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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 6, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. one year on, the chairman of the iraq inquiry tells the bbc that tony blair has "failed to be straight with the nation." in his first interview, sirjohn chilcot, says the evidence the former prime minister gave was ‘emotionally truthful‘, but suggested that he relied on his own belief rather than the facts. any prime minister taking the country into war has got to be straight with the nation and carried so straight with the nation and carried so far as possible with him or her. i don't believe that was the case in the iraqi instance. good morning, it's thursday sixth july. also this morning: a quarter of care homes in england are not safe enough — that's the verdict of a damning report by inspectors. reckless and irresponsible. america's ambassador to the un condemns north korea's missile test.
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business leaders are gathering just down the road from here to talk about how to create the business leaders of tomorrow. i'm amongst teams who have been taking part in a competition to set up and run their own business from scratch. in sport, on a great day for the home crowds here at wimbledon. johanna konta reaches the third round for the first time, as watson, bedene and murray make it four british players through. we step back to 1967 to look at a slice of wimbledon history — 50 years ago, the first colour tv transmission was broadcast. we speak exclusively to the man who made it happen. the skies were throbbing ultramarine. the green was very saturated, and rolled, it was awful. but that was what we wanted. we want
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colour! a lot of it! and carol has the weather. we do not expect too many disruptions at wimbledon here today. some early showers that should pull away. it can completely rule out the risk of a thunderstorm but there will be a lot of dry weather. for the uk as a whole, rein in scotland, dry northern ireland, heavy downpours across the north of england labour. we will have more later. tony blair has not been straight with the nation according to sir john chilcot. speaking to the first time since the publication of the report one year ago, sirjohn chilcot tells the bbc why he thought tony blair made the decisions he did. our correspondent is in westminster for us this morning.
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firstly, can you reminders of the context of that highly charged enquiry? remember it was back in 2009 when gordon brown ordered the enquiry into what, by then, had become a very controversial war in iraq. the idea was enquiry was to learn the lessons of iraq, it was meant to look into the decision to go to war, whether the troops were prepared, how the conflict was conducted and the planning for the aftermath. seven years later, last summer, aftermath. seven years later, last summer, we aftermath. seven years later, last summer, we got the conclusion of the enquiry chaired by sirjohn chilcot. there were damning conclusions including that the uk chose to join the invasion of iraq before all peaceful options for disarmament had been exhausted. it was no imminent threat from saddam hussein at the time and the policy was made on the asus of flawed intelligence assessment. quite clear there from
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sirjohn chilcot last summer. now he has spoken for the first time to our political editor the, addressing one of the most important issues, the role of the former prime minister. do you feel that the politicians you dealt with were as straight with you as they ought to have been? i think i would need to distinguish. they adopted different approaches. i have to name names, here, because these were public sessions. tony blair is always and ever an advocate. he makes the most persuasive case he can, not departing from the truth, but persuasion is everything. advocacy for my position, my blair position. do believe he was a straight with you in the public as he ought to have been? can i slightly reword that to say that i think any prime minister taking a country into war needs to be as straight with the nation and carry it as far as possible with him or her.
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i don't believe that was the case in the iraq instance. you think he gave the fullest version of events? i think he gave, from his perspective and standpoint, emotionally truthful. and i think that came out in his press conference after the launch statement. i think he was under really great emotional pressure during those sessions, far more than the committee were. and he was suffering. he was deeply engaged. in that state of mind and mood, you fall back on your instinctive reactions. you are saying that he was relying on emotions, not fact? both. these are his personal reflections,
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looking back at his own enquiry. the report did not click accused tony blair of report did not click accused tony blairofany report did not click accused tony blair of any intention to deceive, any liars and a spokesperson for tony blair has referred as to the comments mr blair made at the time, the time sirjohn chilcot reference that, at the lengthy press conference when he accepted that the intelligence was wrong and planning had been poor but he insisted he had acted in good faith. there were no lies and no intention to deceive and he saw what he did at the time was right. we'll be speaking one british army general who gave evidence at the chilcot inquiry at ten past seven. a quarter of adult care services in england are not safe enough, according to inspectors. a report by the care quality commission says most care homes, nursing homes and home care services are good, but too many are failing on safety. among the issues raised by the care
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regulator are people not getting enough to eat and drink, and not being given the right medication. our social affairs correspondent alison holt has more. can you open your eyes, just a little? this woman carefully gives him at the lunch. the front room of their birmingham home has become betty's bedroom. they want her close by after discovering the sort of poor ca re by after discovering the sort of poor care highlighted in the report today. betty, who has heart problems and dementia is in a nursing home. the family had concerns so they put ina the family had concerns so they put in a secret camera. it showed a care worker pushing betty's chair sharply towards the desk. then when bedi objects to her top being changed, he had back into the chair. no, i don't wa nt had back into the chair. no, i don't want to! last february in court the
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ca re want to! last february in court the care worker accepted that her actions were reckless rather than intentional. she was given a 12 month community order. query everything. do not let them distance you because they did with us for about eight months and i wish we would have, you know, pursued it a lot quicker than we did, then mum probably would not have suffered the way she did. the report by inspectors today says most care in england is good or outstanding. even so, 25% of all services failed on safety. 37% of nursing homes were not safe enough. also, when ring inspected, quality of care and some good homes had deteriorated. what we're seeing in these services that are deteriorating is how fragile and precarious quality adult social care is and that is the reason why we really have to make sure that
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everybody understands quality matters, providers have got to focus on that and commissioners and funders have got to make sure that funding is available to ensure that people get the quality of care they deserve. the government says the poor ca re deserve. the government says the poor care experienced by some families is completely unacceptable. as well is putting in more money it will be consulting on how to place social care on a more secure footing for the future. the us ambassador to the united nations has described north korea's latest missile test as ‘a clear and sharp military escalation‘. it has been confirmed that the intercontinental ballistic missile fired by north korea for the first time could have a range of more than 3,000 miles — meaning it could reach alaska. nick quraishi reports. on the coast of south korea, a barrage of missiles is fired by local and american forces. commanders said the tests indicate what could happen if the us loses its patience with north korea. a show of force, backed up by strong
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words at the un security council. yesterday‘s actions by north korea made the world a more dangerous place. there are legal missile launch was not only dangerous, —— their illegal missile launch was not only dangerous, but reckless and irresponsible. experts believe the country‘s icbms could carry warheads as far as alaska. reaction has been divided. china‘s president in germany has called for restraint. russia has warned against any pre—emptive military action. as the us considers what to do next, president trump has arrived in poland ahead of the g20 summit in german many. —— germany. a united
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response looks likely. —— unlikely. a task force is to be sent in to help run kensington and chelsea council in the wake of the fire which destroyed grenfell tower. it will take over the running of key services, after their response to the disaster was heavily criticised. most of the families who lost their homes in the fire is still living in hotels despite government pledges to rehouse them by yesterday. we will do absolutely everything we can as a council to help our community and to help our community heal. and you don't think the council should be taken over? the council is not being taken over? the council is not being taken over. taken over? the council is not being ta ken over. we taken over? the council is not being taken over. we have asked people to come because we need more help. amnesty international has accused the european union of deliberately turning its back on migrants and refugees. the human rights group claims that making deals with libya put thousands of people at risk of drowning and torture. a new eu action plan aims to help the libyan coastguard stop migrants from crossing to italy —
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but amnesty says it will only make the crisis worse by leaving people trapped and exposed to abuse. we‘ve all heard of cats getting stuck up trees, but now they‘ve found a new way to risk their nine lives — by getting stuck in tiny spaces. the rspca says they‘ve been so busy they‘ve been called out to almost 3,000 trapped cats since january. this one, albus, got stuck in a four inch gap, which firefighters had to free him from. he could get in, but he could not get out. an rspca officer had to rescue this kitten, lola, when she got wedged eight feet up a chimney. it took four hours to free her! this gorgeous kitten was rescued from a 20 foot tree by a firefighter who found him huddled inside a pigeon nest, along with some nestlings.
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i had ihada i had a cat who used to get stuck in a tree every week. he was scared of heights. what happened if the cat did not come down?|j heights. what happened if the cat did not come down? i would have to ask people to help me get up a ladder to bring the cat down because i was not tall enough. the cat was probably an attention seeker. there was a sad ending to that. he could not get down. he was genuinely scared of heights. here we are having a look at the front pages for you. the main story here is kim jong—un, front pages for you. the main story here is kimjong—un, obviously in connection with the ballistic missile test and more on that story throughout the morning. the latest story here is about volvo saying that engines are changing radically and they will be abandoning diesel and they will be abandoning diesel and petrol only vehicles in favour of some form of electric engines in all of their cars. that is from 2019. one story we‘re covering here
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on breakfast is that one quarter of ca re on breakfast is that one quarter of care homes are not meeting the safety sta nda rds care homes are not meeting the safety standards required. the care quality commission has released a report saying 2% are inadequate, 23% don‘t meet safety regulations. the picture there is true wilfred —— jo—wilfried tsonga, trying to keep his cool amidst all the flying ants descending on wimbledon. not a pleasa nt descending on wimbledon. not a pleasant condition. i think we will see some of those shots surely when we go down to wimbledon. the daily mail also enjoying the british successor wimbledon. four british people in the third round, first time for decades. also, the change in engines for volvo cars. lots of wimbledon stories on the front page. especially with those flying ants. there they are. there were some an
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amazing slow motion shots. you could see them zipping around as the players were playing and then with the amazing cameras they have now... they are causing a few problems. people having to brush them off, use special lotion... some players said they had swallowed them. one day of they had swallowed them. one day of the year, they all come out. sally is that wimbledon for us this morning. do not mess with sally. if you are an ant, you don‘t have a chance. they are absolutely everywhere. good morning, both of you. we really struggled with the flying ants yesterday. it was like being in some kind of tropical jungle. yesterday. it was like being in some kind of tropicaljungle. we have all been bitten, i don‘t think i the ants, not by something else. it has been so humid and warm, grass everywhere. a difficult time for the players, you mentioned jo konta had
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swallowed a few of them. who cares, as she had a fantastic day yesterday. a brilliant match forjo konta, and as you mentioned, that fantastic statistic, four brits through for the first time in many yea rs. through for the first time in many years. the finest effort for women in 31 years. there was a lovely moment yesterday forjo konta, and i think she knows it, when the crowd absolutely backed her so much. she felt the love of the wimbledon crowd, i think possibly for the first time. she has not always had an easy time at wimbledon, so i think that was a real turning point for her. the back page of the mirror talking about wayne rooney. calling for lu ka ku to talking about wayne rooney. calling for lukaku to replace wayne rooney. and a really sad thing that we saw yesterday. here we go in the daily
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mail, they have a picture of kvitova, who was treated on court yesterday. the doctor came on the court, they were checking her heart and blood pressure, she said ifeel like a slow, sick animal. she is not going to play any further part in wimbledon, so a really sad end to what could have been an incredible wimbledon fairytale. our headline todayis wimbledon fairytale. our headline today is that wonderful fact, four brits through to the third round for the first time in 20 years. it is feeling, i am quite glad to say, a tiny bit cooler than it was yesterday. carol can explain why and whether or not i am right. well, as ever, we always have this debate about how cold it is. at the moment it is about 18 or 19 celsius, which is not very cool at all. you need to have a hot cup of tea, or something. many parts of the uk are starting
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off in double figures, so not a particularly cold start, what today we are looking at some thunderstorms. if we have a look at the forecast for wimbledon, the forecast, as you can see on the charts, looks like it will be dry and sunny, and there will be dry and sunny weather around. into the early afternoon we are at risk of some showers. at risk then diminishes, but we can‘t completely rule out a thunderstorm as we head into the afternoon. it will be hot and humid again, temperatures upto 30 celsius. for most of the uk it is going to be a warm day, and we are looking at is thunderstorms developing. we even have a few this morning across some southern areas. but these are the precursors to later on. as we move northwards, northern england seeing some showers, there could be thundery, again a precursor to later. scotland seeing rain moving from the west, heading up towards the north—east, and a few showers for northern ireland this morning but a lot of dry weather as well. as we head into wales, a lot of dry weather, variable amounts of cloud,
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some sunshine. some sunshine across south—west england. temperatures already in double figures and continuing to climb, but for parts of the coast of south—west england, that cloud will peg back the temperatures. as we had further east, a lot of dry weather, some sunshine, but the risk of a few showers, which could be thundery. as temperatures rise, we will see the atmosphere really go bang in places like east wales, the midlands, and northern england, which are the prone areas for the torrential downpours. they will be hit and miss, not all of us will see them, but if you do see one you will know all about it. we could see a few further south as well. in scotland, the rain moves northwards and some heavy showers will follow on behind. it should stay dry in northern ireland. as we head through the evening and overnight we carry on with those thunderstorms for a time before they push up into the north sea and another weather front comes in across the west of scotland, introducing some rain. in between, a lot of dry weather with a temperature range between ten and 18
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celsius, so still quite sticky in the south. tomorrow, we will have a lot of dry weather to start the day but the weather front in the west of scotla nd but the weather front in the west of scotland continues to drift steadily south eastwards, taking its cloud with it in the rain turning more showery in nature. fresher conditions for many of us, not as hot in the areas which are going to be hot, except in the south—east, where temperatures will be dry. that leads us into saturday. we start off the day across pots of wales, the midlands, and parts of northern england with some rain. that increasingly turning showery as we go through the course of the day, and once again there will be a lot of dry weather around. it is still the south—east that hangs on to the highest temperatures. for the rest of us we are in the high teens or the low 20s. so still a few days in the low 20s. so still a few days in the south in particularfor that the low 20s. so still a few days in the south in particular for that hot and humid weather to continue. thank you very much, we will get much more from carol and sally from wimbledon later in the morning. how do you create the business leaders of tomorrow?
