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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 3, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at two. a teenage girl admits killing seven—year—old katie rough in january. katie's mother was one of the first on the scene. we found her at the same time as a police officer found her. i cradled her. i saw her injuries, i knew she was gone. downing street insists there's no change in the government's policy on the public sector pay cap — amid continuing pressure to lift it. a long awaited report into child abuse spanning decades injersey is published later today. a tourist bus crashes in germany and bursts into flames. 18 people are missing, feared dead. and in the next hour we'll hear emmanuel macron set out his priorities.
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the french president is addressing both houses of parliament at the palace of versailles. and andy murray begins the defence of his title after brushing off injury fears. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a 16—year—old girl has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of seven—year—old katie rough. the little girl died injanuary after being found seriously injured on a playing field in york. she later died in hospital. and we can now ci’oss to our correspondent, phil bodmer, outside leeds crown court. as you say, katie rough died from
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severe lacerations to her neck and chest on a playing field in the woodthorpe area on the south—western outskirts of york in january. woodthorpe area on the south—western outskirts of york injanuary. she was attended to by paramedics and taken to hospital, but later died of those injuries. a 15 yard goal was subsequently arrested and charged with murder. today at leeds crown court, the girl who is now 16 and can't be named, pleaded guilty to manslaughter via diminished responsibility and appeared via video link. my colleague has the story. katie rough — an innocent, sweet, much—loved schoolgirl, killed in an attack close to her home. her life was taken by another child. it was a school day afternoon and just getting dark when katie rough was found fatally injured at the end of an alleyway on the edge of a playing field here in york. the seven—year—old died a short time later in hospital. it then emerged that a 15—year—old girl had attacked her with a knife. katie's parents were quickly
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told what had happened and dashed to the scene. we found her at the same time as a police officer found her. i cradled her. i saw her injuries, i knew she was gone. and... i don't know, it's impossible to describe. we just held each other, didn't we? today the teenage girl who killed katie admitted what she had done here. she's too young to be publicly identified and has been in custody ever since. what happened to katie shocked so many people in this city. things like that don't happen in york. such a safe city, such a safe place, such a lovely, beautiful place. people come from all round the world to see york. for this to happen here was just unbelievable. the full reasons why this
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seven—year—old was killed cannot be told because of legal reasons. katie rough will be remembered as a kind and thoughtful child whose life was taken away in the most dreadful circumstances. the court heard the defendant had been suffering from mental illness, andindeed been suffering from mental illness, and indeed a number of medical assessments were read out to the courts. they were carried out by psychiatrists doctors. but thejudge was told about disturbing thinking, and how the defendant has become socially isolated duty deteriorating mental health. at one stage the girl is said to have referred to people as robots rather than humans. after the incident in january, as robots rather than humans. after the incident injanuary, police found nothing of a violent nature that belonged to the defendant. she
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later told detectives she heard voices in her head giving up our thoughts. the hearing continues. the french president, emmanuel macron, is about to address a joint session of parliament in versailles. the speech is to set out a five—year plan of the president, but critics say it overshadows a speech by the prime minister due to take place tomorrow. letsjoin the president lets join the president for this historic speech. translation: what is asked of us by the people is to link again with the spirit of conquest which existed to reconcile ourselves with ourselves. by reconcile ourselves with ourselves. by bringing together the national assembly, the french people are showing how impatient it is with the spectre of political world in which to offer quarrels or empty ambitions, as was the place until
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110w. ambitions, as was the place until now. also, it's their way to see the politics. in trusting men and women here together. the french have expressed an imperious expectation, the desire for deep change. and i'm sure that you hear all are aware as iam. and sure that you hear all are aware as i am. and i sure that you hear all are aware as iam. and i know also sure that you hear all are aware as i am. and i know also that the senators are fully aware of this, evenif senators are fully aware of this, even if their election goes back further, because they perceive, they also attended by their very nature to the movement of time, the new hopes for universal direct suffrage has shown. to be faithful to what the french people wanted. let's say a certain form of asceticism, strength and demands. a specific dignity. and no doubt even more today than yesterday. bad habits quickly come back, marked by
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cynicism, being discouraged and i would even say platitudes. many still reflect upon a failure which would justify their scepticism. it will be up to you, it will be up to us, to prove them wrong. and again it will be up to us to produce all those who wait. who trust us, you have not voted. all those whose anger at the ineffectiveness, our ineffectiveness, often, have led to extreme choices on either side of the political chessboard. choice of which french in —— choices which france in its greatness has nothing to expect from that. this mandate of the people we have received, what is it, really? to know this, we have to go out of this climate of false
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conflict of cases that the public debate has often locked us in. we have to find air, serenity. we have to make an effort. whether it is a question of reforming labour law, to dynamite, to give morejobs for those who don't have them, people will say it is a question of adapting friends to the cruelties of the globalised world, or to abide by the globalised world, or to abide by the dictators of brussels. is it a question of reducing public expenditure so that our children don't have to pay the prices? will be told that we are putting at risk are modest achievements. is a question of moving out a state of emergency. we will be told we are leaving friends without a defence against terrorism. others we are risking our freedoms. against terrorism. others we are risking ourfreedoms. none of all of this is true. behind all those false criticisms, we get the same vice.
