seat majority, they didn't take account of the fact that corbyn was a brilliant campaignerand that corbyn was a brilliant campaigner and theresa may was a terrible campaigner, so, the result of that is that they are struggling now, to keep up, that the wind is in
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corbyn's sails to use another nautical reference and you go to cricket matches, people are chanting ohjeremy corbyn, cricket matches, people are chanting oh jeremy corbyn, glastonbury, cricket matches, people are chanting ohjeremy corbyn, glastonbury, he has become a cult, and the tories seem has become a cult, and the tories seem completely lost how to respond that. i have got three daughters who are students and you know, they said they didn't have to talk to tory students very long to convince them to vote labour because he was offering to remove tuition fees, i mean that is an obvious thing to do. you are right damian green is flagging up that even that flagship tory policy may be ending. let talks about that since you nicely take us on to that. the tuition fee. are they really plans, the mail on sunday saying theresa may ready to consider a dramatic u—turn on tuition fees to woo young voters back, but surely that won't mean scrapping tuition fees in the way labour have suggested. everything is up labour have suggested. everything is upforgrab, it labour have suggested. everything is up for grab, it seems like it. you know, there have been several
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interviews that show the result of the election mean the government is not the strongest position. people coming for money, maybe it leads to vote. we don't know which one could, theresa may, leave aside the brexit thing, which is already complicated, domestically this is is a whole host of issues in which every minister must be banging down the door asking for mormon. it shows the power of the youth vote in the election, which was, had never really been harnessed before, young voters registering and voting labour. what was fascinating in the eu referendum only 40% of 18—25—year—olds voted. in the last election, a couple of weeks ago it was 70%, and people like my daughters and their generation were getting out the vote. they are calling themselves generation vote, social media was important. labour did lots of funny memes and pictures they were putting o memes and pictures they were putting oto memes and pictures they were putting o to encourage young people to engage. it is great the next generation is becoming involved with
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politics because somebody has to ta ke politics because somebody has to take over this country, when we move on, and! take over this country, when we move on, and i do think this all plays into the total lack of authority that theresa may has now, i mean people might complain we didn't vote for the removal of tuition fee, we didn't vote for the dup to get {1.5 million. as you say all bets are off now and they will do anything to cling to power. the power of that youth vote, tuition fees is a crucial issue. we can recall about 2025 were tuition fees were raised or implemented for british voter, round then, that was a hugely controversial policy at the time and there were so many defectors from labour rank, this is a political issue that has destroyed political careers. nick clegg, what is he rememberfor? a careers. nick clegg, what is he remember for? a u—turn. careers. nick clegg, what is he remember for? a u-turn. and for 2,000 odd sheffield hallam students rising up against him and make his
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lose his seats. you are right, that is what he is most remember for, betraying liberal democrats about student tuition fees. revenge is a dish served cold. let us move on the something different. the sunday times have a story about a rogue sas unit accused of executing sieve rans in afghanistan. we have to say the ministry of defence has said that they have disputeded this story, we have to make that clear, but the sunday times has some interesting allegations, that have been a p pa re ntly allegations, that have been apparently compiled by the royal military police, about certain things that the sas was doing in afghanistan, they talk about special forces soldiers are alleged to have handcuffed and shot prisoners. it did not need to be investigated.
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this is really remarkable. we will have to see the result as it comes through, according to the sunday times it has been curtailed, there is not much we can... it is a sort of operation, a police investigation called operation north moorem of operation, a police investigation called operation north moore it has been going on for a year half from a secure been going on for a year half from a secure bunker in cornwall. it is amazing it has got to this degree and not many of us knew about it. i absolutely agree prashant, it could be serious, for the mod and the suggestions are they want to just make it go away, because if any of these allegations, and they are only allegations are proven, it is catastrophic for the army's credibility. sunday times have got a story about parents facing a £60 fine if their kids are late for school. is that fair snuff? enough? this is a case of do as i say not do asi this is a case of do as i say not do as i do. first of all, the story
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quotes the government's behaviour zaha. who knew he existed. several councils are sort of canning the idea of fines if pupils are late but the behaviours are tom bennett admits he was late for school every day studying for a—levels.|j admits he was late for school every day studying for a-levels. i would have been several thousand pounds in debt to the school when my children we re debt to the school when my children were growing up. it very hard to get three children out of the house, well, is not but i am saying it is, but what scares me is the possible sanctions they are going to bring m, sanctions they are going to bring in, make children collect litter, re move in, make children collect litter, remove chewing garry monk gum or mop classroom floor, measures used in south korea, maybe we should be copying it! i am sure no-one is late for school in south korea. back to the sundayel graph. they have a
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g re nfell the sundayel graph. they have a grenfell council, the government warning kensington and chelsea council, couldn't ta ken warning kensington and chelsea council, couldn't taken over by commissioners, and it has been so criticised. we were talking about this earlier, this is a tragedy, eve ryo ne this earlier, this is a tragedy, everyone is right to say so, but, the response to what happened has been astonish, the kind of thing, this tory says, that some of the families were evacuated, they were, charged rent on their flats. are are still being charged rent. etch though there is no hot water. still being charged rent. etch though there is no hot waterlj still being charged rent. etch though there is no hot water. i noah to say. i think! reflects though there is no hot water. i noah to say. i think i reflects badly on the sense of entitlement certain political leaders have. i mean, i deplored the manner in which nicholas paget—brown resigned yesterday. he got the resignation wrong, he was so tone deaf, completely grudging he seemed to me and without dignity and he used the