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you leaders of tomorrow? have a bit of a gathering bet you. you have a bit of a gathering behind you. organised chaos, as they get ready for theirfinal you. organised chaos, as they get ready for their final presentations. this is the final for the young enterprise scheme. it has been whittled down to 1a teams, and some of them are with me today. this is ten colombia. tell us what you have got here —— team colombia. it is a small team and pretty hi—tech. it is an augmented reality children‘s book. by downloading ourfree an augmented reality children‘s book. by downloading our free app, you can point that the book and things come to life on the screen. and then that is interactive, so people can play with it. yes, so if you go to the earth, you can spin the earth and play around with that. there is even a colouring game, so
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if you click on that you can colour in the parrot different colours. and where did you come up with this idea, and the technology? so we programmed at all from scratch in a game engine called unity. we made all the engines ourselves and programmed all interactivity ourselves, and stuff like that. congratulations, and good luck later. i know you have to present this to the bosses. let me introduce you to many. tell me about the book on how you came up with it. this is leon's cooking adventure —— maddy. it integrates a storybook and a cook look into one, so as you can see we have the story, and then the recipes, and another element is we wa nt recipes, and another element is we want to integrate technology into children's lives in a positive way, so we children's lives in a positive way, so we have qr codes which take us to
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our youtube channel, and tutorials oi'i our youtube channel, and tutorials on how to make the video. so it is all about technology. showing it in all about technology. showing it in a positive way, and obviously the more traditional element is the recipes and stuff like that, and it helps to get parents and kids back together, because obviously they spend a lot of time on ipads, but it reconnects is spend a lot of time on ipads, but it reconnects is our spend a lot of time on ipads, but it reconnects is our aim. i definitely think perseverance is the key. especially with making a book, we wanted to be something unique. it was a little bit of a struggle coming up at that initial idea, but we have been strong as a team, and hopefully good enough. we have been strong as a team, and hopefully good enoughlj we have been strong as a team, and hopefully good enough. i will catch up hopefully good enough. i will catch up with you later. i want to introduce someone in an amazing bee costu me. introduce someone in an amazing bee costume. our book targets dangerous animals, we wrote a book targeting endangered animals and improving literacy in scotland in young children. so tell me about the book,
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andi children. so tell me about the book, and i have found someone who is as tall as me! tell me about the book. it is about coming up with the idea, but also you have learnt quite a lot of lessons about how to run a business, some good and some bad. yes, teamwork was really our main thing for us. we found it really challenging. we had a lot of the members at the start and we came down to our core team and found we really came together, and worked together. so the biggest lesson, that you have to fire people sometimes. yes, if they are not doing anything that has to be done, we we re so doing anything that has to be done, we were so much doing anything that has to be done, we were so much more doing anything that has to be done, we were so much more productive after we lost some deadweight, almost! thanks so much, nice to see you. let me introduce you to sharon, who is the possible of this. we are hearing some stories about how they come up with the idea and run those businesses, and they are really valuable life lessons, aren‘t they? getting the right skills for business is such a challenge. yes, and an appetite to learn is key to
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staying employable. and they are learning what works, what doesn't work. so the key traits of purser perseverance , and work. so the key traits of purser perseverance, and the ability of to learn from what doesn't work. 94% of people who take part in this programme go on to further education and training, versus 87% of the national average, so this is so important in making people employable. really good to talk to you, and we will catch up with your little later. that is a taste of what is going on. we will meet some of the other entrants, the 1a teams in the finals, a little later. stay tuned for that and we will have more of that later. thank you very much, rather impressive young people. of that later. thank you very much, rather impressive young peoplelj was never like that, were you? no. we re was never like that, were you? no. were you good at maths at school? not my speciality. still to come this morning: tim
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is with some maths—mad pupils, to find out the secret to becoming a whizz at your times tables. good morning to you from parklands school, in leeds, which is one of more than 100 which took part yesterday in an extraordinary event celebrating times tables. later on we will see what happened. at the school they love times tables. check this out. six eight. we will be finding out the secret to successfully learning your time is tables. why do they matter? why do we need to learn them? first, the news, the travel and the weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. a woman who survived the 7/7 london bombings says her heart goes out to victims of the recent terror attacks in the capital, and she is calling for better compensation for those affected. martine wright lost both her legs when the tube train she was travelling on was bombed in 2005. she went on to compete
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in the paralympics, and has now written a book about her experience. she says the government needs to reform the compensation system. ido i do think, and this is something that i fought for very early on, is the compensation to the victims and theirfamilies. they the compensation to the victims and their families. they promise that they were going to look at that, but they were going to look at that, but they have not looked at it. the ministry forjustice says victims and their families are supported under the criminal injuries compensation scheme. a teenager who drowned while working on the woolwich crossing is to have one of two new ferries named after him, in his memory. ben woollacott, who came from a family of five generations of thames watermen, died in 2011 after being dragged overboard by a mooring rope. the new boat is to be named after him, following a campaign by his friends and family. travel now.
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starting with the tube, that is looking pretty good so far this morning, although i do have to tell you that there are problems at tottenham court road station at the moment. central line trains aren‘t stopping there, because of an electrical fault. let‘s take a look at the blackwall tunnel. usual rush hour problems, really. it is slow northbound from blackwall lane. traffic on the a13 is also building up westbound, heading out of dagenham into barking. and in north london, barnet high road is closed between chandos avenue and buckingham avenue, for works. it is just to the north of the totteridge & whetstone tube station. over to lucy martin, now, with the weather. hello, good morning. another hot day on the way today, but with that it does come the risk of seeing some heavy, thundery showers. and we do have a yellow weather warnings in place, because if you catch one it could be quite heavy here. the odd rumble of thunder, could see some lightning, but not of ron catching glove are showers. we put the detail onto the map, we will see increasing
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amounts of sunshine as we move through the day to day. one or two showers to look out for through the morning but as the heat warms up into the afternoon, that is where we have the potential to see some heavy showers. probably the further north you are. temperatures today on the upper 20s. we could see about 30 celsius in central london. as we go through this evening, then, still one or two showers likely in the north. not on catching one of those again but then becoming increasingly dry. we will see variable amounts of cloud. we have plenty of clear skies, and on the night. overnight lows of 18, 19 celsius. tomorrow we will start off with plenty of brightness, but as we move through the day, starting to see increasing amounts of cloud. it does look like tomorrow will be very warm as well, and largely dry, with highs of 27 celsius. i leave you with the other then, the risk of seeing a heavy and thundery shower today but not eve ryo ne thundery shower today but not everyone catching one of those. another very warm day on the way tomorrow, with some decent spells of sunshine. that‘s all for now. more in half an hour, and of course, there is plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. our will hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we‘ll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: find out what happened when andy murray challenged charlie to take his place at the top of the leaderboard in our ‘game set mug‘ challenge. david attenborough‘s been telling us how his personal ambition, and a race against germany, made sure the bbc was the first to air colour tv 50 years ago. ab fab starjane horrocks will be here here to tell us how a chance discovery about her ancestors on ‘who do you think you are‘ inspired her new drama about the lancashire cotton famine. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning‘s main news. the chairman of the iraq inquiry, sirjohn chilcot, has told the bbc that the former prime minister, tony blair, was not "straight with the nation", or his inquiry, about the decisions made in the run—up to the iraq war. speaking for the first time since the publication of his report a year ago today, sirjohn tells the bbc why he thinks mr blair made
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the decisions he did, and about mr blair‘s state of mind at the time of the inquiry. do you believe that tony blair was the street with you in the public as he ought to have been? —— as straight with you. you. any prime minister taking the country into war has got to be straight with the nation and carry it so far as possible with him or her. i don‘t believe that was the case in the iraq instance. a quarter of adult care services in england are not safe enough, according to inspectors. a report by the care quality commission says most care homes, nursing homes and home care services are good, but too many are failing on safety. among the issues raised by the care regulator were people not getting enough to eat and drink, and not being given the right medication. the government said it would invest
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more money in social care. the us ambassador to the united nations has described north korea‘s latest missile test as ‘a clear and sharp military escalation‘. it has been confirmed that the intercontinental ballistic missile fired by north korea for the first time could have a range of more than 3000 miles, meaning it could reach alaska. it isa it is a dark day because yesterday‘s actions by north korea needs the world a more dangerous place. there are legal missile launch was not only dangerous reckless and irresponsible. it showed that north korea does not want to be part of a peaceful world. the risk of attacks on uk soil by supporters of the so—called islamic state group could increase as is continues to lose territory in the middle east. that‘s the warning from the director of public prosecutions following bbc news research which found that over 100 people in the uk have now been convicted of terror offences related to iraq and syria. it‘s believed that two of the three men who carried out
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the london bridge attack had wanted tojoin is in syria. a task force will be sent to help run kensington and chelsea council, in the wake of the devastating fire which destroyed grenfell tower and killed at least 80 people. it will take over the running of key services, after the council‘s response to the disaster was heavily criticised. most of the families which lost their homes in the fire are still living in hotels — despite government pledges to re—house them by yesterday. we will do absolutely everything we can as a council to help our community and to help our community heal. and you don't think the council should be taken over? the council is not being taken over. we have asked people to come because we need more help. amnesty international has accused the european union of deliberately turning its back on migrants and refugees. the human rights group claims that making deals with libya put thousands of people at risk
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of drowning and torture. a new eu action—plan aims to help the libyan coastguard stop migrants from crossing to italy — but amnesty says it will only make the crisis worse, by leaving people trapped and exposed to abuse. at least 15 people are missing after widespread flooding hit parts of japan following unprecedented rainfall. 400,000 people have been forced from their homes after floodwaters hit towns and villages on the main southern island of kyushu. meteorologists are warning that the weather could worsen. japanese authorities have deployed police, search and rescue teams and soldiers to the region. the latest on the ant situation at wimbledon. we cross now to our correspondent. in amongst a great day of action on court, rather bizarre some of the goings—on, won‘t they? i feel like i bizarre some of the goings—on, won‘t they? ifeel like i should be wearing one of those huge mosquito nets, perhaps a giant hat with a net
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because it was mad yesterday. touch wood it is not so bad today. if the just like that? one day full of flying ants every summer. the players must serve had a really tricky time out there. joanna conca says that she is convinced she swallowed many of the ansey is today but it did not matter because she won anyway. it really was a great day for home fans here, for the first time in 20 years, there are four british players through to the third round. johanna konta said it was great to be part of it — she needed three sets — and three hours — to beat donna vekic but she made it through to round three for the first time. iam i am looking to compete at my best every single match i got to play. i have given myself another opportunity to come back here at wimbledon, play another round and i am gonna give my all in that so i‘m here with the intention of wanting to bea here with the intention of wanting to be a part of the events of the
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full two weeks but as you saw out there, every single player he plays a very high level on any given day there is no easy match and i‘m just very grateful to have another go. heather watson was the first british player through — she beat anastasia sevastova and faces the former world number one victoria azarenka next. aljaz bedene also reached the third round for the first time in his career, beating a good friend of his, damir dzumhur. and last but definitely not least, andy murray‘s bid for a third title is still on course, after an entertaining but comfortable win over one of the game‘s great characters, germany‘s dustin brown. idid i did well. i concentrated quite well own service games, which is positive and put a lot of returns back in play. i think that was very positive today. i did not give too many free points on my server so it was a good start. and you might remember these
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pictures from yesterday — jack sock‘s wimbledon towel being snatched out of the hands of a young fan by an older man. well, the good news is the youngster has been tracked down after a social media hunt, and jack has sent him a new towel in the post! i think he deserves it. in other sport, tammy beaumont and sarah taylor both hit centuries as england‘s cricketers moved a step closer to the semi— finals of the women‘s world cup. they beat south africa by 68 runs. today, england‘s men take on south africa at lord‘s in the first of four test matches. iam i am confident in the squad that we have got in the side we have. very respectful that they are a strong
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side. wejust need respectful that they are a strong side. we just need to respectful that they are a strong side. wejust need to be respectful that they are a strong side. we just need to be consistent player well away from home. we are fully aware that we need to be our best but i have the confidence in the group. chris froome has taken the overall lead at the tour de france. he finished third on stage five to overtake sky team—mate geraint thomas, who‘s now second. and the british and irish lions have named an unchanged side for their deciding test with new zealand on saturday. it‘s the first time they‘ve done that since 1993. and after all of the changes and all of the talks of different types of squads, it is an interesting move. now, back to the tennis. you may remember that giant bbc breakfast market here at wimbledon and we have been challenging some of the top tennis players in the world to game, set, mug um to see how many balls they can get into the giant mug in 30 seconds. we have had joanna conca, andy murray but we thought who else could we get? which
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brilliant tennis player could perhaps matched andy murray was to mark we‘ve got charlie! here he is. andy murray is watching. no pressure. you are standing close to me when! pressure. you are standing close to me when i was doing it. you are trying to put extra pressure on. me when i was doing it. you are trying to put extra pressure onlj was just asking questions. trying to put extra pressure onlj wasjust asking questions. this is, this was your technique, right? ok, we have a timer. i will give you a free, too, one go. how am i doing? good. there we go. if i beat andy murray... you are halfway. how long have i got? i pulling weird faces? i
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have i got? i pulling weird faces? i have not been checking. you have done better than most of the players. that was good. i think this counts. 15, 16, 17... 21. except we have to minus the ones that you got. how many do get altogether? seven. with that. ryan only got four. you should be proud. i am feeling better all the time. well done. can we just check the leaderboard and see where charlie is now professional leaderboard? charlie charlie is now professional leaderboa rd ? charlie is charlie is now professional leaderboard? charlie is second?! as
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andy mentioned, near loss round each only got four. —— —— milos raonic.|j am not exaggerating. that is one of the best moments of my life. did you see the technique? it was impressive. i think andy murray was taking tips. i think charlie is secretly good at tennis. he was a very good sport, that is the truth. that was his idea. he wanted me to do it as well. he is a good sport, a busy man and we wish him well over the next few days. we will talk to sally a little later on. done, you.