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device which have been in the public debate for too long. the refusal to see reality. the refusal to see reality in its complexities and constraints. a blindness the state of emergency which is both economic and social, just as much as one of security. and i've always considered that the french people were more wise. more informed. and i deeply think that the mandate that the people have given us is a demanding mandate, and also deeply realistic. and to achieve it, we have to put ourselves beyond such theoretical positions. which while they ensure success on the podium don't actually contribute anything. our first duty is to get back to the meaning and strength of an ambitious project to
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transform our country, and to remain rooted in reality. not to yield anything to the principles of desire. easy words, illusions. so that we can look the reality of our country directly in all its forms. this mandate of the french people — what is it? well, first of all, a mandate of sovereignty of the nation. to be able to act ourselves, despite the constraints in the world. let's see reality directly. the forces of alienation are very powerful. alienation, with respect to the new division of work, which is showing itself in a universe deeply transforming itself, where digital is reshaping whole areas and changing the balance ofjobs. alienation in respect to misery. if we don't allow each person to find a job which suits them, which they're
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happy to do. studio: we will leave president macron back, who is giving ace date of the union sale addressed to a rest style —— to a rare style and the palace of versailles. we can now speak to the broadcaster and journalist, christine ockrent. she joins us on webcam from central london. we are grateful for your time. versailles, if my history serves me right, it was used to reflect new reader 14's absolute power. so what should we read into the fact that mr macron has selected bits for his first address? what does it tell us about his style? versailles is traditionally the place where both the senate and the national assembly can meet. because it's the only place which has a large enough setting. and indeed in this way, president macron is not really doing
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anything innovative. both his predecessors asked for both assemblies to meet their once during their presidency. what is interesting about what's happening this afternoon is that obviously president macron is very much turning back to what was the original conception of french institutions. and the fact that he's as afternoon before his prime minister, who will be talking to the national assembly tomorrow, really shows that it is up to the president to indicate the priorities and up to his prime minister to try and execute. can you tell us a little bit more about what you think his priorities are? well, obviously, the little i've heard of your experts
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right now live is that he will try and explain what his priorities are in the context of the overall change. which is affecting our economy, and also globalised world. and i think that in this respect, he will once again insist upon europe, the european union, being the best protection and the best tool that we europeans have to still be part of history. and he will also probably insists on the need to have more flexible labour laws. but also to protect people, and give them hope ata time protect people, and give them hope at a time of such obvious uncertainties. christine, thank you.
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good to hear your thoughts, thanks. downing street insists that the government's position on the public sector pay cap hasn't changed, despite calls from several cabinet ministers for it to be scrapped. number 10 says some pay review bodies will be reporting later this year and the government will respond to them in due course. theresa may is under pressure to end the public sector pay cap which has meant that public sector workers like nurses, teachers and police officers have had their pay rises limited to 1% — even though the cost of living has risen by more than that. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young, at westminster. they have all decided they are going to speak out and that is a reflection of a lack of authority for the prime minister, having lost that majority it now feels like cabinet ministers feel they can speak out about this kind of thing and are trying to put pressure on philip hammond, who has talked before about the country having to
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live within its means. he thinks thatis live within its means. he thinks that is still the case and i think his message to them would be if you wa nt his message to them would be if you want this, you have to explain how you will pay for it through tax rises, which aren't popular. to discuss this further, i'm joined by the conservative mp, stephen crabb. it's extraordinary, isn't it? cabinet ministers fighting to get on the airwaves to tell us what they think is going on. but stop —— that's not very eloquent. people up and down the country were telling us about the pressures they feel under, working under front line public services. the issue of pay is a really, really important one. particularly for the nursing profession, where the number of vacancies is now increasing. across the board to lift that pay cap would cost billions of pounds if you're going to look at all public sector workers. is that something the country can afford, or do you have a way to pay for it? when labour less
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than 04 at seven years ago saying that was no money left, they weren't joking. there is no money and we are spending £50 billion more than the amount of tax raising to pay for these services. hard choices are coming along. to answer the first bar of your question, i'm not in favour of a blanket lifting of the public sector pay cap because it will cost money we don't have. but when you look at critical workers and key front line services like nurses, who have been shouldering a lot of the burden of keeping the nhs in business in recent years, i think that a compelling and strong case to be made for looking at them and treating them as an exception at point. what about paying for it? tax rises is obviously a possibility if you're not going to borrow any more. the tax rises do hit the workers we re the tax rises do hit the workers were talking about trying to help. this is where we need an honest debate as a society about the hard choices involved. we can't carry on