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phrase which may have been provided by lawyers perceived fail, you know my perception of that phrase is it is really offensive to the victims and theirfamily, is really offensive to the victims and their family, those may well be the same lawyers that gave him the great advice not the let the press into the cabinet meeting on thursday, which ultimately precipitating his downfall. there has been no council in the country could have coped with the disaster on this scale. that may be true. people have cited camden council. the leader has been out and about, knocking on the doors of the people that they were evacuating, making her presence felt. nobody has seen nicholas paget—brown and his cabinet seem nicholas paget—brown and his cabinet seem to have gone into hiding. i don't know if that is true. that is the reports that no—one has seen him and in this world it is all about perceptions and image, and the perceptions and image, and the perception is they have failed miserably. ok, let us go on to by. miserably. ok, let us go on to rugby. well, are you rugby people? i ama
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rugby. well, are you rugby people? i am a massive fan. you will have to ta ke am a massive fan. you will have to take this over. i had five friend over yesterday morning, and my wife, who had had a bit of a late—night on friday and my youngest daughter were upstairs and by 8.45, ten minutes after kick off, they had been woken up after kick off, they had been woken up three times by our shouting. in the end they came down to watch, they said 0 we can't sleep through this. the shouting, all over the country for people watching was amazing, because the, to give you some of the stats, the all blacks have not lost at home since 2009. they were playing with a man down. he deserved to go off, he did a shoulder charge on a defenceless man. i think it is a one of the great british and irish victories and oh my gosh f you thought the shouting was loud yesterday, wait till next saturday, the decider. he
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is going to come round to your house and watch it with you. it sound like and watch it with you. it sound like a good party. i think! am going and watch it with you. it sound like a good party. i think i am going to come. it is only tea and cake we have. the doctor won't see you now, family doctors will be able to turn away all but life—or—death patients. it goes backs to something the health secretary said where the nhs needs, seems to need more money. i everything is stretched, everything seems to be, you know, increasingly under pressure and so, nhs practises may have to think in more creative ways how best to allocate resources until the funding situation is resolved. what it indicates to me, not only the people are fed up with austerity, the minutesters are fed up austerity, the minutesters are fed up with it. they are getting criticism —— ministers. their services are failing and they are saying, they may well be say we are giving the dup one billion, why
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can't we give to it the nhs and school? nurses get a 1% pay rise, thatis school? nurses get a 1% pay rise, that is outrageous, a what they do is astonishing, their pay is capped is astonishing, their pay is capped is disgraceful. if one of buy borough councils of this election disaster for the tories is they lift austerity hooray. andy murray, we have done rugby, can we do tennis?” am nota have done rugby, can we do tennis?” am not a huge fan but there is few things better than the english summer things better than the english summerfor sport. things better than the english summer for sport. cricket, tennis. do you think andy murray can do it again. he has a bad hip. my worry is he overturns the idea of the great british loser, we have prided ourselves on being gallant loser, and now he is winning, i mean, our heads are so messed up. it is the hope that kills us. good luck to sir andy, thank you to both of you.
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many thanks for be with us. we will ta ke many thanks for be with us. we will take a look at tomorrow's front pages every evening during the week at 10.40 here on bbc news. hello there. well, today is shaping up to a similar story to yesterday. a good deal of fine weather in the offing, and a few scattered showers. that is the story up into the north—west across argyll and bute, the showers continuing here, but it is a beautiful day, with blue sky and sunshine across much of north yorkshire. and that really is the story for much of england and wales. as you can see from the satellite picture, this cloud across the south—east easing away, sunshine into the afternoon, but the thicker cloud in the north—west, strengthening winds driving in some showers across the north of scotland — some of these quite heavy, with the odd rumble of thunder. but i expect for the bulk of us it will look somewhat like this. a pleasant feel out there as well, 19—22 degrees, with just a light breeze.
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fair weather cloud tending to come and go, but not spoil the story by any means. further north and west, we will see thicker cloud into northern england, the isle of man, northern ireland. it should stay dry during daylight hours, but the sharp showers, some with rumbles of thunder will continue, and here it will be more disappointing — 14, 15 degrees. now this weather front will sink steadily south and east through the night, introducing more cloud and rain into northern england and north wales. but it will continue to weaken off really considerably, as it pushes into the south—east corner. the only real significant rain through this week will be on tuesday from this area of low pressure into northern ireland and northern england, but that does mean for wimbledon there is the risk of of some light patchy rain on monday, getting better for tuesday and wednesday. warming up nicely — 24, 25 degrees not out of the question. so on monday a weak weather front will sit across the bristol channel into the midlands, down to the south—east by the afternoon.
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it will be warm, with 24 degrees behind it, somewhat brighter conditions and a bit fresher. here is the rain as we move out of monday towards tuesday, potentially turning quite heavy through northern ireland and the north of england. it is worth bearing in mind to the south of here we start to really import some pretty warm air, so temperatures could start to peak into the mid 20s on tuesday. a bit fresher to the north of that frontal system, and that will be the story from wednesday onwards. if you are heading to wimbledon, it is worth bearing in mind 25 is 77 fahrenheit. but a good deal of dry weather to close out the week. take care. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 10am. pressure on the prime minister to ease austerity — michael gove joins cabinet ministers calling for higher pay rises to public sector workers.
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council tenants whose services have been disrupted by the grenfell tower fire have had their rent suspended. iraqi forces say they've taken control of the main base of the so—called islamic state in mosul. also in the next hour, could battery powered planes be the future of flying? we'll take an exclusive look at an experimental electric plane. in half an hour — the welsh capital is one of the uk's fastest growing cities, but cardiff boyjason mohammad asks if his city is expanding too fast.
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