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i‘m so impressed. sally a little later on. done, you. i'm so impressed. i fear the mathematics test a little later, that won‘t go as well. mathematics test a little later, that won't go as well. just days in the glory of this moment. this is bbc breakfast. one year on from the iraq enquiry the chairman has told the bbc that tony blair was not straight with the nation when making the case for war. america‘s un ambassador has condemned and north korea‘s missile test as president trump heads to europe to meet world leaders. patients who are not getting enough to eat or drink, who are getting out of date medication and when there are not enough staff to go around. these concerns highlighted by the care regulator today. it is unveiling the full details of its new inspection regime. the failings have been caught completely unacceptable but what will be done? let‘s find out now. andrea sutcliffe is the chief
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inspector. i know you are keen to point out that the majority of services offered are performing well. indeed they are. what we have showed in our report today is that the vast of adult social care services, be that caring your own home, in nursing home or residential, they are good and meeting the tests and 2% of those services are outstanding. that is down to the dedicated work of thousands of staff across the country and we should pay tribute to them. but inevitably, care isjudged by the worst because that is the standard we are looking for. 20,000 people, this morning, as we are chatting now, are in institutions or ca re chatting now, are in institutions or care homes that are inadequate. can you give us a sense of what that means in practical terms? some of these things sound extraordinary. not enough to drink, not being fed
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properly. it is extraordinary. it is com pletely properly. it is extraordinary. it is completely unacceptable. we are finding that about 2% of services are inadequate and we have said that another 20% of services that need to improve. what we see in these homes, particularly in the worst ones, and what we see in the care that people get in the community is not enough staff. people are rushed, unable to give the care that they need to give so people are missing calls home, not giving medication, not being supported to eat well enough or drink well enough and that is so important for the health and well—being. important for the health and well-being. how is coming about? one of the things that we are concerned about is the colour you know, level of va ca ncy about is the colour you know, level of vacancy in the services and the numbers of staff who move each year between services or out of the sector altogether. what that means is that there is no consistent —— consistency that we want to see. one
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thing our reporters tried to do todayis thing our reporters tried to do today is to highlight what the good services are doing, how they are focusing on the needs of people, how they ensure that they have a culture which is inclusive, transparent and connected to the local community, and how they have really good leaders to support their staff and make sure that they are trained and valued and recognised for the work that they do and all of that those together to make a good service. that is what we want in the services that we‘ve identified as needing to improve or inadequate need to do. when it boils down to the practicalities, a moment ago you mentioned people not being given enough to eat or drink, not getting enough to eat or drink, not getting enough time to go the toilet. of the really basic staff. how is it ok for one of your inspectors to leave a home, knowing that that is happening and back home to remain open? how do you know, for example, that the very next day, exactly the same thing is not happening again? one of the very
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important aspects of our inspections is the feedback we provide to people who are running the services. but what they need to do and how they need to go about making those improvements. what we have seen in these inspections is that the majority of services, when we have identified the problems, have indeed improved. let‘s not forget, these are the homes for people. we do not wa nt to are the homes for people. we do not want to close things down overnight because that means a huge disruption and disruption for their families. we wa nt and disruption for their families. we want the services to improve in the majority do. that does not happen, we will take further action and we have done so to force that improvement, either by preventing them from admitting new people in all, indeed, taking action which means that the service does close. i would much prefer that people put these things right and they provide these things right and they provide the care that people have every right to expect. ina way,
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in a way, when it boils down to some of the things which are going on, it is almost frightening, isn‘t it? i know the phrase tipping point has been mentioned before, about where we‘re at with our social care. is there a horrible new reality dawning now, which is that, because of the recruitment crisis, others talk about the financing and social care, is there a horrible new reality, which is that, in the world we live in now, if these kind of... i am going to call the mistakes, but these things happening, people not being fed, being given basic human needs,is being fed, being given basic human needs, is that something which is just going to happen? it so should not be what is going to happen. that is the reason why... but it is happening, you are seeing. that is the reason why what we are doing is so important, in identifying and shining a spotlight on this, and making sure that people put it right. i think that we have a precarious situation in our adult
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social care has. we are seeing good services. it is not the reality for everybody, but it is not consistently good enough everywhere, and we need to make sure that we are taking the action that we need to do. at others need to step up to the plate as well. people that are running these services need to use the resources that they have got available properly, support their staff, make sure that people are getting the care they deserve, and the public wadis which are commissioning these services, buying these services on behalf of people, they need to make sure that they are focusing on quality, and supporting these services to do the right thing by the people who are using them. thank you for your time this morning. carol is at wimbledon with a look at this morning‘s weather. iimagine i imagine this area will get very busy later on. it most certainly will, and it is beautiful down here as well. and later on, you are quite
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right, we might see some more flying a nts right, we might see some more flying ants because today is going to be hot and ants because today is going to be hotand humid ants because today is going to be hot and humid in the south once again. a couple of interesting facts about those flying ants. they tend to do it more or less on the same day, give or take a day or two, across the country, and scientists are no way exactly that is, but they think the queen and picks the day by sensing the temperatures, the humidity and the day length. and hot and humid conditions are perfect. the heat makes it easier for them to fly and the humidity makes the ground softer for the ants to actually dig in and lay her eggs. so some interesting facts they are. the forecast today for wimbledon, you can see in the charts it looks like it will be dry all day. it will be sunny and hot and humid, it will be dry all day. it will be sunny and hotand humid, but we are at risk of some showers into the early afternoon. some of those could be thundery, and that risk tends to diminish, but not completely. we can‘t completely rule out the thundery shower in the afternoon or evening, and temperatures up to 30
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celsius. for all of us, evening, and temperatures up to 30 celsius. forall of us, again, evening, and temperatures up to 30 celsius. for all of us, again, today we are looking at some thunderstorms here and it will be warm, or indeed hot. if we start off the south—east of england, we are looking at variable amounts of cloud, a little bit more than yesterday, some sunshine, and some showers. and though showers not particularly heavy, you may hear the odd rumble of thunder. as we drift to the midlands, east anglia, heading in northern england, variable amounts of cloud, some sunny spells, the odd shower. scotland has rained crossing towards the north—east. in northern ireland, one or two showers, but largely dry. same for wales, largely dry, with some sunny spells. south—east england, the same, temperatures in double figures, although in the south—west of england, some cloud will peg back the temperatures. drifting towards bristol and the home counties, similar story. a fair bit of cloud at times, some sunny spells and the risk of the odd thundery shower. as we go through the course of the day and temperatures rise, we start to see the torrential thunderstorms, especially from east wales, the
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midlands in northern england. they are hitand midlands in northern england. they are hit and miss, midlands in northern england. they are hitand miss, not midlands in northern england. they are hit and miss, not all of us will see them, some possible stay dry and sunny but if you do you‘ll know all about it. we could see a few further south, again hit and miss. about it. we could see a few further south, again hitand miss. in about it. we could see a few further south, again hit and miss. in the rain turning showery, in northern ireland it will stay dry. as we head on through the evening and overnight the remnants of the thunderstorms continue to drift off into the north sea. lots of dry weather, some clear spells, and another weather front showing its hand across western scotland, introducing some rain. the temperature range of 12 in the north toa temperature range of 12 in the north to a sticky 18 as we had further south. tomorrow, a lot of dry weather to start the day. start once again. we will see that weather front across western scotland start to sink southwards. in doing so it will weaken, so there will be more cloud with it and the rain turning more patchy. and around that and behind it are well be that bit fresher, but still quite sticky in the south—east, with highs up to 28 celsius. as we head into saturday,
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we start the day across wales, the midlands, parts of northern england, with some rain. through the course of the day that tends to break up and turn more showery. again, on either side of it, quite a bit of dry weather around, and some sunshine. and in the south—east, hanging on to the higher temperatures. for the rest of the uk, it will be fresh. thank you very much, we will see you later on. at wimbledon, we are used to tennis balls being this colour, but they very nearly looked like this, instead, and it is all down to what worked best for colour tv. it has been 50 years since colour television began with coverage of wimbledon, and it was all down to the personal ambition of one man, sir david attenborough. he has been speaking exclusively to breakfast‘s graham satchell. lillian gish, what made you decide to become an actress?|j lillian gish, what made you decide to become an actress? i never decided. late-night line 1967, and
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the bbc was running an experiment. while the rest of the country was watching black—and—white, to make people were watching in colour. there were two, two prototype colour television receivers. one of them belong to the chief engineer of the bbc, and the other was mine, and they were the size of refrigerators. sir david attenborough, then controller of bbc two, one of the channel to be the first in europe to go colour. we knew that we were running a race with germany. and in a rather childish way, i thought it would be nice to compete. and it occurred to me than that two broadcast units were enough to give you a continuous service from wimbledon. it is not the first time wimbledon. it is not the first time wimbledon offered an opportunity. 80 yea rs wimbledon offered an opportunity. 80 years ago, it was the first sport to be broadcast live on television. this year also sees the 90th anniversary of radio commentaries, and then 50 years ago, this. the first colour television in europe.