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spending like there's no tomorrow. we have to recognise that every bit of extra spending will either come from more borrowing, or increasing taxes. there is no more low hanging fruit when it comes to cutting public expenditure. all of the simple, straightforward cuts have been made. we are into difficult choices here and i think there could well be an argument. let's see what plan the government comes up with for it. there could be an argument for it. there could be an argument for seeing that a limited targeted tax increase could come out public supportive taxpayers knew that it was going into the wage packets of nurses. do you think this is the kind of environment where you will get mature discussions about issues such as, for example, social care? we saw what happened in the conservative manifesto. we are in a hung parliament situation and this is not really going to be the time to have these kinds of discussions. the general election campaign period is certainly not the time for a sensible rational discussion about difficult policy choices. we saw
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that run social care and the winter fuel allowance. some of the discussion we were trying to have two months ago, we shouldn't lose sight of that. there are difficult choices to be met. the hung parliament situation could mean we will see more cross party working in the coming months and years. that might lend itself to a more mature, rational discussion about difficult options. a lot will depend on what posture the labour party want to take, and with jeremy corbyn and posture the labour party want to take, and withjeremy corbyn and his team going around promising free everything with no difficult choices to be made, i'm not hopeful that can be achieved. do you think ministers are speaking out in this way, is that the right approach to take? there is a reason that the cabinet meets in private and there is a reason why cabinet ministers' minutes are kept the good. it's because you need a united government friend. i don't think it's eloquent to sleep different cabinet members —— i don't think it's eloquent to see different cabinet members
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briefed the press in different ways. but it is important to show we are listening to what people on the doorsteps are telling us. stephen crabb, thank you very much indeed. this is a lively debate here in parliament. downing street insist that nothing is changing and the moment. they do of course went to the fact that they will be a budget in the autumn. if a decision is to be made, that is where we will hear about it. the headlines on bbc news... a teenage girl pleads guilty to killing seven—year—old katie rough during a vicious attack in york. downing street insists there's no change in the government's policy on the public sector pay cap — amid continuing pressure to lift it. a long awaited report into child abuse spanning decades injersey is published later today. in what — andy murray has started the defence of his wimbledon title. the world number one is on centre
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court right now facing the world number 130 or. mummy when the first set 6—1. —— murray one in the first set 6—1. —— murray one in the first set 6—1. as ministers discuss public sector pay, it's emerged that for the first time in nearly a decade, more nurses and midwives are leaving the profession in the uk thanjoining it. the nursing and midwifery council says working conditions, workload and poor pay are among the reasons given by staff for quitting. our health editor, hugh pym, reports. recruitment and retention of nurses and other nhs staff has been a problem for a while now. today's figures show it's as difficult as ever. for the first time in nearly a decade, more nurses and midwives left the profession than joined in the latest year. attention has focused recently on nurses from other eu countries being less keen to work here. but the figures show the trend was more marked among british staff. there was a fall of nearly 1800 nurses and midwives on the official uk register over 12 months.
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the total of above 692,000 in march 2016 had fallen below 688,000 by may of this year. quite what the answer is, i don't know, but it's telling us something. we need to respond to that. government needs to respond to that, employers need to respond to it, because what we do know is that we need nurses and midwives to care for us in gp practices, care homes, hospitals, maternity units, whereever, across the uk. the nursing and midwifery council also carried out a survey asking why people were leaving the profession. reasons given apart from retirement include working conditions and staffing levels, personal circumstances and disillusion with quality of care for patients. the pay issue was less significant. demand is going through the roof and we have to find a way to tackle demand and then we can make jobs more manageable. it's notjust an isolated focus on the workforce, we need to look at all the pressures facing the nhs system. a department of health spokesperson said, "we are making sure
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we have the nurses we need to continue delivering world—class patient care. last week we launched a national programme to ensure nurses have the support they need to continue their vital work." but health unions argued that patients were paying the price for the government's failure to plan for the future and that introducing tuition fees for student nurses in england would make matters worse. hugh pym, bbc news. a long—awaited report into alleged child abuse injersey‘s care system will be published this afternoon. it follows a three—year public inquiry, which has heard from more than 600 witnesses. a police investigation recorded more than 500 alleged offences, most of which were said to have been committed at the haute de la garenne children's home. robert hall reports from jersey. i used to be woken up some nights with screaming from the boys. they put dettol in my mouth. he hung himself.