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it was like, you know, a sudden new world of brilliant colour, and everything that you only saw if you went there to the event was here before your eyes, and that was wonderful. john barrett, the voice of tennis commentary for more than 30 years. in 1967 he was still playing, but remembers the introduction of colour tv well, and its impact on wimbledon. the colour of the balls used to be white. they had a day here which i remember well when they were testing all sorts of new colours. and after a number of colours were tested, including pink, yellow was found to be the most easily discernible against the grass. so it could have been pink. well, it could have been. it doesn't feel right, does it? pink! there is the trophy going back to australia. there were other changes. the trophy presented on court to the winning man used to be this, the presidents
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cup. today they get the challenge cup, because it looks better on colour tv. it is gold. so what does the man who introduced colour make of his achievement? we had guests in every evening, and it was a wonder. the problem was, on the first set there was a thing called the tilt control, and viewers would wind up the tent, so that the skies were throbbing ultramarine, the greens we re throbbing ultramarine, the greens were saturated and rolt. i mean, they were awful. but they wanted real colour. that's what they wanted. we want real colour! and we still do. hard to imagine today a world without colour television, had all world without colour television, had a ll started world without colour television, had all started here on centre 50 years ago. it is absolutely fascinating, isn‘t it? the advent of colour tv. and now you know why we have yellow balls.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. a woman who survived the 7/7 london bombings says her heart goes out to victims of the recent terror attacks in the capital, and she is calling for better compensation for those affected. martine wright lost both her legs when the tube train she was travelling on was bombed in 2005. she went on to compete in the paralympics, and has now written a book about her experience. she says the government needs to reform the compensation system. i do think, and this is something that i fought for very early on, is the compensation to the victims and their families. they promised that they were going to look at that, but they‘ve not looked at it. the ministry forjustice says victims and their families are supported under the criminal injuries compensation scheme. a teenager who drowned while working on the woolwich crossing is to have
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one of two new ferries named after him in his memory. ben woollacott, who came from a family of five generations of thames watermen, died in 2011 after being dragged overboard by a mooring rope. the new boat is to be named after him following a campaign by his friends and family. travel now. starting with the tube, that is looking pretty good so far this morning, although i do have to tell you that there are problems at tottenham court road station at the moment. central line trains aren‘t stopping there, because of an electrical fault. let‘s move onto the roads, then. this is the a13. traffic is building westbound heading out of dagenham into barking. we have also got the usual rush hour delays at the blackwall tunnel. northbound traffic on the southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. and in north london, barnet high road is closed between chandos avenue and buckingham avenue, for works. it is just to the north of the totteridge & whetstone tube station. over to lucy martin,
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now, with the weather. hello, good morning. another hot day on the way today, but with that does come the risk of seeing some heavy, thundery showers. and we do have a yellow weather warning in place, because if you catch one, it could be quite heavy here. the odd rumble of thunder, see some lightning, but not everyone catching those showers. so if we put the detail onto the map, then, we‘ll see increasing amounts of sunshine as we move through the day today. one or two showers to look out for through the morning, but as the heat warms up into the afternoon, that is where we have the potential to see some heavier showers, probably the further north you are. temperatures today in the upper 20s. but we could see about 30 degrees celsius in central london. as we go through this evening, then, again, still one or two showers likely in the north. not everyone catching one of those, again, but then becoming increasingly dry. we will see variable amounts of cloud, but plenty of clear skies, and overnight lows of 18, 19 celsius. tomorrow we will start off with plenty of brightness. but, as we move through the day, starting to see increasing amounts of cloud.
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it does look like tomorrow will be very warm, as well, and largely dry, with highs of 27 degrees celsius. i‘ll leave you with the outlook, then. the risk of seeing a heavy and thundery shower today, but not everyone catching one of those. another very warm day on the way tomorrow, with some decent spells of sunshine. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. one year on, the chairman of the iraq inquiry tells the bbc that tony blair has "failed to be straight with the nation." in his first interview,
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sirjohn chilcot, says the evidence the former prime minister gave was ‘emotionally truthful‘, but suggested that he relied on his own belief rather than the facts. any prime minister taking the country into war has got to be straight with the nation and carry it so far as possible with him or her. i don‘t believe that was the case in the iraq instance. good morning, it‘s thursday sixth july. also this morning: reckless and irresponsible. a quarter of care homes in england an a quarter of care homes in england a n safe a quarter of care homes in england an safe enough as a result of a damning report from inspectors. reckless and irresponsible. america‘s ambassador to the un condemns north korea‘s missile test. how do you create the business leaders of tomorrow? you train them today. i‘m here with the finalists
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of the young enterprise scheme in london to learn about what they know about creating their own business. good morning, everyone! in sport four british players through to the third round at wimbledon for the first time in 20 years. an emotionaljohanna konta battled it out for more than three hours as she joined andy murray, aljaz bedene and heather watson in the last 32. and we‘ll be looking at a slice of wimbledon history. 50 years ago, the first colour tv transmission. we speak exclusively to the man who made it happen. the skies were throbbing ultramarine. the greens were saturated emerald, it was awful. but that was what we wanted. we want colour! a lot of it! i‘m next to the trophies, the risk of showers to early afternoon and
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thenit of showers to early afternoon and then it diminishes but we can‘t rule it out altogether. for the rest of the uka it out altogether. for the rest of the uk a lot of dry weather around. rain crossing scotland and heavy thunderstorms for some later on. we will be back later in the programme. good morning. first, our main story. the chairman of the iraq inquiry, sirjohn chilcot, has told the bbc that the former prime minister, tony blair, was not "straight with the nation", or his inquiry, about the decisions made in the run—up to the iraq war. speaking for the first time since the publication of his report a year ago today, sirjohn tells the bbc why he thinks mr blair made the decisions he did, and about mr blair‘s state of mind at the time of the inquiry. our political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminsterfor us. shall we start first of all with the chilcott inquiry and what it was all about? it was ordered in 2009 by gordon brown in an attempt to learn lessons from the iraqi war. seven yea rs lessons from the iraqi war. seven years and almost 2 million words later, last summer, we got the
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conclusions from sirjohn chilcot and they were pretty damning. among other things he said the uk chose to join the invasion of iraq before all the peaceful options for disarmament we re the peaceful options for disarmament were exhausted. he said policy was made on the basis of flawed intelligence assessments, the military were underprepared and the consequences were underestimated. he has given his first interview since the publication of his report and he has been speaking to laura kuenssberg, reflecting among other things on the role of former prime minister tony blair and his conduct during the enquiry. do you feel that the tony blair was as straight with you as he ought to have been? can i slightly reword that to say that i
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think any prime minister taking a country into war needs to be as straight with the nation and carry it as far as possible with him or her. i don‘t believe that was the case in the iraq instance. do you think he gave the fullest version of events? i think he gave, from his perspective and standpoint, emotionally truthful. and i think that came out in his press conference after the launch statement. i think he was under really great emotional pressure during those sessions, far more than the committee were. and he was suffering. he was deeply engaged. in that state of mind and mood, you fall back on your instinctive reactions. you are saying that he was relying on emotions, not fact? both. these were his personal reflections
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on the process of carrying out that enquiry. in his report he didn‘t accused tony blair of lying or manipulating the evidence for going to war but we‘ve heard from a spokesperson for tony blair who referred us to the comments he made at the time in a press conference where he said he accepted the intelligence was wrong and he took full responsibility for what happened and the decision he made but he took that decision in good faith and there were no lies or intention to deceive and he did what he thought was right at the time. thanks very much. we are going to talk to one british army general who gave evidence in a few minutes. a quarter of adult care services in england are not safe enough, according to inspectors. a report by the care quality commission says most care homes, nursing homes and home care services are good, but too many are failing on safety. among the issues raised by the care regulator were people not getting enough to eat and drink, and not being given the right medication.
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there are some distressing images in this report from our social affairs correspondent, allison holt. mum, can you open your eyes just a little? this woman carefully gives her mum her lunch. the front room of their birmingham home has become 78—year—old betty boyland‘s bedroom. they want her close by after discovering the sort of poor care highlighted in the report today. betty, who has heart problems and dementia, is in a nursing home. the family had concerns so they put in a secret camera. it soon showed a care worker pushing betty‘s chair sharply towards the desk. then when betty objects to her top being changed, her head is slammed back into the chair. no, i don‘t want to! last february in court, the care worker accepted that her actions were reckless rather than intentional. she was given a 12—month community order. query everything. don‘t let them distance
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you because they did with us for about eight months and i wish we would have, you know, pursued it a lot quicker than we did. then mum probably would not have suffered the way she did. the report by inspectors today says most care in england is good or outstanding. even so, 25% of all services failed on safety. 37% of nursing homes were not safe enough. also, when re—inspected, quality of care in some good homes had deteriorated. what we‘re seeing in these services that are deteriorating is how fragile and precarious quality adult social care is and that is the reason why we really have to make sure that everybody understands quality matters. providers have got to focus on that and commissioners and funders have got to make sure that funding is available to ensure that people get the quality of care they deserve. the government says the poor care
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experienced by some families is completely unacceptable. and that as well as putting in more money, it will be consulting on how to place social care on a more secure footing for the future. palace halt, bbc news. the us ambassador to the united nations has described north korea‘s latest missile test as ‘a clear and sharp military escalation.‘ it has been confirmed that the intercontinental ballistic missile fired by north korea for the first time could have a range of more than 3,000 miles, meaning it could reach alaska. nick quraishi reports. on the coast of south korea, a barrage of missiles is fired by local and american forces. commanders said the tests indicate what could happen if the us loses its patience with north korea. a show of force, backed up by strong words at the un security council. yesterday‘s actions by north korea made the world a more dangerous place.
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there are legal missile launch was not only dangerous, but reckless and irresponsible. experts believe the country‘s icbms could carry warheads as far as alaska. president xijinping in germany has called for restraint. russia has warned against any pre—emptive military action. as the us considers what to do next, president trump has arrived in poland, ahead of the g20 summit in germany. the crisis will be high on the agenda there, but a united response looks unlikely. president trump has arrived in poland ahead of tomorrow‘s g20 summit.
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he‘s due to make a keynote address to the crowds in warsaw later today. our correspondent adam easton is live there now. donald trump is there but how do these things work, do you get an indication about what he might say? i think what he‘s most likely to say is give reassurances, defence reassurances, to the polls and other central europe and leaders who are meeting in warsaw today for a summit. the will say i believe in nato, i believe in the article five in that any member of nato which is attacked, the other member states will come to your defence. the annexation of georgia, crimea and the war in ukraine is the number—1 thing polls and other regional leaders would to hear from donald trump. —— poles. we‘ll help you if you‘re attacked. amnesty international has accused
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the european union of deliberately turning its back on migrants and refugees. the human rights group claims that making deals with libya put thousands of people at risk of drowning and torture. a new eu action—plan aims to help the libyan coastguard stop migrants from crossing to italy, but amnesty says it will only make the crisis worse by leaving people trapped and exposed to abuse. we‘ve all heard of cats getting stuck up trees. now you can see how they are finding new ways to risk their nine lives, by getting stuck in tiny spaces. the rspca says it was called out to help almost 3,000 trapped cats since january. this one, albus, got stuck in a four—inch gap, which firefighters had to free him from. an rspca officer had to rescue this kitten, lola, when she got wedged eight feet up a chimney. it took four hours to free her! it always surprises me the cats can get in but they can‘t get out. this gorgeous kitten was rescued
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from a 20ft tall tree by a firefighter who found him huddled inside a pigeon nest, along with some nestlings. they really get into some pickles, don‘t they? we will have the weather later so that with them in a bit. let‘s get back to our main story now. when sirjohn chilcot delivered his report on the iraq war he criticised almost every part of the uk‘s involvement in it. that included the reasons it began, the intelligence provided and the post—war planning. a year after the report‘s publication, sirjohn has now told the bbc that tony blair was not straight with the nation or his inquiry. major general tim cross also appeared at the inquiry. we can speak to him now. thank you very much indeed for
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joining us this morning, major general. first of all, your reaction, you‘ve been hearing snippets of this interview sirjohn chilcot gave to the bbc, your reaction? i thought it was really interesting. as you say, it was only snippets of what i know was aao minute interview so inevitably you will have pulled out some of the key issues. what i found interesting was sirjohn made the point tony blair gave his witness statements from a different approach, the advocacy idea, and he focused on the emotional intelligence aspect of tony blair, which is really interesting i think because tony blair was interesting i think because tony blairwas an interesting i think because tony blair was an emotional guy, one of the reasons he got elected so often, i have to say i never voted for him, but it was because of his emotional intelligence. one needs to see the context of the decisions taken in 2003. the 1991 which i was involved m, 2003. the 1991 which i was involved in, the rwanda issue in the 1990s, the balkans, kosovo and so on, i‘m
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not surprised he focused in on this, blair was not surprised he focused in on this, blairwas an not surprised he focused in on this, blair was an emotional guy and ironically gordon brown and theresa may are being accused of not being emotional enough so there‘s an interesting conversation here i think. do you think or believe that emotion interfered with rational decision—making? emotion interfered with rational decision-making? sure, yeah, i'm sure it did. when i met tony blair in kosovo for example when my brigade built and ran refugee camps, he literally wept in tents with the refugees, he‘s very emotional, and in chicago in 99 when he made a speech, he talked about the necessity in the 20th century not to stand back and watch when people are massacred in the balkans and rwanda and so on but we all bring emotions into this but how far do you allow them to infringe on your decision—making? again i stress, i don‘t rush to defend tony blair, i don‘t rush to defend tony blair, i don‘t agree with a lot of the decisions he made, but it‘s interesting sirjohn didn‘t say he
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didn‘t tell the truth but his emotions obviously had a big impact on his decision—making. one of the things that struck people observing the wall was how prepared the british army was, and i am going to play a clip, and hopefully you will be able to hear this, of sir john chilcot torquay about the level of preparedness of the army. john chilcot torquay about the level of preparedness of the armylj john chilcot torquay about the level of preparedness of the army. i had so many years in northern ireland where the troops were given extremely clear instructions and orders as to how to operate. no such instructions or guidance was given at all in the beginning of iraq. what do we do if a bunch of iraqis come at us and we have got rivals? do we shoot not shoot? now that can never happen again. that was awful institutional failure. and that is because the report has wrought in a new level of challenge.” because the report has wrought in a new level of challenge. i believe so. in fact, new level of challenge. i believe so. infact, i new level of challenge. i believe so. in fact, i am assured so. and hoping so. you were the british
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representative of the office of humanitarian assistance and you saw firsthand what was happening and how the army was coping. your reaction to what sirjohn chilcot said there? it is interesting that he is focusing in on what we call rules of engagement. i served focusing in on what we call rules of engagement. iserved in focusing in on what we call rules of engagement. i served in northern ireland in the 19705 and they were very clear rules of engagement. the british army train5 very clear rules of engagement. the british army trains to manage and understand warfare, things like the geneva conventions and so on. so there is a foundation of the rules of engagement. and sirjohn, i did not say this earlier, but he said in his report and reaffirmed in this interview that this was not last resort, one of the just war criteria, the idea that in warfare how do you fight this war is what he i5 how do you fight this war is what he is talking about here, in terms of the rules of engagement. i think the british army were pretty well prepared for this operation militarily, in terms of the combat
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power, and we mustn‘t forget this wa5 power, and we mustn‘t forget this was a war, so this is not a peacekeeping operation or dealing with terrorism or counterinsurgency, at this stage. so to be honest, i wa5 at this stage. so to be honest, i was in baghdad, kuwait and then baghdad, when the invasion started, andi baghdad, when the invasion started, and i never actually saw the specific rules of engagement which we re specific rules of engagement which were given, but i am pretty confident that the guy is understood what it was that they were intending to do, and how to use force in this context. that said, i do not want to move away from sirjohn‘5 point, if they were not clear enough, that is a lesson we need to learn. do you think this country was taken into war with all of the information it should have had ? war with all of the information it should have had? well, to be honest, ifind should have had? well, to be honest, i find that really quite difficult to answer. he talked again, tony blair talked about taking the nation to war as blair talked about taking the nation to wara5 fara5 blair talked about taking the nation to war as far a5 is possible. what do we mean by that? where on the spectrum? some people would
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obviously say that they do not believe we have enough information. i don‘t think these things are ever that clear. when i briefed tony blair, it was quite clear that he felt that this was a necessity, that there was a just cause, that we had to do something about this. how he portrayed that politically, the information he gave out, my own sen5e information he gave out, my own 5en5ei5 information he gave out, my own sense is that he wasn‘t that far short if he was short. again, i carry my own baggage here, because as carry my own baggage here, because a5| carry my own baggage here, because as i said earlier, i have no problem with the fact that in the end we did away with saddam hussein. i watched the mass graves being dug up, and this is a nasty, brutal dictator. getting rid of him, i don‘t have a problem with. politically, i don‘t think blair played it well personally. i don‘t rate him that much, in the context of ever having voted for him. thank you very much for yourfrank views voted for him. thank you very much for your frank views this morning, major general tim cro55. carol is at wimbledon with a look at this morning‘s weather. in the rather grand surroundings, i5
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in the rather grand surroundings, is that the trophy immediately behind you? that is absolutely right, on all you? that is absolutely right, on a ll levels. you? that is absolutely right, on all levels. i am next to the trophy cabinets, and if you take a look you can see at the bottom of the gentleman‘s double trophies, and this is the gentleman‘s singles trophy. it was first presented in 1887. herbert ford askew horford was the first champion to wind that cup, but it was decided to engrave all the names of the champions from 1877 —— fortescue. you can see them down the sides of the trophy there. the plinth at the bottom, the gold one, was added in 2009 when there was no more room for any names at the top and the gentleman who winds the trophy will not take this one home. he will take with a size replica, still with all the names of the previous champions on it. it is rather nice, don‘t you think? i would rather like to take that myself or my mantelpiece although it might be too big. the forecast for
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wimbledon is looking dry, according to my charts, but there is the risk of some showers. this morning, up until early afternoon. and then that risk diminishes, but we can‘t com pletely risk diminishes, but we can‘t completely rule out thunderstorms in the afternoon. temperatures today up to 30 celsius, so another hot and sticky day. in fact, across the country today it is going to be either fresh, warm country today it is going to be eitherfresh, warm or very warm, and we are looking at thunderstorms for some of us. across southern england we have some cloud around, but also some sunshine. a few showers, which could be thundery but won‘t be happy, and as we drift through the midlands in northern england, a similar story. you could see the odd rumble of thunder or lightning in north—east england. scotland has rain crossing, moving north eastwards, and for northern ireland there are a few showers in the north but largely dry. again, brighter, sunny skies. brighter, sunny skies in wales in south—west england, although there is more in the way of low cloud across parts of the
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coastline in south—east england. as we drove from bristol, gloucestershire, over towards the home counties, we are looking at bright skies, some sunny spells and the risk of the odd shower, which could be thundery. as we go through the course of the day and temperatures rise, that is when we could see intense thunderstorms develop from east wales, the midlands, into northern england. not all of us will see them, they will be hit and miss, but there will be large hail in them as well and you will know about them if you catch one. further south, you are not immune to them, but at the risk is lower. here it is fresher, still hot and humid across england and wales, especially the south—east. through the evening and overnight we eventually lose the thunderstorms into the north sea. there‘ll be a lot of dry weather around and the new frontal system introducing rain to western scotland showing its hand. temperature—wise, roughly 12 to about 18. again, another oppressive night in the south. for tomorrow, we start on mild note at the rain across western scotland, that weather front, continues to
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sink southwards and in doing so it sta rts sink southwards and in doing so it starts to weaken. so it will still be wet but it will be patchy rain and afair be wet but it will be patchy rain and a fair bit of cloud coming south with it. we will also feel a lot fresher across england and wales, but not the south—east. here, we hang on to the higher temperatures. as we move on into friday we start the day across wales, the midlands, parts of northern england, with some rain. through the day that will increasingly turn showery. on either side of it, largely dry and bright and again we get the division. fresher in comparison across most of the uk but the south—east still hanging onto the and humid conditions. what do you think of my trophies? they rather nice, aren‘t they? just tell me, for geography purposes, those doors behind you, is that the entrance to centre court? absolutely right, that is where the players come down the stairs, they go through there and they are on the centre court. gorgeous, lovely. carol, your trophies are marvellous. how do you create the business
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leaders of tomorrow? that is the big question often asked by employers, and ben is with some young people who may have the answer. good who may have the answer. morning. you are absol right, good morning. you are absolutely right, welcome to central london, we are here with the final is from the young enterprise scheme, and they are putting me to shame, coming up with all sorts of ideas. the point is that they sell those ideas and hope to be crowned the winner. 20,000 students have been involved this year and it has been whittled down to just 1a teams. let me introduce you to some of them. henry is with us. tell me about what your firm has come up with. we are based in gibraltar, and this is our product, it is an nfc wristband on which you can store your medical information. working closely with the gibraltar nhs authority, a
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sickly the nhs in gibraltar and st john‘s ambulance, and working with them, they have scanners so that first responders can see this information and treat patients effectively. how did you come up with an idea like that? so as a group we had various ideas, basing it mainly on our company ethos. we wa nted it mainly on our company ethos. we wanted to get back to the community, and to benefit those around us, so we had ideas from baby shoes you can fit in your handbags, and this really stood out. one of our directors said that maybe we could do something with nfc technology, and then linking it together, we came up with the medical use. best of luck with the finals today. so from bury new tech, i want to take you to some old tech, but in a very different way. your venture pad. tell me about this. we are the most
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advanced notepad in the world, we like to think. so show us how this works. basically underwater, and here we go. and i have written bbc, physically underwater, smudge proof, tear proof and waterproof. so who would you sell this to? we started with the idea of rowers, but we realise there is a huge market for it, from rowers, to outdoor enthusiasts, accpac is, and latin physios have contacted us asking for the products —— backpackers. physios have contacted us asking for the products -- backpackers. staying with tech, you have this futuristic looking gadget, and it is different because you are going international, making yours in china. so we designed exclusively for us, and it is manufactured in china. we import and distributed through a range of retailers. i imagine that causes
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some logistical problems. you have to have a good eye on your suppliers if you are dealing with china. that‘s right, one of the biggest points of our business is ensuring we have great relationships with suppliers. obviously if there are delays, we don‘t have products to sell and we can‘t make any money so we need to make sure that loose ends are tied up in a betting is in order. and before i go, one, quickly, just to show you. victoria, you have come up with a really interesting idea. this is how to charge your phone using denim. yes, basically, our product is a denim pocket which you hang over a socket when your phone is on charge to keep ca bles when your phone is on charge to keep cables in place, as we found in a common room that the sockets are really high up on the wall. we thought it would be a fun way to incorporate recycled jeans with fun and creativity. so this is finding a problem and absolutely coming up with a solution for it. yes, quite a
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rare problem but everyonejudges their phones all of the time and it was quite difficult when they were hanging from the walls. we thought it would be a good idea. good luck, really nice to see you. we will talk to you later. so really impressive ideas this morning. they have all come up with different ways of working, and now they have to sell those products, they have the picture to all thejudges those products, they have the picture to all the judges and they are hoping to be crowned winner of young enterprise. and the winner of this will go over to brussels to ta ke this will go over to brussels to take part in the european championships. some really impressive ideas down here today, certainly putting me to shame. more from me a little later. you need to come up with an idea and get them to help you. that is what you need to do by the end of the day. claim on the right place to get that, think. ——iam in the right place to get that, think. —— i am in the right place to get that, i think. still to come this morning: tim is with some maths—mad pupils, to find out the secret to becoming a whizz at your times tables. good morning to you from parklands primary school in leeds, more —— one
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of more than 100 schools to be celebrating times tables. in about ten minutes‘ time we will tell you what has happened. much faster mortification than me, we will find out how we make times tables interesting, and white we should be bothered. first, the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. a woman who survived the 7/7 london bombings says her heart goes out to victims of the recent terror attacks in the capital, and she is calling for better compensation for those affected. martine wright lost both her legs when the tube train she was travelling on was bombed in 2005. she went on to compete in the paralympics, and has now written a book about her experience. she says the government needs to reform the compensation system. i do think, and this is something that i fought for very early on, is the compensation to the victims and their families. they promised that they were
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going to look at that, but they‘ve not looked at it. the ministry forjustice says victims and their families are supported under the criminal injuries compensation scheme. a teenager who drowned while working on the woolwich crossing is to have one of two new ferries named after him in his memory. ben woollacott, who came from a family of five generations of thames watermen, died in 2011 after being dragged overboard by a mooring rope. the new boat is to be named after him following a campaign by his friends and family. travel now. starting with the tube, that is looking pretty good so far this morning, as you can see. no reported problems there. in highgate, though, roadworks are slowing the traffic down. it is slow on the a1 archway southbound towards highgate tube station. we have also got the usual rush hour delays at the blackwall tunnel. northbound traffic on the southern approach is slow from blackwall lane.
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and in north london, barnet high road is closed between chandos avenue and buckingham avenue, for works. it is just to the north of the totteridge & whetstone tube station. over to lucy martin, now, with the weather. hello, good morning. another hot day on the way today, but with that heat does come the risk of seeing some heavy, thundery showers. and we do have a yellow weather warning in place, because if you catch one, it could be quite heavy here. the odd rumble of thunder, see some lightning, but not everyone catching those showers. so if we put the detail onto the map, then, we‘ll see increasing amounts of sunshine as we move through the day today. one or two showers to look out for through the morning, but as the heat warms up into the afternoon, that‘s where we have the potential to see the heavier showers, probably the further north you are. temperatures today in the upper 205. but we could see about 30 degrees celsius in central london. as we go through this evening, then, again, still one or two showers likely in the north.
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not everyone catching one of those, again, but then becoming increasingly dry. we will see variable amounts of cloud, but plenty of clear skies, and another muggy night, overnight lows of 18, 19 celsius. tomorrow we will start off with plenty of brightness. but, as we move through the day, starting to see increasing amounts of cloud. it does look like tomorrow will be very warm, as well, and largely dry, with highs of 27 degrees celsius. i‘ll leave you with the outlook, then. the risk of seeing a heavy and thundery shower today, but not everyone catching one of those. another very warm day on the way tomorrow, with some decent spells of sunshine. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. one year on from the inquiry into the iraq war, the man who carried it out has, for the first time, given his personal account of what happened. sirjohn chilcot told the bbc that he believes the former
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prime minister, tony blair, was not straight with the nation about the decisions made in the run—up to war. do you believe that tony blair was as straight with you and the public as he ought to have been? cani can i slightly reword that? any prime minister taking the country into war has got to be straight with the nation and carry it so far as possible with him or her. i don‘t believe that was the case in the iraq instance. a quarter of adult care services in england are not safe enough, according to inspectors. a report by the care quality commission says most care homes, nursing homes and home care services are good, but too many are failing on safety. the government said it would invest more money in social care. earlier the chief inspector told us the cqc had discovered a catalogue of problems. what we see in these homes,
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particularly in the worst homes, and what we see in the care the people get in the community is not enough staff, people rushed around not able to give the care that they need to give so people missing their calls at home, not being given the medication that they need in a residential or nursing home, not being supported to eat well enough, to drink well enough, and that is so important for their health and well—being. the us ambassador to the united nations has described north korea‘s latest missile test as a clear and sharp military escalation. it has been confirmed that the intercontinental ballistic missile fired by north korea for the first time could have a range of more than 3,000 miles, meaning it could reach alaska. a task force will be sent to help run kensington and chelsea council, in the wake of the devastating fire which destroyed grenfell tower and killed at least 80 people. it will take over the running of key services after the council‘s response to the disaster was heavily criticised.