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he was only 14. don't say anything to anybody. their cries of anguish were stifled, ignored or dismissed. but for the past two years, the story ofjersey's abuse victims has finally been told. in 2007, a worrying pattern of abuse claims led to a secret police investigation involving a number of care homes and youth organisations. but within a few months the secret was out. a series of witnesses had reported decades of abuse here at haut de la garenne, a former children's home. alarmed by claims of deaths here, forensic teams took the home apart. they recovered fragments of bone and dozens of children's teeth. none could be linked to a specific crime or time frame, but these images prompted accounts of abuse at homes across the island. complaints of abuse had come to light, real complaints. yet, decisions were made not to deal with those complaints in a way
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that they ought to have been done. neil mcmurray runs a blog that has carried out its own investigations and which acts as a forum for care leavers. these are human beings. a lot of us talk about colloquially, victims or survivors, but every single one of them is an individual. that's one thing that it has taught me, they have been to hell and back, tortured, abused, raped, by people who are supposed to love and care for them. when the inquiry chair fra nces old ha m reveals their findings today, victims will be looking for one clear message. i want them to say thatjersey failed catastrophically in looking after the children under their care. and that the government are going to promise it's never going to happen again. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, will make a commons statement this afternoon about the negotiations to restore power sharing at stormont.
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he allowed the talks between the democratic unionists and sinn fein to continue after a negotiating period, laid down in law, ran out four days ago. the republicans have said it's unlikely a deal will be reached "in the short term". we're a 19 years on from the good friday agreement, and ten years on from the st andrews agreement. the dup still are blocking the bill of rights, marriage equality, legacy issues, respect issues have been addressed by the assembly. they oppose rights for irish language speakers. ethnic minorities and women. they oppose the rights of lesbian and gay citizens to equal marriage. and in doing all of this, they are emboldened by their alliance with the british government, which has taken initiative in its own interests, and against the interests of what needs to happen in this part of ireland. the institutions, if they are to be reformed, have to be based on respect and equality.
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that was the basis on which they were formed in the first place. and that's the basis, the only basis on which they can survive. a short while ago, our correspondent at stormont chris buckler gave us this update on the negotiations. last thursday was the final deadline for negotiations. the parties are back and they are talking again inside stormont castle. but that it seems to be making much difference. we heard from sinn fein a short time ago and they said there had been much progress. when i asked about one of the crucial issues within all of this, the irish language act, the call to sinn fein full official status within the irish language, they said they hadn't got into the detail within it yet. it gives you an idea of how far apart the dup and sinn fein. they went was far to as there might be no point in continuing these negotiations while
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the marching season starts its height and the holiday season starts to approach as well. it'll make a difficult for the northern secretary, james brokenshire. he has two during these things up and has a limited number of options. he can call fresh elections, he could have direct rule by westminster will take over the running of northern ireland for a over the running of northern ireland fora time, or over the running of northern ireland for a time, or he could basically fudge it — set a new deadline, some kind of talks extension to see if they can come to an agreement in the longer term. some parties are already talking about the autumn. what i think is a growing recognition and the problems of power—sharing are a little more complicated than perhaps everyone realised. two men have been charged after border force officers based in france seized 79 handguns. the weapons had been hidden in engine blocks on a trailer which was about to be taken through the channel tunnel into britain. two men from poland and the czech republic were arrested in connection with the raid. let's catch up with all of the
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weather news now. good afternoon. someone, some of the sunshine. for many of us, there are showers on the card across parts of southern england and east anglia. many of us avoiding the showers. sunny spot front temperatures today between 17—24 celsius. it will cloud over a cross between 17—24 celsius. it will cloud over across northern ireland and into the evening hours we will see when working in. that rain had eastwards into southern scotland and the far north of england, too. i'll swear it looks dry tonight and there will be —— elsewhere it looks dry. on tuesday, a dry day for many of us. on tuesday, a dry day for many of us. there is a front bringing rain to northern ireland, southern scotla nd to northern ireland, southern scotland and parts of northern england. to the north of that there are sunny england. to the north of that there are sunny spells. temperatures round 15-17 are sunny spells. temperatures round 15—17 eggs celsius. further south it
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will be warm with highs in the south—east of 29 celsius. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: a 16—year—old girl has pleaded guilty at leeds crown court to the manslaughter of seven—year—old katie rough. katie was found seriously injured on a playing field in york injanuary. she died later in hospital. downing street insists the position on public sector pay has not changed, despite several cabinet ministers, including the foreign secretary borisjohnson, calling for it to be scrapped. a long—awaited report into alleged child abuse injersey‘s care system will be published this afternoon. it follows a three—year public inquiry, which has heard from more than 600 witnesses. president emmanuel macron is outlining his plans for government, in a rarejoint session of the french parliament, at the palace of versailles. the sport next. that afternoon. first—round winners