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most of the families which lost their homes in the fire are still living in hotels despite government pledges to re—house them by yesterday. we will do absolutely everything we can as a council to help our community and to help our community heal. and you don‘t think the council should be taken over? the council is not being taken over by outside commissions. we have asked people to come because we need more help. at least 15 people are missing after widespread flooding hit parts of japan following unprecedented rainfall. 400,000 people have been forced from their homes after floodwaters hit towns and villages on the main southern island of kyushu. meteorologists are warning that the weather could worsen. japanese authorities have deployed police, search and rescue teams and soldiers to the region. the conservative mpjacob rees—mogg has announced the birth of his sixth
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child, revealing his son‘s unique name, sixtus dominic boniface christopher. the tory backbencher, who has recently become a popular figure on social media, shared the news on his instagram feed. baby sixtus has siblings peter, mary, thomas, anselm and alfred, and shares his unusual name with five popes. later on carol will have the weather from wimbledon. it wasn‘t just the tennis professionals who were making headlines at wimbledon yesterday, take a look at this. swarms of flying ants invaded the courts. they were landing on players and spectators, irritating everyone. players were forced to swat them away and some, including jo konta, said by the end of the match they had even swallowed a few! it was flying and day yesterday but hopefully... the experts tell us it‘s literally one day. sally is at wimbledon this morning. your indoors so hopefully they‘re not there, a
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real problem yesterday in amongst a great day for the brits?” real problem yesterday in amongst a great day for the brits? i tell you what, where we are this morning and we re what, where we are this morning and were carol and i have been for the last half an hour or so, no flying ants, no flying and would dare come in here, this is the heart of wimbledon where we see the players come through for their matches, you can see the trophies. i want to give you an indication of the feeling of history when you‘re in here. a bit like being in a cathedral. let me show you the gentlemen‘s singles champions board, we‘ve got roger federer, djokovic, andy murray, but look at this, fred perry, 35, 36, 3a as well. it‘s so poignant, you go back and there are the gaps for the world wars. no play between 1939 and 1946. it gives you a sense of the yea rs 1946. it gives you a sense of the years and years that people have been coming here. the ladies‘
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singles champions, very important yearfor singles champions, very important year for this singles champions, very important yearfor this lady, miss singles champions, very important year for this lady, miss virginia wade, her 1977 when, the 40th anniversary of virginia wade winning the women‘s title at wimbledon —— victory. i want to walk you through to the last moment the players have absolute privity before they go to centre court. you would have seen this on the tv. two of them standing here ready to go on. it‘s very quiet, they walk out and everything changes. the air changes, it‘s a different sound, you can probably hear the noises of people setting up. what‘s happening right now while i‘m talking to you, the covers are coming off centre court. the players come around here, the crowd can‘t see them yet, they can see the crowd. they walk around this corner an my goodness, there the crowd is. look at the scale of that, from that quiet time inside to this, centre
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court. as you said, charlie, it was a brilliant day for the fans on centre court yesterday, they got to see some amazing tennis. joe konta battled it out in three hours. she had a wonderful centre court moment i think, she played brilliantly, she needed three sets to beat the honour their kitsch but she made it to round three for the first time —— donna vekic. i am looking to compete at my best every single match i get to play. i‘m here with the intention of wanting to be a part of the events of the full two weeks but as you saw out there, every single player here plays a very high level on any given day. there is no easy match and i‘m just very grateful to have another go. heather watson was the first british player through, she beat anastasia sevastova and faces the former world number one victoria azarenka next. aljaz bedene also reached the third round for the first time in his career, beating a good friend of his, damir dzumhur.
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and last but definitely not least, andy murray‘s bid for a third title is still on course, after an entertaining but comfortable win over one of the game‘s great characters, germany‘s dustin brown. i did pretty well. i concentrated quite well in my own service games, which is positive, and put a lot of returns back in play. i think that was very positive today. i returned a little bit better and didn‘t give too many free points on the serve. it‘s been a good start and hopefully keep it going. he‘s looking ok, andy murray. and as they continue to take the covers off... you might remember these pictures from yesterday, jack sock‘s wimbledon towel being snatched out of the hands of a young fan by an older man. well, the good news is the youngster has been tracked down after a social media hunt, and jack has sent him a new towel in the post! in other sport, the british and irish lions have named an unchanged side for their deciding test with new zealand on saturday.
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it‘s the first time they‘ve done that since 1993. chris froome has taken the overall lead in the tour de france. he finished third on stage five to overtake sky team—mate geraint thomas, who‘s now second. and tammy beaumont and sarah taylor both hit centuries as england‘s cricketers moved a step closer to the semi—finals of the women‘s world cup. they beat south africa by 68 runs. later this morning, the england‘s men take on south africa at lord‘s in the first of four test matches under new captainjoe root, so how will he do? we can talk now to former england fast bowler steve harmison, who‘s in our london studio. good morning to you, steve. good morning. how does joe root approach this? i know everyone is telling him to be himself, what can he bring today? when you change the captaincy you get a little bit of an energy and a new boost as a team, a spring
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in their step and that‘s whatjoe brings, that‘s the way he‘s lived his life to be fair, please play cricket with a smile on his face and i don‘t see joe cricket with a smile on his face and i don‘t seejoe being different to the way he has been for the first pa rt the way he has been for the first part of his career when he was just a batsmen and team member, now he‘s in charge there more onus on him to be more authoritative but i can still see this team going about their ways in a relaxed manner and i think that‘s indicative to their captain. we hear a lot from cricketers about the pressures of cricketers about the pressures of cricket and playing for england, can you give us some insight into what type of pressure they face? there's a wide range of emotion especially with cricket because of the length of the match, which is obviously five days, and the length of the day, which potentially by the time you‘ve left breakfast and left the hotel, you‘re looking at seven or eight hours of constantly thinking about what you‘re trying to do and
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beat your opponent. it‘s all mental to be fair. the game of cricket, the mental approach, if you get that right, that‘s the difference between the good and the great, joe as captain, when the team is doing well and when the team isn‘t doing well, it‘s the emotions and he has to manage that. it‘s a difficult game mentally but that‘s the difference between the good and the great, the great control those emotions because when you play the first test match at lord‘s, it‘s always a great event to play in but it comes with the added pressure, especially from the opposition, it seems to lift them. footballers want to play at the home of football, wembley stadium, opposition teams come to lord‘s and they really raise their game and that‘s the test england have got this morning. a scary thought, steve, thank you very much indeed.
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wouldn‘t that be great, if we could all control our fears and our nerves and our emotions? a lot of that has got to happen here today. i should mention that coverage of the cricket is on radio 5 live with test match special on radio and online through the day. thanks very much, see you later in the programme. we are concentrating on times tables now, remember learning them in a certain way? i didn't enjoy it very much. tim muffett was there and it sounds like it was quite a gig, tim? good morning from one of more buying 100 schools that took part yesterday in an extraordinary event designed to make times tables as interesting and exciting as possible. is that possible? you know what, once they demonstrate their times tables skills, let‘s have a look at what happened yesterday. egg guitar? rockstar photo shoots?
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-- air. egg guitar? rockstar photo shoots? —— air. and times tables. rarely combined but this event is greater than the sum of its parts. they are fighting it out in a series of head to head rounds to become crowned the supreme ultimate rock hero for eternity. jazz winter is the rock alter ego of maths teacher bruneau ready, he created times table rock stars, which is now used in 5000 schools across the uk. via a rockstar persona, pupils engage in a maths battle. this is the regional finalfor maths battle. this is the regional final for the north—east of england, 50 schools are taking part. we've been practising for seven months waiting for this competition. you practise your times tables at the same time and it's really fun.
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practise your times tables at the same time and it's really funm pushes me to get quicker and quicker. some people say you don't need to learn your times tables, their old—fashioned and boring, what do you make that? 60% of maths gcse can be taken back to times tables, for the pupils it‘s just fun, they‘re for the pupils it‘s just fun, they‘ re lost for the pupils it‘s just fun, they‘re lost in the element of being a rock star. i was bad at maths in, like, year5 a rock star. i was bad at maths in, like, year 5 but now i've really improved. and the whole rock thing really helps as well? yeah. why's that? because it creates inspiration. the last qualifying round is over, it‘s time for the grand final. nabil correctly a nswered grand final. nabil correctly answered a staggering 35 questions in three minutes. you won, how did you feel? excellent, my family's going to be proud. the prize is waiting outside, a helicopter ride above leads. what impact do you hope this has? i hope nabil's incredible
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performance today inspires children in this school and around the region to be incredible mathematicians. excellent! for those about to do their times tables, we salute you. you love timetables, don‘t you ? tables, we salute you. you love timetables, don‘t you? why are they so important? we adore times tables at parklands. it is enhanced by the great work of times table rock stars, it is so important, the entire school has turned out to see how we see ourselves as one of the quickest in britain. the rockstar thing is kind of an online thing, but it is also important to do them verbally, and it is notjust doing the times table, but doing the sum and my nursing at from 100. you are going to demonstrate. 12 times 12. 144. six times eight. 48. so you are
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doing the sum and subtracting it from 100. i have been asked to have ago from 100. i have been asked to have a go myself. seven times eight. 44. not quite as fast. six times three. 18, 18 from 100 years... 82. practice makes perfect. i will challenge you to here. eight times eight. 36. i think it is fair to say you are faster, congratulations. i saw you at the event yesterday. combining rock and times tables, whoever thought that would happen? and a special mention to our youngest grand champion. this is tyler, the quickest in the world. i
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wa nt tyler, the quickest in the world. i want you to is say your three times ta bles want you to is say your three times tables as quick as you can. and slower for the viewers at home. what is nine times three. 27. five times three. well, that is 15. that is very impressive, that is what that is. and why should people worry about times tables? as soon as you have your times tables, all the things children struggle with, division, fractions, become easy and straightforward. and last week 25 of the students got full marks in arithmetic paper. and at the event we saw yesterday, there are other events happening across the uk this week and next week in bolton, birmingham and london as well. so yes, inspirational, and i am being put to shame, i think it is fair to
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say. thank you very much, and good on you for giving it a try. tyler is the star, whenever we go to a school, there is always a star, and tyler is the star. and carol, we are not going to test you and your times ta bles not going to test you and your times tables at all, but we want some numbers, some big numbers, perhaps, when it comes to the temperatures. they certainly are in this forecast, and another big number behind me. 1977 was when virginia wade won the ladies singles championships at wimbledon. her 40th anniversary this year, and also the centenary of the championships and the queen‘s silver jubilee, and she was watching that spectacular wind from the royal box. big numbers certainly in the forecast, and also for wimbledon. the forecast for wimbledon today is a mixture, one of sunshine, but also there is the risk of some showers. showers this morning, into the early afternoon, and then at risk
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diminishes. but it doesn‘t com pletely diminishes. but it doesn‘t completely clear. we could still see the odd rumble of thunder and lightning as we head home during the course of the afternoon. temperatures up to 30 celsius. today the forecast for the uk is one of some thunderstorms, and again, warm or humid depending on where you are. across southern england, we have got some sunshine. there is quite a bit of cloud as well, and some of the showers could be thundery. as we drift into northern england it is a similar story. the risk of the odd rumble of thunder, the precursors to what is coming later. for scotland, rain crossing from the west towards the north—east. one or two showers in the morning, but largely dry, and dry across wales as well. in the south—west, although there is a fair bit of sunshine, around the coast it will be cloudy and that is holding the temperatures back. as we move from bristol towards the home counties, similar to what we have at wimbledon, some sunshine but still some cloud around in the risk of the
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odd shower. through the course of the day, as temperatures rise, the risk of thunderstorms increases to intense thunderstorms across east wales, the midlands and northern england. they are not going to be everywhere, they will be hit and miss. you might mist them all together and have a dry, sunny and warm day. further south there is the risk of them. meanwhile across scotland, the rain is more showery. as we head into the evening and overnight, we eventually see the back edge of those thunderstorms pushing off into the north sea. there will be a lot of dry weather around and a weather front coming across western scotland which will introduce some rain. temperature—wise, 12 to about 18. where you have 18, again, it will be a muddy night. tomorrow we start off ona dry a muddy night. tomorrow we start off on a dry note for many. the rain across scotland will continue the journey southwards through the course of the day, that weather front weakening all the time, producing by the end of the afternoon a band of cloud and some patchy rain. behind it you may see the old shower, but a lot of dry
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weather. one thing you will notice, where it has been so hot across england and wales, it will be fresher, except in the south—east where we hang on to those high levels. for saturday we start off with some rain across wales, the midlands and northern england. that band tends to fragment through the day, and for many of us there will bea day, and for many of us there will be a lot of dry weather around. again, a fresher fields except in the south—east where we hang on to the south—east where we hang on to the high humidity and high temperatures for one more day. that is how it is looking for now. is that your helicopter arriving?” would love to say it is, but it is not. it is somebody blowing the sidelines. why do we have these in our hands? to demonstrate something. at wimbledon, we are used to tennis balls being this colour. but they very nearly looked like this, instead, and it is all down to what worked best for colour tv. it has been 50 years since colour television began with coverage of wimbledon, and it was all down to the personal ambition of one man — sir david attenborough.
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he has been speaking exclusively to breakfast‘s graham satchell. lillian gish, what made you decide to become an actress? i never decided. late—night line—up 1967, and the bbc was running an experiment. while the rest of the country was watching black—and—white, two people were watching in colour. there were two — two prototype colour television receivers. one of them belonged to the chief engineer of the bbc, and the other was mine, and they were the size of refrigerators. sir david attenborough, then controller of bbc two, one of the channels to be the first in europe to go colour. we knew that we were running a race with germany, and in a rather childish way, i thought it would be nice to compete. and it occurred to me than that two broadcast units were enough to give you a continuous service from wimbledon. it is not the first time wimbledon offered an opportunity. 80 years ago, it was the first sport to be broadcast live on television.
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this year also sees the 90th anniversary of radio commentaries. and then, 50 years ago, this — the first colour television in europe. it was like, you know, a sudden new world of brilliant colour, and everything that you only saw if you went there to the event was here before your eyes, and that was wonderful. john barrett, the voice of tennis commentary for more than 30 years. in 1967, he was still playing, but remembers the introduction of colour tv well, and its impact on wimbledon. the colour of the balls used to be white. they had a day here, which i remember well, when they were testing all sorts of new colours. and, after a number of colours were tested, including pink, yellow was found to be the most easily discernible against the grass. so it could have been pink?
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well, it could have been. it doesn‘t feel right, does it — pink! there is the trophy going back to australia. there were other changes. the trophy presented on court to the winning man used to be this, the president‘s cup. today they get the challenge cup, because it looks better on colour tv. it is gold. so what does the man who introduced colour make of his achievement? we had guests in every evening, and it was a wonder. the problem was, on the first set there was a thing called the tint control, and viewers would wind up the tint, so that the skies were throbbing ultramarine, the greens were saturated emerald. i mean, they were awful. but they wanted real colour. that‘s what they wanted. we want real colour! and we still do. hard to imagine, today, a world without colour television, that all started here on centre court 50 years ago. isn‘t it fascinating?
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isn't it fascinating? i think it is brilliant. and the colour of the grass as well, quite different.” think it was different then. i do think it was different then. i do think it was slightly different.” believe they have taken gullible out of the dictionary! there were some daysin of the dictionary! there were some days in the old days of wimbledon when the grass was incredibly pale and almost worn away completely. it seems to be that there is more grass. someone is going to argue. we can find out. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. a woman who survived the 7/7 london bombings says her heart goes out to victims of the recent terror attacks in the capital, and she is calling for better compensation for those affected. martine wright lost both her legs when the tube train she was travelling
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on was bombed in 2005. she went on to compete in the paralympics, and has now written a book about her experience. she says the government needs to reform the compensation system. i do think, and this is something that i fought for very early on, is the compensation to the victims and their families. they promised that they were going to look at that, but they‘ve not looked at it. the ministry forjustice says victims and their families are supported under the criminal injuries compensation scheme. in a world—first, doctors at a south—west london hospital will be performing a pregnancy scan today using a new growth chart that helps them tell if twins are developing healthily. up until now, medics had to rely on charts based on measurements for single babies. experts say the new method being used at st george‘s, in tooting, will help give parents of twins more accurate information, and avoid worrying them unnecessarily. travel now.
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the tube is all looking good so far. no reported problems on any of those lines at the moment. in highgate, though, roadworks are slowing the traffic down on the a1 archway southbound towards highgate tube station. there are southbound delays on the m4 heathrow spur, too. a vehicle has broken down in the heathrow tunnel, and the queues are back to junction 4 for the m4. and there has been an accident on the m25. it has slowed everything down clockwise from junction 9 for leatherhead, heading towards junction ten for the a3 at wisley. over to lucy martin, now, with the weather. hello, good morning. another hot day on the way today, but with that heat does come the risk of seeing some heavy, thundery showers. and we do have a yellow weather warning in place, because if you catch one, it could be quite heavy here. the odd rumble of thunder, see some lightning, but not everyone catching one of those showers. so if we put the detail onto the map, then, we‘ll see increasing amounts of sunshine as we move through the day today. one or two showers to look out for through the morning, but as the heat warms up into the afternoon,
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that‘s where we have the potential to see the heavier showers, probably the further north you are. temperatures today in the upper 205, but we could see about 30 degrees celsius in central london. as we go through this evening, then, again, still one or two showers likely in the north. not everyone catching one of those, again, but then becoming increasingly dry. we will see variable amounts of cloud, but plenty of clear skies, and another muggy night, overnight lows of 18, 19 celsius. tomorrow we will start off with plenty of brightness. but, as we move through the day, starting to see increasing amounts of cloud. it does look like tomorrow will be very warm, as well, and largely dry, with highs of 27 degrees celsius. i‘ll leave you with the outlook, then. the risk of seeing a heavy and thundery shower today, but not everyone catching one of those. another very warm day on the way tomorrow, with some decent spells of sunshine. that‘s all for now. more in half an hour, and of course, there is plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with
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naga munchetty and charlie stayt. one year on, the chairman of the iraq inquiry tells the bbc that tony blair has "failed to be straight with the nation." in his first interview, sirjohn chilcot says the evidence the former prime minister gave was "emotionally truthful", but suggested that he relied on his own belief rather than the facts. any prime minister taking a country into war has got to be straight with the nation and carry it, so far as possible, with him or her. i don‘t believe that was the case in the iraq instance. good morning. it‘s thursday 6th july. also this morning: a quarter of care homes in england are not safe enough — that‘s the verdict of a damning report by inspectors. reckless and irresponsible — america‘s ambassador to the un condemns north korea‘s missile test.
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ben will be talking to a number of entrepreneurs. sally is at wimbledon. in sport, four british players are through to the third round at wimbledon for the first time in 20 years. an emotionaljohanna konta battled it out for more than three hours as she joined andy murray, aljaz bedene and heather watson in the last 32. and we‘ll find out what happened when andy turned the tables on charlie in our game, set and mug challenge. and weather—wise, we are looking at a largely dry day, but there is a risk of showers in wimbledon in the early morning into the afternoon.
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that risk then diminishes. and for the uk as a whole, there will be a lot of dry weather, some rain in scotland and some intense thunderstorms later. i will tell you where when we are back. good morning. first, our main story. one year on from the inquiry into the iraq war, the man who carried it out has, for the first time, given his personal account of what happened. sirjohn chilcot told the bbc that he believes the former prime minister, tony blair, was not "straight with the nation" about the decisions made in the run—up to war, which many now regard as one of the uk‘s biggest foreign policy mistakes. do you believe that tony blair was as straight with you and the public as he ought to have been? can i slightly reword that to say i think any prime minister taking a country into war has got to be straight with the nation and carry it, so far
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as possible, with him or her. i don‘t believe that was the case in the iraq instance. do you feel he gave you the fullest version of events? i think he gave... i hesitate to say this, rather, but i think from his perspective and standpoint, it was emotionally truthful, and i think that came out also in his press conference after the launch statement. i think he was under very great emotional pressure during those sessions, far more than the committee were. he was suffering. he was deeply engaged. in that state of mind and mood, you fall back on your instinctive skills and reactions, i think. but he was relying, you suggest, on emotion, not fact. both. our political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminsterfor us.
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there is no greater decision a prime minister takes than taking a nation to war. the inquiry was intense. tell us about the significance of what has been said by sirjohn chilcot and also about what tony blair has said in response? this the first time we are hearing sirjohn‘s reflections on that seven—year process , reflections on that seven—year process, wading through all of that testimony he heard, all of those documents, in trying to learn the lessons from the iraq war, which for many people still so controversial, the fact that there were no weapons of mass destruction discovered in iraq, despite that being the central argument for going in, the fact that iraq descended into chaos after the invasion. remember, some of the conclusions that sirjohn chilcot gave last year, that the uk had not exhausted peaceful options for disarming saddam hussein before
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going into warand disarming saddam hussein before going into war and that the policy was made on the basis of flawed intelligence. sirjohn chilcot did not at the time accused tony blair of having lied or having misled the british public, but the comments today that tony blair was not straight with the nation will provide some ammunition to those who believe still that he did. a spokesperson for tony blair has referred us to the comments he made at the time in a lengthy press conference he gave after the publication of the chilcot report last year, saying that he accepted the criticism but he had no intention, there were no lies, there was no intention to deceive and he did what he thought was best at the time and he made that decision in good faith. it is worth adding that for some people, it will feel like we are going over old ground, that this has been discussed many times before. but for many others, it is still a very live issue. a quarter of adult care services in england are not safe enough, according to inspectors.
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a report by the care quality commission says most care homes, nursing homes and home care services are good, but too many are failing on safety. among the issues raised by the care regulator were people not getting enough to eat and drink, and not being given the right medication. a warning — there are some distressing images in this report from our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. mum, can you open your eyes? bernie jarvis carefully gives her mother lunch. the front room of the family‘s birmingham home has become 78—year—old betty‘s bedroom. they want her close by after discovering the sort of poor care highlighted in today‘s report. betty, who has dementia and heart problems, was in a nursing home. the family had concerns, so put in a secret camera. it soon showed a care worker pushing the chair betty was slumped in sharply towards the desk. then when betty objects to her top being changed, her head is slammed back into the chair. no, i don‘t want to.
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0h! last february in court, the care worker accepted her actions were reckless rather than intentional. she was given a 12 month community order. query everything. don‘t let them dismiss you. because they did with us for about eight months, and i wish we had pursued it a lot quicker than we did, because mum probably wouldn‘t have suffered the way she did. today‘s report by inspectors says most care in england is good or outstanding. even so, a quarter of all services including home care and residential homes failed on safety, and 37% of nursing homes were not safe enough. also, when reinspected, quality of care in some good hands had deteriorated. what we are seeing in these services that are deteriorating is how fragile and precarious quality
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of adult social care is. that‘s the reason why we have to make sure that everybody understands that quality matters. providers have got to focus on that, and commissioners and funders have to make sure funding is available to ensure that people get the quality of care they deserve. the government says the poor care experienced by some families is completely unacceptable, and that as well as putting in more money, it will be consulting on how to play social care on a more secure footing for the future. the us ambassador to the united nations has described north korea‘s latest missile test as "a clear and sharp military escalation". it has been confirmed that the intercontinental ballistic missile fired by north korea for the first time could have a range of more than 3,000 miles — meaning it could reach alaska. yesterday‘s actions by north korea made the world a more dangerous
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place. there illegal missile launch was not only dangerous, but reckless and irresponsible. it showed that north korea does not want to be part of peaceful world. president trump has arrived in poland ahead of tomorrow‘s g20 summit. he‘s due to make a keynote address to the crowds in warsaw later today. our correspondent adam easton is live there now. adam, we know what is going to happen tomorrow, but this is all bearing in mind what is happening with north korea ? bearing in mind what is happening with north korea? sorry, i didn't hear the question. tummy is what we should be expecting from warsaw —— tell me what we should be exciting. we have a summit in the castle you can see behind me, which is a dozen central european leaders. president trump is going to attend that. there
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will be discussions about potential gas sales from the us to this region of europe, which is dependent on russian gas imports, much of it. so president trump will be keen to talk about the prospect of some deals. and once that summit is over and there have been bilateral meetings, he will give this keynote address to the polish nation in a square in warsaw, the first time president trump has given a speech in europe. he has chosen poland and it is no point at us because he knows he will get a good reception that. —— it is no coincidence. he can show he has loyal allies in this part of europe, and the polish government can save, look, we are not isolated. we may be ina look, we are not isolated. we may be in a dispute with the european union, but the leader of the most powerful nation in the world has come to give his keynote speech here with us today. adam, thanks. those are the main stories. we have the weather and the sport coming up.