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and losers in the first day of wimbledon and andy murray looks like he is on his way to victory in his first—round match. is there rain centre court? yes, i think the rain is so fine that you would not be able to pick it up from where you are. there is the finest spots of rain falling. andy murray went to the umpire on centre court and said he thought it was raining and said he thought it was raining and the grass would get slippery. the cover is going on on centre court. andy murray particularly careful because he has been carrying a hip injury coming in the centre court and he will be so desperate not to put himself at risk and not to slip and the hurt himself. so he said he was not happy playing in and he and alexander bublik went to sit
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down. alexander bublik the world 134, andy murray's first—round opponent, and he has been really enjoying the atmosphere. he is such an underdog but the crowd had been cheering every point he has been able to win. but for kazakhstan is, he is unfortunately 2—0 down. andy murray, 6—1, 6—4, as he defends his wimbledon title. a couple of casualties already. a man we thought andy murray might meet in the fourth round is out, one of the men's seeds. yes, they would meet later on, nick kyrgios, the maverick australian, always popular at wimbledon. and anywhere he plays. you never know what you will get with him. but he also has a sore hip. similarto with him. but he also has a sore hip. similar to andy murray. he was grimacing and he looked laboured and his movement was not good. usually
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such a dynamic and explosive player, but he worked flat out and was really struggling. he retired from his first—round match. hubert goes round. nick kyrgios has never lost in the first round at wimbledon, but this championships will be one he wa nts to this championships will be one he wants to forget. a lot of union flag is always around the all—england club. 12 british players in the draw for the singles, and it went down to ten. yes, we lost two early british players. before defending champion andy murray stepped in court and he is the one for whom most of the union flags will be flying. not much to cheer behind me, the first match out was laura robson and she was taking on beatriz haddad maia, of brazil, playing in her wimbledon
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debut. laura robson a former british number one, she has been out a number one, she has been out a number of years with injuries and fitness problems, and she did not have what it takes to take on the 85 macro, brazil. she played so many in u nforced macro, brazil. she played so many in unforced errors and it was a straight sets brazilian victory —— to ta ke straight sets brazilian victory —— to take on beatriz haddad maia. so her wimbledon lasted just one hour six minutes. another british scalp in this first day. and that is somebody you may not have heard of if you don't watch a lot of tennis. karen norrie is a student, only turned professional last month, playing in his first wimbledon on court number two, but beaten by jo—wilfried tsonga who has played in a couple of semifinals here. so norrie and laura robson go out on the opening day of wimbledon. plenty going on in the first couple of
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hours, many thanks. the former chelsea and england captain john terry has joined aston villa. that is on a one—year deal. a full update on the next hour. the foreign secretary has become the latest member of the cabinet to put pressure on the chancellor to relax the public sector pay cap. sources close to borisjohnson have made it clear he wants a better deal for workers. he joins the environment secretary, michael gove, who has suggested the 1% pay cap should be lifted. downing street says decisions will be made on a case—by—case basis. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young, at westminster. a long time since we said boris johnsonjoins michael a long time since we said boris johnson joins michael gove in anything! yes, the floodgates have opened and they are hammering to get on the airwaves to talk about this issue. downing street very much trying to say, we will look at this
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as the pay review comes forward. we will look at the recommendations. but not building up of a lot will change. they do say there will be a budget in the autumn. and everybody looking at that to see if things might change. i am joined by conservative mp johnny mercer, might change. i am joined by conservative mpjohnny mercer, one of the first to raise this issue, and you have set the trend for your collea g u es and you have set the trend for your colleagues to call out against this. what you make of it? i think it is positive. at politics, we get excited about who said what and when. it is a question of fairness and what is right. i was clear during the campaign. i take the temperature going out on the doors and people were talking about this and people were talking about this and the offer we give to our public sector workers. we have to make sure it is right. there is a noncontributory pension scheme and job security. but we need to make
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sure, are we getting that right. we need to look at that. the question from the chancellor is how is it to be paid for? would you be in favour of more borrowing would you think taxes have to go up? my party clearly believes in taxes and i agree with that, but as a population expands and we require more public services, we will have a conversation about tax and how much we pay. a lot of people in the doors we re we pay. a lot of people in the doors were prepared to pay more to make sure we look at the people properly. but there is still work to be done and still plenty of people who think too many people are claiming welfare who do not need to. so it is a balance. but we do need to look at public sector pay. m pleased others are climbing on board. but it is not about individuals and who said what and when. it is achieving at their result for public sector pay in this country and i look forward to the