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the plight of 11—month old charlie gard, who has an extremely rare genetic disease, has made headlines across the globe. in the last few days, his parents‘ desperate campaign to keep him on life support so they could seek treatment overseas has been picked up by the vatican and the american president donald trump. we‘ll be discussing this in more detail in a moment, but first let‘s take a look back at charlie‘s story. when he was born last august, charlie gard was a seemingly healthy baby boy. but within weeks, he started to deteriorate. charlie has a rare genetic disease and severe brain damage. since october, he‘s been receiving specialist treatment at london‘s great ormond street hospital. in march, doctors advised that charlie‘s life support should be switched off. his parents, connie yates and chris gard, have fought to keep him alive. they raised £1.3 million through crowdfunding to pay for experimental treatment in the us. last week, his parents lost the last
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stage of their legal battle when the european court of human rights refused to intervene, concluding that charlie was most likely being exposed to continued pain, suffering and distress, and that undergoing experimental treatment with no prospects of success would offer no benefit. his parents say the hospital has denied them theirfinal wish — to take their son home to die. we want to give him a bath at home. we want to sit on the sofa with him. we want to sleep in bed with him. we want to put him in the cot he‘s never slept in. but we‘re now being denied that. great ormond street said they could not discuss details about charlie‘s care. his plight has gained worldwide attention. on monday, both us president donald trump and pope francis offered their support. a children‘s hospital in the vatican has asked if charlie can be transferred to their care. the foreign secretary borisjohnson,
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however, said it was impossible for charlie to be moved to italy. we‘rejoined now by emma nottingham. she‘s a lecturer in child law and medical ethics at the university of winchester. it is such a difficult story, and everyone‘s thoughts are with charlie‘s parents. it‘s an impossible situation for them. you are here to help clarify some of the realities. take us through some of the basics. for example, a lot of people are asking, why is it that charlie‘s parents can‘t take him out of the hospital? establish that for us in terms of the situation they are in. this points to a really difficult tension, where we have the pa rents‘ difficult tension, where we have the parents‘ writes on the one hand, and the advice of the medical professionals. a lot of people are saying, why can‘t the parents just
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do what they want and take him out of the country? where there is a dispute like this, the only way forward is legal intervention. it was clear in this case that there was clear in this case that there was not going to be an agreement between charlie‘s parents and the medical professionals, so this had to go to the courts and we found out what was lawful. the way this is approached by the courts is to look at what is in the best interests of the child. the welfare of the child is always the paramount consideration. sometimes, that does conflict with what the parents want. and the doctors need to know what they can do, because they don‘t want to do something that is unlawful. but it comes down to an element of what risks or what chances you are willing to take. the parents are saying they have been offered help by the vatican and offered medical help. they have been offered help from the united states. they say
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they have the funding, but the doctors are saying it is not in his interests and it is not probable that his condition will improve. many parents will be saying, we should have the right to try our ha rd est to should have the right to try our hardest to keep our child alive and improve his quality—of—life. when does that come down to doctors and not pa rents does that come down to doctors and not parents who are saying, we have been given medical opportunities? a lot of parents at home will be thinking that they would do exactly the same as charlie‘s parents. i would want it to be my choice and final say over what should happen. but when we are hearing from medical experts, some of the best in the world, and we have heard from the courts as well, we have gone through all of the courts possible. we have gone through all of the uk courts and also the european court of human rights, who have all agreed and been unanimous that the best thing for charlie is for his treatment to be
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withdrawn. what is interesting about this case is the attention that it has got globally, over the last few days. charlie‘s treatment was supposed to be withdrawn last week, but now we are starting to hear from really prominent figures such as donald trump and the pope. they have all made comments and said they want to help. but it has come after a decision from the european courts. it is worth emphasising that. once the court has become involved and made theirjudgment, it precludes great ormond street from making any comment or having any other decision. they can't make a decision because the court has taken that decision away from them? absolutely, once the court has made the decision, that is fairly final. u nless decision, that is fairly final. unless there is a change in charlie‘s circumstances, which would dictate that his best interests might be different. at that point,
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maybe the doctors could advise differently. at the moment, we have been told his condition is quite stable. the outcome seems to be the same at the moment, that it is in his best interests for the treatment to be withdrawn, sadly. nobody can imagine what charlie gard‘s parents are going through, and their immediate family as well. but it has been quite interesting to hear how the hospital has reacted to the pa rents. the hospital has reacted to the parents. this time last week, we we re parents. this time last week, we were talking about life support being taken away from charlie gard and the parents being upset they we re and the parents being upset they were not getting a say in that. now the hospital is making it clear it is working with the family to come to the least painful resolution. how much do we know about how much they can negotiate between each other, while they have this umbrella, the idea of the court having made its judgment? that is really tough. we heard last week and in the youtube
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video that was released by the pa rents video that was released by the parents that there is some tension between what is going to happen, towards the end of charlie‘s life, which it sadly looks like it is going to come to. they said they wa nted going to come to. they said they wanted to take charlie home to die, and great ormond street hospital have said it is not in his best interests. the pa rents have said it is not in his best interests. the parents are saying thatis interests. the parents are saying that is their final interests. the parents are saying that is theirfinal wish, interests. the parents are saying that is their final wish, and we we re that is their final wish, and we were assured that if it was going to come to this, that was something that we are going to be able to have happened. they feel like their final wish has been taken away from them. the reports that we have had so far are that they are trying to work with the family in the best way possible. it‘s tough, because it‘s been going on for quite a few days now, almost a week, past the initial date where the treatment was going to be withdrawn. thank you very much for your time this morning. we are going to pop over to
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wimbledon. carol is taking a look at the weather. you have been given access all areas. we have seen the trophy room, where the players walk out to centre court and now you are where the action takes place? we are in centre court once again, being trimmed by rick, with his lawn mower. that brings me to pollen. if you have an allergy, the levels are high or very high across northern ireland, england and wales. for scotland, mostly moderate, except in the north, where it is low. a warm start today more less across—the—board. start today more less across—the—boa rd. temperatures at wimbledon already at 22 celsius and set to rise as we go through the day, up to as much as 30 celsius. for much of southern england and wales, we are looking at that kind of level. for most of england and wales, it is from the mid—205 to the high 205. a look at the forecast for wimbledon itself, and there will be
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a lot of dry weather today. there will be a lot of sunshine. it will be hot and humid. however, there is the chance of a shower until early afternoon. doesn‘t mean we will catch it, but there is a. it diminishes as we head through the day. if we look through the forecast, there are some showers around this morning. they could be thundery. there was a lot of dry weather, but there is rain in scotland. that will push north eastwards as we go through the day. for northern ireland, a largely dry start with one or two showers. for wales and south—west england, a lot of dry weather. there is some coastal low cloud across the south—west that will hold temperatures back. as we crossed southern counties, one or two areas which could be showery. as temperatures rise, the intense thundery downpours will develop. anywhere from east wales, the midlands and into northern england.
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they will have hail embedded in them, but hit and miss. not all of us will see them. some thundery showers threatening wimbledon later on. they are also hit and miss. it is going to be hot and humid across england and wales. for scotland and northern ireland, we have something a little bit fresher. the rain in scotla nd a little bit fresher. the rain in scotland is replaced by some showers, staying largely dry across northern ireland. to the evening and overnight we lose thundery showers into the north sea. a weather front sta rts into the north sea. a weather front starts to show its hand across western scotland, introducing some rain. temperatures 12 or 18, another sticky night in the south. tomorrow, we start with a weather front across north—west scotland. through the day it will move steadily south eastwards, at a weakening feature. the cloud breaking up, the rain turning more patchy. away from that, most of us will stay dry. it is going to feel fresher across the bulk of england and wales, compared to today. for the south—east, it is still going to be hot and humid. for scotla nd still going to be hot and humid. for scotland and northern ireland,
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temperatures similar to today. as we head into saturday, we have a line of rain across parts of wales, the midlands and northern england. that will crumble as we go through the day. we are looking at a mostly dry day, by a few showers where we had the rain to start with. fresher, except for the south—east, where we had the last day of the very high temperatures. at least we have that sunshine. i love seeing the preparation behind! they are busy. put in the stripes m, they are busy. put in the stripes in, making sure the seats are clean. perhaps weather could join in. we‘re going to go to ben, who is going to introduce us to the entrepreneurs of the future. welcome to the south bank in central london for the final of the young entrepreneur of the year award. 20,000 students have taken part. it has been whittled down to 14 teams. i‘ve been meeting them all morning,
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looking at the ideas they have come up looking at the ideas they have come up with. it is really impressive. lots of it is using new technology, but some of it old technology and new ways. let‘s talk to ellie. what did you come up with? we wanted to go with a product that was com pletely go with a product that was completely about safety. we decided to manufacture the products ourselves. it is an insole with a small compartment at the bottom and can fit any standard housekeeper or money. the idea is that if you are short of money or your house key, you can catch a taxi home or get home safely. how did you come up with the idea? i imagine it is a process of elimination, thinking of ideas, getting rid of them and coming up with a new one? definitely, finding a product that was innovative and not on the market was innovative and not on the market was very was innovative and not on the market was very difficult. we trialled several products, we disregarded a few. one of our team members, several products, we disregarded a few. one of ourteam members, he several products, we disregarded a few. one of our team members, he was short of money and he had said, why can‘t we create something where we can‘t we create something where we can have a house key or money in it. we decided that an insole would be
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perfect, it is hidden and easy. best of luck later. i know you have to do the presentation. let me introduce you to the guys on team weighing. it looks wonderful, by the looks of it it isa looks wonderful, by the looks of it it is a children‘s book? looks wonderful, by the looks of it it is a children's book? yes, the children‘s book. we got together as a team and wrote alfie‘s adventure. it follows him on hisjourney. he meets friends along the way and goes into a large oak tree and help the animals that helped him. it sounds like to be easy to do, a bit of writing and some pictures. but it is anything but? there is so much, the font, the thickness of the pages, the amount of words on the page and the amount of words on the page and the plot itself. there are some way things to think about. best of luck. i know that you guys are presenting it later. i want to introduce you to nyan. you have been through this,
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you were a contestant and candidate. what does it teach you? what did you learn? you learn a lot, it develops your core employability skills, confidence, resilience, leadership. for somebody lacking in confidence, i was really shy, to take part in the programmer develop so much has been a real challenge. for me to do that, it has been really inspiring. you said about that lack of confidence. i imagine this makes you come out of your shell because you got to do presentations, you have to manage teams and budgets, you have to sell this stuff. now you are at university and it was a useful skill? yes, absolutely. with the co re skill? yes, absolutely. with the core skills, i can use it in every aspect of my life, job interview, seminar presentation. it is useful in every walk of life. i am able to bea in every walk of life. i am able to be a lot more proactive and take on many more opportunities available to me. atop many more opportunities available to me. a top tip for the teams present in? to remain positive. you are going to go through a number of
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challenges today. to have a positive mindset will allow you to win and bring you forward. good advice! thank you very much. we have been meeting all of the teams this morning. they have all been keen to explain what they do. goodbye from us down here, there is much more on the bbc news channel. it is only fair that we say goodbye to the teams. goodbye, everyone! goodbye! very enthusiastic and bright crowd. coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. here on breakfast let‘s have a look at the scene live in wimbledon this morning. mowing the lawn, getting it pristine. that is centre court? centre court, last—minute preparations as we get ready for another day of action. great day yesterday for british tennis. all other details later carol has the weather. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. today will be a fairly interesting
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day forecasting—wise, because we have hot and humid weather across england and wales this morning. by this afternoon, the heat will really build in the south. further north, the heat will not quite be reaching you. but with the heat and humidity comes the risk of thunderstorms. that is what we will see this morning across the south—east of england. and by the afternoon across the midlands and northeast. but not all of us will see those thunderstorms. for much of south—west england, it will stay dry. a dry afternoon in london and the south—east, but still the risk
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of the odd shower. driver much of wales with sunshine, but the showers could be heavy across north and eastern parts of england. sunny spells in between, and it will feel hot if not very warm. for scotland, it will rain in the afternoon. should be dry for northern ireland as well. the showers this evening could make for a tricky drive home across eastern areas of england. a lot of rainfall in a short space of time could lead to localised flooding. there will be hail and gusty winds associated with that as well. overnight, it is largely dry. quite an uncomfortable sleeping again. —— an uncomfortable night for sleeping. saturday will be a hot day —— friday will be a hot day across southern areas. sunny spells for much of england and wales. in
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northern ireland, quite cloudy, with a bit of rain moving in. further north, a bit fresher. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and ben bland. never mind brexit and trump — that‘s the message from the eu and japan as they close in on a huge free trade deal. live from london, that‘s our top story on thursday 6thjuly. the deal‘s on —japan and the eu will today sign a free trade deal on everything from cars to crops. could this be the beginning of a new economic power couple? also in the programme, slicing off a thinner profit — the owner of pizza hut, kfc, and taco bell in china
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posts lacklustre results in the first quarter.

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