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results of that hopefully in the autumn. labour say they have changed the conversation and it is the offer they made to the voters at the election that has meant you as the conservative party are running to catch up. i have only been here a couple of years but i cannot remembera time when couple of years but i cannot remember a time when the government did something the opposition plastic tattoo. government mps and mps in the party try and do the right thing by their constituents. —— something the opposition requested of you. we are servants of the people, everything —— are servants of the people, everything — — everybody are servants of the people, everything —— everybody knows that. it is ourjob to represent people. this is what they say. they understood austerity and that we could not undo it —— in 2015. in 2017, people looking at more and have two adapt to continue to drive change in this country and hopefully this will be part of that. do you think the chancellor was listening
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to that? he is concerned with the country not living with its means and balancing the books, it is the message going to get through to those in charge of the country's offers ? those in charge of the country's offers? the prime minister and chancellor listening. they have a difficultjob as you chancellor listening. they have a difficult job as you pointed out, where is the money going to come from and how would balance this complicated balance ? if from and how would balance this complicated balance? if we look at what we have done for low earners, raising the income tax threshold and living wage, let's not pretend the lowest workers are seen of all the time, there have been improvements. we have to listen to what people say. i know that the chancellor is listening and the prime minister. they are not going to not listen to either people like me. but people in this place think we are all isolated from public opinion and you put your finger in the air and vote against a public sector pay rise. that is not true. we are dedicated and i know the prime minister and the chancellor are part of that. during
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the election, you were knocking on doors and yours is not a typical conservative constituency. what were people saying? the election was another great experience for me being quite new into politics. people were talking about public sector pay and public services. 35% ofjobs in plymouth are in the public sector. it is a broad part of the workforce. brexit was not strong. people think brexit is done and we have voted and we need to deliver. we need to adapt to these challenges and the challenge of austerity. but deal with brexit. people want to get in. and what does the country look like post—9 macro? how we fund public services and get mental health right. veterans care. crushing problems we have to tackle. i want to see us get on with brexit
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and we can tackle these challenges further down the line. we are in a hung parliament and there is a deal between the conservatives and the dup, where we are politically, is that the kind of place, and environment you can have a mature discussion about very difficult decisions. i would like to think so. one of the disappointing things is the opposing nature of policies. there is a lottery agree on. we understand mental health has been badly funded for too long by governments. our veterans care is not good enough and i would like to see better working across party and i was working with norman lamb last term to talk about social care funding, and others. this is a court challenge. how do we look after people? people that do not want to pay more tax? it is very difficult. we can only do that if we work together. whether it can be
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achieved, probably we have been trying to do that for a long time andl trying to do that for a long time and i will certainly keep trying well until we get there. thank you very much indeed. a lot are pressing issues not just for the very much indeed. a lot are pressing issues notjust for the prime minister, for the chancellor to deal with over the summer as he looks ahead to the autumn budget. thank you very much. up to 18 people are feared dead, after a coach crashed and burst into flames in germany. the vehicle collided with a lorry on a motorway close to the bavarian town of stammbach, in the south of the country. police say 30 passengers have been taken to hospital, some with serious injuries. the rest are missing. daniela relph reports. the terrible scene of the crash on the a9 motorway near stammbach in bavaria. firefighters fought a desperate battle to put out the blaze that engulfed the vehicles. it is believed the tour
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bus was heading south to nuremberg when it hit a lorry in a trafficjam on the motorway. it caught fire immediately and was ablaze by the time the emergency services arrived. on board were a tour group from saxony, a state in the east of germany. as well as those still unaccounted for, rescue helicopters have taken others to a number of hospitals. many have serious injuries. a spokesman for the german chancellor angela merkel said there was great dismay about the crash and said her thoughts go to the victims and family members, as well as the injured. daniela relph, bbc news. the skincare brand baby dove has been criticised by mums, who say the company's new adverts support those who oppose breastfeeding in public. one advert says "75% say breastfeeding in public is fine, 25% say put them away. what's your way? with me is emma pickett, chair of the association of breastfeeding mothers and a lactation consultant who
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advises mothers on breastfeeding. what do you think of these adverts? we arejust what do you think of these adverts? we are just really sick of new mothers being taken advantage of by companies. i am sure dove are patting themselves on their back to think how clever they are, people talking about it online and being angry, but we're angry people trying to divide new mums. i have friends who formula feed and we stay together in children centres, we support them and their choices. i think dove think dividing mums will sell their products and it will backfire completely. in what way is the adverts dividing mums? backfire completely. in what way is the adverts dividing mums7m backfire completely. in what way is the adverts dividing mums? it says that we support your weight of breast—feeding in public and also if you oppose breast—feeding in public. yoo oppose breast-feedingin'poblic. i idea that will appeal to mothers the idea that will appeal to mothers who choose to formula feed, and that
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is nonsense. there is an advert talking about leaving a young baby to cry and that is the parental choice that you might leave your baby screaming and hysterical when thatis baby screaming and hysterical when that is a fallacy. there is something cynical and manipulative about it. and equality legislation is not optional. the right to breast—feed in public is protected by law. i'm sure next week dove will not say whether or not support you —— whether or not you support black doctors becoming doctors, we will support you. the idea that this piece of equality legislation is up for grabs on something you can make a cynical advert about is just really boring and insulting. but in england and wales, it is illegal for anybody to ask it breast—feeding woman to leave a public place and some people might say, is an advert going to make that much difference, it is enshrined in law! it is against criminal law in scotland and
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civil law in england and wales. but a new mother feeling vulnerable and leaving the house for the first time, this kind of conversation affects you. i had a message this morning from a mother who said she felt a bit more nervous because of this conversation, how on earth do dove think they will sell this product? they are at risk of things like postnatal depression when they are told they should stay inside their homes, that is not helping anybody. you might then the war has been won because of equality legislation, but a lot of people do not feel they can breast—feed. legislation, but a lot of people do not feel they can breast-feed. dove says, whatever choice you make, we are with you every step of the way, do not believe that? if they say we support you to formula beat or breast—feed, that sounds good to me, but if they are supporting new to abuse the woman breast—feeding next you, no. there will be supporting people either going to prison in scotla nd people either going to prison in scotland or the court in england and wales. we passed this now and we
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understand what media companies are trying to do and we are more sophisticated now. we are capable of choosing another product of the shelf. emma, it is really good to talk to you, thank you. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc news: a teenage girl pleads guilty to killing seven—year—old katie rough during a vicious attack in york. downing street insists there's no change in the government's policy on the public sector pay cap — amid continuing pressure to lift it. a long—awaited report into child abuse spanning decades injersey is published later today. hello. in the business news this afternoon. french energy supplier edf has estimated that the cost of completing the new hinkley point nuclear plant will be one and a half billion pounds more than expected. edf say that the total cost of the plant is now
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likely to be £19.6 billion. hinkley will be the uk's first nuclear plant for decades. the energy regulator ofgem says it's considering introducing a price cap on gas and electricity — aimed at bills for households on low incomes. it would be similar to a cap already in place for people who use pre—payment meters. ofgem will focus on whether some families with young children — and pensioners who receive the warm home discount — should be protected. four former barclays executives are in court today charged with conspiracy to commit fraud and the provision of unlawful financial assistance. they include the former chief executive of the bankjohn varley. the charges relate to a deal between barclays and several investment vehicles owned by the qatari state in 2008. good afternoon. elon musk, the boss of tesla, says his much—hyped model 3 car has
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passed regulatory requirements for production two weeks ahead of schedule. model 3 is the more affordable of his electric cars with a price tag of $35,000. samira hussainjoins us now from the new york stock exchange. how much of a game changer is this car? how much of a big deal is it? it is huge because if you look at the other tesla cars, they are a lot more expensive. one of the things elon musk wanted to do was to create a carat elon musk wanted to do was to create acarata elon musk wanted to do was to create a car at a more modest price. this is it. if you want to gauge interest, either a sense of how interested people are when you look at how many people put down a $1000 refundable deposit to be able to be one of the first to get their hands one of the first to get their hands on this model three. so there is a lot of hype and a lot of excitement, but at the same time, there are concerns. when you look at the model x, the suv, there were 18 months of delays to try to get that vehicle to
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consumers. so that worries about whether tesla will be able to deliver the number of cars already on demand. the cusp of that more modest price point, demand is going to be much higher and tesla does not have experience in mass producing ca rs have experience in mass producing cars and getting them out to consumers so a lot of people will be wanting to watch that. do the numbers add up, how are investors feeling about it? if you look at how it is trading here on the new york stock exchange, it is up a percentage and a half, which is not super significant, but it is the day before the big july the 4th weekend. long—time watchers around me, there is not that much activity happening, it isa is not that much activity happening, it is a lot slower these days. so it is hard to gauge investor sentiment by the stock because it is a slow week because of the holiday. thank you very much. in other business news:
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bank of england workers are going on strike at the end of the month over pay. it'll be the first time in more than 50 years that the bank has faced a walkout by staff. now, this comes after a ballot in which 95% of workers voted for industrial action. staff say for the second year in a row, they'd been offered a pay rise that was below the rate of inflation. samsung is releasing a new phone using parts from its galaxy note 7, which was axed after a battery fault led to some devices catching fire. the new phone — the note fan edition — is meant to "minimise the environmental impact". the handset will go on sale only in south korea at the end of the week, with a safer, smaller battery. and this may strike a chord with some parents — concerns in china over children spending too much time playing online computer games has led to taming curfew. led to a gaming curfew. the chinese tech giant tencent has responded to concerns by limiting the amount of time children can play some of its popular games,
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including king of glory. from today, players aged under 12 will be allowed to log in for only one hour a day, and not after 9pm. let's look at the markets now. european shares have made a strong start to the week — helped by energy shares and the price of crude oil touching over $49 per barrel. also, shares in supergroup, the owner of the clothing brand superdry, which is listed in the ftse 250, have risen sharply after it reported a big rise in profits and plans for standalone sports stores. that's all the business news. last night, a movie about the early life of the smiths front man morrissey, had its world premiere at the edinburgh international film festival. and while morrissey does know about the film, he is yet to say what he thinks of it. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been to meet the team behind it. the movie was made in manchester and
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filmed in stratford street. last night, a movie about the early life of the smiths front man morrissey, had its world premiere at the edinburgh international film festival. and while morrissey does know about the film, he is yet to say what he thinks of it. the local music scene is the sole preserve of troglodytes who is regard subtlety is comparison to the... it wasn't very good. muller see it was filmed in the street and underpasses would shape the man and its music. its director and writer mark gill was born nearby. we think this was the unemployment office. he signed on here. when morrissey was looking for a job, it became a film set. i wasn't making film about morrissey, i was making it about stephen. you could not make a film about the icon because he's not that person. i
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wa nted icon because he's not that person. i wanted a person. like any teenage person growing up with ambitions, i was trying to see how is he saw the world. like anybody else. one thing which isn't in the film is any music by the smiths. the film ends when the band were formed. the actor who played morrissey says there is no need to cover his years asa there is no need to cover his years as a front man. we do not need to do that. he's very much still alive and kicking, who cares? we don't need that, you can go see him and watch him, that's after him. this is before. the ginger scottish morrisey is not an obvious one. that sums up the film. i am nothing like the bloke. the film is a portrait of him. why is everybody concerned with my happiness? morrissey was told the film was being made, but is yet to comment. how nervous will you be when the review comes in? it
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depends how good or bad, it's going on the wall. stephen patrick morrisey, he likes the sound of own voice. thank you. the weather forecast now. the weather has been warming up and that sticks with us. some pine and summery weather today. this is east lothian ta ken by summery weather today. this is east lothian taken by our weather watcher this morning. through this week, those temperatures will be rising. some sunshine and a bit of rain, especially on tuesday. heavy showers and thunderstorms possible later in the week. this afternoon, we have spells of sunshine with some showers around across parts of east anglia. much of southern england look straight through the afternoon. temperatures about 20, 20 three degrees. cool around the coast. north into northern england. some light showers across cumbria and the
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scottish borders. northern ireland will cloud over late in the afternoon. scotland having a fine afternoon. scotland having a fine afternoon. some cloud building, bringing light showers. if you are going to wimbledon, around 20% chance of an afternoon shower. mostly dry over the next couple of days and you can see temperatures rising. into this evening, cloud continues across northern ireland bringing outbreaks of rain. moving overnight into the early hours of tuesday, the rain shifts across parts of southern scotland and north west england. elsewhere, it is looking dry and muggy in the south east. 15, 16 degrees. on tuesday, we have got this frontal system pushing slowly north and east across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england. to the north, spells of sunshine in central and northern scotland, 13—15d. warmer further south with 25 celsius and
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across the london region. into the middle part of the week, a weak frontal system, a warm front pushing further north across the uk. a fairly wea k further north across the uk. a fairly weak front which could bring cloud and petchey showers across northern ireland and later into scotla nd northern ireland and later into scotland and north east england. showers possible here. to the north of that, temperatures around 14—17d. further south, another very warm day on wednesday, with temperatures 28 celsius in the south east. with lead and humidity, heavy showers and thunderstorms by thursday. goodbye for now. this is bbc news. the headlines at three. a long—awaited report into decades of child abuse injersey is about to be published. a teenage girl admits killing seven—year old katie rough injanuary — the little girl was found with fatal injuries in a park in york. her mother was one of the first on the scene. we found her at the same time as the police officer found her. and i cradled her.
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i saw her injuries, i knew she was gone. four senior barclays bankers have appeared in court the first time, charged with conspiracy to commit fraud. downing street insists there's no change to the government's policy on the public sector pay cap, amid continuing pressure to lift it.
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